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luscious berries cool cocktails indigo bbq flowers + ice


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CONTENTS Summer 2016

8

What’s up Sweet Paul?

10

My happy dish

14

Handmade

18

To market, to market

24

Keep your eye on

30

Bookmarked

34

Healthy appetite

40

Friends are for...

46

Sweet Paul Makerie

50

This & that

53

Scenes from Sweet Paul's 50th

56

Mormor's kitchen

58

Put a lid on it!

60

Woof

features 66

Indigo summer

76

When Paul met Donna

88

Ramadan

96

Frozen beauty

104

Berry crush

112

Summer fruits

122

Who's a pretty cocktail

128

Red inspiration

140

From Live's flower farm

150

An American in Hanvana

160

Sweet hats

162

Cheers

164

Pantry confessions

Photography by Paul Lowe

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Paul Lowe Founder & editor-in-chief paul@sweetpaulmag.com Paul Vitale Marketing & business development director paulvitale@sweetpaulmag.com Joline Rivera Art director joline@sweetpaulmag.com Nellie Williams Graphic designer nellie@sweetpaulmag.com Laura Kathleen Maize Copy editor laura@sweetpaulmag.com Andrew Fox Web editor webeditor@sweetpaulmag.com Advertising Inquiries advertising@sweetpaulmag.com General Inquiries info@sweetpaulmag.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Aina C Hole

Linda Winski

Alexandra Grablewski

Lova BlĂĽvarg

Brandon Harman

Manal Aman

China Squirrel

Marianne Gjengedal

Donna Hay

Melina Hammer

Dietlind Wolf

Michael Marquand

Dorie Herman

Michaela Hayes

Elsa Mora

Quyn Duong

Janine Kalesis

Ray Kachatorian

Jihan Zencirli

Rich Dahlgren

Larisa Makow

Susanna BlĂĽvarg

Leah Michaelson

Follow us on Instagram instagram.com/sweetpaulmagazine instagram.com/jolinerivera


A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

THE HANGING GARDEN A perfectly simple and chic DIY hanging pot for your favorite plant or herbs! Crafts+styling+photography by Paul Lowe Hanging planter For this craft you need a simple and inexpensive square picture frame and a pot that fits securely inside the frame. SUPPLIES:

pot square picture frame that has an opening smaller than the top of your pot craft paint paint brushes EcoScraps Organic Potting Soil plant or herbs rope scissors 1. Paint the frame and the pot in whatever color you want. Allow to dry completely. 2. Add soil and plant to the pot. 3. Cut 4 pieces 50� rope and place around the frame at each corner. Tie at the top. 4. Hang the frame from a hook, add the pot and enjoy!

For an added pop of color, dip dye your rope before hanging! grow gardens. not landfills. EcoscrapsÂŽ, a brand that recycles food scraps into organic and sustainable lawn and garden products.

ecoscraps.com


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THE FIRST-EVER

HOME MA K ER

“ DIY DREAM IT’S REALLY A

COME TRUE. Sallie Dale, Mrs. Meyer’s Home Maker

Today we celebrate Sallie Dale, the first-ever Mrs. Meyer’s Home Maker. She turned her fabulous felt wreath into a $75,000 payday. MEET SALLIE AND HER PUP LOLA, AND LEARN HOW TO MAKE HER WINNING DIY AT MRSMEYERS.COM/MAKER. © 2016 The Caldrea Company. All Rights Reserved.

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Turning 50! This summer is a milestone for me. I just turned 50 years old. Turning 50 wasn't as bad as I thought it would be… I’m still the same. I did not go into panic mode. I kind of like myself as a 50-year-old man! It’s true what they say—with age comes a certain knowledge and understanding of things. Small, silly things that used to be so important are now totally unimportant and I tend to focus more on the big questions. But the biggest change of all is that I get less and less patient about bullshit (pardon my French!). I read Meryl

8 SWEETPAULMAG.COM SUMMER 2016

Streep’s thoughts about this subject and I was like, “Hey, that’s just how I feel.” I want to surround myself with good people—people I love and have a good time with. I don't have time or patience for anything else. That’s why I love my Sweet Paul family so much. They are all amazing people with big hearts. I have been truly lucky in finding all of them. You all know who you are. Thank you! And then there is you guys—all the amazing readers. You guys rock. I love getting your comments, emails, and meeting you all. I feel like Sweet Paul readers are such great people, really!

Your notes and comments really make my day. I do apologize if I don't always respond, but please know that I read them all. So if you are under 50 or over, I wish you all an amazing summer with sun, laughter, and time with the people you love.

xoxo,

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL LOWE | COOKIES BY PATTI PAGE, BAKED IDEAS

WHAT'S UP SWEET PAUL


Signed, limited edition fine art prints from our global marketplace of independent artists. minted.com

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L I M I T ED ED I T I O N A R T S H OW N :

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MY HAPPY DISH

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Sweet, sour, & more sweet This dish make me happy because...

Food+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

I can use all of my favorite ingredients in one place: bread, goat cheese, herbs, and pine syrup. Pine syrup is made from real pine and has an amazing taste of forest, wood, and citrus. If you can't find any then use balsamic instead.

Strawberry Bruschetta with Goat Cheese & Pine Syrup SERVES 6

12 slices baguette olive oil ½ cup crumbled goat cheese 10 fresh strawberries, hulled and sliced fresh basil pepper, to taste pine syrup 1. Heat the oil in a pan and toast the bread until golden on each side. 2. Place toast on a platter. 3. Spread a layer of goat cheese on each piece and top with strawberries, basil, and pepper. 4. Finish off with some drops of pine syrup.

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Keep track of in all of your favorite places!

Pickling! Fruits, vegetables, you name it—there is a way to pickle it. Whether it is a quick refrigerator pickle, a pickle that you can into jars to stock your pantry, or a nutritionally packed fermented pickle, there are an infinite variety of ways to add more flavor to your local winter meals. These are some of my new seasonal favorites. Now is the time, so get pickling!

FOOD by Michaela Hayes | STYLING by Sarah Cave | PHOTOGRAPHY by Susanna Blavarg

58 | SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2013

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Handmade Inspiring DIY Projects from Lova

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Personal stamp A DIY stamp and gold paint combine for a totally unique touch on gifts for old friends Text+crafts by Lova BlĂĽvarg | Photography by Susanna BlĂĽvarg

THIS SUMMER some of my closest friends will be graduating from high school, and I wanted to make some pretty boxes for their gifts. I found a stamp at Paper Source that you can carve yourself, and so I sketched some summery nature pictures. I ended up liking this one the best.

HOW-TO SUPPLIES:

self-carving stamp pencil and paper Sharpie pretty paper and cloth, including marbled paper hobby knife carving tool gold ink, for stamp hole punch 1. Transfer the picture to the stamp by pressing hard on your pencil while tracing the sketch. 2. Redraw the image with a Sharpie on the stamp. 3. Carve the stamp using a hobby knife and a carving tool. 4. Stamp the bird on paper and cloth in gold. (I also used some really cute ready-made stamps from The English Stamp Company.) 5. Glue beautiful papers, both the stamped paper and some marbled paper, to the old gift box. 6. Punch holes in small pieces suitable for cards and added eyelets and ribbons. SWEETPAULMAG.COM 15


© 2015 GLORIA FERRER CAVES & VINEYARDS, SONOMA, CA

Be glorious

AT GL ORIAFERRER.COM


Henry Street Studio handmade ceramics platters bowls plates pitchers mugs bottles spoons salt cellars & more

www.henrystreetstudio.com photo by Julia Gartland

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aliza sweet paul.indd 1

11/10/15 12:50 PM


TO MARKET, TO MARKET Fresh food and finds

Garden tribe

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICH DAHLGREN

Want to make your own garden but are unsure how to start? Take Garden Tribes Boot Camp Series. This series is a go-at-your-own pace online class featuring videos from the Garden Tribe test garden, daily emails with tips & lesson reminders, daily giveaways for boot campers, and access to their private community with resources & support. Learn more at gardentribe.com.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY QUYN DUONG

Hasbrouck House I'm so excited about the new Hasbrouck House at Stone Ridge. Just 2 hours from NYC, Hasbrouck House is an inn, a food and drink destination, and a beautiful setting for special events. The property centers around an 18th Century Dutch Colonial stone mansion featuring 17 beautifully designed suites within the main house, carriage, and stable houses. Visit their website at hasbrouckhouseny.com.

IN BLOOM

Sweet peas Get em' while they're hot SHISHITO PEPPERS

These peppers are the perfect summer snack. Roast them in a little olive oil for a few minutes and eat them dipped in aioli.

Sweet peas are now in season and I love to fill my house with these sweet-smelling flowers. Did you know sweet peas can grow to 6-feet tall? They just need a structure to climb on, like a fence or a tree. Plant them all around a tree and watch them climb—it’s truly stunning.

FRESH GARBANZO BEANS

Also known as chickpeas, these will be your new favorite snack. Pop them out of their shell and dress with fresh lemon and salt. KIWI BERRIES

A cousin of the large kiwi. These are sweeter and can be eaten with the skin on.

ON TREND

Micro-greens CARROTS

Now is the time to enjoy these vitamin C bombs. I love mine dipped in a little herb salt.

These are the shoots of salad vegetables such as arugula, Swiss chard, mustard, beetroot, etc., picked just after the first leaves have developed. They are a food stylist's dream as they make everything look and taste so good. They’re easily found at the farmers’ market. SWEETPAULMAG.COM 19


TO MARKET, TO MARKET

THE INGREDIENT

Cantaloupe

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL LOWE

Melons are at their best in July and there is no better month to enjoy a popsicle. These green pops taste amazing on a warm summer day. Sweet, a little salty, with a kick of chili. You can skip the chili if you want, but it makes them really good.

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Summer Energy Pops MAKES 6 POPS

1 cucumber, sliced, peel on ½ cantaloupe, peeled, diced 1 lime, just the juice pinch of salt pinch of red chili flakes 1 ⠄3 cup fresh spinach 2 tablespoons honey 1. Place cucumber, melon, lime, salt, chili, and spinach in a blender and blend until smooth. 2. Add honey a little at a time until mixture is sweet enough for you. 3. Run mixture though a sifter and pour into pop molds. 4. Add the pop sticks and freeze overnight. Serve with a sprinkle of salt and chili.

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Keep your eye on Throwing delicates Inside her light-filled barn studio, ceramist Frances Palmer stays elbow-deep in clay and contentment Text by Larisa Makow | Photography by Paul Lowe

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FRANCES PALMER’S bespoke pottery is coveted by those who appreciate beauty with a sense of playfulness. A New Jersey native, Frances studied art history at both Barnard and Columbia. Though her initial focus was printmaking, she was inspired by fellow Connecticut artists to try her hand at pottery. It stuck and Frances Palmer Pottery was born. Her unique ceramics have been featured by top design press worldwide. When Frances not occupied at her wheel, she may be found cooking, perfecting her photography, growing her prized dahlias (“a geometric wonder”) or tending to the busy bees in the hive she keeps. Here, she shares her thoughts on design, inspiration, and happiness. What is important to you in a work space? My studio is filled with light and space. I am very lucky to have such a wonderful barn to work in. As it is all mine, I can leave projects in various stages and not have to move things until they are ready.

Do you know what you’ll be making when you start the day? I try to have an agenda every day, however, as I work by myself, certain aspects such as answering emails, packing orders, dealing with the bees (with the help of my bookkeeper/ beekeeper Joan) and working in the garden, all transpire to affect the amount of work that I am able to produce. I don’t count how many pieces I make and some can be time consuming to construct, so I do the best that I can. What is your process for creating a ceramic? I first sketch out the shape in my notebook, wedge up clay, sit at the wheel, and construct a form. Then, if it is a pedestal or pot with multiple parts, I throw this as well to keep the clay drying at the same rate. When the pieces are leather hard, I trim the parts and then put them together with slip. When the piece is dry, the firings begin. First the pot is bisqued and then can go through numerous

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KEEP YOUR EYE ON

glazing and firing stages. A good deal also depends on the clay body, as the porcelain, terracotta, and earthenware have different personalities and have to be handled and fired differently. Do you listen to music while you work? I mostly listen to audiobooks while I work. Listening to a book, especially with a great voiceover, can be transportive. Are there any pieces that are particularly special to you? I do keep certain pots and not for a grand reason. There is usually something special in the form or glaze that appeals to me and I don’t wish to give it up. These are usually quirky, but I know that they won’t be replicated, so I have them in the studio to use for flowers. When you wish to feel inspired, where do you go, what do you do? Just being in the barn every day and having a good workflow can be inspiring. Going to museums and travel opens up the mind and gives a change of scene. My family and I went to Athens for Christmas and it was incredible to study Greek pottery of all centuries in the land where it was created. The Acropolis was moving, stunning, and I’ll never forget it. What makes you happy about your work? I love throwing pots. I am happy when people live with my pieces and hopefully the pots bring them joy. Best advice you’ve ever received? Begin something and follow through to the end. View more of Frances’ work on her site: francespalmerpottery.com.


A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

BREAD FIT FOR A FIESTA!

I just love making individual loaves of bread for my guests! Food+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

Skillet Bread with Fennel MAKES 4 LOAVES

1½ tablespoons dry active yeast 2 tablespoons honey ½ cup+1 cup warm water 3½ cups all purpose flour 3 tablespoons olive oil oil for greasing the skillets 1 teaspoon salt 4 teaspoons olive oil flaky sea salt 2 teaspoons fennel seeds 1. Mix yeast, honey, and ½ cup warm water in a large bowl and let it sit for 5 minutes. It should be frothy after 5 minutes, if not the yeast is dead and you have to start over. 2. Add the rest of the water, flour, oil, and salt and mix until you have a smooth dough. 3. Cover the bowl with plastic and let it rise until double in size. This will take about 40 minutes. 4. Preheat the oven to 400°F. 5. Divide the dough into 4 and place each dough into a well-greased skillet, top with oil, and use your fingers to flatten out the dough. 6. Top with salt and fennel. 7. Bake them golden for about 18–20 minutes. 8. Cool on a wire rack.

Herb & Chili Cream Cheese Smear MAKES ABOUT 1 CUP

6 oz cream cheese 2 tablespoons chopped herbs, I used dill and parsley pinch of salt and chili 1. Place all the ingredients in a bowl and mix with a spoon. 2. Serve with the freshly baked skillet bread.

EAT, DRINK & FIESTA®

An American Tradition Since 1936

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Sweet Paul Eat & Make “Sweet Paul has been inspiring my family and I for years with his stylish take on crafts and food. Paul’s Nordic roots and New York taste shine in the delicious and distinctive dishes he has created in Sweet Paul Eat Make.”­—Tyler Florence

Available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and IndieBound 28 SWEETPAULMAG.COM SUMMER 2016


Now available at many Barnes & Noble bookstores!

Don't see your city here? Ask your local store to start carrying us!

luscious berries cool cocktails indigo bbq flowers + ice

S U M M E R 20 1 6

New York City

Northern Virginia

New Orleans

Brooklyn

Honolulu

Dayton

Los Angeles

Glendale

Chicago

Atlanta

Minneapolis

Rochester, NY

San Jose

St. Louis

Philadelphia

Ann Arbor

Kansas City

Lancaster, PA

Boston

Santa Monica

Seattle


Bookmarked Books we're loving this summer

THE ROOFTOP GROWING GUIDE: HOW TO TRANSFORM YOUR ROOF INTO A VEGETABLE GARDEN OR FARM By Annie Novak, $23 FOOD WITH FRIENDS: THE ART OF SIMPLE GATHERINGS By Leela Cyd, $25 BATCH: OVER 200 RECIPES, TIPS AND TECHNIQUES FOR A WELL PRESERVED KITCHEN By Joel McCharles & Dana Harrison, $30

TASTING ROME: FRESH FLAVORS AND FORGOTTEN RECIPES FROM AN ANCIENT CITY By Katie Parla & Kristin Gill, $30 BASQUE: SPANISH RECIPES FROM SAN SEBASTIAN & BEYOND By José Pizarro, $40

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A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

¡Gazpacho, Olé! When I was a boy my family loved to vacation in Spain. This recipe is my take on the authentic Spanish gazpacho that we would eat every day on vacation and dream about all year long when we were back home in Norway! SERVES 2-4

1 28 oz can of Muir Glen Organic Whole Peeled Tomatoes ½ small cucumber, peeled ½ green pepper, seeded 3 fresh basil leaves 1 clove of garlic 2 slices of soft white bread OR ½ cup of the inside of a loaf of white bread 3 tablespoons of olive oil 1 tablespoon of vinegar 1 teaspoon celery seeds salt and pepper, to taste celery seed, basil, and olive oil, for serving 1. Add all ingredients to a blender or food processor. 2. Blend until you have the desired consistency. I like mine a little more chunky, but some people liquify the gazpacho and serve it in a glass. If you want a more smooth soup add water until you reach the desired consistency. 3. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. 4. Serve at room temperature or chilled with a drizzle of good olive oil, a sprinkle of celery seeds, and a basil leaf. At Muir Glen, we believe that organically farming under the warm California sun brings out the very best in a tomato. For decades, our farmers have harvested and canned our tomatoes at their peak flavor to make sure we capture the purity and simplicity of nature in every juicy, rich, delicious bite. For more information and recipes, visit muirglen.com.


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Healthy Appetite Menu of the moment Welcome to Sweet Paul’s new recipe column, which shares go-to dishes on my continuing journey to get healthy and lose weight Food+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

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Creamy Cauliflower Soup with Spicy Kale & Almonds I have been eating lots of cauliflower but always used to throw away the core. This is a great way to use it. The soup is creamy, hardy, and really satisfying. You won’t believe that there is no cream in it. The kale topping is so good, I sometimes make it just as a snack. MAKES 4 SMALL BOWLS OR 2 LARGE ONES

1 tablespoon olive oil 1 small red onion, finely chopped 1 celery stalk, finely chopped 1 small carrot, finely chopped 1 cauliflower core, see above 1 qt vegetable stock 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 bunch washed kale, in pieces 1 tablespoon slivered almonds, I like them with the skin salt and pepper, to taste 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast (you can also use parmesan, if you do use 2 tablespoons) pinch of chili flakes 1. Heat the oil in a pot and sauté onion, celery, and carrot until the onion goes soft. 2. Add the cauliflower and stock and let the soup simmer until the cauliflower is tender. 3. Use an emulation blender and blend the soup until creamy. 4. Season with salt and pepper. 5. Heat the oil in a pan and add the kale, almonds, salt, pepper, yeast, and chili. 6. Sauté just until the kale starts to wilt. Serve the soup in bowl with the kale on top.

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HEALTHY APPETITE

Lunch Bowl with Cauliflower, Avocado, & Egg This has been my favorite breakfast and lunch for months now. I never get tired of it. I mix the egg into the dish so that the egg coats everything and becomes part of the dressing. You can totally add some chicken to this if you want a bigger meal. SERVES 4

1 cauliflower 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 small red onion, finely chopped 1 tablespoon slivered almonds, I like them with the skin 1 tablespoon pepitos salt and pepper, to taste ½ bunch shredded kale 2 avocados, peeled and cut into wedges 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 tablespoons rice vinegar 4 poached eggs pinch of red chili flakes kale sprouts, if you have

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1. Cut the end off the cauliflower. You only want to use the top 1”. (Save the core to make soup.) 2. Heat the oil in a large pan and add onion, cauliflower, almonds, pepitos, salt, and pepper. 3. Cook over high heat so the cauliflower gets more crispy than mushy. Stir often. 4. When it’s almost done, add kale and cook until the kale almost softens. 5. Place in bowls and top with avocado. 6. In a small bowl, whisk together oil and vinegar and divide into the bowls. 7. Top with egg, some chili, and kale sprouts.


HEALTHY APPETITE

Cod with Guilt Free Lemon & Caper Sauce Sauce is something I always miss when I’m trying to be good. I’m so happy I came up with this one. It’s so easy—it more or less makes itself. You can add herbs, a dash of tapenade, or even some cream. I use it on fish, chicken, and pork. SERVES 4

1 tablespoon butter 4 nice pieces of cod, no skin or bone salt and pepper, to taste ½ cup vegetable stock 1 large lemon, just the juice 1 tablespoon capers brine 3 tablespoons capers 1. Melt the butter in a large pan. 2. Season the fish well with salt and pepper. 3. Cook the fish 2 minutes on one side and flip. 4. Add vegetable stock, lemon juice, brine, and capers, and cook until the fish is done, about 2 minutes. Serve the fish with the sauce.

Fennel Crusted Salmon with Squash & Garlic This is a great lunch or dinner dish. The squash almost becomes pasta and tastes great with the garlic. Salmon is my go-to fish, I just love it. It’s really good for you too. SERVES 4

2 squash, cut into really thick strips 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoon slivered almonds, I like them with the skin salt and pepper, to taste 4 nice salmon fillets, with skin 1 teaspoon ground fennel 1 tablespoon butter 16 cloves garlic arugula 1 lemon, cut into wedges 1. Heat the oil in a pan and add squash, almonds, salt, and pepper. Cook until the squash starts to soften. 2. Take it out and divide in bowls.

3. Add the butter to the same pan and season the fish with salt, pepper, and fennel. 4. Cook the fish with the garlic 2 minutes on 1 side and about 2–3 minutes on the other side. All depends on how big your salmon filets are. 5. Place on top of the squash and add garlic and arugula. Serve with lemon.

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OFFERING

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Friends Are For... Getting together to bring out our best

Entertainment artist Jihan Zencirli’s creative talent shines through in her role as the ultimate party host Text by Larisa Makow | Styling+recipes by Jihan Zencirli Photography by Brandon Harman

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AS A CHILD, creative whirlwind Jihan Zencirli would distribute care packages her great grandmother had made to elderly neighbors. When Jihan experienced the delight of the recipients, she was hooked. It was from this desire to surprise and enchant that the idea for Geronimo Balloons was born. At Jihan’s thrillingly original design atelier, clients abandon all notions of standard party décor at the door. This blonde beauty’s creations are bright, bold, sophisticated, and always turn heads. Chanel booked her early on, and from there, Geronimo’s reputation for the unusual and unforgettable has only grown. Here, the irrepressible “balloon girl” shares her inspirations, philosophies, and divulges her next endeavor. How do your surroundings influence you? My Los Angeles studio is a very happy place for me. It looks different every week. I change my space because it’s

what keeps my mind fresh. And I need to feel the energy of others—I love my staff and seeing the neighborhood pass by my windows. I play music loudly—everything from rap to opera to podcasts to dialect coaching tapes (right now I’m learning how to speak with a Scottish accent). I cook in the studio kitchen, I take yoga nearby, and I hold meetings at the coffee shop down the street. My studio is my community and I am fascinated by it daily. When I have learned all the names and faces and have memorized the cracks in the sidewalk, I’ll know I’ve become too comfortable and will move on. Who are you admiring these days? Nathalie du Pasquier of Memphis Design. She's a beautiful painter, designer, conceptual artist. Her website is something I love to look at for inspiration because it feels like a living piece that changes and reflects her. I love that she applies her creativity to any and every medium.

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FRIENDS ARE FOR...

SMOKED TROUT SMØRREBRØD: JIHAN ASSEMBLES THIS AFTER HER GUESTS ARRIVE, RIGHT BEFORE SERVING. IT'S AN OPEN FACE SANDWICH THAT IS BRIGHT AND CITRUSY— BALANCED WITH A SMOKY, SALTY SAVORY FINISH.

What role has travel played in your life? I was raised to be curious and explore. My mother, a high school French teacher, would save throughout the year and every summer, we’d go backpacking. We’ve traveled throughout Europe, South America, Asia, and North Africa. This was the best education in the beauty of humanity. I still travel as much as possible, and it's that that beauty that motivates me. What inspires your work at Geronimo? How has it evolved? The creations I make for people are something I do from my heart. I didn't start Geronimo to make money. It means everything to me because it is my voice and how I express myself. Years have passed and it's no longer my exact style because I've changed—my wardrobe has morphed, my motivation has shifted, and I’ve developed new interests. The balloons are like a dear, sweet friend that I will always love and have in my life—even as I continue to move forward. What’s next for Jihan? I found this funny three-wheeled truck, a Tuk Tuk, on Craigslist. I’d been wanting to start a food project rooted with a street presence. I love street food culture—when I travel, it’s what I usually seek. I find it’s a great way to experience a city and meet people. Right now my Tuk Tuk is open nights and I'm making crepes and dosas. What’s your secret to happiness? I was taught two lessons in my childhood. The first was "bloom where you are planted" and the second was that I could always, always, always be empowered to reinvent myself and change the outcome. I feel like my happiness comes from playing between these two ideas. I find strength in overcoming and loving any circumstance as a choice I make, but am also wildly passionate about directing my destiny and being able to disrupt any unfavorable situation by recalculating my path.

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Smoked Trout Smørrebrød SERVES 4

1 baguette, cut into 4 pieces, sliced lengthwise olive oil salt and pepper, to taste mixed greens like pea shoots, arugula, watercress 1 lemon, just the juice sumac 1 small red onion 1 cup cornichon juice 6 cornichons, cut lengthwise 12 oz smoked trout 1 cup fresh ricotta 1 avocado, thinly sliced 1 Meyer lemon, thinly sliced 1. Drizzle the baguette halves with a little olive oil and some salt. Put on a tray. 2. Mix the greens, 2 tablespoons olive oil, ½ of the lemon juice, some salt, pepper, and sumac in a bowl and add to the baguettes. 3. Mix red onions, cornichon juice, and the rest of the lemon juice. Let it sit for a little while and place on top of the greens. 4. Top with cornichons, trout, ricotta, avocado, and lemon.

Ginger Citron MAKES ABOUT 10 COCKTAILS

5 oz fresh peeled ginger 2 cups water 1 cup sugar 20 slices dehydrated citrus 4 limes, just the juice 1 cup gin 1 small bottle sparkling water nutmeg pinch of cinnamon 1. Place ginger and water in a food processor and blend until smooth. 2. Place in a saucepan with sugar and bring to a boil. 3. Let it simmer for 10 minutes. Cool. 4. In a large pitcher, add ginger syrup, lime juice, gin, and the dehydrated citrus. 5. Add ice and muddle together. 6. Add sparkling water, grate a little nutmeg on top, and add some cinnamon. Mix well and serve.

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Sweet Paul Makerie Text by Elsa Mora Photography by Linda Winski There are two types of foods that humans need to stay alive; one of them feeds the body and it has taste, color, texture, aroma… while the other is invisible, but we need it to feed our soul. At the Sweet Paul Makerie Creative Retreat this year, everyone had the pleasure to enjoy a delicious combination of both. Creativity, curiosity to learn new things, the tactile joy of playing with different materials, the spontaneous interaction with others, and being open to the unexpected—those are important things that the soul needs to activate and express its full potential. Unfortunately, we tend to neglect them in our busy lives. But there are people in the world doing the precious work of facilitating these experiences. Among them, I give the gold medal to Sweet Paul Magazine and the Makerie. Teaching at the retreat this year was extremely inspiring to me. Seeing my students use their hands creatively, the stimulating conversations, the spectacular location, it was all magical and energizing. As soon as I started driving back home, I felt as if I was leaving a wonderful family behind. But I know that I will see them again, because these retreats generate a magnetic energy that keeps all of us connected.

TERRAIN’S SUN PRINT CLASS; GREAT PORTRAIT BY WILLOW THORNEATER; PAUL AND GUEST OF HONOR TIFFANI THIESSEN; PAPER CUTTING CLASS; THE AMAZING MAKERIE GANG; PATTI PAGE'S COOKIE DECORATING CLASS; TEREASA SURRATT, JOLINE RIVERA, TIFFANI THIESSEN, AND PAUL; ADORABLE FELTED WOOL LAMBS

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A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Pistachio perfection My friends at American Pistachio Growers asked me to share a couple of my favorite summer pistachio recipes! Food+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

Honey & Pistachio Chutney Delight This pistachio chutney is a pure delight! Serve on top of a good round of brie, on toast, or a teaspoon in your tea! MAKES 2 CUPS

½ cup+1½ cups shelled pistachios 1½ cups honey 1. Place ½ cup of the pistachios in a food processor and chop until fine. 2. Place them in a jar with the rest of the pistachios and add the honey. 3. Seal with a lid.

Pistachio Crusted Cauliflower Steaks I often serve these hearty cauliflower steaks in the place of protein for a weeknight meal. The addition of pistachios elevates the flavor and gives the steaks the best texture. SERVES 4

2 large heads cauliflower 1 cup shelled pistachios 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon dried thyme salt and pepper, to taste pinch of chili flakes

Makes a wonderful hostess gift or a sweet treat for dad on Father’s Day!

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. 2. Cut the cauliflower into thick slices. You should get 2 slices from each head. (The leftovers scraps can be prepared the same way) 3. Finely chop the pistachios—you can do this in a food processor or by hand. 4. Cover a baking tray with parchment paper. 5. Brush both sides of the cauliflower slices with oil and then sprinkle with pistachios, thyme, salt, pepper, and some chili. 6. Bake until golden, about 15–18 minutes. Serve warm with a simple salad.

americanpistachios.org


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VISIT US IN WASHINGTON DC + ONLINE! SHOPSALTANDSUNDRY.COM @SALTANDSUNDRY

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THIS & THAT Sweet Paul's picks of the season

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I can't decide if I want this cool lamp in my bedroom or kitchen‌ maybe both. $568, lightwork.nu

Chic and simple porcelain plates in shades of gray. Set of 3 plates. $149, etsy.com/shop/GoldenBiscotti

How cool and practical are these washable suede pot holders? $13, ernstandcompany.com

SUMMER 2016 Okay, I don't have a garden. But I still want these fab boots! $178, shopterrain.com

A very yellow reporter notebook with pen will make a gray day sunny and warm. $14, sous-bois.at

I so want to put my cocktail down on these Carrara Marble coasters. Set of 4, $39, etsy.com/shop/marbleandmetal

Stunning French coffee press in ceramic with a copper pull. $120, yielddesign.co

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THIS & THAT

Grilled Halloumi Cheese & Watermelon Sandwich with Parsley Cilantro Salsa Halloumi is a Greek semi-hard cheese that you can grill. It's salty taste goes so well with watermelon. This is a hearty sandwich even without meat. SERVES 4

½ cup cilantro

 ½ cup parsley 1 tablespoon capers

 1 clove garlic

 1 teaspoon sherry vinegar

 ½ cup+more olive oil

 salt and pepper, to taste
 9 slices halloumi cheese

 12 slices watermelon

 4 buns (I used olive buns) 1. To make the salsa, place herbs, capers, garlic, and vinegar in a food processor and add the ½ cup of oil while you blend. 2. Season with salt and pepper. 3. Heat a grill or a pan and brush the halloumi with a little oil. Grill about 1 minute on each side. 4. Toast the buns in the same pan. 5. Layer the sandwiches with salsa, watermelon, and grilled halloumi. Top with more salsa.

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Scenes from Sweet Paul's 50th A birthday bash at the NoMad Hotel Photography by Quyn Duong

AMAZING FOOD AND DECOR AT THE NOMAD HOTEL. AND YES… THERE WERE COCKTAILS; PAUL BLOWING OUT CANDLES; ALBERTUS SWANEPOEL, PAUL, AND FRANCES JANISCH; MATTHEW ROBBINS AND GENEVIEVE GORDER; PAUL WITH JAMES ANTHONY; DELICIOUS RED VELVET CAKE

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SWEETPAULMAG.COM noritakechina.com

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MORMOR'S KITCHEN Back to blotkake Soft, creamy, and wonderfully naughty, this is my favorite cake from childhood Text+photography+styling by Paul Lowe

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GROWING UP, there was one cake that was served every birthday, holiday, and party: a good old blotkake (translated to soft cake). I know it’s a strange name, but it’s kind of appropriate too, as it’s a velvety sponge cake filled with cream, jam, and fresh berries. Both my mom and Mormor mastered this cake—it became a competition between them for who could make the best one. Between you and me… my mormor won. She poured Amaretto over the warm sponge as soon as it came out of the oven. My mom did the same—but with orange juice. It really was my favorite childhood cake. I mean, what’s not to love about whipped cream and berries? It tasted especially good on a warm summer day when we had picked all the berries for the cake an hour before. My mormor said she could taste the sun in the berries—such a charming statement! One year on my mom’s birthday, Mormor had made a big blotkake and I nagged her to be the one to carry it into the dining room. I slipped on something and half the cake ended up on the walls and the rest on the floor. It was actually kind of funny—a real Laurel and Hardy moment. The only one who didn't laugh was our dog Snipp, as he was too busy eating the cake that was all over the floor.

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. 2. In a large bowl, beat butter and sugar until light and creamy. 3. Add flour and baking powder and mix well. 4. Stir in the egg yolks and milk. 5. Pour the mixture into 2 9" round cake pans covered with parchment paper. 6. Bake mixture in the middle of the oven for about 25 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. 7. While cooling, soak the sponge in Amaretto. 8. While the sponge is still cooling, beat heavy cream and sugar to soft peaks. 9. Once cool, place 1 sponge on a serving dish, top with jam, strawberries, and cream. Place the other sponge on top and cover with the rest of the jam and cream. 10. Finish with berries and mint. Let the cake sit for 1 hour in the fridge before serving.

Blotkake SERVES 8–10

1½ tablespoons butter, softened ²⁄3 cup sugar 11⁄3 cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 5 egg yolks 1 ⁄3 cup whole milk 4 tablespoons Amaretto ½ pint heavy whipping cream 2 tablespoons sugar 1 cup strawberry jam 1 cup sliced strawberries 1 cup mixed berries fresh mint

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PUT A LID ON IT! The essential guide to canning and preserving

Okra pickles

With fermentation and seed preservation, okra gets the respect it deserves Food+styling by Michaela Hayes Photography by Paul Lowe

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Smoky Pickled Okra MAKES ABOUT 2 QUARTS

STARTING A FARM has given me a whole new appreciation of plants and where they come from. I first heard stories about the history of okra in the United States at the Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners conference in NYC in 2010. My friend Chris Bolden-Newsome, an urban farmer and teacher in Philadelphia, led a workshop where he spoke about food sovereignty movements around the world. One of the stories he told was about okra and how it was a food so treasured that when Africans were enslaved and brought to the US, they wove the seeds into their hair. It is such a powerful story and has stuck with me. In this day and age, when most of us can go to a grocery store and buy food from around the world, the thought of saving seeds to protect our future food source seems unnecessary. Coming to the farm has reaffirmed for me that it is not. Seeds are power, and whoever controls the seeds controls our ability to grow food. There are some amazing people out there saving and keeping seeds in danger of being lost as food crops, and we are happy to support them. We have also already started our own seed keeping— saving seeds from a number of plants last

season and growing them again this year. In this way, we preserve the natural cycle of seeds. In honor of the people who brought okra seeds to this country, and of the evolution of okra as a staple in southern cooking, I created this recipe for pickled okra. Drawing on inspiration from Edna Lewis—a chef, early proponent of seasonal southern cooking, and granddaughter of a man freed from slavery—I wanted to incorporate the smoky flavor that bacon brings to okra dishes (without actually adding the bacon!). I often encourage my students to think of fermentation as cooking without heat, so breaking a cooked dish down into fermentable components is sometimes where I start. Smoked paprika seemed like a natural to accomplish the smoky flavor, and the addition of a little black tea helps to round that flavor out. These pickles are beautiful! The paprika gives them a warm red glow. Keeping the pods intact and pickling them through fermentation helps them stay crisp. We like these pickles so much that we’re selling them at market now. You can find out where on our website, crockandjar.com.

2 quarts okra, stems trimmed 1 quart water (filtered or de-chlorinated) 2 tablespoons coarse sea salt 8 cloves garlic, halved 1 large shallot, quartered 2 tablespoons black peppercorns 2 tablespoons mustard seed 2 teaspoons smoked paprika 1 teaspoon loose black tea leaves 4 sprigs fresh dill 1 bay leaf parchment paper 1. Wash okra and trim the ends, being careful not to cut open the pods. 2. Mix water and salt to form a brine. 3. Add garlic, shallot, spices, tea, dill, and okra to the bottom of a half gallon jar. Cover with brine. 4. Crumple a large piece of parchment paper and push on top of okra to keep it submerged in the brine. 5. Cover the jar with a clean towel, securing it with a rubber band so the contents are protected from critters but can still breathe. 6. Store the jar in a cool place (65 to 75º F) for 1 week to 10 days. 7. When the okra is sufficiently sour, cover the jar tightly with a lid and refrigerate. Enjoy your pickles within 3 months.

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Woof When Paul & Hugo met Chloe The big eyes, the tongue, the overall cuteness. Let’s face it—she is a star! Photography by Alexandra Grablewski

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I FIRST saw Chloe Kardoggian when a friend told me to look her up on instagram. It was love at first sight. Hugo and I met up with Chloe and her mom, Dorie Herman, and I asked Dorie some questions while Chloe and Hugo were playing. Tell us the story of how you got Chloe. Chloe was born in Florida on May 11, 2004. Too small to breed, she was given away. She bounced through three homes in one family. Eventually she wound up with an elderly grandmother. When Chloe was nine and the grandmother could no longer care for her, the woman's granddaughter (a friend of a friend of mine) worked to find Chloe a home. My own dog had just passed, and I was looking for a dog just like her. After she came to live with me in New York City, I started an Instagram account to keep Chloe's old family updated on her new life. She was so photogenic! We started having some fun with captions and photos. Soon enough, Chloe's followers were climbing through the thousands. Now Chloe is taking the world by storm! Her growing fan base totals around 100,000 across all social media platforms, which she uses to spread the word about senior adoptions and Chihuahua rescue. What makes Chloe such a special dog? That tongue! It is always poking out, because she's only got two teeth (a common side-effect of the overbreeding of small dogs is dental disease, so she's had most of her teeth removed). Between the tongue and big eyes and tiny body, she's just the derpiest thing I've ever seen. She also breaks all the stereotypes about Chihuahuas. Most people think they're barky, bite, and are generally unfriendly. Chloe loves everyone, hardly ever barks, and wouldn't ever bite (even if she could). How did you get involved with Senior Dogs? When I was a few months in to Chloe's Instagram, I was contacted by Susie's Senior Dogs (an organization that places senior dogs in homes) to do an interview. It was brought to my attention what a

problem seniors being abandoned was. Many seniors wind up homeless because their owners get sick or pass away, or sometimes people turn them in to shelters because they're just “too old”. It really woke me up to a new mission: using Chloe's face and sweet personality to show the rich lives senior dogs lead. And it was especially important with Chloe because Chihuahuas are one of the top breeds found at shelters—right up there with Pitbulls. I later learned about Foster Dogs Inc.’s Fospice program, which finds foster homes for elderly and terminally ill dogs that are unable to be adopted. Fospice provides the dogs with creature comforts like new beds, treats, toys, and even a professional photo shoot. I loved the dignity it gives these dogs, and it became a personal mission. To date, we have raised over $4,000 for this initiative.

CHLOE'S MOM DORIE CREATED THIS HOMEMADE PHOTO ALBUM USING HOME-PRINTED MATTE PHOTOS, GLUE DOTS, GOLD CARD STOCK, GOLD WASHI TAPE, GOLD PEN, AND FOR THE COVERS, RECYCLED CARDBOARD GIFT BOXES. DECORATIVE BINDER CLIPS WITH THEIR SPRINGS REMOVED HOLD IT ALL TOGETHER.

Chloe is clearly a little diva. Her calendar must be full. A busy day can mean getting up very early for a news segment (she has been on The Today Show!), doing a photo shoot, or appearing at an event. Alan Cummings directed a short film featuring Chloe and some of her Instagram friends, and she posed on the red carpet and appeared at the premier in Times Square. There can be meetings about future projects and partnerships. And we always take time to post Instagram and Snapchat photos throughout the day. Luckily she gets to sleep through that last part a fair amount—a senior girl needs her rest! Read more about Chloe at chloekardoggian.com. SWEETPAULMAG.COM 61


WOOF

FETCH

Quirky finds for you and your best pal Personalized mug, $25, etsy.com/shop/lovealicemugs

SWEET PAWS

Doing our best for our most loyal companions

Fostering the path home

All dogs go to heaven pin, $10, wkndrsshop.com

Sometimes the best houseguests have tails and shed a little Text by Dorie Herman IN 2009, Sarah Brasky, Foster Dogs Inc.'s Founder and Executive Director, saw a gap between dog rescuers and those who wanted to help but didn’t know how to do so. Brasky began her mission to ease the process of fostering dogs by providing supplies, networking opportunities, financial assistance, and educational support. “If we host an adoption event, we’ll pay for your dog's taxi ride there. If you can’t attend, we’ll pick up the dog and bring him for you. We want it as low-cost and low-stress as possible for all rescuers and foster parents involved,” says Brasky. To date, Foster Dogs has posted over 3,500 dogs on its website and currently moves about 30 dogs per month out of shelters and into foster and/or adoptive homes. Beyond traditional fostering, Foster Dogs is also committed to several related initiatives. Fospice places homeless elderly and terminally ill dogs in permanent foster homes and supplies them with vet care and creature comforts. Operation Foster Bound shines a light on hard-to-place fosters stuck in kennels and shelters and gets them into homes by providing training, reimbursement for food, and even a custom cartoon of the dog. In 2016, Foster Dogs has taken its mission national, with a foster dog manual called What to Expect When You’re Fos’pecting, which can be downloaded free at fosterdogsnyc.com. The manual guides fosters through the nuts and bolts of fostering and provides helpful resources. “There are homeless dogs all over the country that are brought to New York City, but if more people nationwide foster in their city, more dogs' lives can be saved." Read more at fosterdogsnyc.com.

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BOCCE'S TREAT IN A TIN These are my boys’ favorite treats. All veggies, no wheat, perfect for dogs with allergies. $16 boccesbakery.com

Pin cushion, $58 elenorbostrom.tictail.com


A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Sweet summer coolers

To make the world's best iced coffee, start with Organic Valley Half & Half... then just add coffee!

Vietnamese Iced Coffee

Blueberry Iced Coffee with Rosemary

MAKES 4 GLASSES

MAKES 4 GLASSES

1. Start with the syrup. Place water, sugar, cinnamon, cloves, pepper and cardamom in a saucepan and bring to a boil. 2. Let the mixture simmer for 5 minutes. 3. Cool and strain. 4. Place coffee, Half & Half and ½ cup of the syrup in a cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake well. 5. Pour into glasses and enjoy.

1. Start with the syrup. Place water, sugar, cardamom, blueberries and rosemary in a saucepan and bring to a boil. 2. Let the mixture simmer for 5 minutes. 3. Cool and strain. 4. Place coffee, Half & Half and 1 cup of the syrup in a cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake well. 5. Pour into glasses, garnish with fresh rosemary and enjoy.

2 cups water 1½ cups coconut sugar 4 cinnamon sticks 4 cloves 5 black peppercorns 10 cardamom pods 2 cups cold brew concentrate 1 cup Half & Half ice

2 cups water 1½ cups sugar 10 cardamom pods 1 spring fresh rosemary 15 oz frozen wild blueberries 2 cups cold brew concentrate 1 cup Half & Half ice fresh rosemary for garnish

organicvalley.coop

Food+styling+photography by Paul Lowe


A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Colorful Cabinet Knobs Spruce up cabinets and drawers with inexpensive plastic knobs that you dye yourself with Rit DyeMore for synthetics! Crafts+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

SUPPLIES: white plastic cabinet knobs Rit DyeMore water small saucepan 1. Add 40% water and 60% DyeMore to a small saucepan. 2. If you want the dip-dyed effect the dye bath should just reach the middle of the knobs once added. 3. Heat dye bath to just below boiling point. 4. Add your knobs and leave them in for 45–50 minutes. The longer they stay in the dye the darker they become. 5. Take them out of the dye bath, rinse until water runs clear of dye, allow to dry, and install! For more info on Rit DyeMore visit ritstudio.com

Sponsored by Rit DyeMore America’s Favorite Dye

Be Brilliant with Color


Summer 2016

WHEN I think of summer, I think of my annual escape to Fire Island. And when I think of Fire Island, I think of BBQ, beaches, and the color blue: blue water, blue sky, blue denim, and the blue shells I collect off the sand. What's the color of your summer?

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Food+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

Cooking and collecting seashells are my two favorite Fire Island traditions. Those amazing blue shells—and all that cooking—is the inspiration for this story 66 SWEETPAULMAG.COM SUMMER 2016


GRILLED ASPARAGUS WITH CUCUMBER SALAD & EGG


Grilled Asparagus with Cucumber Salad & Egg

1. Mix olive oil, lime juice, chili, and salt in a bowl.

This is the perfect summer lunch. It’s quite quick to whip up and tastes delicious. The cucumber salad is a great pairing with any grilled fish.

2. Add the sliced Halloumi and toss.

SERVES 4

4. Warm the grill and grill the Halloumi for about 2 minutes on each side.

1 large cucumber 2 cups water 1 ⁄3 cup white wine vinegar 1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon sugar 2 tablespoons chopped dill 1 bunch asparagus olive oil salt and pepper, to taste 1 ⁄3 cup toasted hazelnuts, cut in half 4 poached eggs pinch of red chili flakes 1. Cut cucumber lengthwise into thin slices. 2. Place water, vinegar, salt, sugar, and dill in a large bowl and mix well. 3. Add the cucumber and let marinate for 1 hour. 4. Rub asparagus with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. 5. Place on the grill and cook for about 2 minutes. 6. Divide the asparagus onto plates and top with nuts, cucumber, poached eggs, and some chili flakes.

Chili & Lime Marinated Halloumi with Tomato Salad & Charred Romaine Halloumi is such a great invention—a cheese that can be grilled. Brilliant. When you grill the romaine they get a sweet taste mixed with some char. So good. SERVES 4

3 tablespoons olive oil 1 lime, just the juice pinch of red chili flakes pinch of salt 2 packs Halloumi, thickly sliced 2 cups halved grape tomatoes 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon balsamic pepper, to taste 2 heads romaine lettuce

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Leave for 30 minutes. 3. Mix tomatoes, oil, and balsamic in a bowl and season with salt and pepper.

5. Place the romaine on the grill and turn often until the edges are charred. Serve the romaine topped with Halloumi and tomato salad.

Grilled Naked Pizza with Cilantro/Lime Oil Pizza on the grill is the best thing ever. It’s not that hard—you just need a firm dough and a really warm grill. You can add some simple toppings, but I prefer mine “naked” and served with some good herb oil. MAKES 2 PIZZAS

2 teaspoons dry yeast 11⁄3 cups lukewarm water 1 tablespoon honey 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons olive oil 3½ cups all purpose flour 1 bunch cilantro 1 lime, just the juice salt and pepper, to taste 1 cup olive oil 1. Make the dough by mixing yeast and water in a bowl. Leave for 5 minutes. 2. Add honey, salt, oil, and flour. Mix until you have a smooth dough. Cover with plastic wrap and let it rise for at least 1 hour. 3. Place cilantro, lime juice, salt, pepper, and olive oil in a blender and blend until you have a smooth, thick oil. 4. Get your grill going—remember it needs to be really hot. You will need a clean grill rack for this, so clean it well if it’s old and gritty. 5. Divide your dough in 2 and place each on well-greased parchment paper. Press them out using your fingers and coat with a layer of olive oil. 6. Flip the paper upside down on your grill and slowly remove the paper. Let the pizzas grill for 3 minutes.


CHILI & LIME MARINATED HALLOUMI WITH TOMATO SALAD & CHARRED ROMAINE

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GRILLED NAKED PIZZA WITH CILANTRO/LIME OIL

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HONEY GRILLED PINEAPPLE

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BEET & ALMOND DIP WITH GARLIC

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GRILLED PINEAPPLE SALAD WITH PEPPERONI, MOZZARELLA, & ALMONDS

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BBQ LEMON & CHILI CHICKEN

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7. Flip the pizza over and grill for another 3 minutes. 8. Take it off the grill and cut into pieces. Serve with some salt and the cilantro oil.

Honey Grilled Pineapple An easier summer dessert does not exist. Pineapple on the grill is just a delight, add honey… and wow. I used a store-bought BBQ spice mix—something with spice and heat is great. Whatever you have. SERVES 6

1 tablespoon BBQ spice mix 1 pineapple, cut into wedges, skin on 3 tablespoons honey 1. Rub the spice mix into the pineapple and place on a warm grill. 2. Leave for about 2 minutes on each side. 3. Place on a platter and top with honey. Serve warm.

Beet & Almond Dip with Garlic Someone left some cooked beets in my fridge this summer, so I experimented and created this dip. It’s super good as a dip or as a sauce with BBQ chicken or pork. It lasts a couple of days in the fridge.

SERVES 6

6 cooked+peeled beets (I used vacuum packed from the grocery store) ½ cup toasted Marcona almonds 2 cloves garlic, minced 4 to 6 tablespoons olive oil salt and pepper, to taste 1. Roughly chop beets and place them with almonds and garlic in a blender. Blend until smooth. 2. Add the olive oil a little at a time until you have a smooth, creamy dip. 3. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with chips.

Grilled Pineapple Salad with Pepperoni, Mozzarella, & Almonds Pineapple equals summer to me. When you BBQ them they become even sweeter. Throw in some chili and you will have a taste bomb! SERVES 4

½ fresh pineapple, thickly sliced olive oil salt, to taste pinch of chili 1 teaspoon sesame seeds 1 jar baby mozzarella 20 basil leaves ½ cup toasted Marcona almonds 20 slices dried pepperoni (sliced pepperoni dried in the oven at 360ºF until crispy) 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 lime, just the juice red chili flakes

1. Rub the pineapple with oil, salt, chili, and sesame seeds. 2. Place on a warm grill and cook for about 2 minutes on each side. 3. Remove and cut into chunks. Place on a platter. 4. Top with mozzarella, basil, almonds, and pepperoni. 5. Pour oil and lime overtop and season with red chili flakes.

BBQ Lemon & Chili Chicken Lemon and chicken is the perfect combo. Not only does the lemon make the chicken taste great, but it also tenderizers the meat while it cooks. You can use this recipe with chicken breasts as well. SERVES 4

8 chicken thighs, skin on, bone-in 2 lemons, sliced fresh rosemary olive oil salt and pepper, to taste red chili flakes 1. Gently lift the skin off the thighs to create a small pocket. 2. Place a slice of lemon and some rosemary inside. 3. Rub the chicken with olive oil, salt, pepper, and as much chili you can take. 4. Leave for 30 minutes so the flavors can blend together. 5. Place the chicken skin-side down on a warm grill and cook for about 4 minutes on each side, depending on thickness. 6. Place any leftover lemon slices on the grill and serve those on top of the chicken.

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Recipes by Donna Hay, The New Easy Text+styling by Paul Lowe Photography by Alexandra Grablewski

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ORANGE & ALMOND CAKE


Years agO I was lucky enough to visit Sydney, Australia and can still remember flipping though a Marie Claire at a hair salon and

coming across one of Donna Hay’s pages. I was captivated by the simplicity of her styling and food. I tore the pages out of the magazine and simply put them in my pocket. (Sorry, not sorry!) A couple of years later her first book came out—The New Cook—and ever since I have been in love with everything she does. Her magazine and books are a great inspiration and actually inspired me to start my own magazine. I mean, we are both stylists who started magazines, how cool is that! I was lucky enough to meet Donna when she last visited New York to promote her new book, The New Easy. It’s a wonderful book with easy and delicious recipes you actually want to make. I have tried several and they have become staples in my own kitchen. We had a chat over a coffee and I asked her a few things about food, Australia, and life in general. Paul: Why is food important to you? I love that food is at the center of so many of the occasions we share with our friends and family—whether it’s everyday meals to cook on weeknights, a long and lazy lunch on the weekend, or the most elaborate layered cake for a birthday party or Christmas feast. My friends are always dropping over at my place, because they know there will be some delicious food to enjoy—it has a wonderful way of bringing people together.

Donna:

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P: I grew up with a grandmother who was a great cook. Who inspired you to start cooking? The first cookbook I had was my grandmother’s, so that’s where it started

D:

for me, too! P: What do you always keep in your pantry? It’s always very well stocked! For baking, I always have cacao powder, almond meal, and wholemeal spelt flour. Plus maple syrup, sushi rice, and Asian chilli jam (it’s perfect with grilled fish or tossing through greens in a salad). P: Favorite dish? If you come over to my house in the summer, you’ll always get fed my lime and lemongrass moreton bay bug tails, cooked outside on the grill. That probably sounds like a really odd dish to everyone in the States (moreton bay bugs are like mini lobsters—they’re delicious).

D:

D:

P: What’s the biggest difference between the food in Australia and the US? I think a lot of people don’t realize how sophisticated our food culture in Australia is—the abundance and quality of our fresh produce is amazing, and we have stunning local seafood. Our food is very light and lean.

D:

P: We all have our dirty food secrets. (Mine is Taco Bell.) What’s yours? Cheese and vegemite toasties (you might need to look that one up, too!). And it’s no secret, but I could eat ice cream all day.

D:

P: I love your new magazine all about healthy and fresh eating. Why did you decide to add another title to your workload? I’m not very good with rules and I’m not really one for restrictive diets. I wanted to put together recipes that you can feel good about eating, while still allowing yourself little treats every now and again. The recipes in Fresh + Light are genuinely how I love to eat and cook—it’s about making clever swaps, celebrating beautiful fresh produce, and bringing that sense of balance into your lifestyle. Fresh + Light isn’t available in the US as a printed copy yet, but you can get the digital edition online. It’s been a busy year, but I’m so excited to have launched the new title and see how much our readers are loving it!

D:

P: What’s the one thing we don’t know about Donna? People don’t believe me when I tell them I’m actually really shy. P: What’s next for Donna? I’ve just opened my first pop-up store in Sydney, which is so exciting, and we’re doing some great thing to really bring the pages of my magazine and books to life. There are big changes in the works for the magazine next year, too. And I’m about to start filming a new television series, so I’m going to be a busy girl.

D: D:


food has a wonderful way of bringing people togetheR

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APPLE & CELERY SALAD

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ZUCCHINI & FETA PANCAKES

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SAGE & GARLIC BRINED CHICKEN

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Orange & Almond Cake SERVES 10–12 cake

1¾ sticks unsalted butter, softened 1¼ cups superfine sugar 2 tablespoons finely grated orange rind 3 cups almond meal (ground almonds) 5 eggs 1 cup all purpose flour natural yogurt, to serve or ange syrup

1½ cups orange juice ²⁄3 cup superfine sugar 1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped 1. Preheat oven to 325°F. 2. Place the butter and sugar in a food processor and process until well combined. 3. Add the orange rinds, almonds, eggs, and flour and process until combined. 4. Pour the mixture into a lightly greased 9” round springform cake tin lined with non-stick baking paper. 5. Bake for 1 hour or until cooked when tested with a skewer. 6. While the cake is baking, make the orange syrup. Place the orange juice, sugar, vanilla bean, and seeds in a small saucepan over low heat and stir to dissolve the sugar.

1 cup small celery leaves 1 Granny Smith apple, thinly sliced m ustard dressing

1 tablespoon wholegrain mustard 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon apple juice 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil sea salt and cracked black pepper, to taste 1. For the dressing, place the mustard, vinegar, juice, oil, salt, and pepper in a bowl and whisk to combine. 2. Arrange the celeriac, celery, leaves, and apple on plates and spoon the dressing overtop.

Zucchini & Feta Pancakes SERVES 4 pancakes

3 large zucchinis, grated 3 eggs 1 cup feta, roughly chopped ¾ cup all purpose flour 1½ teaspoons baking powder 1 ⁄3 cup chopped mint leaves 1 ⁄3 cup chopped flat leaf parsley sea salt and cracked black pepper, to taste extra virgin olive oil, for frying tomato sal ad

7. Bring to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes or until the mixture has thickened and is syrupy.

2 teaspoons honey 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 cups mixed cherry tomatoes, halved 1 ⁄3 cup small basil leaves 2 tablespoons small mint leaves

8. Discard the vanilla bean and pour half the hot syrup over the hot cake.

1. Place the zucchini in a flat layer on sheets of absorbent paper.

9. Stand in the tin for 10 minutes.

2. Cover with another layer of paper and press to remove the excess water.

10. Remove the cake from the tin and serve with the yogurt and remaining syrup.

Apple & Celery Salad SERVES 4 sal ad

1 small celeriac (celery root), peeled, cut into matchsticks 3 stalks celery, thinly sliced

minutes each side or until golden. 7. Keep the pancakes warm and set aside. 8. For the the tomato salad, place the honey, lemon juice, salt, and pepper in a bowl and stir to combine. 9. Add the tomato, basil, and mint and toss to combine. 10. Divide the pancakes between plates and top with tomato salad.

Sage & Garlic Brined Chicken SERVES 4

4 cups cold water 1 ⁄3 cup table salt 8 sprigs sage 4 cloves garlic, smashed 4 chicken breast fillets, trimmed 4 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1. Place the water and salt in a bowl and stir to dissolve. 2. Add the sage, garlic, and chicken and allow to stand for 15 minutes. 3. Remove the chicken, sage, and garlic and pat dry with absorbent paper. 4. Heat the butter and oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium heat. 5. Add the chicken and cook for 5 minutes. 6. Add the sage and garlic, turn the chicken, and cook for a further 5 minutes or until the chicken is golden brown. 7. Reduce the heat to low and cover the pan with a lid. 8. Cook for 4 minutes, remove from the heat, and stand, covered, for 2 minutes. Serve the chicken with the sage, garlic, and pan juices.

3. Place the zucchini, eggs, feta, flour, baking powder, mint, parsley, salt, and pepper in a bowl and mix to combine. 4. Heat a little of the oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. 5. Add 2 tablespoons of mixture to the pan and flatten with a spatula. 6. Repeat and cook, in batches, for 2–3

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MOZZARELLA SALAD WITH CRISPY BRUSSELS SPROUTS

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LEMON FISH WITH CRISPY DILL

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CRISPY CAULIFLOWER PASTA

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Mozzarella Salad with Crispy Brussels Sprouts

Lemon Fish with Crispy Dill

Crispy Cauliflower Pasta

SERVES 4

SERVES 4

SERVES 4

4 tablespoons butter 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 3 cloves garlic, thickly sliced 2 large green chilies, seeds removed and chopped 2 tablespoons shredded lemon zest 4 6 oz firm white fish fillets, halved sea salt and cracked black pepper, to taste 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, extra 2 cups dill sprigs

24 oz cauliflower, trimmed, and roughly chopped ½ cup pine nuts ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic, chopped ¼ cup oregano leaves 2 tablespoons finely grated lemon rind 1 teaspoon dried chili flakes sea salt and cracked black pepper 14 oz orecchiette grated Parmesan or Pecorino, to serve

sal ad

2 buffalo mozzarellas, thickly sliced 3 green tomatoes, chopped 1 tablespoon small oregano leaves ¼ cup+more shredded mint leaves 2 tablespoons finely chopped white onion 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon caster (superfine) sugar sea salt and cracked black pepper, to taste crispy brussel s sprouts

14 oz brussels sprouts, trimmed 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil sea salt, to taste 1. Preheat oven to 350°F. 2. To make the crispy brussels sprouts, trim the stalk of the sprouts with a paring knife and separate the leaves.

2. Add the butter, oil, garlic, chili, and lemon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2–3 minutes or until soft. 3. Increase the heat to medium, sprinkle the fish with salt, pepper and cook for 2–3 minutes each side or until cooked to your liking. 4. Heat the extra oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat.

3. Place in a bowl with the oil and salt and toss to combine. 4. Divide between 2 baking trays lined with non-stick baking paper and bake for 10–15 minutes or until golden and crisp.

5. Cook the dill in small batches for 1–2 minutes or until crisp. 6. Drain on absorbent paper. 7. Top the fish with the crispy dill and serve with lemon wedges.

5. Divide the mozzarella between plates. Combine the tomatoes, oregano, mint, onion, vinegar, oil, sugar, salt, and pepper and spoon over the mozzarella. 6. Top with the crispy brussels sprouts and extra mint leaves to serve.

1. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over medium-low heat.

1. Place the cauliflower and pine nuts in a food processor and process until finely chopped. 2. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. 3. Add the oil, garlic, cauliflower mixture, oregano, lemon rind, chili, salt, and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes or until the cauliflower is golden. 4. While the cauliflower is cooking, cook the pasta in a large saucepan of salted boiling water for 8–10 minutes or until al dente. Drain. 4. Toss the pasta with the cauliflower mixture and sprinkle with the cheese to serve.

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Ramadan Crafts+recipes by Manal Aman | Styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Alexandra Grablewski

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Dates Topiary

Whirling Dervish Place Settings

Manal Aman is a young Canadian who is a rising craft star. She also happens to be Muslim and entreated me to do a Ramadan story together. As I think it’s always important to learn about other traditions, and I was inexperienced with the customs of Ramadan, I jumped at the chance! We sat down over a cup of coffee and talked about everything we have in common: our love of food, crafts, and our inspiring grandmothers SWEETPAULMAG.COM 89


tradition, also occurs in the night. And one of the most important Ramadan traditions of all, the Night of Power, is about spending the night in worship. I thought purple was a good color to represent the night because black and blue are too strongly tied to other North American holidays; purple, on the other hand, is not the primary color for any North American holiday. The church uses purple as the color of Lent, but I think that’s okay as anyone in North America that doesn’t know what Ramadan is can at least gather that it’s somewhat similar to Lent since they share the same color. Also, I think Disney’s Aladdin already

Paul: Why is it important for you to have a crafty Ramadan tradition? Manal: It’s important for me to start a crafty Ramadan tradition because it’s an expression of my Canadian identity. In North America, we’re accustomed to celebrating every holiday with DIYs, crafts, and decorations. It seemed natural for me to extend this element of my North American culture to the religious holidays I celebrate as well. I feel it represents who I am both as a Canadian and as a Muslim. P: How did you settle on purple and gold colors? M: I did a lot of digging into how North American holidays got their colors and I noticed a pattern. The colors of North American holidays are informed by a holiday’s traditions. For example, Halloween’s tradition is to put out jack-o-lanterns at night. Orange (representing the pumpkins) and black 90 SWEETPAULMAG.COM SUMMER 2016

(representing the night) makes sense for Halloween. Christmas’ red and green roots are a bit more obscure, but some sources suggest they stem from the red and green of holly and poinsettia plants, which were used during the Roman festivities of Saturnalia. In terms of contemporary Christmas traditions, the green represents the tradition of putting up a Christmas tree and the red represents the tradition of Santa Claus bringing presents in his big red suit. With this pattern in mind, I began to analyze Ramadan’s traditions and noticed our religious traditions are based around the theme of night. For example, the calendar dates for Ramadan and Eid are determined by spotting the crescent moon in the night. The two traditional meals of the fasting person are taken in the night, just after sunset and before dawn. Tarawih prayer, solely a Ramadan

using purple to represent Muslim culture is helpful too. Perhaps Disney chose purple because their version of Aladdin was inspired by a story in 1,001 Nights. Maybe they thought purple was a good color to represent the mystery and magic of the night as well! Along with purple to represent the night sky, I like to use gold to represent light. In Ramadan, lights turn on in homes and mosques in the dead of night and they tell a story of people spending time in prayer or getting ready to take their pre-fasting meal. I think homes and mosques with their lights switched on (represented by gold) against the night sky (represented by purple) paints a picture of how people perform Ramadan’s core traditions in the night. I also like to use white to represent the moon. During sunset, purple, gold, magenta, and blue are some of the colors I see in the sky—so I even like to add a touch of magenta or blue to represent the tradition of breaking fast at sunset. P: What’s your best childhood Ramadan memory? M: My favorite childhood Ramadan memory is dining at Pizza Hut in Pakistan at 4 a.m. When I was 8 year old, we spent a few days of Ramadan in Pakistan because it happened to fall around winter break. The Pizza Hut in Pakistan offered deals if you went to their restaurant for a sit-in meal before dawn. So my cousins, siblings, and I would wake up in the middle of the night and head on over to the restaurant. Pizza Hut has different


In Ramadan, lights turn on in homes and mosques in the dead of night and they tell a story of people spending time in prayer or getting ready to take their pre-fasting meal flavors of pizzas in different countries and in Pakistan they had this amazing chicken tikka pizza. It was seriously the best pizza ever. We went back for that pizza several times during our vacation! P: Your grandmother was a big influence on your. Tell me about her. M: My grandmother was passionate about cooking and crafting and I have a lot of fond memories with her. We liked to watch Martha Stewart’s show together, make origami, and spend afternoons painting eggs—not because we celebrated Easter but because she just found the craft so adorable. Her naan khatai cookies were my favorite and I remember helping her ever since I was 4 or 5 years old. Once she had placed each cookie on the baking sheet, it was my job to dent each cookie with my finger and sprinkle on the pistachios. She kept a scrapbook of her recipes; it’s a collection of her own recipes as well as recipes that interested her from newspapers and magazines. After she passed away, my aunt let me have her scrapbook. One day I’ll get around to digitizing it—my cousins have been asking me for her recipes for ages! For more Manal visit her webpage, helloholydays.com.

Eid Gift Wrap Traditionally, children receive money on Eid. But in North America, many parents now opt to give their children wrapped gifts. Maybe this is in response to Christmas; a lot of Muslim children don’t get to experience the thrill of ripping open presents on Christmas morning, and parents want to make up for it. If you’re giving gifts instead of money this Eid, here’s a way to make your wrapping special! SUPPLIES:

glitter wrapping paper, purple (available at Paper Source) glitter wrapping paper, gold (available at Paper Source) kraft wrapping paper, brown pencil sticky tape for glitter wrapping papers (available at Paper Source)

1. Wrap each gift in one of the glitter wrapping papers. 2. Then, before fully wrapping another sheet of wrapping paper on top, make creases with your finger of where the wrapping paper will fit. 3. On the outer wrapping paper, use the creases you made as guides for where your crescent moon and star will be placed. 4. Use any circular object that will fit your gift box to make a crescent moon on the wrapping paper. Freehand a star shape and cut out voids for the both the moon and star. 5. Now, using the creases you made earlier as guides, wrap this top sheet of wrapping paper onto the gift so a different shade of wrapping paper peeks through the crescent moon and star.

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8 Pointed Star Ornaments These ornaments are in the shape of an 8-pointed star, one of the most prominent symbols in Islamic art and architecture. As Emma Clark describes in her book The Art of the Islamic Garden, the star represents God’s throne. The eight points represent each of the eight angels that will flank Allah’s throne on the Day of Judgment as described in the Quran (69:17). In Islamic tradition, when God created the heavens and the earth, He rose above His throne and inscribed on it “My mercy supersedes My wrath,” meaning God is more gentle, kind, and loving than He is anything else. In this way, the 8 pointed star becomes a symbol of having hope in God’s mercy. In Ramadan, this sentiment of having hope in God’s mercy is especially high, making the 8 pointed star a relevant symbol for the occasion. SUPPLIES:

Chapli Kebab

air drying clay template purple and gold acrylic paint bamboo skewer or straw ribbon foam brush small brush pencil 1. Roll out clay and use the template to cut out 8 pointed star shapes. 2. Make a hole on top of each ornament with a bamboo skewer or straw. 3. Once dry completely, paint entirely in purple with a foam brush. 4. When the purple paint has dried, paint each point of the star gold. You’ll be left with a purple octagon in the center. 5. Cut out the smaller 8 pointed star from the template, including its negative space. 6. Use a pencil to trace the template onto the center of the clay stars. Be sure to trace around the outside and inside edge of the template. 7. Paint inside the pencil tracing with gold paint. 8. Add ribbon and hang.

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Plum & Rosewater Sherbet SERVES 12

6 plums, chopped 2 cups sugar 2 tablespoons rose water water ice 1. Grind plums and sugar in blender. Don’t add any water at this point. 2. Pour out into sieve. 3. Add water into sieve to help drain the purée through the sieve and remove plum skin. Keep adding water as needed till all the plum juice gets out. 4. Fill a jug ¾ of the way up with plum juice and rest with water and ice. 5. Add 2 tablespoons rosewater and stir well. Serve.

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My grandmother was passionate about cooking and crafting . Her naan khatai cookies were my favorite and I remember helping her ever since I was 4 or 5 years old

Naan Khatai with Oil

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Chapli Kebab MAKES 8 KEBABS

1 lb ground beef ½ teaspoon red chili pepper flakes 2 teaspoons chaat masala ½ teaspoon garam masala 1 teaspoon ginger paste 1 teaspoon garlic paste ½ cup chopped onion ¾ cup chopped coriander ¼ cup chopped mint ¼ cup chopped tomato ½ of a green chili, chopped 1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon chickpea flour 1 beaten egg 1 teaspoon coriander seeds, crushed with mortar and pestle

indentation in the center with your finger. Fill each indentation with crushed pistachios. 9. Bake for 5 minutes. 10. Reduce the heat to 250°F and bake for 2 minutes until edges are golden brown.

a prophetic tradition for both Ramadan and Eid; this dates topiary is a great way to keep tradition alive while also adding to your decor. If you’re making this ahead of time, be sure to wrap the topiary in plastic wrap to keep it from becoming stale. This feeds a crowd!

Ramadan Lanterns

SUPPLIES:

6” white floral ball brown spray paint toothpicks medium soft dates (such as Mazafati dates) short candle stand or urn

1. In a fine colander, drain water from beef really well.

Before electricity, it was a tradition in some Muslim cultures to climb up to high elevations with lanterns in hand to help spot the crescent moon; the sighting of the moon indicating the beginning of Ramadan or Eid. Today, amongst some Muslim cultures, lanterns still remain a symbol of Ramadan. These decorative lanterns feature the crescent moon and star, which is the emblem of Islam. It’s a useful symbol to help communicate that Muslim holidays follow the lunar calendar.

2. Mix all ingredients together.

SUPPLIES:

3. Divide beef into 6 balls. With wet hands, press down on each ball and flip between hands back and forth till a patty is formed.

recycled glass jars glass enamel paint, purple and gold masking tape 18-gauge wire pliers clipart foam brush small brush

Oil a saucepan and cook on medium-high 4. heat for a few minutes on each side. Enjoy with a fork and chutney.

Naan Khatai with Oil MAKES ABOUT 40 COOKIES

½ cup butter 1½ cups confectioners' sugar, sifted 1 cup canola oil 1 egg ½ teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon ground cardamom 2½ cups all purpose flour, sifted crushed pistachios, for garnish 1. Preheat oven to 400°F. 2. Cream butter and sugar well. 3. Beat in the oil. 4. Add the egg and beat till butter is light and fluffy. 5. Add all other ingredients except flour and pistachios and beat some more. 6. Gradually add in flour till dough forms. 7. Make 1” balls by rolling between your hands. Place each ball onto a baking sheet and gently press down to flatten. 8. On each flattened cookie, make an

1. Thoroughly clean glass jars, making sure to wipe down with a glass cleaner as well. 2. Paint the interior of the jars with 3 coats of purple paint using the foam brush. 3. Print out clipart, reducing or increasing size to fit jar. Cut out the negative space to create a moon and star template. 4. Secure the template to the jars with masking tape. Use a small brush to paint the moon and star with gold enamel paint. 5. Take the 18-gauge wire and, using pliers, make a small hook at each end of the wire by folding it back onto itself. 6. Wrap the wire around the rim of the jar and secure to the hook. Then shape the remaining wire into a handle and hook down.

Dates Topiary Food and drink for Ramadan and Eid vary across all Muslim cultures but dates are the one food uniting Muslim cultures together during the holy days. Dates are

1. Spray paint the floral ball brown and let dry completely. 2. Place the floral ball on a short candle stand or urn. Insert a toothpick into the ball and then insert a date onto the toothpick. 3. Repeat until entire ball is covered.

Whirling Dervish Place Settings Whirling dervishes act as symbols of love and kindness. When entertaining, give your guests a warm welcome with a personalized dervish they can take home. For an added touch, have a short poetry reading at the dinner table from the works of Mevlana Rumi. SUPPLIES:

clip art red paper black paper white pen scissors glue stick 1. Cut out whirling dervish templates onto white paper. Cut along all black lines, including the ones along the torso. 2. Cut out a red hat using the hat template. Glue the hat onto the dervish. 3. Pull the dervish’s robes together to form a “skirt” and glue. 4. Cut out a strip of black paper enough to fit around the dervish’s waist. 5. Write your guest’s name on the strip with a white pen and glue around the dervish’s waist.

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rozen beauty Crafts+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

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One of my favorite things to do as a kid was make ice lanterns. We would make them before a party and place them outside to welcome guests. It’s amazing what you can do with some water and flowers!

FLOWER BOWL

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I used distilled water for everything except the ice cubes—you need to use tap water for those. Your ice will be more clear upon freezing if you boil the water first.

Frozen Sweet Peas I love to freeze flowers just to create an interesting shape. Here I froze sweet peas in a measuring cup. I let the stems stick out so they kind of look like they have been frozen in time. Place these all around your table as interesting conversation pieces.

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Ice Cubes Make any drink go from drab to fab in an instant! Just serving water with these ice cubes are a beauty in itself. You will be the hostess of the year. SUPPLIES:

untreated edible herbs and flowers sliced lime water, use regular water for this ice cube molds 1. Place the flowers, herbs, and lime in the molds and add water. 2. Freeze until solid. SWEETPAULMAG.COM 99


Bottle Chiller My mom would do this every holiday with aquavit, holly, and red berries. Use alcohol that should be served ice cold—like vodka. SUPPLIES:

empty milk carton scissors flowers bottle distilled water 1. Cut the top off the milk carton. 2. Place the bottle and flowers inside the carton and fill up with water. 3. Freeze solid and the simply tear the carton away.

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Candle Holder These make stunning center pieces.Leave some of the stems sticking out of the bowl for that perfectly imperfect look. SUPPLIES:

bowl smaller bowl flowers distilled water 1. Fill the bowl with flowers and water. 2. Place the smaller bowl inside the large one and fill it with water to weigh it down. 3. Place in the freezer to freeze until solid. 4. Remove from the freezer and run under warm water to get it out. 5. Place on a plate and add a candle.

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ICE BUCKET

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Ice Bucket I used to make these with my Mormor as a kid. We didn’t use them for wine, we placed them outside in winter with tea lights in them. They’re so festive. This bucket lasts at least 4 hours. SUPPLIES:

large bucket smaller pot or bucket to place inside flowers distilled water 1. Place the smaller pot/bucket inside the larger. Using a pot is great because the handles can rest on the bucket edge.

2. Place flowers all around between the 2 buckets. 3. Fill with water and freeze. 4. Remove from the freezer and let it run under the sink in warm water to get it out. 5. Place on a platter and add the wine. This takes about 20 hours to freeze in a normal freezer.

Flower Bowl Great as decor or serving food like shrimp. I love when the flowers stick up like this. Make sure you use sturdier flowers.

SUPPLIES:

2 metal bowls, 1 larger than the other flowers distilled water 1. Place flowers in the large bowl. 2. Fill with water and place the smaller bowl on top. Put some water in the small bowl to keep it in place. 3. Freeze until solid and get the bowl out by placing it under running warm water for a few seconds.

Flower Squares Here I froze flowers and ferns in a square plastic take-away container. Place them on plates and put them on your table. They will last an entire dinner.

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Berry

Crush 104 SWEETPAULMAG.COM SUMMER 2016


The warm summer weather brings an abundance of lush and colorful berries. China squirrel shows us how to create natural berry dyes for fabric and paper then teases our summer thirst with icy cold fresh raspberry lemonade. For the fashion conscious we also have fun blushing pink ombre popsicles to cool you down together with pink scoops of delicious roasted strawberry ice cream

Crafts+styling+photography by China Squirrel SWEETPAULMAG.COM 105


Dyeing with Fresh Berries It’s a great time to make your own natural dyes whilst summer’s berries are plentiful. Dyes made from natural ingredients produce unique colors. Use the dyes to over-dye vintage floral fabrics, up-cycle vintage cottons and linens, or dye new fabric to create a subtle pastel palette.

Natural Berry Dye You can use 1 variety of berry for each dye color or mix berries together to make your own color combinations. SUPPLIES:

4 cups berries 8 cups water 1. Place berries into a heavy-based saucepan then add water. (As a general guide to 1 cup of berries add 2 cups of water.) 2. Bring berries and water to a boil over a medium heat, reduce heat to low, and simmer for about 1 hour or until liquid is dark in color. 3. Strain through a fine sieve lined with muslin or cheesecloth. 4. Discard solids. 5. Return liquid to saucepan. 6. Place fabrics into dye liquid and stir well to coat. 7. Simmer over a very low heat for 45 minutes. Stir occasionally 8. Remove from heat and allow fabrics to stand in dye until cold. Remember fabrics will be lighter when dry. 9. Remove fabrics when desired color strength is reached and rinse under cold water. Note: to achieve darker colors, leave fabrics in cooled dye liquid longer.

Preparing the Fabric for Dyeing Before starting the dyeing process, you need to get your fabric ready. SUPPLIES:

½ cup table salt 8 cups water 1. Wash the fabric you have chosen to dye. 2. Don’t dry it—it needs to be wet. 3. Prepare the fixative or mordant. This

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is to help the fabric take up the dye more easily. Combine salt and water in a large saucepan. 4. Bring to a boil, stirring until salt dissolves. 5. Remove from heat. 6. Add the washed (wet) fabric and allow to stand 1 hour in the salt water. 7. Remove fabric and rinse well with water. The fabric is now ready to be dyed.

Vintage Paper Watercolor Berry Flowers Use fresh berry dyes to paint vintage book pages. Pretty idea for paper craft projects, wedding invitations, gift cards, and buntings! SUPPLIES:

paint brush berry dye (see above) old book pages scissors masking tape 1. Lightly brush berry dye onto book pages then allow to dry naturally. 2. Use scissors to cut almond shapes from book pages. 3. Pinch the narrow end of each shape to form a petal. 4. Arrange 4–5 petals together with the narrow ends at base, shape into a flower, and secure base of flower with tape.

Berry Valance We made separate dyes using blueberries, raspberries, blackberries and strawberries. SUPPLIES:

vintage white cotton handkerchiefs (as many as you need for your window width) mordant (see above) berry dye (see above) pins sewing needle thread 1. Prepare handkerchiefs for dyeing. 2. Dye handkerchiefs in your choice of berry dyes.

4. Working 2 at a time, place right sides of handkerchiefs together and pin along 1 edge allowing a ¼” hem. 5. Sew together. 6. Repeat with remaining handkerchiefs until you have a curtain the size you require. 7. Measure the diameter of the rod (we used a branch!) you wish to hang the curtain from. 8. Pin and sew a hem to fit rod or branch through. 9. Hang curtain!

3. Allow to dry naturally.

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Ombré Berry Popsicles Take chic ombré style a step further by creating your own summer ombré popsicles. Use the natural hues and flavors of raspberries and strawberries to create these easy and delicious summer treats. MAKES 12 r aspberry ice cre am

7 oz fresh raspberries 7 oz Greek yogurt 3 teaspoons maple syrup str awberry ice cre am

7 oz fresh strawberries, hulls removed, sliced 7 oz Greek yoghurt 3 teaspoons maple syrup wooden popsicles sticks (available at craft stores)

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1. To make the ice cream, place raspberries and strawberries in single layers on trays lined with baking paper. 2. Cover and freeze overnight or until solid. 3. Keeping the berries separate, place frozen raspberries or frozen strawberries with yogurt and maple syrup into a food processor and process until creamy. 4. Working quickly, spoon the raspberry ice cream into the base of 12 1⁄3-cup popsicle molds. 5. Top each with the strawberry ice cream. 6. Insert a wooden popsicle stick into the center of each.

A refreshing drink for hot summer days

7. Freeze until firm, about 3–4 hours. Eat within 14 days of making.

Fresh Raspberry Lemonade SERVES 6

1 cup superfine sugar 1 cup water 7 oz fresh raspberries+more for serving 1 cup fresh lemon juice (about 7 lemons) 4 cups chilled water ice cubes 1. Place sugar and water into a medium saucepan and stir over a medium heat until sugar dissolves. 2. Remove from heat and allow to cool. 3. Purée raspberries in a food processor or blender then press through a fine sieve lined with muslin or cheesecloth. 4. Discard seeds. 5. Combine sugar syrup, lemon juice, and raspberry purée together in a jug. 6. Chill until serving. 7. To serve, mix water and raspberry mix together. Serve with ice cubes and extra raspberries for decoration.

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this will become your summer favorite


12. Fold cream into strawberry mix. 13. Pour into a deep 6-cup metal loaf tin, cover with aluminum foil, and freeze overnight. 14. Just before serving, remove ice cream from freezer and place in refrigerator for 10–15 minutes or until ice cream softens slightly. 15. Serve scooped into cones. Eat ice cream within 7 days of making.

Book Page Ice Cream Cone Sleeves A fun, colorful, and easy summer holiday craft idea. Ice cream cone sleeves will keep fingers from getting sticky and will prevent crisp ice cones from getting soggy.

Roasted Strawberry Ice Cream A simple, easy, and deliciously refreshing ice cream recipe that requires no ice cream churn. This will become your summer favorite scooped into crisp waffle cones. SERVES 6–8

3. Combine strawberries and sugar in a bowl. 4. Arrange in a single layer in a prepared baking pan. 5. Bake for 25 minutes or until soft and syrupy.

1½ lbs fresh strawberries, hulls removed, halved ¼ cup superfine sugar ¾ cup canned sweetened condensed milk 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 10 fl oz heavy cream 2 tablespoons confectioners' sugar, sifted ice cream cones, for serving

6. Remove from oven, stand 10 minutes, then transfer to a bowl and refrigerate until cold. 7. Place cooled strawberries into a food processor and process until smooth.

1. Gather old books from markets or charity stores. 2. Remove pages from books. 3. Use a pencil to mark a 4” square (or larger if you have large ice cream cones) on each book page. 4. Use a compass or trace around the edge of a small saucer or plate to make 1 corner of square a curve. 5. You should have a piece of paper with 2 straight sides of 4” and 1 curved side.

9. Transfer to a large mixing bowl.

6. Cut out with scissors. Check the sizing by wrapping around an ice cream cone, with curve section of paper at the top of each sleeve, forming the base into a point.

10. Place cream in a separate mixing bowl and add icing sugar.

7. Use this as template to draw onto other book pages, then cut each out.

1. Preheat oven to 350ºF.

11. Using an electric mixer, beat until soft

2. Line a baking pan with parchment paper.

peaks form and cream is thick.

8. Wrap around cones and secure edges with glue tape or Washi tape.

8. Add condensed milk and vanilla extract and process until well combined.

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SUMMER FRUITS Kneel down in the garden and listen to the plants grow. Having carefully tended the summer crop, now’s the time to reap a juicy harvest. The summer bounty swells from the beautiful black earth. Hot days give way to quenching afternoons, when drinks on the patio beckon. Revel in the simplicity of summer fare‌ just picked

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Pastis Summer Sipper

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Pastis Summer Sipper MAKES 2

4 oz Corallejo Tequila ½ oz Pernod pastis or Absinthe 1 oz freshly squeezed lime juice 3 to 4 tablespoons honey syrup 8 fresh mint leaves, plus a few sprigs for garnish 1. To make the wildflower honey syrup, dissolve a 1:1 ratio honey and filtered water in a saucepan set on medium heat. 2. Whisk to dissolve, then remove from heat. 3. Once cooled to room temperature, store chilled in the refrigerator. Keeps, chilled and sealed, for up to 3 weeks. 4. In a cocktail shaker, tear mint leaves and add lime juice. 5. Muddle mint for 10 seconds, add tequila, pastis, and honey syrup, and top with ice. 6. Shake vigorously for 30 seconds. 7. Place a single large ice cube into each rocks glass. 8. Strain into the glasses, slap a couple mint sprigs across your hand to release their aromatic oils, and garnish.

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Heirloom Tomato Black Pepper Galette

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Heirloom Tomato Black Pepper Galette Buttery pastry gives way to gem tone slices, still juicy from harvest. Call this treat framed-in-golden-crust art.  SERVES 4 pastry

1¼ cups all purpose flour 1 stick butter, cut into cubes, freezer-cold 1 egg 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon organic cane sugar 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper buttermilk, for brushing onto pastry filling

¾ cup fresh ricotta ¼ cup finely shredded Parmigiano- Reggiano cheese 5 to 8 heirloom tomatoes, cut into ¼” slices kosher salt, to taste Note: I used to make dough in a food processor. It was easy, to be sure. Feel free to do it that way if you are tight on time. But now, I make the extra time to cut the butter into the flour by hand. It’s not much longer really, and for the results, it’s worth it. 1. In a large bowl, stir together the dry ingredients. 2. Add the butter and use a pastry blender to cut it into the flour, scraping its edge with a knife occasionally to free any clumps that form. Keep at it until you are left with pea-sized bits of butter in the mix, being careful not to overwork the dough. A few larger butter clumps are okay. 3. Add the egg and 1–2 tablespoons of buttermilk and cut them in. As you continue to work them, the dough will

form. Pinch the dough with your thumb and index finger to see if it holds together. If it’s crumbly, it isn’t ready. 4. Drizzle another tablespoon of buttermilk (or more, as needed) and cut in again. 5. Once the dough has formed, empty it out onto cellophane. 6. Press opposite ends of the cellophane together to form the dough into a ball. Flatten it into a disk, wrap it securely, then refrigerate for at least 20 minutes to let dough mellow. 7. In a bowl, mix together ricotta and Parmesan and season with salt. Set aside. 8. Between sheets of lightly floured parchment, roll dough out to 14” round, about 1⁄8”–¼” thick. Transfer to a rimmed baking sheet and peel top parchment layer away. 9. Spread ricotta-Parm mixture onto pastry, leaving a 2” border all around. 10. Layer tomato slices in a pleasing fashion. When I made this, it struck me as a stained glass window. 11. Season with salt and pepper, then fold pastry over filling, pleating as you go. 12. Brush buttermilk over pastry border, then refrigerate for at least 30 minutes to set. 13. Preheat oven to 400ºF. 14. Remove gallette from fridge and bake in oven for 25–35 minutes, or until crust is deeply golden. 15. Allow to cool for 5–10 minutes on a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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Watermelon Corn Salad & Bright Garnishes

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Grilled Skirt Steak with Tomato Vinaigrette & Pickled Shallots


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Peach, Raspberry, & Blueberry Fools


Watermelon Corn Salad & Bright Garnishes When you want to eat extravagantly and barely lift a finger, this colorful mix delivers the juiciest of bold and bright flavors. SERVES 4

½ a small watermelon, seeded, rind cut off, cut into 1” cubes 2 ears fresh sweet corn, kernels cut off cob 1 teaspoon sumac powder ¼ teaspoon cayenne 5 basil leaves, cut into chiffonade ½ a lemon peel, cut into thin strips flake salt, to taste 1. Transfer cubed watermelon and any accumulated juices to a serving platter. 2. Add cut corn, leaving any rows or partial rows intact as you scatter it onto the watermelon. 3. Sprinkle sumac and cayenne, followed by the basil and lemon zest. 4. Season with flake salt. Serve immediately.

Grilled Skirt Steak with Tomato Vinaigrette & Pickled Shallots Ready in a jiff. Punchy pickled onions and tangy vinaigrette are the perfect pile-on for succulent steak. Made with peak-ripe tomatoes and grass-fed meat, the simplicity of this dish shines like the sun. SERVES 4 pickled shallots

3 to 5 shallots, sliced into very thin rings
 ¾ cup white vinegar
 1 bay leaf
 pinch of black peppercorns
 vinaigret te

2 cups sungold tomatoes, about half the quantity cut into halves olive oil, for searing 1 to 2 teaspoons white wine vinegar kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

ste ak

1½ lbs grass-fed skirt steak salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste good olive oil, for grilling 1. Arrange shallot slices in a small jar. 2. Add a pinch of peppercorns and a bay leaf, and pour in enough white vinegar to submerge. 3. Set aside to marinade for at least 30 minutes.
 4. Heat a sauté pan over medium heat and once hot, add a glug of olive oil. 

Peach, Raspberry, & Blueberry Fools

5. Add the tomatoes, cooking until some begin to release their juices. Add vinegar and let them bubble, stirring occasionally, for 5–8 minutes.

This dessert-with-a-funny-name won’t feel foolish as, no doubt, it’ll get eaten quicker than it is to make. Fruit cooked in aromatics, enrobed in cream’s velvet peaks, the fool makes a sweet balance between fresh and indulgent.

6. Using the back of a wooden spoon, press on some of the tomatoes to collapse them, remove from heat, and allow to come to room temperature. (This step can be done 3 days in advance.)



 7. Pat skirt steak dry with absorbent paper and discard. 8. Drizzle with olive oil and rub to coat, and season well with salt and pepper. 9. Allow steak to sit at room temperature for at least 20 minutes before grilling.
 10. Heat a grill on high until it is screaming hot, at least 5 minutes. 11. Grill steak 3 minutes on each side at the hottest point of the grill, so that it becomes charred in places. 12. Remove from heat and rest for at least 5 minutes. 13. Slice steak thinly, against the grain, and pile vinaigrette and pickled shallots on top. Eat at once.


 Note: You may have leftover pickled shallots. They will keep, submerged in the vinegar in a refrigerated airtight container, for up to 3 weeks. The liquid is excellent incorporated into salad dressings or marinades, and the shallots, on everything: cooked rice, eggs, salads, and seared veggies.



SERVES 4 fruit

1 cup fruit 1 teaspoon lemon juice pinch of cinnamon pinch of kosher salt 2 tablespoons sugar (just use 1 tablespoon for peach variation) cre am

1 cup grass-fed heavy cream 1 tablespoon caster (or superfine) sugar 1. Simmer your fruit of choice in a saucepan, along with the lemon juice, cinnamon, sugar, and salt for 5–8 minutes or until it begins to break down. The fruit should bubble but not spatter. If you choose all 3 fruits, cook each separately. 2. Once softened, use a fork to mash fruit mixture into a preserves-like consistency. 3. Set aside to cool completely. (This step can be done up to 3 days in advance.) 4. Whip the cream and caster sugar until the cream holds stiff peaks. 5. Fold each cooled cooked fruit into whipped cream, just until swirled, in separate glasses. Serve immediately.

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Who ’s a pretty

cocktail? Our summer cocktails are so pretty and tasty that they just can’t get enough of themselves. Talk about vain cocktails! Recipes+food+styling by Janine Kalesis Styling+photography by Paul Lowe

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Vamos a La Playa


Sandia de Tequila

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Cherry Chocolate Bourbon SERVES 1

Kiwi Berry Trifle

2 tablespoons fresh lime juice ½ cup mint tea 1 tablespoon hibiscus syrup 6 dashes chocolate bitters+more for topping ¼ cup bourbon ¼ cup black cherry soda+more for topping mint leaves for garnish 1. Stir lime juice, mint tea, hibiscus syrup, and chocolate bitters into a cocktail shaker. 2. Add ice and shake well. 3. Stir in ¼ cup black cherry soda.  4. Strain into a chilled glass and top with more black cherry soda and 2 dashes of bitters.  5. Garnish with hibiscus flower and lime.

Ginny Fiz SERVES 1

½ cup English cucumber slices+more for garnish 1 tablespoon vanilla infused turbinado sugar 3 large basil leaves 6 large mint leaves 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice  2 tablespoons club soda ¼ cup cucumber gin 1. In a cocktail shaker muddle cucumber, sugar, basil, mint, lemon juice, and a splash of soda.  2. Add ice and shake until incorporated.  3. Strain over fresh ice and top with club soda.  4. Garnish with cucumber slices.

Vamos a La Playa SERVES 4

1 cup fresh pineapple, diced & firmly packed ¼ cup pineapple juice 4 tablespoons unsweetened Thai coconut milk 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar, firmly packed 15 mint leaves 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice ½ cup spiced rum toasted coconut shavings for garnish 1. Add all of the ingredients to a blender with ice and mix until incorporated. 2. Garnish with toasted coconut shavings.

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Sandia de Tequila SERVES 4

6 cup watermelon, diced 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 cup silver tequila 1. Combine watermelon and tequila, place in the freezer for 2 hours. 2. Remove from the freezer and blend in a blender until smooth. 3. While the motor is running, add lime juice and continue blending another minute. 4. Garnish with a smile!

Blackberry Lemongrass Elixir

Kiwi Berry Trifle SERVES 1

1 cup strawberries, diced+slices for garnish 1 kiwi, diced+slices for garnish 3 teaspoons honey 3 teaspoons strawberry schnapps 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice, plus lemon peel for garnish ¼ cup light rum 1. Muddle 1 cup strawberries, 1 kiwi, honey, schnapps, and lemon juice. 2. Add rum and ice. Shake well. 3. Layer glass with crushed ice, strawberry slices, ice, kiwi slices, ice, strawberry, and ice again.  4. Pour strained muddled mixture into prepared glass.  5. Top with a lemon peel.

Blackberry Lemongrass Elixir SERVES 1

6 blackberries+more for garnish 3 stalks lemongrass, chopped+more for garnish ¼ teaspoon freshly grated ginger, packed+more for garnish 3 tablespoons light brown sugar, packed 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice ¼ cup vodka 1⁄3 cup seltzer 1. Muddle lemongrass, blackberries, sugar, and lemon juice. 2. Add vodka and ice, stir until well chilled. 3. Strain over fresh ice, add seltzer, and stir.  4. Garnish with blackberries and lemongrass stalks.

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Red inspiration Crafts+styling+photography by Dietlind Wolf

BEAUTIFUL HAND DRAWN PAPER AND CHAIR BY LESLIE OSCHMAN, SWARM.COM 128 SWEETPAULMAG.COM SUMMER 2016


Sweet Paul’s Dietlind Wolf came upon these amazing vintage sample books at a flea market a little while back. She was instantly inspired by the colors to create these craft projects for you all. Bright red in summer feels so fresh and new!


Shibori Paper SUPPLIES:

thin Japanese paper liquid acrylic paints 1. Fold the paper in a creative way. 2. Mix paint and water in a bowl. 3. Dip all the edges of the paper in the paint. 4. Unfold and lay to dry.

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Fruit Salad Mix your favorite fruits and berries, add some coconut and sugar. Finish off with some cold coconut milk.

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Marbled Paper SUPPLIES:

basin, as large as your paper paper oil colors solvent stick 1. Add water to the basin. 2. Add a few drops of color, mix whatever you want. 3. Add a little solvent. Use a stick to blend. 4. Place the paper on top of the water and pull it gently off. 5. Hang to dry.

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Wax Dietlind found all these vintage wax stamps at flea markets. Use them to seal letters and gifts.

Chinese Color Wax You can find these at Chinese cultural stores. They also have stamps or you can find them at flea markets. Use them to sign letters and artwork.

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Printed Napkins SUPPLIES:

cotton or linen napkins number stencil fabric paint brush 1. Place the stencil on top of the fabric. 2. Brush on the paint and pull the stencil off. 3. Follow the instructions on the paint to make it wash proof.

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Strawberry Chips 1. Slice strawberries and place them on a parchment-covered baking sheet. 2. Bake them at 110ºF for about 8–10 hours. 3. Turn them over after 4–5 hours. Store in a paper bag.

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Textile Printing It’s not as hard as it looks! It’s all about having fun with it. Use everyday objects like tape, glasses, cookie cutters or ready-made stencils. Use fabric paint and follow the instructions on the bottle for care.

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From Live’s farm

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Marzipan Cake

Food+styling by Marianne Gjengedal | Photography by Aina C Hole

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Mini Bundt Cakes with Lemon & Poppy Seeds cake

2¾ cups all purpose flour 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 3 tablespoons poppy seeds pinch of salt 1¼ cups plain Greek yogurt 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest 2 large eggs 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 stick butter, melted frosting

1 egg white 1 tablespoon lemon juice confectioners’ sugar 1. Heat oven to 380ºF. 2. Mix all dry ingredients in a bowl, add yogurt, lemon zest, and eggs, and mix well. 3. Add the melted butter and stir until smooth.

Deep in a forest

in the middle of Norway lives Live, Tollef, and their daughter Kari. They have an old farm from the 1800s and live off what nature brings them. Live is, amongst other things, a vivid flower farmer—edible organic flowers that she turns into cakes, treats, and candies. Live, who is from Oslo, and used to live in New York and Paris, met a Norwegian farmer’s boy in Central Park, of all places, and it was love at first sight. After some time of dating she went back to Norway and visited him at the farm, and the rest… is history. Now they all live at the farm, work the woods, and farm flowers.

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4. Pour batter into well-greased mini bundt pans, you can also make it in 1 large bundt pan. 5. Bake for about 25 minutes or firm to the touch. 6. Cool on a wire rack for 5 minutes before removing them from the pans. 7. In a small bowl, mix egg whites and lemon juice and add a little confectioners’ sugar at a time. 8. Once the mixture is thick and creamy, pour some over the cakes.


Mini Bundt Cakes with Lemon & Poppy Seeds

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Lavender Ice Cream with Honey

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Scones with Lilac

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Lavender Ice Cream with Honey

6. Cut into triangles.

SERVES 4

7. Place on a parchment-covered baking tray. Sprinkle with some extra sugar.

½ vanilla pod 2 cups whole milk 1 cup heavy cream 6 to 8 fresh organic lavender stalks 4 tablespoons honey 5 large egg yolks ½ cup sugar

8. Bake until golden, about 12–14 minutes. 9. Cool on a wire rack. Serve with a light drizzle of a frosting made of confectioners’ sugar and water.

1. Use a sharp knife and split the vanilla bean. Scrape out the seeds.

Raspberry Cheesecake

2. Place in a pot with milk, cream, lavender, and honey. Stir until warm but not boiling.

4 oz graham crackers ½ stick butter 1 cup frozen raspberries 1 tablespoon gelatin 14 oz natural cream cheese 1¼ cups heavy cream seeds from 1 vanilla bean 1 ⁄3 cup sugar 2 cups fresh raspberries edible untreated flowers

3. Let the mixture sit for 10 minutes. 4. Whisk eggs and sugar until light and creamy. 5. Heat up the milk mixture and remove the lavender. 6. Pour the warm milk into the eggs while whisking and pour it back into the pot. 7. Heat it up, stirring until it thickens (do not let it boil). 8. Cool and pour into an ice cream maker.

SERVES 10–12

1. Place all the crackers in a plastic bag and beat them with something heavy to crush them all.

11⁄3 cups unbleached all purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 5 large eggs, just the yolks 1 ⁄3 cup whole milk strawberry jam 3 cups heavy cream confectioners’ sugar seeds from ½ vanilla bean 18 oz white marzipan edible untreated flowers 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F, with a rack in the middle position. 2. Line an 8” baking pan with parchment paper. 3. Beat the butter and sugar in a large bowl with an electric mixer until light and creamy. This will take about 3 minutes. 4. Add the flour and baking powder and mix on low speed. 5. Mix in the egg yolks and milk. 6. Scrape the batter into the baking pan. 7. Bake for 30–35 minutes, until golden brown.

9. Churn and freeze.

2. Melt the butter and mix it in a bowl with the crackers.

Serve with some edible flowers, pistachio, and extra honey on top.

3. Press the mixture into a 9” cake pan and let set for 30 minutes in the fridge.

9. Transfer to a cutting board.

Scones with Lilac

4. Place the frozen berries in a saucepan and heat them up over low heat until they are soft.

11. Plate 1 piece of cake on a serving tray and cover with a layer of jam and 1 of cream, continue with all layers.

5. Pour over a sifter so you only have the juice left.

12. Cover the entire cake with a thin layer of cream.

6. Sprinkle the gelatin powder over the juice, stir until dissolved, and let sit for 5 minutes.

13. Use some confectioners’ sugar to roll out the marzipan until really thin.

7. Beat cream cheese, cream, vanilla, and sugar until thick and creamy and add a little of the raspberry juice at a time.

15. Cut off the edges and decorate.

MAKES 8 LARGE SCONES

2½ cups all purpose flour 1 ⁄3 cup sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1¾ sticks butter, cold, cubed 1 cup milk 1 cup lilac flowers (only the flower itself, remove the green part) confectioners’ sugar 1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. 2. In a large bowl mix flour, sugar, baking powder and soda, and salt. 3. Add the butter and work it in with your hands. 4. Add milk and lilacs and work the dough fast together. Careful not to over work it. 5. Use a rolling pin and roll it to a 1” dough.

8. Pour the mixture over the cracker crust.

8. Cool on a wire rack in the pan. 10. Cut in 3 slices lengthwise.

14. Cover the cake with the marzipan. 16. Let the cake sit 30 minutes before serving.

9. Top with fresh raspberries and flowers, by pressing them gently into the cream. 10. Cool for 3 hours before serving.

Marzipan Cake SERVES 12

1 0½ tablespoons butter, softened ²⁄3 cups granulated sugar

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An American in

Havana Experiencing a cross-cultural old-world mashup in modern civilization’s lost city Text+photography by Michael Marquand


OPPOSITE PAGE: CRATE OF GREEN ORANGES FOR SALE; GIRL HOLDING A FRESH COCONUT DRINK WITH RUM; OLD WOMAN ON THE STREETS OF HAVANA; COLORFUL GRAFFITI IN OLD HAVANA; OLD AMERICAN IN THE CENTRAL DISTRICT; STREET PERFORMER BUSKING; FRESH MOJITO THIS PAGE: CUBANS HANGING OUT IN FRONT OF COLORFUL BUILDINGS IN OLD HAVANA IN THE EARLY EVENING

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Even if you’ve never been, Havana conjures up colorful imagery of Latin culture and 1950s Americana. And it turns out that vision is fairly accurate, but only a fraction of the experience. ON THE MORNING of the first day, I went for a walk outside in search of bottled water. My sister and I had arrived late the night before and we hadn’t ventured out to see anything that night other than the inside of our hotel bar where we drank too much rum and told embarrassing family stories. After walking a few blocks and making my way back to the hotel room, I handed my sister a water bottle and said: “It is like… CUBA, out there”. “What do you mean?” “It’s weirdly colorful and vibrant and musical and Caribbean and I only walked three blocks.” The Quintessential Havana street is just about every street. The sheer amount of people socializing on every stoop and alleyway gives the whole city the feel of a never ending summer block party. Turn one corner and there are people playing music, turn another and a cyclist is selling fruit out of his rickshaw. A brisk 10-minute walk will yield kids competing in a soccer game, old men playing dominos, well-fed street dogs napping on the sidewalk, uniformed school children talking, and women hanging clothes to dry on their balconies. The city itself is a charming and bizarre mix of cultures. The architecture is Spanish Colonial with mid-century American influences, adorned with neon signs that were clearly added pre-embargo, sporting names like El Floridita Bar or Teatro America. If you explore you’ll find more hidden pockets, like the Russian-style ballet school, or the Chinatown district tucked between the old European Catholic churches and hyper-saturated homes. Not to mention beautifully ornate 1930s hotels built for wealthy gamblers of the era. The cars are mid-century American as well as Soviet era Russian. Equally vivid, they somehow fit with the landscape when you see them driving down narrow cobblestone streets or

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along the Malecón on a windy day, with the waves crashing onto the roadway. The food is a curious blend of cultures as well as a testament to both the effects of the embargo and the ingenuity of the restaurateurs. Restaurants were previously heavily regulated and taxed, stifling any creative menus or experimentation. However, in modern Cuba, chefs and restaurant owners are getting their feet wet in the food world, creating unique menus with the limited resources that the island provides. While much of the food may be notoriously bland don’t let that deter you—you can easily find rice and beans or the reliable Cuban jamon sandwich, you can also find decent Italian food, American style pizza and burgers, and Spanish food throughout the city. Yet there are more interesting hidden gems if you search for them. At one point we discovered a Chinese restaurant down a dark alley by our hotel. No sign, just a crumbling building with an old man standing outside, gesturing at a shadowy doorway and calling: “Chinese food?” For some reason we took that gamble, despite having to walk a literal wooden plank over a muddy ditch and a broken sidewalk to get in. Through the door and up a creaky unlit staircase, the interior was shockingly nice but in a slightly absurd way. The space was draped in richly ornate Chinese fabrics and traditional artwork with the detailed molding of the corroded Spanish-style architecture covered in multicolored peeling paint poking out behind them. Naturally they also served Italian food and sandwiches. Other favorites included a modern Swedish-Cuban fusion restaurant, and an American-style joint featuring a tinsel Christmas tree and a disco ball. Some consumables in Cuba however, are consistently high quality. The fruit is fresh and delicious and there are fruit stands everywhere. It’s hard not to stop and pick up a couple of perfectly ripe oranges or a freshly cracked coconut. The coffee is excellent and much of Havana seems to have its own coffee

OPPOSITE PAGE: STREETS OF CENTRAL HAVANA; WAVES CRASHING INTO THE MALECÓN ON A STORMY DAY THIS PAGE: PEDICAB RIDING THROUGH HAVANA; CUBAN KIDS PLAYING STREET GAMES; WHITE DOVE AND A PIGEON IN AN ANTIQUE CAGE ON THE STREET

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“It is like… CUBA, out there. It’s weirdly colorful and vibrant and musical and Caribbean."

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OPPOSITE PAGE: OLD AMERICAN CARS DRIVING THROUGH THE CENTRAL DISTRICT IN THE EVENING THIS PAGE: OLD AMERICAN CAR DRIVING DOWN THE MALECÓN; PLAZA DE ARMAS IN THE HISTORICAL DISTRICT; TOBACCO CROPS IN VIÑALES VALLEY; DOMESTICATED PIG IN VIÑALES

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OPPOSITE PAGE: TOBACCO CROPS AND MOUNTAINS OF VIÑALES; SANTA MARIA BEACH IN HAVANA; VINALES VALLEY THIS PAGE: HAVANA BOY HOLDING A PIGEON

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culture happening. Go to any restaurant in the Historic district and you can get a great cappuccino. Depending on where you go you can find much more complex java drinks as well as some coffee-based cocktails. The rum is made from locally grown sugar cane. You can get a cheap, well-made mojito (the Cuba’s most popular drink) with fresh mint and lime at just about any bar or restaurant in the city. And of course the cigars are famously good and very available. The people of Havana are possibly the most interesting thing about the city. Before coming, I envisioned Cubans to have a bit of that 1940s classic Havana

THIS PAGE: BANANA PINEAPPLE SMOOTHIE WITH CREAM, ICED COFFEE COCKTAIL; COLON CEMETERY IN VEDADO, HAVANA; SANTA MARIA BEACH OPPOSITE PAGE: PALACIO DE LA ARTESANIA COURTYARD; CITY OF HAVANA AT SUNRISE

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style. Women in red lipstick with long dresses and flowers in their hair and men in tailored suits, hats, and leather dress shoes. I’m sure I projected this idea onto the culture in part, because everything else about the country feels like another era and partially because I, as American from the Northeast had experienced so little of Cuba’s culture outside of I Love Lucy reruns. On this point I couldn’t have been more wrong. Everyone looked impossibly cool and casual. Much closer to what you would expect from 100 degree island culture then from Rici Ricardo’s nightclub. My sister had been genuinely concerned about looking too exposed in a knee length skirt and a tank top on arrival. Fears that were quickly assuaged upon seeing the airport security women wearing fishnet tights underneath their short brown uniform shorts. The young people were stylish and trendy. Their clothing complemented by well placed tattoos and occasionally a facial piercing thrown in. Many of them looking like super stylish hipsters that could just as easily be walking around Brooklyn, L.A. or San Francisco. The classic Americana themes that permeate the city are equally apparent in the population. The people we met were incredibly friendly and seemed to have an almost comical admiration for the United States. It’s not uncommon to see someone with American flag leggings or a T-shirt that says New York City. When asked where I was from and answering


“New York,” or “United States,” I would get a big smile in return and people would run up to shake my hand. One guy lifted up his shirt to show me his statue of Liberty tattoo. Another man I photographed playing dominos in the street just grinned and said: “Take my picture and put it on Facebook in USA!” This was the most impressing thing about my experience in Cuba. There was a strong and genuine need to connect with other people and with the world. Walking around anytime in the day you’d see people in public spaces, socializing and playing games. This happens in every populated city, but in Havana it was much more pronounced. The internet had come to Cuba in a big way about six months before my arrival. It wasn’t common enough for people to have it at home, but it was available in public parks and hotspots throughout the city. Most nights I’d pass one or two of these places and see crowds of people sitting almost shoulder to shoulder on their phones or other devices connecting to the web. Like everything else they were doing it in a very different way than I’m used to. It wasn’t passive. It was a social activity and they were excited about it. The people of Havana have a real thirst for knowledge and progress and participation in the world. In some ways this dynamic made me fear for the culture of Cuba being tainted by the modern world. However, when I contemplate the history of the city it’s hard not to come to the conclusion that it can take on many influences and only becomes more interesting. On my last night in Havana I walked down the Malecón as the sun was setting. Every few minutes passing by a young couple staring at the Atlantic, or a group of friends talking, or an old man playing the trumpet. Walking back towards my hotel a middle aged man approached and asked me the standard friendly, curious questions that foreigners get asked about how long I’m here and where I’m from. After telling him he replied: “Ahh, United States. Our countries are fighting but our people are friends”.

There was a strong and genuine need to connect with other people and with the world.

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sweet

How adorable are these hats made especially for Sweet Paul readers by Deidre Lozier of Mountain Honey Clothier

Photography by Leah Michaelson+Paul Lowe | Hats by Mountain Honey Clothier


DEIDRE IS inspired by the simplicity and whimsy of an old-fashioned childhood. Seeking to design clothing, accessories, and toys that capture the sweetness of being young and inspire imagination, she is known for her signature bonnets, vintage clothing, and no-batteries-required toys. Most notably, she is known for putting animal-inspired ears on the majority of her creations, bringing out the wild little creature in the youth that enjoy her wearable works of art.

WANT TO MAKE THESE SUPER CUTE HATS DEIDRE MADE ESPECIALLY FOR SWEET PAUL MAGAZINE? GO TO SWEETPAULMAG.COM TO DOWNLOAD TEMPLATES AND HOW-TO.YOU CAN SEE MORE OF DEIDRE’S WORK AT BUBBLES81.MYSHOPIFY.COM.

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cheers

Summer in a glass My favorite warm-weather cocktail pairs spirits with citrus. Best served in a large icy pitcher for several thirsty friends Food+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

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Citrus Zing MAKES 2 LARGE GLASSES

6 oz tequila 2 oz vodka 1 oz Triple Sec 12 oz freshly squeezed orange juice 2 oz freshly squeezed blood orange juice 2 oz lime juice ice lime and orange slices 1. Place all the ingredients in a shaker, shake well, and pour into glasses with fresh ice. 2. Garnish with lime and orange slices. Cheers!

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pantry confessions

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAY KACHATORIAN

We asked one of our favorite Food Network stars Giada De Laurentiis about her favorite things… in and out of the kitchen

Where do you live?

Favorite song?

Ultimate vacation destination?

Los Angeles, California.

At the moment, Adventures of a Lifetime by Coldplay.

What inspires you?

Favorite flower?

Where to begin! So many things inspire me these days, but especially my daughter Jade. There is something about the curiosity and excitement of a child that lights a spark in everyone around them.

I love white orchids. They are long, lean, and sexy. Potted, they last much longer than cut flowers and require little maintenance.

The Amalfi coast in Italy. Something about the water and the cliffs… not to mention the food and the people. It is an indulgent breath of fresh air.

Favorite color?

White. It’s clean, modern, and an ything goes with it. Necessary luxury?

Manicures. With all the cooking I do and all the close ups of my hands that go along with that, maintenance is key. But I also love how fun it is switching styles whenever I want. Guilty pleasure?

Really good dark chocolate or even more indulgent… gelato! 164 SWEETPAULMAG.COM SUMMER 2016

Last purchase?

A house! Perfume/cologne?

Fracas by Robert Piguet. My grandma used to wear it and I absolutely love it. It’s a combination of jasmine and gardenia. Favorite restaurant?

Depends on the city. In Las Vegas, of course it is my restaurant, Giada. In LA I like Gjusta and Capo and in NYC , Milos is my go to. Cookbook you can’t live without?

My Nonna Luna’s recipe handbook.

Film idol?

My grandmother Silvana Mangano. She was stunning and captivating in so many ways. Perfect meal?

My lemon spaghetti with a simple arugula and Parmesan salad. Shared with my daughter, of course!

Sweet Paul Issue #25 Summer 2016  
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