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October 2013 Volume 47 Issue 10

swədəbš qyuuqs News

Photo Courtesy Jessica Grossglass

pedxiTxiTil (pud-HWEETHWEE-teel) Moon of the Falling Leaves

“Much of October is “the moon of the falling leaves.” During this moon, the last stocks of sockeye, and humpback go up-river, while silvers and dog salmon are reaching their peak. Fishing and drying salmon for the winter months continues. This is the height of the harvest, because the plants are maturing and starting to die. It is a good time to gather nettles, cattails, salal, and bracken fern roots. Hunting begins for ducks, geese and other birds as they return for the winter, and also for larger game such as deer and elk.” 13 Moons: The 13 Lunar Phases, And How They Guide the Swinomish People. By swelitub (Todd A. Mitchell) & Jamie L. Donatuto


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qyuuqs (Kee Yoks) An official publication

swədəbš Swinomish Indian Tribal Community

The deadline to submit to the qyuuqs (Kee Yoks) is the 15th of every month or nearest business day.

of

Contents:

22 | September Community Dinner

04 | Bulletin Board

23 | Senior Lunch Menu/Jughead B’day

05 | From the qyuuqs Editor

24 | Lushootseed: Are you going clamming?

Chairman:

07 | Community Announcements

25 | St. Paul’s Invitation

spee pots (Brian Cladoosby) Vice Chair: ya-qua-leouse (Brian Porter) Secretary: Sapelia (Sophie Bailey) Treasurer: Taleq tale II (Barbara James) General Manager: tuk tuk luus (Allan Olson)

08 | Feature: Indigenous Health Indicators

26 | New Swinomish Clinic Hours

09 | Feature: Indigenous Health Indicators

27 | Swinomish Police Department

10 | Feature: Indigenous Health Indicators

28 | Native Business

11 | Feature: Indigenous Health Indicators

29 | Fitness Center: Impact of Fitness

12 | Feature: WA Youth Summit Climate Change

30 | SHA/SHUA News

14 | Mrs. V’s 2 Cents: The Serving Journey

32 | Mouth Matters

15 | Feature: Bistro Garden

33 | Invite: Veteran’s Pow Wow

16 | Being Frank: Fix White River Dam...

34 | SWRP—Tide Table

17 | Archives: Archive & Records Bldg.

36 | Birthdays—September

18 | Youth Center News

38 | Community Calendar

19 | Beach Seining at Lone Tree

39 | Free Ads

Officers:

Senators: sapelia (Sophie Bailey) pay a huxton (Chester Cayou, Jr.) spee pots (Brian Cladoosby) cha das cud II (Glen Edwards) yal le ka but Steve Edwards Taleq tale II (Barbara James) SM OK O LO (Leon John) wa lee hub (Kevin Paul) ya-qua-leouse (Brian Porter) sOladated (Brian Wilbur) kani?ted (Tandy Wilbur)

qyuuqs Advisory Committee Allan Olson John Stephens Tracy James Kevin Paul

qyuuqs News Mission The mission of the qyuuqs newspaper is to provide monthly communication to swədəbš, the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, near and far. We are committed to serving as an apolitical forum for SITC governing officials and all community members. The newspaper is not intended to reflect the official position of the governing body of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, but rather reflects the ideas, events, and thoughts of individual community members and tribal staff. As such, the Swinomish Tribe makes no claim as to the accuracy or content of any of the articles contained therein.

“Swinomish qyuuqs News”

qyuuqs 17337 Reservation Road La Conner, WA 98257 360-466-7258 Fax 466-1632 qyuuqs@swinomish.nsn.us Michael M. Vendiola Editor mvendiola@swinomish.nsn.us Caroline Edwards Assistant Editor cedwards@swinomish.nsn.us Photos: qyuuqs and submitted This issue of the qyuuqs is available on the Swinomish website: http://www.swinomish-nsn.gov/news.aspx The qyuuqs can viewed on the internet. When submitting information or photos, please be aware that everything published in qyuuqs will also be on the internet and available to the world. Please consider carefully whether anything you are submitting might have information or images that may not be appropriate for the internet. By submitting information or photographs to qyuuqs for publication, we consider that you are agreeing to publishing your submission in both the paper and digital versions of the qyuuqs.


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Chairman’s Message: We have so many wonderful people on our staff and it has been an honor for our Senators to share with them our unique way of life and the values that have sustained Chairman spee pots who we are as Swinomish People. We have honored many of our family and friends such as Lorraine Loomis who has worked for SITC for 40 plus years and John Stephens, Mary Cayou, John Petrich and Allan Olson who have all served our members for over 30 years each.

health of our members, sustaining our ancestral industry of fishing and traditional way of life. There are many goals that we have worked on together. One that stand out for me is the rekindling of our governmentto-government relationship by stabling the Coast Salish Gathering and renaming of the Salish Sea. Another great one is the first state and tribal owned park which we know as Kukatali. At the end of the day we value our time with Charlie and want him to know that he can always call Swinomish home. We will always welcome him with the sound of our drums and with our hands raised in honor of all that he has done for us

and thankful for the right to live our way of life. As many of you know we have worked on several large investments and in the next few months we will share more with you all on the economic development. We will be working on our annual strategic planning and will share these with you soon. There are enormous opportunities and we have planned and worked diligently to establish sound decisions for our community. I look forward to sharing this with all of you. I am grateful for our community and staff who have all been part of the success of Swinomish. May the Creator bless you all.

“We will always welcome him with the sound of our drums and with our hands raised in honor of all that he has done for us today and for our generations to come. dahadubs Charlie!” This October we will honor a true friend of Swinomish, Charlie O’Hara, who has served us for many years as our Planning Director and has served in Indian Country for 35 plus years. I still remember hiring Charlie in the late 90s when he came to us from the White Mountain Apache Tribe. There he served Chairman Ronnie Lupe for over 20 years. Charlie, his wife, Liz, and daughter Megan have been a rich part of our history. The shared memories of laughter, tears and yes, battles, will remain with us forever. Charlie has been one of our strongest friends who worked with us to protect treaty rights for hunting, fishing and gathering, our waters, lands, and resources, human

today and for our generations to come. dahadubs Charlie! Speaking of our future—let me shift gears a bit. We celebrate the return of the pink and silver salmon to our waters. It has been an astounding fishing season with nets full of bountiful salmon, pots full of crab, and shorelines filled with shellfish! We are thankful for a safe year on the water and for the Creator blessing us with the opportunity to harvest resources just as our ancestors did in the past in the mighty Skagit. The fall season is upon us and many of our hunters will be harvesting elk and deer for our freezers. Please keep them in your prayers for a safe hunting season and safe travels. We are blessed to be Swinomish

Chairman spee pots and crew beach seining at Lone Tree, 2013.


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AVAILABILTY OF PETITIONS FOR NOMINATION TERMS EXPIRING: SENATE SEAT 10: CHESTER CAYOU, JR. SENATE SEAT 11: BRIAN WILBUR Petitions for Nomination will be available beginning November 4, 2013, in the Swinomish Administration building, during normal business hours. Please contact Wendy Otto, Election Officer, for information, 360-466-1134.

The submission deadline for Petitions for Nomination is December 21, 2011 by close of business.


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From the qyuuqs Editor: Michael M. Vendiola The qyuuqs News staff is very thankful for the generous contributions from community members and SITC departments for supplying content to the qyuuqs News on a monthly basis. The October issue fortunate to have the same quality contributions as in months past. We have featured the Indigenous Health Indicators for the past few months and we hope that you find it an informative read. This months contribution focuses on the very serious topic of Climate Change. Speaking of which, our very own Caroline Edwards was a featured speaker at the Washington State Youth Summit on Climate Change. She wrote an article on the experience that you might find inter-

esting, coming from a Swinomish community members perspective. Since it is fall season some of us are in the midst of the fall harvest. Robin Carneen-Edwards captures the experience of the Paul family at they participated in the distribution of vegetable goods from Bistro Community Garden. We hope in the future to feature more articles focusing on communities growing their own food! We are very pleased to feature a new monthly article written by our very own Swinomish Clinic doctor! Dr. Carrillo and Sarah Wilborn, Chief Medical Officer, collaborated to write an article focused on building greater health for the Swinomish community.

Lastly, our chairman pays tribute to one the great SITC administrators who is now retiring. A special invitation is featured to recognize the great work that Charlie O’hara did for the Swinomish Tribe. We hope you enjoy the issue! Stay warm and enjoy the season!

The view from Lone Tree.—qyuuqs staff


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Are you a person who has been struggling to keep your job? Stay in school? Get a job? Is it hard for you to fill out applications? Do you have trouble following verbal instructions at work? You just might have a disability that you don’t even know about. There are many types of disabilities that can keep you from being successful at work, including Depression, Learning disabilities, Drugs/Alcohol addiction, and so many more. Gretchen Gahan is the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor at Swinomish, and she is waiting to assist you to do better in your job, get a job, and figure out what services might assist you to successful employment. Give her a call at 360-466-1343 or on her cell 360-319-1934 There are many services open to those who qualify. Gretchen is in the office on Tuesdays and Wednesday. You can call her on the cell phone any day of the week. Come in for an assessment in a non-judgmental and confidential environment. Oregon State University Swinomish and Samish Environmental Sampling

Seeking work?

This fall researchers from Oregon State University will be taking environmental samples on a few Swinomish beaches. This work is a part of a project between Tribes, OSU, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. For this part of the project, the research team will be collecting butter clams and taking sediment samples. They will analyze the clams and samples for various toxic chemicals, and then give us some more information about what chemicals may be present in butter clams and sediments. The sampling will take place in

Chevron wants you!

northern Turners Bay, at Lone Tree Point, in Fidalgo Bay at Samish Beach, and on the west side of March Point. If you see the researchers, please feel free to ask them about their project or offer advice. We are excited for this project to get underway! Blair Paulik Submitted by Jaime Donatuto

Both the North end & Village Chevron gas stations will be gearing up for the busy months by adding additional staff soon. All tribal members 21 and older are encouraged to go to HR Department and put in an application!


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A Group Show at the Swinomish Lodge Gift Shop Featuring Dream catchers by Carneen Allen, Beaded hats and jewelry by Laura Kasayuli, Beaded leather pouches and jewelry by Yoli Quevedo, Pine needle baskets and wearable art and jewelry by Robin C. Edwards and more. The gift store is always open, so please come check out our hand made items. Custom orders also welcome. For more info contact : (360) 941-7696 Swinomish Gift Shop (Inside the Lodge and next to the Casino): 12885 Casino Drive, Anacortes, Washington 98221

Children’s Church at Church on the Hill moves to Tuesdays beginning October 1 at 6:30 p.m Any questions contact Doug York at 540-3684 or facebook Doug or Kay York.


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Feature: Indigenous Health Indicators (IHI): Community Health, Climate Change and impacts to shellfish areas on Swinomish Reservation In May 2013 the Planning Department held a meeting with tribal members to ask about how projected climate change impacts to the shellfish beaches at Lone Tree Point might affect community health. We wish to thank the 16 anonymous tribal members that participated and helped us think about important environmental health issues. Today there are roughly 20 acres suitable for growing and harvesting shellfish at Lone Tree Point. The photo below shows the Reservation’s present shellfish harvesting area around Lone Tree Point. The main threat to Lone Tree beaches in terms of shellfish harvest will be sea-level rise and the overall loss of harvestable area over time. Scientists estimate that sea level rise could increase dramatically and cause serious reduction in the ability to harvest shellfish on the Reservation. The next photo shows the potential loss of harvest area due to predicted sea level rise. By 2100 the area of beach suitable for growing and harvesting shellfish may decrease by 27%. Currently seawalls line 30% of the shore; seawalls stop the natural movement of sediment and rocks, making the beaches narrower and provide less area for shellfish beds. The data shows where seawalls exist the beaches are much smaller and narrower than areas without seawalls.  Existing seawalls on Reservation  Current area of shellfish beds  Predicted reduced future area of shell fish beds The focus group members were keenly interested in this information. Some commented: “Climate Change is changing our resources. We are all in fear of what the future is. We are horrified, but the more you learn the more you learn you can do something.” “Eye opening program- to see how seawalls are damaging beaches.” “Land protection- how people think houses are more important than community use.” “Maybe we can get information out to neighbors so they can see why this is important to every one of us.” The program presented a set of questions that asked members to rank their responses from 1-4. Below are the posted results: On a scale of 1-4, how are things in terms of Swinomish community health and natural resources now? How might climate change affect community health (in the year 2100) Now:

2100:

1. Things are very bad

0%

2. Not very good

33%

69%

3. Looking pretty good

67%

0%

0%

0%

4. We’re doing great

31%

Continued on Page 9


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Feature: Indigenous Health Indicators (IHI): Community Health, Climate Change and impacts to shellfish areas on Swinomish Reservation Sea level rise will likely increase storm waves. Scientists have been studying the impacts of sea level rise for over a decade now and data shows that today’s 100 year flood event becomes a ten year event by 2050. By the year 2100 it will be a yearly flood occurrence. The past few years we have seen record high tides and storm surges in areas seldom or rarely flooded. It is apparent to even the most casual observer that “something is different”. The next topic was on how the six IHI are viewed currently by the workshop participants and how they view them being impacted in the future by climate change and sea level rise (in the year 2100).

Natural Resource Security components are: Abundance, Access, Sharing. On a scale of 1-4, how would you rate natural resources security? Now: 1. Things are very bad

0%

2100: 18%

2. Not very good

46%

64%

3. Looking pretty good

46%

18%

8%

0%

4. We’re doing great

Community Connection components are: Relations, Work, Trust On a scale of 1-4, how would you rate community connection? Now: 1. Things are very bad

0%

2100: 7%

2. Not very good

31%

53%

3. Looking pretty good

61%

40%

8%

0%

4. We’re doing great

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Feature: Indigenous Health Indicators (IHI): Community Health, Climate Change and impacts to shellfish areas on Swinomish Reservation Cultural Use components are: Gatherings & Ceremonies, Respect, Fulfill Cultural/Spiritual Needs On a scale of 1-4, how would you rate cultural use? Now: 1. Things are very bad 2. Not very good

0%

2100: 14%

0%

71%

3. Looking pretty good

75%

14%

4. We’re doing great

25%

0%

Self-determination components are: Healing, Restoration, Development On a scale of 1-4, how would you rate self-determination? Now: 1. Things are very bad

0%

2100: 18%

2. Not very good

46%

64%

3. Looking pretty good

46%

18%

8%

0%

4. We’re doing great

Education components are: The Teachings, Elders, Youth On a scale of 1-4, how would you rate education? Now: 1. Things are very bad

2100:

0%

13%

2. Not very good

67%

25%

3. Looking pretty good

25%

62%

4. We’re doing great

8%

0%


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Feature: Indigenous Health Indicators (IHI): Community Health, Climate Change and impacts to shellfish areas on Swinomish Reservation Well-being components are: Connection to Nature, Confidence, Resilience On a scale of 1-4, how would you rate natural resources security? Now:

2100:

1. Things are very bad

23%

2. Not very good

38%

42%

3. Looking pretty good

38%

29%

0%

0%

4. We’re doing great

29%

Comments from participants: “20-30 years ago L.T.P. was hard to go… limits on fish permits. Our funerals, we need healing foods, cultural foods.” “Education needed on safety of seafood and open/close beaches.” “My family sings our family song! If there is no earth who are we signing to? We need our youth to get involved.” “The dikes changed where and how we fished. Dikes cause more pollution-changed tides- changed clam areas, fish traps at Snee-Oosh were once a week on Wednesdays, but not now.” “One little change tremendously affected us and the fisherman.” “That history needs to be known.” “Dredging has to be done to slough—the spoils are dumped on the Swin side—used to be beautiful sand, now it’s sludge.” “Needs to be told what’s been done to us and continues to be done to us.” “Those seawalls will make a difference to each one of us.” “Celebrating First Salmon, Blessing of the Fleet is our family. If we do our ceremonies we will be alright, reminds us of our culture.” “We always had fish at funerals: crabs, clams, salmon. Fishermen used to provide it, now Tribe does, which breaks down family ties and doesn’t allow fishermen to go out and get fish for family and experience cultural tie to grieving family.” We welcome comments or questions regarding this information; please contact Myk Heidt at mhedit@swinomish.nsn.us or Jamie Donatuto at jdonatuto@swinomish.nsn.us or leave a message at 466.1532.


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Washington Youth Summit for Climate

By Caroline Edwards

The Washington Chapter of the American Planning Association hosted the first Washington Youth Summit for Climate at the Meydenbauer Center, Bellevue, WA on 1 October 2013. Their goal was to bring at least 150 students together. They estimated that nearly 100 students attended the event either in person or via webcast. Speeches were given from business leaders, policy makers, educators, planners and other professionals. The welcoming and opening remarks were from the Washington Chapter American Planning Association President, Ivan Miller, the host State Representative, Joe Fitzgibbon, and Terry Williams the Commissioner of the Treaty Tulalip Tribes. The first plenary presentation was about: Making Climate Adaptation a Priority by Ray Quay of the Global Institute of Sustainability. The second plenary presentation: We Got This: How Students are Turning the Tide on Climate Change-Student Leaders Share Their Experiences. Caroline Edwards, from the Swinomish Tribe, was the first of three student panelists. She shared her experience in working with the Swinomish tribal youth and climate change educationm, Pablo Gomez, from the Alliance for Climate Education and Anna Sophie Vaughan Iglitzin, from the Climate Solutions also shared their experiences in working with youth and climate education. The third plenary presentation: What is (and isn’t) Funny About Economics by Yoram Bauman, PhD, and the “Stand-Up Economist”. The afternoon was designated for workshops. Workshop 1: The Role of Education in Climate – What is it and what could it be? Gilda Wheeler, from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Pablo Gomez, from the Alliance for Climate Education, and Barbara Chamberlin, from the Bicycle Alliance of Washington gave speeches for this workshop. The Workshop 2: The Role of Policy/Advocacy in Climate – What policies are in place to address climate change and what more can be done? State Representative, Joe Fitzgibbon, Lara Whitely Binder, from the University of Washington, Paul Andersson, from the City of Bellevue, Ed Knight, from the Swinomish Tribe gave speeches for this workshop. The Workshop 3: The Role of Business in Climate – How are businesses addressing climate change and what more can be done? Yale Wong, from the General Biodiesel, Kathryn Merlino, from the University of Washington College of the Built Environment, and Robert McFarland, Professor, from the Bellevue College provided speeches for this workshop. The morning workshops were recorded via webcast. You can watch the webcast by following the link:

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/washington-youth-summit


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What’s Up, Doc? Beating the Common Cold From the Swinomish Indian Health Clinic, providers Sarah Wilborn and Dr. Monica Carrillo, with combined 26 years of pediatric and family medicine experience. We are coming into cold season with sneezing, runny nose, cough, headache, sore throat and sore muscles, everywhere. Mucus and swollen lymph nodes is the way your body fights off the viruses that cause colds. Most colds go away on their own, but can last two weeks from beginning to end.

Most importantly, take care of yourself: get plenty of rest, drink lots of water and keep track of your Tylenol use. Chicken or vegetable soups can provide vitamins and minerals you need and herbal teas can be soothing to the throat. A hot shower or humidifier can relieve stuffiness.

Antibiotics don’t make a cold go away any faster because they don’t

Always call the clinic if you have questions about medication dosing or

snacks and candies included) and after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.  Remind kids to cover their mouths with tissue or elbow (not hand) when sneezing or coughing. Two year olds can learn this with regular coaching.  Clean off door handles, faucet handles, refrigerator handles, hand rails, keyboards

“Most importantly, take care of yourself: get plenty of rest, drink lots of water…” kill viruses. Ibuprofen or acetaminophen can help relieve headaches, sore throats and muscle aches. A decongestant may help decrease a runny nose, but call the clinic before using it with children or with high blood pressure. In the past 10 years, acetaminophen (Tylenol) toxicity or overdose has become a serious problem because people are taking 2-3 different cold medications, most of which now have acetaminophen (Tylenol) added. Do not give kids under 15 years old aspirin.

questions about your illness. We should see you (or your child) immediately if your child is under 3 months old, if you have a fever of 104 ̊F, if you’ve had a fever over 100 ̊F for more than two days, or if you are having a hard time breathing. The best ways to keep a cold away:  Wash hands frequently and help your kids wash their hands properly, particularly before eating (fast food,

and remotes, at home FREQUENTLY. It’s OK to be obsessive!  Keep hand sanitizer handy when you are away from a wash basin.


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Mrs. V’s 2 cents!

Submitted by Diane I. Vendiola

The Serving Journey Last month as I sat in a committee meeting, one of our Tribal leaders came over to me and asked if I had received the email that he had sent to me. “What was it about?” I asked. “It was a request asking you to replace a board member who had to step down from one of our community’s project boards.” He responded. I must have looked puzzled because then he said I will tell you about it after this meeting gets over. And he kept his word. When the committee meeting was finished he came over and told me that he would send me detailed information about the board he was asking me to become a new member of. He added that he had recently been asked to become a new member himself and he hoped that I would join him in attending the next meeting. Although I already serve on numerous boards and committees, I volunteered to serve on this board. You may ask, why? You are not alone in asking. I too, am asking myself, why? Why consent to serve on yet another board? Sometimes it is good to ask oneself questions. It is good because it is ourselves that possess the true answers. It is good because sometimes you are pleasantly surprised with where the question leads. I believe in asking myself questions: When I was about 2 years old and first starting to walk, I got the nickname “Hobo”*. (A hobo, unlike a bum or a tramp, is more than willing to work, but mostly for a short duration, as their main motive is travel, the love of the journey above the actual destination.) My mother told me that I got that name because when we were out walking on our

way to some place I could not walk past those big square metal gratings they used to have on Seattle sidewalks. I would not pass without stopping everything to peer down in between the little metal framework frames placed over vents in the concrete pavement. I remember I did this in order to see what might be hidden from my sight down there. (Mostly, I used to see gum wrappers, tax tokens*, and sometimes two cents, but oftentimes there was more.) I always felt like I just had to see, I was curious like that. Thankfully I outgrew my habit of peering down metal gratings before it became an obsession and before I turned 4. I suppose my curiosity about what lies beneath the grate, under the sidewalk, hidden from my sight, might explain my reluctance to say ‘no’ upon being asked to join yet another new and different group of fellow citizens serving on a board. Every time I join another group, I feel like it is my Hobo days once again, when I stopped to peer into the depths of the ground under the grating. I anticipate le+arning something new. I expect that my perspective will be broadened. And today I must say that serving on a board or committee I am definitely gaining new and different understandings about the needs and interests of my community and even my own needs and interests as well.

sciously link their destinies to those of their ancestors, contemporaries, and descendants? Perhaps the explanation lies in our identities as indigenous individuals and within the traditional characteristics of the culture from which we originate and identify? Yes, perhaps I and the other individuals serving as members of a group of people concerned with the interests of the community reflect the characteristics of traditional values: extended family, respectful attention, patience, reciprocity, responsibility, sharing. Perhaps serving as one member of a board or committee is not only a challenge but an opportunity to rise to the occasion? Maybe it’s like forcing me to get myself outside as the weather turns cool to go for my walk. It eventually leads to a surprisingly pleasant, beneficial experience of not only growth but continuance. “Today, more than ever before, life must be characterized by a sense of Universal responsibility, not only nation to nation and human to human, but also human to other forms of life.”—Dalai Lama *Sales tax tokens were made in great quantities starting in 1935 in order to give change for sales taxes. Sales tax resulted in the final price of items having fractions of a cent. Today Washington State’s retail sales tax is 6.5%, but individual cities add on additional percentages.

How does one explain a group of people gathered together and concerned with interests of the collective good? What could lead individuals to sacrifice Diane I. Vendiola, Swinomish tribal elder, is a regular their self interests to the contributor to the qyuuqs, continues to serve the tribe in public good and conher retirement, and is a loving grandmother.


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A Family outing to the Bistro Garden Submitted by Robin Carneen Edwards Patricia and Michael Paul have been picking and gathering vegetables to distribute to members of the tribal community. They frequent Margaret 'Peggy' Schafer's garden, called The Bistro Garden. This garden provides fresh food for her restaurant in La Conner, called Marion's Bistro. Recently, Patricia invited Swinomish Tribal members Robin C. Edwards; Carneen Allen; Scott Charleston; and Carrie & Joey Bill's children (Rachel/ Doug & Allen) to go on a family outing to learn how to pick veggies. They also helped make up care packages for their own homes and for homes Patricia & Michael distribute to. It is such a treat to find Peggy's veggies at our/your door. It is a beautiful garden with a variety of healthy homegrown products. The veggies have been useful in recipes; salads and have even been canned for future uses. Everyone is grateful for Peggy's generosity & thoughtfulness, as well as Patricia & Michael's community service. We learned by our experience with them, that it is hard work. It was also an educational outing where we learned where our some of our food sources come from & that these are healthy food choices we can include in our every day meals and diet.


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Being Frank Fix White River Dam, Fish Passage By Billy Frank, Jr., Chairman NWIFC OLYMPIA – A crumbling 103year-old fish-blocking diversion dam and inadequate fish passage system on the White River near Buckley need to be replaced because they are leading to injury and death for hundreds of threatened salmon, steelhead and bull trout, slowing salmon recovery efforts in the river system. It’s common for some adult salmon to display a few cuts,

by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. At two years, pink salmon have the shortest life cycle of all salmon and are abundant in the Puget Sound region. Pink salmon returns to the White River have shot up in the past decade from tens of thousands to close to a million. That’s led to massive crowding of returning adult spring chinook, steelhead and migrating bull trout at the foot of the diversion dam where

lem in the river. Back in 2007, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) issued a biological opinion under the Endangered Species Act requiring the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to upgrade the fish trap. So far, the Corps has ignored the order, claiming that it doesn’t have the money. NMFS, meanwhile, has turned a blind eye to the Corps’ documented illegal killing of ESA-listed salmon.

“The Corps and NMFS need to step up to the plate and do their jobs. When they don’t, what they are really saying is that salmon, treaty rights, and years of effort and investment by so many of us here in Puget Sound don’t really matter.” scrapes and scars by the time they complete their ocean migration and return to spawn. That can take two to six years depending on the species. But more and more fish are now being found at the foot of the diversion dam with gaping wounds and other injuries caused by exposed wooden boards, steel reinforcement bars and other parts of the deteriorating structure. Many of those fish later die from their injuries. At the same time, an explosive revival of pink salmon has overwhelmed the inadequate trap-andhaul fish passage system operated

salmon continually try to leap over the structure – injuring themselves in the process – in their effort to move upstream and spawn. All three species are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The diversion dam, constructed in 1910, sends water from the river to Lake Tapps. The dam prevents adult salmon from reaching the Mud Mountain Dam farther upstream, which is also impassable to salmon. Instead, fish are collected in a 73year-old trap just below the diversion dam, then trucked upriver and released above Mud Mountain Dam. There’s been a lot of talk but no action to fix the fish passage prob-

In 1986, only a handful of spring chinook returned to the White River, but today those returns number in the thousands because of the cooperative efforts of the Muckleshoot and Puyallup tribes, state government and others. The Corps and NMFS need to step up to the plate and do their jobs. When they don’t, what they are really saying is that salmon, treaty rights, and years of effort and investment by so many of us here in Puget Sound don’t really matter.


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Tribal Archive: Blessing and Dedication of New Archive Building Submitted by— Michael M. Vendiola September 9 is a significant date in Swinomish history. On September 9, 1873 President Ulysses S. Grant authorized a new reservation boundary for the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community. This redrawing of the tribal boundary essentially cut off what is now called March Point from the northern border of the tribe. However, there exists a previous map that shows the tribal boundary intact prior to 1873 giving question to the legality of the President’s authorization. September 9, 2013 seemed to be a fitting day to dedicate the new Swinomish Tribal Archive and Records Building, located immediately west of the John K. Bobb Memorial Ball Field, in between the Swinomish Smokehouse and the canoe shed. Theresa Trebon, SITC Archivist planned accordingly for this specific day to bring recognition to stories that have all but disappeared. As the story was retold at the beginning of the dedication, various heads nodded in agreement amongst the approximately 75 tribal employees, members, senators and greater community members who had gathered. Michael Vendiola served as the speaker for the event. Tribal elders and respected community members were called forward to be witnesses to remember the occasion and to bring the story forward to any who would ask what occurred at the event. suday (Joe McCoy) was asked to do an opening prayed and blessing for the new building. Also, Senator wa-lee-hub

(Kevin Paul) was asked to offer an opening song for the occasion. Senator taleq tale II (Barb James) also welcomed all at the gathering on behalf of the Swinomish Tribe. A special event that occurred at the gathering was a generous donation from the McGlinn family. A canoe was gifted back to the tribe after the owners, collectors of Northwest tribal artifacts, were seeking the makers of a canoe they had found in a fellow collector’s storage. The McGlinn family had spent a couple years trying to locate the tribe where the canoe had came from with no luck. Until the McGlinn’s and a family friend attended the 2011 Paddle to Swinomish and by chance spotted a small photo on Theresa Trebon’s information table at the Tribal Journey’s gathering. The canoe was immediately identified by a unique knot in the wood which appears near the front of the canoe. The photo was of a young Bob Joe and his father Andrew Joe kneeling with a canoe Andrew had carved. The McGlinn’s were relieved to find the canoe’s home! Receiving the canoe on behalf of the tribe were Kateri Joe, Andrew Joe’s granddaughter, and taleq tale II (Barb James) on behalf of the Senate. Following all of the work each witness came forward to share insights on what they had seen from the day’s event. Each speaker addressed new perspectives while supporting each previous speaker’s words. Finally the Swinomish Archive and Records building was opened up and guests were allowed to take a tour of the new facility.


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Fisheries: Beach Seining at Lone Tree All photos this page courtesy of Jessica Grossglass

A few of the Swinomish crews worked hard for this year’s beach seining at Lone Tree. A collaborative effort was made by all as each crew helped with reeling in nets for a big catch!


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swedebs ~ Community Arts Swinomish Canoe Participates in Salmon Homecoming Ceremony at Seattle Waterfront Photos this page by Eric Day


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Cultural Events: September Community Dinner

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Lushootseed: When are you going clamming?

Lilex ti?e seSuO

The tide is going far out.

Pe(d)tab Ii A(u)ads?aHu?iluA.

When are you going clamming?

Xu?ele? ?al Ii tilXi.

Maybe in a while.

?esleqc Vex (?)u.

Did you hear me?

?i. ?esleqcid Ved. Stab I(i) adsXaO.

Yes. I hear you. What do you want?


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Swinomish Health Clinic: Clinic Begins New Hours, Service for Friday We will be offering medical appointments Monday through Friday, with same day scheduling:  Dr. Gil Traylor has joined the Swinomish Health Care Team and will be available Mondays.  Sarah Wilborn, PA-C and her team will be available Monday through Thursday  Dr. Monica Carrillo and her team will be available Tuesday through Friday  Dr. Mark Backman and his team will be available Thursday mornings 10:00 am ~ noon For appointments please call 466-3167 and vist with Michele Perry and/or Jessica Grossglass.

Swinomish Welcomes New Staff: Leah Kintner Tell us a bit about your background: I grew up in rural Puget Sound and attribute Leah Kinter much of my connection with nature to a childhood spent exploring the woods and waterways of western Washington. I was away the past ten years, working and studying in various places from California to Washington D.C. I even stayed in Central Asia for a couple months. In early 2013, I returned home to Washington State and currently live in Olympia. What kind of work were you doing prior to coming to Swinomish? A love of wildlife led to working in zoos and aquariums for many years, including Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, San Diego Zoo, and

the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. In graduate school, I interned with World Wildlife Fund exploring ways to merge sustainable environmental practices with humanitarian recovery actions around the world. Shortly before joining the Puget Sound Partnership, I spent several months on a riparian buffer stream study with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. I studied peacebuilding, conflict resolution, and environmental policy at American University in Washington D.C. and biology at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma. What are the duties of your new position? My main duty as the new Ecosystem Recovery Coordinator (ERC, for short) with the Partnership is to provide support for continuing salmon and ecosystem recovery work in the Skagit watershed and greater Puget Sound region. I connect with local, regional, and tribal governments, science teams, policy

bodies, environmental advocates, business interests and citizens groups to help link local priorities for recovery actions with regional plans and funding programs. With that goal in mind, I have been busy over the last month meeting and making connections with many of the key people dedicated to these goals in our area. Please introduce yourself when you see me around! What are some interesting facts about you that you don’t mind sharing? I love hiking, yoga, horseback riding, and boating, whenever I have an opportunity. My great aunts lived on Big Lake in Skagit County and gave me my first water skiing lessons there as a child. When I was older, my Aunt Nancy Jane was also particularly instrumental in encouraging and supporting my education. It is significant to me now to be giving back a part of that gift by working toward the restored health of this beautiful area.


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Native Business: The Strength of Welcome A proper welcome sets the tone of a meeting and when done right, can have a strongproductive impact by Jim Stanley creating positive feelings between people and motivating whoever is receiving the welcome, to play their role. I recently attended the Ellensburg Rodeo and witnessed a wonderful welcome. The announcer was inclusive of all groups within the stadium including veterans, riders, fans, leadership board that organized the event, and the Yakima Nation. The effect of the warm and inviting welcome was a strengthened sense of community as each group was recognized. Veterans were thanked for their commitment and sacrifice to defend our country so we, the citizens of the United States, may have freedom. Riders were acknowledged for their willingness to compete and sustain the vitality of the cowboy-way. Fans were appreciated for their attendance and spending money to support the

rodeo. The leadership board was thanked for their time spent bringing resources together and coordinating many things in order to conduct the event. Then there was the Yakima Nation. This was my favorite part of the entire trip. To kick-off the day, riders from the Yakima Nation rode horseback down the side of a hill. Fans from inside the stadium watched as 10 riders, dressed in traditional form, slowly and deliberately approached the stadium. It was powerful as the announcer told their story of resilience to live off the land and survive harsh winters because they understood how to work with the land. He went on to mention that Ellensburg is the land of the Yakima People and they are a strong People because they know where they have come from. When the ten riders entered the stadium so too did another 100 Yakima people, ranging in age from elders to children. They formed a circle at the center of the arena. Then something wonderful happened. The announcer invited attendees from the stands to join the Yakima Nation to symbolize one community. I took my 7 and 4 year olds to the floor of the arena. Over the course of 20 minutes about 400 people migrated from the stands to the dirt floor. Two circles were formed. Yakima Tribe maintained the inside circle and guests the out-

side. Then the Yakima began to move in a counter-clockwise rotation so that every attendee from the outer ring could shake the hand of each tribal member. The impact was powerful. My kids thought it was the coolest to be inside the arena giving high-fives and seeing up-close the full traditional outfits. I was thankful for the opportunity to share the experience of another Native community, “cousins” as I told my girls, so that I could reinforce how special it was to be who they are. The experience brought back the words I heard as a child from my Uncle, “Be proud of your people, be proud of who you are.” My family and I had a really good time at the Ellensburg Rodeo and I know because of the warm, inviting, and inclusive welcome I spent more money than I planned. It felt good to support an event that preached community and I was happy to play my part as an attendee. Jim Stanley freely shares his knowledge in an effort to foster economic success in Indian Country. He is a tribal member of the Quinault Nation, Treasurer of the Tribal CStore Summit Group, and Chairman of the Quinault Nation Enterprise Board. To contact Jim for comments, go to JimStanley.biz.


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New from the Swinomish website! Receive a little bit of Swinomish in your inbox every month! Click the subscribe button at swinomish-nsn.gov or email enews@swinomish.nsn.us with "Subscribe" as the subject to receive periodic Swinomish news and event updates or monthly qyuuqs News Highlights. Swinomish Fitness Center: The Impact of Physical Activity on Your Health

 Prevent chronic diseases such as heart dis-

   

ease, cancer, stroke (the leading health related cause of death) Control Weight Make Muscles Stronger Reduce Fat Promote Strong bone, muscle, and joint development

      

Condition heart and lungs Build overall strength and endurance Improve sleep Decrease potential of becoming depressed Increase your energy and self-esteem Relieve Stress Increase your chances of living longer

When you are not physically active, you are more at risk for:      

High blood pressure High blood cholesterol Stroke Type 2 Diabetes Heart Disease Cancer

PARTICIPATE IN OUR “FITNESS FOR LIFE PROGRAM” Incentives available Stop by or call the Swinomish Fitness Center. Make it happen today! 466-3151


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Wellness Program: Swinomish Wellness Program Opens New Space Swinomish Social Services recently renovated a portion of the Social Services building to meet the growing needs of the Swinomish Wellness Program directed by Dawn Lee. The new space which is next door to the previous location of the Wellness Program features larger group meeting space, private offices for staff and a larger reception area for clients. The Wellness Program is in full swing and offers a variety of programs for Swinomish community members.

Office space to meet with clients will benefit the program.

A well lit meeting space will provide a great place to meet.

The new reception area is roomier in the new space.

New Staff in Planning: Jacob Tully Hello, my name is Jacob Tully and I was recently hired to replace Eric Haskins as the GIS Specialist in the Planning Department. I grew up in Grand Rapids, Michigan but have been in the Pacific NW for eight years. Prior to coming to work here, I was working as data analyst for a small consulting company and completing my Master’s degree in Geography at WWU. In my spare time, I enjoy cooking, being outdoors, music, and rooting for the Detroit Red Wings.


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Submitted by: Laura Kasayuli, Swinomish Dental Clinic

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TIDE TABLE: Oct 2013 - Lone Tree, Snee-Oosh, N.Skagit Bay (ft MLLW) Day

High

Low

High

Low

Tue 01 Wed 02 Thu 03 Fri 04 Sat 05 Sun 06 Mon 07 Tue 08 Wed 09 Thu 10 Fri 11 Sat 12 Sun 13 Mon 14 Tue 15 Wed 16 Thu 17 Fri 18 Sat 19 Sun 20 Mon 21 Tue 22 Wed 23 Thu 24 Fri 25 Sat 26 Sun 27 Mon 28 Tue 29 Wed 30 Thu 31

03:24 8.46 ft 04:14 8.96 ft 04:58 9.48 ft 05:41 9.97 ft

09:38 1.94 ft 10:22 2.07 ft 11:01 2.33 ft 11:40 2.71 ft 00:08 0.66 ft 00:43 −0.16 ft 01:21 −0.80 ft 02:03 −1.20 ft 02:50 −1.29 ft 03:41 −1.08 ft 04:38 −0.62 ft 05:41 −0.01 ft 06:50 0.60 ft 08:00 1.13 ft 09:05 1.61 ft 10:02 2.13 ft 10:54 2.72 ft 11:41 3.37 ft 00:05 −0.44 ft 00:40 −0.82 ft 01:15 −0.94 ft 01:52 −0.84 ft 02:30 −0.54 ft 03:12 −0.07 ft 03:57 0.53 ft 04:48 1.20 ft 05:44 1.87 ft 06:47 2.47 ft 07:50 2.96 ft 08:48 3.37 ft 09:40 3.75 ft

16:18 10.14 ft 16:42 10.35 ft 17:07 10.54 ft 17:33 10.71 ft 06:23 10.40 ft 07:07 10.72 ft 07:54 10.89 ft 08:45 10.91 ft 09:40 10.77 ft 10:42 10.57 ft 11:51 10.42 ft 13:02 10.43 ft 14:05 10.60 ft 14:57 10.84 ft 15:38 11.05 ft 16:14 11.18 ft 16:47 11.21 ft 17:18 11.11 ft 06:45 10.81 ft 07:29 10.98 ft 08:12 11.01 ft 08:55 10.93 ft 09:40 10.76 ft 10:27 10.54 ft 11:19 10.32 ft 12:15 10.17 ft 13:08 10.14 ft 13:56 10.20 ft 14:35 10.34 ft 15:08 10.51 ft 15:39 10.69 ft

22:42 3.29 ft 23:08 2.45 ft 23:36 1.55 ft

00:05 8.50 ft 01:34 8.48 ft 02:56 8.87 ft 04:06 9.45 ft 05:05 10.02 ft 05:57 10.49 ft

00:39 7.23 ft 01:57 7.49 ft 03:05 8.06 ft 04:02 8.79 ft

High

12:19 3.20 ft 13:00 3.78 ft 13:43 4.39 ft 14:30 4.99 ft 15:23 5.51 ft 16:27 5.87 ft 17:46 5.90 ft 19:15 5.43 ft 20:31 4.48 ft 21:28 3.32 ft 22:13 2.13 ft 22:53 1.06 ft 23:30 0.19 ft

18:02 10.83 ft 18:33 10.85 ft 19:08 10.76 ft 19:48 10.51 ft 20:33 10.10 ft 21:28 9.53 ft 22:39 8.92 ft

12:27 4.03 ft 13:11 4.65 ft 13:56 5.18 ft 14:43 5.60 ft 15:35 5.89 ft 16:35 6.03 ft 17:48 5.95 ft 19:10 5.56 ft 20:14 4.91 ft 20:57 4.11 ft 21:30 3.19 ft 22:00 2.18 ft 22:29 1.10 ft

17:50 10.88 ft 18:23 10.54 ft 18:58 10.10 ft 19:36 9.58 ft 20:18 9.00 ft 21:06 8.39 ft 22:06 7.80 ft 23:18 7.36 ft

Sunrise Sunset Moonrise Moonset 7:10 7:11 7:12 7:14 7:15 7:17 7:18 7:20 7:21 7:22 7:24 7:26 7:27 7:29 7:30 7:32 7:33 7:35 7:36 7:38 7:39 7:41 7:42 7:44 7:45 7:47 7:48 7:50 7:51 7:53 7:54

18:48 18:46 18:44 18:42 18:40 18:38 18:36 18:34 18:32 18:30 18:28 18:26 18:24 18:22 18:20 18:18 18:16 18:14 18:12 18:10 18:09 18:07 18:05 18:03 18:01 18:00 17:58 17:56 17:55 17:53 17:51

3:36 4:41 5:48 6:57 8:07 9:19 10:30 11:38 12:42 13:37 14:25 15:06 15:41 16:12 16:40 17:08 17:36 18:05 18:37 19:13 19:53 20:39 21:29 22:23 23:20 0:19 1:21 2:24 3:30 4:37

17:05 17:31 17:57 18:24 18:54 19:28 20:09 20:57 21:53 22:56 0:05 1:18 2:31 3:44 4:56 6:08 7:17 8:25 9:30 10:31 11:26 12:16 12:59 13:36 14:09 14:38 15:05 15:31 15:56 16:23

CLAM PSP UPDATE Butter Clams sampled by Swinomish Water Resources Program and analyzed By WA Dept. of Health for Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) on 9/17/13 were found to be

SAFE TO EAT! Swinomish Tribal Members may conduct Subsistence Harvesting on the Reservation when the Swinomish Fisheries Dept indicates beaches are OPEN and the Dept has issued the digger a valid Ceremonial and Subsistence Shellfish Harvesting Permit.

A giant moth lands on Lexie Adams-Lett’s arm while doing fieldwork.


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2013 OCTOBER

FEBRUARY

19—Veteran’s Pow Wow, Kirkland, WA, (425) 936-1402

MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER

23—Community Dinner 31—Halloween Bash, Youth Center

NOVEMBER DECEMBER 2014 JANUARY

—General Council

*’CR’ denotes ‘canoe race’. *Bolded text denotes Swinomish Community event.

*Please submit important dates to the qyuuqs News!

Swinomish Casino & Lodge: Inquire within Excellent benefit package* includes quarterly cash incentive, EAP and 401(k) w/ match for all staff; medical, dental, vision and term life insurance as well as paid holidays and paid time off for full time staff (*must meet required time in service before eligible). All positions require a criminal background check and approval of a gaming license from Swinomish Gaming Commission. In addition, a high school diploma or equivalent is required to be considered for employment. Pre-employment drug testing will be conducted upon acceptance of a position. Applications for positions not currently being recruited are gladly accepted and will be kept on active file for 90 days. Email Applications to jobs@swinomishcasino.com Mail or bring to: 12885 Casino Dr. Anacortes, WA 98221 Fax 360-299-1677


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FREE ADS:

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To place a free ad please contact the qyuuqs at qyuuqs@swinomish.nsn.us

NORTH INTERTRIBAL VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM (NIVRP) Helps people with Disabilities get or keep a job Mondays and Tuesdays 10-3:00 Swinomish: 360-466-1343 Bellingham NIVRP: 360-671-7626 ggahan@stillaguamish.com

Carvings and Prints for sale by Frank Campbell 360-333-2796 or 360-399-1043

NAMAPAHH First People's Radio is hosted and produced by Robin Carneen, an enrolled member of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, in LaConner, WA. Topics include-Native American news, views & music you can listen online at: www.blogtalkradio.com/ namapahh_radio

Lawn Care Services Jeff Edwards Swinomish Village & Beyond Call to make an appointment Cell Ph: 360-420-6842

Lawn Mower Weed Eating Gardening Yard Clean Up


PRSRT STD US Postage Paid Permit #35 ANACORTES, WA

Swinomish Indian Tribal Community

qyuuqs News 17337 Reservation Road La Conner, WA 98257 qyuuqs@swinomish.nsn.us qyuuqs News online: http://www.swinomish-nsn.gov/news.aspx

Swinomish qyuuqs News

OR CURRENT RESIDENT

qyuuqs - October 2013  

The mission of the qyuuqs newspaper is to provide monthly communication to swədəbš, the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, near and far. We...