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FA L L 20 1 6

FALL FEAST

The Simple Egg

LEGUMES

Friends+Forest

OSLO: A FOOD MECCA


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April 8-9 2017

A Two-Day Creative Retreat in

Brooklyn 2 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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CONTENTS Fall 2016

5

What’s up Sweet Paul?

12

My happy dish

14

Handmade

18

To market, to market

24

Keep your eye on

30

Bookmarked

32

In good company

36

Healthy appetite

42

Friends are for...

50

This & that

56

Mormor's kitchen

58

Put a lid on it!

62

Woof

64

A shining example

68

Sweet Paul in Nantucket

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL LOWE

features 70

Spartan

80

Legumes

90

Leather

98

The humble egg

108

Warming spices

118

When Paul met Tiffani

128

An apple a day

134

Autumn in Australia

144

Fall picnic

152

Forest & friends

156

Oslo(ve)

164

Cheers

166

Pantry confessions

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SWEETPAULMAG.COM 3


Paul Lowe Founder & editor-in-chief paul@sweetpaulmag.com Paul Vitale Marketing & business development director paulvitale@sweetpaulmag.com

Andrew Fox Web editor webeditor@sweetpaulmag.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Leslie Shewring

Alexandra Grablewski

Linda Pugliese

Bill Hovard

Lova Blåvarg

Advertising Inquiries advertising@sweetpaulmag.com

Brady Smith

Michaela Hayes

china squirrel

Pernille Loof

Christopher Sturman

Reetta Pasanen

Dietlind Wolf

Sanna Kekalainen

Dorie Herman

Studio Dreyer Hensley

Erin O’Sullivan

Susanna Blåvarg

Frances Janisch

Sven Alberding

Goor Studio

Tiffani Thiessen

Holly Becker

Tudor Caradoc-Davies

Holly Marder

Warren Heath

General Inquiries info@sweetpaulmag.com

Joline Rivera Creative director joline@sweetpaulmag.com Nellie Williams Graphic designer nellie@sweetpaulmag.com Laura Kathleen Maize Copy editor laura@sweetpaulmag.com

Jeanne Lurvey Follow us on Instagram

Kim Moreau Jacobs

instagram.com/sweetpaulmagazine instagram.com/jolinerivera

Larisa Makow

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WHAT'S UP SWEET PAUL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY QUYN DUONG

I don't know about you guys, but I’m so happy to welcome fall. New York is crazy warm in the summer. I can never get used to the heat, so colder days are most welcome to me. One of my favorite things to do in fall is to visit all my friends with farms. There is something so special about farms in the fall. The root vegetables are at their best, same with cabbage and kale. And don't forget the fruit! There’s nothing like picking an apple from the tree and eating it right there and then. The apples have taken all summer to get sweet and tender and now it’s time for picking. When I was a kid, my school had a vegetable garden that we all took turns caring for. I can still remember how proud I was when coming home with a big basket full of fall bounty. My mormor was really impressed and turned everything I brought home into amazing soups and stews. A trip to your local farmers’ market would put you in the same mindset— you’ll find booths filled with all kinds of vegetables and fruits. I always find it so inspiring to go to a market. So, my dear friends, have a truly wonderful fall and don't forget to pick an apple! XO,

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SWEET PAUL'S FALL PICKS The perfect runner for my fall table, Ditsy Pods by Marta Berk, from $48

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA SIPE

SWEET PAUL STOCKIST SPOTLIGHT

Clementine Middlebury, VT What makes Clementine a sweet spot to visit? Clementine blends my love for color, pattern, and beautifully crafted items. I source primarily from handcrafted designers and you can feel their imagination as you wander through the store. I love creating a space that is filled with gorgeous items that are also useful! Our displays are ever-changing and customers often say it feels like a treasure hunt: you’ll find letterpress stationery, leather journals, sweet baby swaddles, and vintage furniture arranged with hand thrown ceramics, bold patterned pillows, and luscious bath products. 8 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

How would readers spend the day after a visit to Clementine? Clementine is located in the heart of Middlebury, Vermont, which is a pretty picturesque spot. Middlebury College is close and they run an organic garden which is lovely for a sunset picnic. There are farms in every direction where you can often pick your own produce: berries to apples to pumpkins. Downtown hosts the Otter Creek river and waterfall to wander along and grab coffee, and check out several galleries and museums. Where does Sweet Paul find a home in your shop and who takes it home? With the gorgeous styled covers, I’m always thrilled to put Sweet Paul at my entrance display, inviting customers in! I also place a few batches in my stationery and kitchen section—it’s the perfect gift to pair with a tea towel or practical kitchen item. I have a loyal following of Sweet Paul readers who are in here the day the magazine arrives! What is your favorite Sweet Paul recipe or craft project? Last summer I dyed a huge quilt after being inspired by Paul’s ribbon dying tutorial. It was a huge project but the results were fantastic!

I'm so using this invitation for my Thanksgiving party, Floral Friendsgiving by Morgan Ramberg, free

Love me some striped placemats, Bold Watercolor Stripes by Catherine Hubert, 2 for $24

Stunning printed menu, Rustic Wreath by Hooray Creative, 25 for $60

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G I V E U S YO U R WA L L A N D W E ’ L L M A K E I T B E AU T I F U L .

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MY HAPPY DISH This dish makes me happy because...

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Fall beauty Photography+styling+recipe by Paul Lowe I love serving poached pears. Not only are they stunningly pretty but the taste is pretty stunning too. Don't throw away the liquid, use it in fruit salads or as a simple syrup in cocktails.

Chai & Whiskey Poached Pears SERVES 4

4 firm pears (I love using Bartlett) 5 bags chai tea 1 â „3 cup whiskey 1 cup sugar water 1. Peel the pears and place them in a large pot. 2. Add tea, whiskey, and sugar. 3. Add enough water to just cover the pears. 4. Bring to boil and let the pears simmer for 5 minutes. 5. Remove from heat and let the pears sit in the pot for at least 12 hours in the fridge. Serve with whipped cream and some of the liquid.

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Handmade Inspiring DIY projects from Lova

Black autumn Give foraged foliage a dark stencil Text+crafts by Lova Blåvarg Photography by Susanna Blåvarg

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IN THE FALL I love to take long walks along the Charles River in Boston, and collect leaves, acorns, and beautiful twigs. I used some leaves and black paint to create a dark fall collage for my wall

HOW-TO SUPPLIES:

rough paper in neutral colors black acrylic paint brush leaves washi tape raven print-out, from sweetpaulmag.com

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1. Place a leaf on a piece of rough paper and paint with black acrylic paint. 2. Wait until the paint has dried, then turn the leaf over and place on another piece of paper to paint the other side. 3. Paint your own or print out my watercolor ravens from sweetpaulmag.com. 4. Cut out ravens using scissors and leave a thin white border around the birds. 5. Make a collage of leaf silhouettes, painted leaves, and ravens on a wall using washi tape.Â

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© 2015 GLORIA FERRER CAVES & VINEYARDS, SONOMA, CA

Be glorious 16 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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Henry Street Studio handmade ceramics platters bowls plates pitchers mugs bottles spoons salt cellars & more

www.henrystreetstudio.com photo by Julia Gartland

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TO MARKET, TO MARKET Fresh food & finds

Batch

IMAGE FROM BATCH: OVER 200 RECIPES AND TECHNIQUES FOR A WELL-PRESERVED KITCHEN. COPYRIGHT © 2016 JOEL MACCHARLES AND DANA HARRISON. PUBLISHED BY APPETITE BY RANDOM HOUSE, A DIVISION OF RANDOM HOUSE OF CANADA LIMITED, A PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE COMPANY. REPRODUCED BY ARRANGEMENT WITH THE PUBLISHER. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Now is the best time to put all of summer and fall’s bounty in jars and bottles. I love the new book Batch by Joel MacCharles and Dana Harrison. It’s filled with new and exciting ideas on how to preserve all your vegetables and fruits. Let’s face it, nothing is better than opening up a jar of sunshine in the middle of winter!

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Wellness in a box I love the natural products from Field Apothecary. I take their flaming cider every morning, no flu here! Now you can sign up for their quarterly wellness box, which includes all natural products such as mouthwash, tinctures, bitters, and balms. fieldapothecary.com

Get ‘em while they’re hot POMEGRANATE

IN BLOOM

Allium Fall is allium time, and these bulb flowers from the onion, garlic, and scallion family look so good on my table. They come in a bunch of varieties and colors. I used to have them in my garden (when I had one) and always loved the way they smelled.

Little red gems that can be used in salads, cocktails, or simply juiced. Makes the most amazing red juice.

PASSION FRUIT

A wonderful, fragrant, tropical fruit. The flesh is amazing in desserts, dressings, or eaten with a spoon.

ON TREND BABY KALE

Kale is best in fall and baby kale is simply tiny kale plants. I roast mine in the oven with oil, salt, and pepper.

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MANGOSTEEN

This time of year they are extra juicy. Peel off the hard shell to expose the white flesh. Great in fruit salads.

Red cabbage Fall is the best time for any kind of cabbage, so sweet and tender. Use cabbage raw in salads or roast with some apple vinegar, oil, salt, pepper, and chili— it’s like a simple way to make sauerkraut. Perfect with that fall pork roast.

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TO MARKET, TO MARKET

THE INGREDIENT

Escarole This hearty green thrives in the late growing season. It’s a variety of endive with a less bitter taste and larger leaves. The lighter the leaves, the less bitter. Rich in fiber, folic acids, and vitamins A and K. Perfect in soups, stews, or my pasta.

Sausage, Escarole, & Bread Pasta SERVES 4

3 sweet Italian sausages, removed from casings 2 slices brioche or white bread, diced 1 small head escarole, sliced pinch of red chili flakes salt and white pepper, to taste 2 tablespoons pine nuts 1 pound orecchiette (or another kind of pasta) olive oil 1. Cook the sausage in a pan until golden, and add bread. 2. Add pine nuts and escarole and cook until the escarole wilts. 3. Season with chili, salt, and pepper. 4. Cook the pasta al dente in salted water, drain, and place in a large bowl.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL LOWE

5. Add the escarole mix, a little olive oil, and toss gently.

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TO MARKET, TO MARKET

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HOME . BABY . STATIONERY

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Download all back issues as PDF files! gumroad.com/sweetpaul FOLLOW US @SWEETPAULMAGAZINE

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Keep your eye on Albertus Swanepoel

24 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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Modern day milliner Text+photography by Frances Janisch AN OBSESSION with crafting and Duchesse satin has led Albertus Swanepoel to become one of the most revered names in the art of millinery. Swanepoel (pronounced Swan-a-pool) has been featured in every major fashion magazine, most noticeably Vogue, GQ, and Harper’s Bazaar. He has collaborated with top retail brands as well as participated in runway shows for the cream of the fashion crop—from Carolina Herrera and Proenza Schouler, to Tommy Hilfiger, Narciso Rodriguez, and Alexander Wang. Albertus, who runs his studio in Manhattan’s Fashion District, answers some questions for us.

You’ve collaborated with some of the biggest brands in the retail business—Target, J.Crew, Club Monaco, and Gap, to mention a few. How difficult is it to handle the business side of what you do? Collaborations with huge companies are a great way for me to get my name out there. I am lucky in that all I have to do is design and make prototypes, and they handle the production and logistics of the collection. The business side of my small endeavor is another matter—it’s hard and a constant struggle—cash flow being the biggest problem as I am self-funded and in a niche market. I have yet to solve this.

You started out as a menswear designer and had your own label, Quartus Manna—how did you transition into millinery? To be honest, I fell into millinery as a survival tactic because my clothing design career did not work out. I never imagined I would be doing this.

You were briefly the style editor for Martha Stewart Weddings. How different was it for you to work in that medium compared to designing clothes or hats? I am a very visual person, so it was quite easy and enjoyable to transfer those skills to print. I started off studying graphic

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KEEP YOUR EYE ON

soon as that came out, Barneys, Henri Bendel, and Bergdorf Goodman all approached me to see my work. Who and what inspires you? South Africa, where I grew up, certainly inspires me. And of course the street fashion of New York, as well as the energy of the city. I am also a big opera lover and the spectacle of music, sets, costumes, and the larger-than-life drama I find truly inspirational. If you could make a hat for anyone in

design, and I feel the principles are adaptable to any medium. I see design as a way of life, whether it’s buying a kettle or making a hat. Some people are fortunate enough to have a person in their life that puts the wind in their sails. Would you say Anna Wintour is that person for you? I began my relationship with Anna Wintour in 2008 when I was named the first runner up in the Vogue/CFDA Fashion Fund Awards. Ms Wintour has been an incredible support to me since then— more than anyone else in the industry. She also initiated my collaboration with Target. I am truly blessed to have that respect from her, and I’m forever grateful. Your hats are available in many of the top retail stores, such as Barneys, Bergdorf Goodman, and various other elite boutiques in New York City. How did you get your foot in those doors? It is really difficult to get into a major department store. Buyers look at hundreds of lookbooks per season of designers who are trying to get in their stores. When I started my millinery career many years ago I was lucky in that Style.com did a huge article on me. As

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the world, who would that person be? To choose one person would be difficult! The top three on my list would be Cecil Beaton, Queen Elizabeth, and the Marchesa Luisa Casati. What is your favorite fabric to work with and where do you source your materials? I love Duchesse silk satin, felt, and grosgrain ribbons. The infrastructure for my craft is diminishing, so it’s increasingly difficult to find materials. Most of my felts come from the Czech Republic; the different straws I get from Ecuador, Switzerland, and Japan. Now there are only one or two importers, so all the milliners get their materials from the same sources. The challenge is to make it one’s own. What is the best part about your job? Making the hats, packing them in boxes, and sending them out to the customer. As long as I am creating, I am happy. I am very much a craft person, whether I am making a hat or a Christmas card for someone. You sound like Sweet Paul! Thank you for chatting with us, Albertus. For more information about Albertus and his millinery, please visit albertusswanepoel.com. You can also find him on Instagram @albertus_swanepoel.

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A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

AN AUTUMN CRUMBLE

When my friends at Fiesta Dinnerware asked me to create a fall recipe, I just knew I needed to do a crumble! This recipe is based on the marzipan tarts that my mormor would make for me in Norway when I was a boy. The healthy dose of amaretto brings this dessert to a dreamy level! Recipe+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

Berry Marzipan Crumble SERVES 4

2 cups mixed berries 4 apricots, cut into wedges 3 plums, cut into wedges ½ cup amaretto 1 ⁄3 cup all purpose flour 3 tablespoons butter 4 tablespoons brown sugar ½ cup crumbled marzipan fresh rosemary 1. Place the berries, apricots, and plums in a bowl and add the amaretto. 2. Let the berries and fruit marinate for at least 30 minutes. 3. In a bowl, mix flour, butter, and sugar to a crumbly mixture. 4. Place berries, fruits, and the juice in ovenproof bowls and top with the sugar mix, crumbled marzipan, and a little fresh rosemary. 5. Bake at 375°F for about 10 minutes, then turn on the broiler so that you toast the marzipan. Watch carefully to ensure that the marzipan gets toasted, but doesn’t burn. 6. Serve as is or with some lightly sweetened whipped cream. TIP: I love to make individual servings in bowls, but you could make this in a single casserole as well.

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Sweet Paul Eat & Make “Sweet Paul has been inspiring my family and I for years with his stylish take on crafts and food. Paul’s Nordic roots and New York taste shine in the delicious and distinctive dishes he has created in Sweet Paul Eat Make.”­—Tyler Florence

Available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and IndieBound 28 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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Now available at many Barnes & Noble bookstores!

Don't see your city here? Ask your local store to start carrying us!

luscious berries cool cocktails indigo bbq flowers + ice

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New York City

Northern Virginia

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Honolulu

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Chicago

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Bookmarked Books we're loving this fall

FRENCH DESSERTS By Hillary Davis $30 DREAM DECOR: STYLING A COOL, CREATIVE AND COMFORTABLE HOME, WHEREVER YOU LIVE By Will Taylor $35 EVERYTHING I WANT TO EAT: SQIRL AND THE NEW CALIFORNIA COOKING By Jessica Koslow $40 SIROCCO: FABULOUS FABULOUS FROM THE MIDDLE EAST By Sabrina Ghayour $30 SAMARKAND: RECIPES & STORIES FROM CENTRAL ASIA & THE CAUCASUS By Caroline Eden & Eleanor Ford $35 THE DIM SUM FIELD GUIDE: A TAXONOMY OF DUMPLINGS, BUNS, MEATS, SWEETS, AND OTHER SPECIALTIES OF THE CHINESE TEAHOUSE By Carolyn Phillips $15

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A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

PRESERVING SUMMER’S HARVEST This is the easiest way to save herbs from your garden so you can use them all winter long! I love to use this technique with herbs like rosemary, thyme, basil, sage, and oregano. It’s so easy to just pop a herb cube into a pan and cook with all the flavors of summer!

Crafts+styling+photography by Paul Lowe SUPPLIES:

herbs from your garden olive oil, no need for the fancy stuff ice cube trays plastic freezer bags 1. Wash your herbs well and pat them dry. 2. Take the leaves from the stems and roughly chop. 3. Fill each compartment of the ice cube tray with herbs. 4. Fill each compartment with olive oil. 5. Freeze several hours until completely solid. 6. Empty the cubes into freezer bags, label the bags, and store them in the freezer. 7. Repeat until you have all your herbs frozen. TIP: This is a great way to freeze and store pesto as well!

grow gardens. not landfills. Ecoscraps®, a brand that recycles food scraps into organic and sustainable lawn and garden products.

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In good company

Grace Bonney's shout-out to her village of creative women Text by Kim Moreau Jacobs

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRISTOPHER STURMAN

GRACE BONNEY

THE SECOND BOOK from Design*Sponge, In the Company of Women: Inspiration and Advice from over 100 Makers, Artists, and Entrepreneurs, isn’t what you’d expect—and it’s not exactly what Grace Bonney’s publishers were initially thinking either. After Design*Sponge at Home, the site founder set out to create a massive craft encyclopedia for her second tome. But as time passed, the crafts didn’t come. Bonney, who began her beloved site in 2004, increasingly felt like a book wasn’t the right place to organize myriad projects that were so readily available online. At the breaking point and ready to return her advance, something else did

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seem to fit. Instead of writing a book about crafts, she’d write about the women behind the craft business (and many other businesses). The goal: to pull back the curtain behind their successes so other women could feel confident enough to create their own. “Two months before my DIY book was due, I wrote an email to my editor and I said ‘I haven’t written the book. This is the book I’d rather write. What do you think?’” Bonney said. “To my total delight, she said ‘I love it. I think this is great. I think this is something people need—but you still have the same deadline, so if you can write the book in two months you can do it.’” Challenge accepted. For two months,

Bonney and co. trekked across the country to chat in the personal workspaces of over 100 potters, artists, poets, and so on. With a diverse roster of skills and stories, from illustrators like Maira Kalman to journalists like Melissa-Harris Perry to musicians like original riot grrl Kathleen Hanna, Bonney hoped to reflect the diverse array of both businesses and the women running them. For Bonney, creating the book reflected one of its biggest lessons: in order to make it all happen, you have to ask for help. “The book is a huge testament to the power of a village, basically,” Bonney explains. “I would say half the women featured in the book are women that I had some connection to in some way, and the other half were women I admired that were way beyond my scope of contact. I would go on my personal Facebook page and say, ‘Does anybody know Nikki Giovanni or Carrie Brownstein?’ and inevitably someone in my network would know someone who knew them. It worked because of this incredible community of other women who said ‘Hey I think this process sounds awesome. How can I help you make this happen?’” That spirit was one of the greatest lessons of the book. As Bonney met with women, she noticed many trends (many creative ladies have very large dogs,

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most work from home or as close-by as possible), but the biggest was that everyone could use a support network of like-minded ladies. “I hope the book inspires more people to reach out to people they see as colleagues or compatriots in their niche or at their level,” Bonney said. “Rather than seeing other women as a threat, it’s a huge asset that, if handled well, can be such a valuable tool; push yourself harder and learn more to make your business and your life a little bit happier.” By talking to other women about their challenges, Bonney believes everyone can realize that the process is just part of running a business. “The biggest lesson for me is that the mistakes and the lessons don’t ever stop,” Bonney said. “They just hit a new plateau and the challenges reappear or might be a different level of challenge than they were in the beginning.” Bonney cites fashion magnate Eileen Fisher as an example. In the book she admits that, despite being decades into running an empire, she still struggles to keep it all in check. Coming face-to-face with those issues was a relief to Bonney, and she mentions the nearly thwarted interview with trans activist and Against Me! frontwoman Laura Jane Grace as another example of moving beyond the stress of being settled. The most difficult get in the book, Bonney and her team traveled 16 hours (plagued by myriad delays) to Grace’s studio in rural Michigan for what boiled down to a brief 20-minute interview. “I’m so glad her interview is in the book, because she brings such a different perspective,” Bonney said. “To see how many different people had different types of hurdles, whether it was Laura Jane coming out as a transwoman and totally changing her public identity, or other people who overcame language barriers, or financial barriers, or having to work three jobs at a time—everybody’s got something, and hearing more about that something and the vulnerability that comes with it was so, so uplifting. The more that we’re open about what that thing is that’s difficult to navigate, the calmer I felt about the fact that we’re all in this together. Nobody was just handed a perfect business and a perfect life. It’s really all about how do you find balance and what’s the support system you have to keep checking in with it.” In the Company of Women: Inspiration and Advice from over 100 Makers, Artists, and Entrepreneurs is out October 4 from Artisan. Check designsponge.com for details about talks and podcasts released surrounding the book’s release.

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TOP TO BOTTOM: PRINT DESIGNER CHRISTINE SCHMIDT OF YELLOW OWL WORKSHOP; DESIGNER AND TELEVISION HOST GENEVIEVE GORDER; BROOKLYN CERAMIC ARTIST MICHELE QUAN; CHEF, WRITER, AND TEACHER, SAMIN NOSRAT

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Healthy Appetite On my plate this season

Filling up fall Meats, stews, vegetables, and broths keep me healthy and full. Now: to use a fork or spoon? Recipes+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

BEEF & BUTTERNUT STEW

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CHICKEN WITH LEMON & CAPERS

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HEALTHY APPETITE

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER SALAD WITH TAHINI & OREGANO

38 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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HEALTHY APPETITE

Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Tahini & Oregano Can I just say how much I love cauliflower? It’s such a saving grace when you are trying to be good. This salad is so perfect. It has lots of flavor and the crispy oregano takes it to the next flavor level. Can be served warm or cold. SERVES 4

1 cauliflower head, cut into florets 2 tablespoons olive oil salt and pepper, to taste 8 sprigs+more fresh oregano 2 tablespoons tahini ½ lemon, just the juice 1 garlic clove pinch of salt water ¼ cup toasted pine nuts 1. Preheat oven to 380°F. 2. Place cauliflower on a baking tray and drizzle with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. 3. Bake for about 20 minutes and shake the tray after 10 minutes. The cauliflower should be al dente—not soft and not hard. 4. Add 8 sprigs of oregano after the first 10 minutes and let it crisp up in the oven. 5. Meanwhile, mix tahini, lemon juice, garlic, and salt in a blender. Blend until smooth. 6. Add water a little at a time until you have a smooth and creamy sauce. 7. Place cauliflower in a bowl and add sauce. 8. Mix well and top with pine nuts and oregano.

Beef & Butternut Stew This is my go-to fall stew. It’s easy to make—you can make it in a pot or a slow cooker. The result is always tender meat and flavorful sauce. SERVES 4

1 tablespoon butter glug of olive oil 2 lbs beef stewing meat, cubed 1 large carrot, cubed 2 celery stalks, cubed 1 yellow onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, sliced

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1 small can crushed tomatoes 2 cups vegetable stock ½ teaspoon dried thyme ½ large butternut squash, peeled, cubed salt and pepper, to taste Sriracha sauce, to taste 1. Melt butter and olive oil in a large pot and brown meat on all sides. 2. Remove meat and add carrot, celery, onion, and garlic. 3. Sauté until onion goes soft, and add meat, tomatoes, stock, and thyme. 4. Let simmer for 10 minutes, add squash, and simmer until meat is done. 5. Season with salt, pepper, and as much Sriracha as you can take.

Chicken with Lemon & Capers I have this for dinner at least once a week. It could not be easier to make. I serve it with a green salad or some roasted vegetables. The sauce can only be described as… divine! SERVES 4

8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs 1 tablespoon olive oil salt and pepper, to taste 1 lemon, just the juice 1 cup chicken or vegetable stock ¼ cup capers 1 lemon, cut into wedges fresh thyme 1. Preheat oven to 370°F. 2. Rub chicken with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. 3. Place in an ovenproof dish and top with lemon juice, stock, capers, lemon wedges, and thyme. 4. Bake for about 30 minutes or until the chicken is done. 5. Top with more fresh thyme and serve.

Chicken & Kale Soup This is my pre-workout soup. It gives me lots of energy and it’s really filling. You can add other vegetables like butternut squash, broccoli, or cauliflower. I always make it with a rotisserie chicken, it makes life so easy.

CHICKEN & KALE SOUP

SERVES 4

1 tablespoon olive oil 1 yellow onion, finely chopped 1 carrot, finely chopped 1 celery stalk, finely chopped meat from 1 rotisserie chicken, no skin 1 bunch of kale, in pieces 1½ qts chicken stock 1 small can crushed tomatoes salt and pepper, to taste 1 teaspoon dried thyme ½ teaspoon fennel seeds Sriracha sauce, to taste 1. Heat oil in a large pot and sauté onions, carrots, and celery until soft. 2. Add chicken and kale and mix well. 3. Pour in stock and tomatoes and let simmer for 5 minutes. 4. Season with salt, pepper, thyme, fennel, and as much Sriracha as you can handle. 5. Simmer for another 5 minutes and serve.

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OFFERING

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Friends Are For... Getting together to bring out our best

Natural passion Text by Larisa Makow Photography by Paul Lowe Recipes by Bill Hovard

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WHEN HUDSON VALLEY–based artisan Bill Hovard isn’t harvesting calendula and chamomile for his line of small batch soaps and oils, he can be found in his kitchen, cooking with local produce and listening to Miles Davis. He founded his apothecary, Hudson Made, with the aim of creating unique, high-quality goods, made from sustainably sourced regional ingredients. His renovated farm in the Catskill Mountains serves as inspiration for his work as well as the laboratory where he concocts his acclaimed beard shaves and other magical elixirs. Here, he shares his life philosophies and what has his attention these days. Describe your childhood. I was raised in Northern California outside San Francisco in the foothills of Mount Diablo. I was a creative and active kid who enjoyed the natural world and dreamed a lot.

uses some of the highest quality organic base oils available. I am intimately involved in the product, from germinating the seed, cultivating and harvesting the flower, and infusing the oil. I use it daily. What’s important to you about your workspace? Honoring the characteristics of the original 19th century agricultural structure I work in, while also bringing in the amenities of the 21st century. Also, open space and natural light. Do you travel? One of my true passions is exploring the world and experiencing diverse cultures. It allows me to look at myself and my life from an outside perspective and also appreciate and value the differences in the world. My favorite destinations include Siena, Italy; London, England; Oaxaca, Mexico; Hampi, India; and Mendocino, California.

What’s been your inspiration for Hudson Made? A lifelong interest and passion for natural beauty and handmade objects. Also, my dear friend Donald Carpentier, who was a historian, naturalist, and artisan.

A writer you love? The works of Henry David Thoreau, because of his inspiring message to appreciate the natural world and an emphasis on the quest to live a simple life.

What do you find magical about Hudson Valley? The nature, the seasons, the connection to the past, and the stunning natural landscapes. Also the inspiring community of artisans, farmers, and makers.

What’s motivating you these days—creatively? Creating something new. Whether developing a new product, growing something in the garden, or preparing a new recipe.

What do you do to relax and rejuvenate? A walk in the woods.

What’s the theme song to the life of Bill Hovard? I Feel Love by Donna Summer or the version by Bronski Beat. Really anything with a disco beat!

Tell us about your cooking. Cooking is a passion and I particularly enjoy preparing a meal for others. Food is what connects us and brings us together. The cuisines I am passionate about are Italian and Japanese. Both require the freshest ingredients available and honor the simple essence of each ingredient. What’s your favorite Hudson Made product? The Hudson Made Body Oil. It is infused with botanicals raised on my farm and

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What’s your secret to happiness? Don’t sweat the small stuff. Life is too short. What will you be doing when you’re 80? Enjoying the moment and being thankful I still have one. You can find Bill’s beautiful handiwork at hudsonmadeny.com.

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FRIENDS ARE FOR...

ALSATIAN ROAST CHICKEN

CRACKED POTATOES TOSSED WITH CORIANDER TUSCAN BRAISED FENNEL 44 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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FRIENDS ARE FOR...

Alsatian Roast Chicken I learned this recipe from Chef Henri-Étienne Lévy of La Cuisine Sans Peur in his kitchen on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It always makes for a savory and succulent roast chicken with just the right level of acidity and full chicken flavor.

1 whole chicken (preferably pasture raised and freshly butchered) 4 full heads garlic salt and pepper, to taste 3 tablespoons soft butter 3 tablespoons chopped parsley ½ cup apple cider vinegar ¼ cup butter flat leaf parsley, for garnish red wine or cognac 1. Preheat the oven to 450°F. 2. Fully wash and dry the chicken inside and out with paper towel. 3. Place the chicken on a cutting board breast-side down. 4. Working from the cavity opening up to the neck, cut down each side of the back bone with a pair of kitchen shears. 5. Trim the ends of the wings. 6. Save or freeze the bones for chicken stock. 7. Rub soft butter on the inside cavity and exterior of the chicken. 8. Add salt and pepper. 9. Take a thin wooden spear and pass through the wing and breast to create a compact form. 10. Cross the legs of the chicken to make for an even tighter form. 11. In a buttered and heavy cast iron pan, place the garlic into a mound in the center of the pan. No need to peel the garlic cloves. 12. Add coarsely chopped parsley. 13. Place the chicken onto the mound of garlic. Ensure all the garlic is covered and under the cavity of the bird. 14. Adjust for a compact form. 15. Add small dollops of butter over the top of the chicken. 16. Place in the oven.

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17. After approximately 15 minutes, reduce the heat to 350°F and pour ½ cup of apple cider vinegar over the bird.

extra virgin olive oil.

18. Cook for approximately 20 minutes per pound.

with ¼ cup of Parmigiano-Reggiano.

7. Pour about ½ cup of the chicken stock over the fennel, salt, pepper, and cover

19. After about 15–20 minutes, baste the bird.

8. Finely chop some of the fennel tops and sprinkle over the dish for added fennel flavor.

20. When the chicken is fully cooked (do not over cook!), remove from the oven and place onto a dish to rest.

9. Place in the oven and cook until the top is golden brown, approximately 20–30 minutes.

21. While the chicken is resting, strain off all the juices and garlic from the pan.

10. Garnish.

22. Separate the chicken fat from the juices. Set aside.

Cracked Potatoes Tossed with Coriander

23. Take the garlic and press through a sieve and into a dish. 24. Place the skillet onto a hot stove and melt approximately ¼ cup of butter. 25. Add the pressed garlic and chicken juices back to the pan. 26. Add red wine or cognac and reduce at high heat, stirring continuously. 27. Place the rested bird onto a platter, remove the wooden spear, and garnish with parsley and olives. Serve the sauce over the bird or on the side. Excellent with a Côtes du Rhône.

Tuscan Braised Fennel I learned this recipe from my dear friend Isabella in the Tuscan hills outside Siena Italy. A classic Italian side dish.

3 bulbs fennel, scrubbed, cleaned 6 cups homemade chicken stock salt and pepper, to taste extra virgin olive oil ¼ cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

This recipe is adapted from the Vefa’s Kitchen cookbook. My only adaptation is a bit of chopped parsley for garnish. This book is always at hand for classic Mediterranean dishes.

10 to 15 new potatoes (or however many you have on hand and will fit in the pan) 2 to 3 cups olive oil 5 tablespoons dry red wine 1 tablespoon coarsely ground coriander seeds 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice dash of salt and freshly ground pepper parsley, for garnish 1. Hit each unpeeled potato lightly with a wooden meat mallet so that it cracks slightly. 2. Pour enough olive oil into a large cast iron pan to cover the potatoes and heat. 3. Add the potatoes in batches, and fry until golden on all sides.

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

4. Drain off the oil.

2. Fully wash and trim the fennel bulbs.

5. Return the pan to the heat and add the wine, corianader, and lemon juice.

3. Trim off the tops of the fennel and set aside. Leave enough of the base in tact so the fennel retains its form. 4. Cut the bulbs lengthwise (top to bottom) into pieces approximately 1” thick.  5. In a pan, parboil the fennel in chicken stock until slightly tender. Strain and retain the stock.  6. Place the braised fennel into a pan or cast iron dish that is lightly coated with

6. Cover the pan and, holding it with both hands, shake it vigorously over the heat several times, tossing the potatoes so that they “jump” around and become coated in coriander. Continue doing this until all the liquid has evaporated. 7. Drain the potatoes on paper towels, season with salt and pepper, and serve hot. 8. Garnish with a bit of chopped parsley.

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FRIENDS ARE FOR...

DANDY COCKTAIL

Dandy Cocktail This recipe comes from my grandparents’ first addition Savoy Cocktail Book from 1930. Makes for a delicious and slightly sweet cocktail to open the pallet before a savory meal.

2 centiliters (0.6 oz) rye (I prefer Tuthilltown Hudson Manhattan Rye Whiskey) 2 centiliters (0.6 oz) Dubonnet 1 dash Angostura bitters 3 dashes Cointreau 1 piece lemon peel 1 piece orange peel 1. Shake well over ice and strain into glasses.

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THIS & THAT Sweet Paul's picks of the season

Really stunning ceramic plates from Felt+Fat. I need some in my house, from $28, feltandfat.com

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The Line Planter was a collaboration between Trey Jones Studio and Christopher Derek Bruno. Perfect for my kitchen window, $425 treyjonesstudio.com

Marble egg cups that can also be used as a spice bowl or a candlestick, $54 for 2 mykilos.de

Amazing leather hanging lamp. So simple and stunning, $169 etsy.com/shop/PuikArt

Want to update your kitchen? These leather handles are perfect, $13 etsy.com/shop/thirteenelevenolive

Is it a stool or is it art? Maybe both. Beautiful wood stool with hand-woven seat, $250 umbrashift.com

Make your sofa cool with this Growl Pillow cover knitted in cotton, $80 dittohouse.com

Love these brushes designed by Zoe Mowat, so chic, price upon request zoemowat.com How cool is this new rug from my friend Genevieve Gorder? Will look so good under my couch, from $462 rvcfloordecorcapelrugs.com

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THIS & THAT

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Tomato Tart with Basil Oil & Almond & Pepper Crust This tart is an instant classic. The crust is an amazing combination of the flavors from both almonds and ground pepper. MAKES 1 TART crust

1 cup all purpose flour ¼ cup almond flour ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper (I like mine coarse) 1 stick cold butter, in pieces ice cold water filling

1 cup fresh ricotta 1 ⁄3 cup torn basil leaves salt and pepper, to taste sliced heirloom tomatoes ½ cup basil, stalks and all ½ garlic clove 1 ⁄3 cup olive oil 1. For the crust, place regular flour, almond flour, salt, pepper, and butter in a large bowl. 2. Use your hands and work the butter into the flour. The mixture should be crumbly and grainy. 3. Add ice water a little at a time until the dough holds together. 4. Wrap in plastic and let it rest in the fridge for 1 hour. (You can make it a few days beforehand if you want.) 5. Preheat oven to 380°F. 6. Roll it out between 2 sheets of parchment paper and lay out in a well-greased tart pan. 7. Prick the bottom with a fork and freeze for 15 minutes. 8. Bake for about 15 minutes or until golden. 9. Cool on a wire rack. 10. Mix ricotta and basil in a bowl, season with salt and pepper, and spread on top of the crust. 11. Add tomatoes on top. 12. In a blender, blend together basil, garlic, and oil, and salt to taste. 13. Drizzle the oil over the tart.

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Apple Tart in a Maple Syrup Crust

4. Wrap in plastic and leave in the fridge for at least 1 hour.

SERVES 4

5. Preheat oven to 380ºF.

1¼ cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon+½ teaspoon sugar ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt 8 tablespoons maple syrup butter, cold and cut into ½” pieces 6 to 7 tablespoons ice water 2 tart apples, thinly sliced fresh thyme honey (optional)

6. Roll out the dough on a floured surface to about 10”x10”.

1. Place flour, 1 teaspoon sugar, and salt in a bowl. 2. Add butter and work into the flour using your hands, the result should be very crumbly.

7. Place the apples in the middle and fold over the edges to create a nice free form tart. 8. Sprinkle with ½ teaspoon sugar and add some fresh thyme. 9. Transfer to a baking tray and bake until golden, about 40 minutes. Serve warm or cold with some honey, a la mode, or with some cheddar. 

3. Add water a little at a time until you have a smooth dough. Don't over work it!

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MORMOR'S KITCHEN Carrying on my Grandma's cooking

Smelly cheese & figs (& port) Mormor’s love of anything salty was well known, but at the top of her list? Roquefort, French blue cheese Recipe+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

Every week Mormor would take a bus into the city to visit her favorite cheese shop, and often I would tag along. I just loved the piles and piles of all kinds of cheeses. The shop was run by two little old ladies with rosy cheeks and white coats. They would always give my mormor a small glass of sherry that they kept under the counter. She would taste all the amazing cheeses while sipping the sherry, but always ended up leaving with the same thing: a big chunk of Roquefort. The rest of my family hated the smell of it, but to me it was like the finest perfume. Rich, pungent, and earthy. She kept it in a sealed container so that no one could smell it. She would make us open face sandwiches with thinly sliced bread, butter, a healthy serving of Roquefort, and a dollop of fig jam on top. To this day, this is one of

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my all time favorite treats! She never used the cheese in cooking, always just by itself. But as I grew older and moved away, I started playing with the cheese: melting it in some cream or in a tart like this one. I love making this tart as it’s so simple yet so full of taste. It really reminds me of her in the best way. So cheers, Mormor, I know you are eating Roquefort and sipping some port wine wherever you are.

Memory Tart with Roquefort & Figs SERVES 8

1 large sheet puff pastry ½ cup fig preserves ²⁄3 cup crumbled Roquefort or other blue cheese 20 pecan halves ½ small red onion, sliced olive oil freshly ground pepper 1. Preheat oven to 420°F. 2. Fold the puff pastry in half so you get a long narrow dough. 3. Place on a baking tray covered with parchment paper. 4. Top with fig preserves, Roquefort, pecans, and red onion. 5. Drizzle with a little oil and add some pepper. 6. Bake for about 20 minutes, turn the tray around after half time. It should be crispy and golden. 7. Cut into slices and serve… with port!

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PUT A LID ON IT! The essential guide to canning and preserving

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Jam of memories Cooking with Mama without words Food+styling by Michaela Hayes | Photography by Paul Lowe

IN BETWEEN high school and college, I had the privilege to study abroad for a year as an exchange student in Yugoslavia. I lived in a small town in Bosnia, back before the war when Yugoslavia still existed tenuously as a united country. Since I had already graduated from high school, my academic studies were not rigorous. However, the life lessons I learned, and the paths I started down in Yugoslavia have been fundamental to where I am today. My host family (Mama, Tata, and my sister, Sladjana) lived in a house on the edge of our small town with a yard full of produce and fruit trees. We raised chickens and pigs and my Mama cooked everything we ate. She spoke only a few words of English, so it was quite a while before we could have deep conversations. Though my understanding started small, she spoke to me often, encouraging me to listen and learn, and laughing with me when we couldn’t quite make sense of each other. Our meals and tasks at home were seasonal. In the spring we got chicks that we kept warm in a box in the garage. A few months later, all the neighbor women got together to help with the slaughtering. Similarly in the fall, the neighborhood came together for the pig slaughter. And around the same time, my host mother taught me to mill the plums from our trees to make plum jam. This thick, sticky jam was stored in our pantry and we would spread it inside warm palacinka (crêpe-like pancakes) and Mama would use it to fill sweet buns, called buhtle, for parties.

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Today I farm with my wife and friends. As I did in Yugoslavia, we live very seasonally and food preservation is a cornerstone of my life. I stay in touch with my Yugoslav family through my host sister. Tata passed away last year, and I wish that I could see Mama, hug her, and laugh together. By sharing her life with me, she has given me one of the best gifts—the love of preserving and cooking seasonally, and the importance of staying connected to the land.

Mama’s Plum Jam MAKES APPROXIMATELY 3 PINTS

½ lbs very ripe plums 4 2 cups water 5 cups sugar pinch of salt juice of 1 lemon 1. Remove pits from the plums and cut into chunks. Or if you have a food mill like Mama, use it! 2. Combine the plums and water in a large saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium and simmer, uncovered, for 1 hour. 3. Add the sugar and salt to the pan and stir until the sugar dissolves. Increase heat to medium-high and boil, stirring occasionally, for 25–45 minutes or until the jam is thick and dark. Stir in lemon juice. 4. Cool and use to fill sweet buns (recipe at crockandjar.com) or cookies, or spread on toast. Or if canning, ladle into prepared 8 oz jars and process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes.

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Hello, Canada!

Sweet Paul is now available in stores across Canada!

Available at many fine independent retailers and your local Chapters & Indigo stores.


VISIT US IN WASHINGTON DC + ONLINE! SHOPSALTANDSUNDRY.COM @SALTANDSUNDRY

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Woof

Dogs have favorite things, too!

SUPPLIES:

Lestat the flower Crafts+photography by Paul Lowe Lestat told me that he wants to be a flower for Halloween this year. So I made him a simple flower collar using some ribbon, crepe paper, and my trusted hot glue gun. He makes quite the pretty flower!

different kinds of crepe paper ribbons, mine were 2" wide scissors thin metal wire ribbon green craft paper hot glue gun 1. Start by measuring the ribbon around your dogs neck and cut to size. 2. Make flowers by rolling about 30" of crepe ribbon together, secure with wire on 1 end, and pull the "roll" apart to create a flower. I used 19 flowers. 3. Cut leaf shapes of the green craft paper. 4. Hot glue the flowers and leaves in place.

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FETCH

Quirky finds for you and your best pal Is it a dog or a shelf? It’s both, $690 olivierpolmanss.fr

Super cute dog pillow, $32 tictail.com

SWEET PAWS

Doing our best for our most loyal companions

Old dogs, new rescues

Chic plaid dog collar, $35 jc-rt.com

Text by Dorie Herman | Photography by Erin O’Sullivan WHEN ERIN O’SULLIVAN and her fiancé, Brandon Stanton, adopted a 12-year-old dog named Susie, Erin had no idea she and Susie would soon be changing more than just their own worlds. People often questioned why they decided to adopt such an old dog—something they had never thought twice about. Thus, Susie’s Senior Dogs (SSD) was born—a social-media based organization that shines a spotlight on the neediest of homeless senior dogs and aims to get them adopted while also educating the public on the benefits of senior rescue. In the five years since starting Susie’s Senior Dogs, at least 500 dogs have been adopted. “What is equally, if not more important,” O’Sullivan says, “are the senior adoptions that are happening outside of the page because a reader has been inspired to adopt a senior dog at their local shelter.” When asked about the most surprising part of SSD, O’Sullivan exclaimed: “So many young humans are adopting old dogs! While it's true that older dogs are a good choice for aging humans, older dogs are also great companions for busy young people. I think the average senior dog adopter on SSD is under the age of 50, and many in their 30s. Senior dogs are a great fit for many different lifestyles.” What’s on the horizon for SSD? The Susie's Senior Dogs book is coming out this fall and will feature the stories of adopters who have discovered the joys of senior dog ownership. And while Susie recently passed away at the age of 17, her legacy will live on with every senior who has a home because of Erin.

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Chevron dog beds, many available sizes, from $130 lionandwolf.co

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A shining example Sweet Paul gets enlightened by ILLUME Written by Larisa Makow | Photography by Goor Studio

SOME 50 EMPLOYEES of the 114 at Minneapolis-based ILLUME begin their work week with yoga Mondays, an opportunity to help everyone focus on finding their inner Zen and ensure the company collectively starts the day off on the right foot. What might seem like an exceptional amount of thoughtfulness on behalf of management is in fact quintessentially ILLUME. The 20 year-old fragrance manufacturer is dedicated to maintaining their identity as a forward-thinking group of artisans who seek to bring unique scents (in beautiful ways) into the lives of its customers. With this unique perspective, it’s no wonder they’ve developed long-lasting partnerships with retailers like Anthropologie, West Elm, and Target, to name a few. Here, we sit down with the ILLUME team to learn about their culture, mission, and how they envision their future. Describe ILLUME’s special view on collaboration. Our approach to team building is what makes our products unique. We are able to recognize each other’s distinctive talents, respect what she or he knows, enable one another to grow, and create an environment for all of us to flourish in. We work as a whole, but this understanding of what each person contributes is what makes ILLUME a success and is evident in everything we make: it’s Gen’s nose, Taisha’s hand painting, April’s vision, Sarah’s attention to detail, and Todd’s love of science... and the list goes on. As you have grown, how have you managed to stick to this creative vision? We have grown to a mid-sized company, but we are still the same people as the day when it all started. Some of us have been here since the beginning, some are new, but we all have one thing in common: we love when curiosity gets the best of us. It makes us think bigger. We are travelers and seekers who study culture and color. We let trends play with our instincts to create one-of-a-kind

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fragrances and beautiful designs. And while we do take our life’s work seriously, we’re also downright nice. It’s a Midwestern thing. What is ILLUME’s mission? What we create are the experiences of people’s lives. Our products need to connect and give meaning. Our craft is a mix of inspired elements—the scent, the style, the colors, and designs. And we infuse flawless standards in every product. You might say we are refreshingly compulsive (and we love that). Share some fun facts about ILLUME with us. Each of our pillar candles is hand poured from real tea kettles. Our fragrances are a mix of natural scents and essential oils, blended throughout the entire candle, so it fills a room with a generous scent. We have a Burn Room where we test burn all our candles, twice! Our artists hand paint on a daily basis, are well versed in calligraphy, and look to nature, art, and culture for inspiration. We have two buildings on our campus: the Studio (where product development, sourcing, marketing and creative are) and our HQ/production facility. We ride a green beach cruiser between them for fresh wind in our hair (but not so much in the winter!). What’s next for ILLUME? The future of ILLUME is to do what we do best: innovate through fragrance and design. Where that will take us in five or 20 years is up to how consumers evolve with scent, but our goal will remain simple—to continuously make really beautiful things. Learn more about ILLUME and their products at illumecandles.com and on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @illumecandles Vist Goor Studio at goorstudio.com, @goorstudio (Instagram) and Goor Studio (Facebook).

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Sweet Paul in Nantucket Photography by Escape Brooklyn I spent some time in Nantucket for the first time this summer. I was invited by Nantucket Bookworks and Nantucket Culinary Center to do a fun brunch with a talk and a crafting section. They put us up at the fab Second Story Loft and even had a cocktail party in our honor. After a few hours on the island, I wanted to pack up my dogs and move there. A great big thank you to everyone who came out and an extra special thanks to Wendy, Suzanne, Greg, and Joy. Love you all! nantucketculinary.com 25broadnantucket.com nantucketbookpartners.com


PHOTOGRAPHY BY WARREN HEATH

Fall 2016

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T h e S p a R ta n Text by Tudor Caradoc-Davies | Production by Sven Alberding | Photography by Warren Heath


OPPOSITE PAGE: IF AN ENGLISHMAN’S HOME IS HIS CASTLE, A SOUTH AFRICAN’S BRAAI (BARBECUE) IS HIS KITCHEN. IN THE BACKGROUND LIES THE THE ROCKY PINNACLE OF KASTEELBERG, AN ANCIENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES OF THE SAN PEOPLE. THIS PAGE: ANGELFISH KEBABS WITH BOKKOM SAMBAL

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Forager-chef Kobus van der Merwe’s daily commute features farm gates, scrubby dunes, and the occasional stop to remove tortoises from his path. And the journey frequently doubles as an opportunity to stock up on ingredients for his celebrated restaurant, Oep ve Koep

HOME IS WHERE THE HEARTH IS. KOBUS’S COTTAGE SITS IN AN EXPANSE OF WEST COAST STRANDVELD, ANCIENT DUNES COVERED IN SCRUB THAT CONTAIN A LARDER OF EDIBLE PLANTS. HIS 15–20 MINUTE COMMUTE TO THE COASTAL VILLAGE OF PATERNOSTER ALLOWS HIM AN OPPORTUNITY TO FORAGE FOR THE KITCHEN

Six years ago, Kobus van der Merwe quit his job as an online editor for a restaurant review website in Cape Town, South Africa’s cosmopolitan tourism hub. He wasn’t quite sure what it was that he needed to do, but he knew he wanted to start fresh and do something more hands-on with food. And so he moved out of the city to the arid West Coast town of Paternoster to live in a beautiful yet Spartan cottage deep in the veld. What happened next was even more unusual. Rather than opening a fish and chip shop or a classic seafood restaurant—businesses that would have a decent chance of survival—he started something completely different with his restaurant Oep ve Koep (Afrikaans for Open for Business). Unpretentious yet challenging, Oep ve Koep is a place radically different from anything to which even foodie South Africans are generally accustomed, and it has rapidly become a benchmark for modern, adventurous locavore food that reflects on centuries of culinary heritage. The West Coast is a harsh, bleak part of the South African coastline, stretching from Cape Town right up to the Namibian border. The further north you drive, the drier the land becomes. Quite soon, it has become semi-desert; trees are few and far between, farming is tough, the wind is a constant companion, swimming in the icy Atlantic Ocean is an activity reserved for the brave, and the weather is consistently harsh. Harsh and hot, or harsh and cold—take your pick. Of all the coastal towns on the West

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Coast, Paternoster is the postcard-worthy jewel. Featuring whitewashed old fishing cottages and a growing number of well-known eateries, it attracts both foreign and local visitors willing to make the two-hour drive from Cape Town during the summer months. Kobus’s family used to farm in the Northern Cape, an even drier region of South Africa further into the interior of the country. For most of his youth, until his parents moved there permanently, Paternoster was the family’s holiday destination. Now the van der Merwes run a shop (also called Oep ve Koep) in a building that used to be a shark liver oil factory. Situated on the same property as his parents’ shop, Kobus’s restaurant has become the town’s most notable culinary drawcard, spilling out from his tiny kitchen into a small garden where tables are set. What Kobus drives through on his daily commute from home—a tiny dwelling on an isolated smallholding about a 15-minute drive from Paternoster village—is Strandveld. Literally meaning beach scrub in Afrikaans, Strandveld is a type of vegetation specific to the West Coast of South Africa. (Its full name is Cape Flats Dune Strandveld and it’s

officially defined as endangered.) The Strandveld around Paternoster covers land that was once ancient coastline—the larder of hunter-gatherer-forager peoples the San and the Khoikhoi. Drive into town with Kobus on his commute and you’ll find him regularly stopping during the journey (and not just to move tortoises from the sandy road!). Without a word of warning, he pulls up, puts his leather hat on his head, and disappears into a clump of innocuous-looking shrubs growing in the sand to search for plants—plants that turn out to be not only edible, but also very tasty too. For decades, South Africa—perhaps as a legacy of apartheid and the international isolation that resulted from it—has been outward-looking, exploring tastes derived from what happened across oceans in another hemisphere. This includes the national palate, which was borrowed from Europe even though there’s a wealth of distinctive indigenous ingredients from which one can create truly local dishes. Kobus is at the vanguard of a new South African pride in valuing our culinary heritage. “I’m extremely inspired by the landscape of the West Coast and its wild food offerings,” he says. “The more I’ve

experimented, studied, and researched, the more fascinated and obsessed I’ve become. I think South Africa’s love of exoticism is finally changing. Even just on the small scale—such as using local olive oil instead of imported. I think the foraging trend will blow over, but to me, being on trend has never been the point. We don’t have the abundance of wild food to sustain everyone suddenly picking dune spinach willy-nilly, anyway! It’s rather about rediscovering forgotten indigenous flavors and appreciating, nurturing, and cultivating a culture of understanding and pride in what’s truly homegrown. Hopefully that includes the possibility of propagating indigenous species sustainably in a kind of small-scale permaculture or eco-agriculture... but even if it’s just planting your own wild garlic and kapokbos (indigenous wild rosemary) in pots at home, that’s already great.” Kobus’s adoption of local and indigenous coastal ingredients is informed by the past, the distant past, and the present. Before it became cool to forage, Kobus was digging around in the dunes for long-forgotten succulents and other plants. Much of his inspiration came from the legendary Afrikaans poet, cook,

BETWEEN WHAT HE CAN FIND ON THE SHORELINE AND WHAT HE FORAGES IN THE DECEPTIVELY RICH STRANDVELD DUNES, KOBUS STOCKS HIS KITCHEN LARDER WITH A UNIQUE VARIETY OF INDIGENOUS PLANTS THAT ARE NOT JUST EDIBLE, BUT DELICIOUS

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and naturalist C. Louis Leipoldt. “I grew up with my parents and grandparents using Leipoldt’s cookbooks,” says Kobus. “I’ve always admired his extensive knowledge of indigenous veldkos (bush food) and his passion for cooking innovative, truly local dishes. He was a true renaissance man: physician, botanist, chef, poet. There’s a bit of hero worshipping from my side—his 1933 book, Kos vir die Kenner (Food for the Connoisseur), is my heritage food bible.” Behind Kobus’s small house—it’s dwarfed by the expansive landscape in which it’s set—lie ancient archaeological sites of the San people. These are concentrated around Kasteelberg, a rocky pinnacle, but the cave paintings and shell middens of the area’s original foragers are found all along this coastline. Initially, when he was trying to understand where he could find edible plants, Kobus asked for the help of expert botanists. But as he grew to understand the Strandveld better, the penny dropped. Everything he needed was right there in front of him: it just emerges when the time is right. Which means that like the San used to, Kobus forages according to the

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seasons—and his menu at Oep ve Koep changes accordingly. “In winter there’s more of a creamy, umami, seaweed focus and in summer it’s more fresh and zingy. I find the transitions hard. I’m very connected to the weather personally. If the sun is out, my mood changes. It’s hard to make that shift. Yesterday the wind was blowing, it was really cold, misty, and wintery… and today it’s perfect, sunny, and blue. Bang.” As much as possible, the focus of Kobus’s food is local. That means many of the ingredients—Strandveld plants like soutslaai (salt salad), dune lettuce, dune spinach, and dune celery, as well as seaweeds such as sea lettuce and kelp are foraged. Then there’s the fast-disappearing and slow-growing heerenboontjie, a small South African heritage bean similar to a Lima bean that few farmers grow nowadays. Kobus has also begun distilling indigenous herbs such as buchu and wild garlic into vermouth. All the menus at Oep ve Koep are constructed in relation to Kobus’s commitment to sustainability. His foraging efforts, for example, are conducted with great care for the vulnerable Strandveld vegetation.

Mediterranean mussels, a widespread alien species in South Africa, are picked off the rocks in front of Paternoster to feature on the menu, and the fish he uses—such as angelfish and locally caught kob—is all sustainable. At Oep ve Koep, you won’t find the crayfish so ubiquitous in other Cape restaurants, as the industry is under immense fishing pressure. And you’ll also probably receive a subtle introduction to bokkoms, the plentiful sun-dried sardines of the West Coast. Loved by locals and in the past treated with suspicion by outsiders, they deliver umami in force. If it’s a double-shift day, Kobus takes another short coastal drive to Mosselbank after lunch service to swim and clear his head before returning to the kitchen for the dinner service. And if he isn’t serving dinner that day he heads back to the farm, foraging along the way to come up with new dishes for Oep ve Koep, which he tries out at home on an outdoor braai (barbecue). “I thought I’d come to Paternoster for a year to help my folks set up the eatery side of the shop,” says Kobus. “Now it’s six years later. Unexpectedly, I guess I found my groove.”

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MUSSELS, GOOSEBERRIES, SAUVIGNON BLANC, & EDIBLE FLOWERS

ABOVE: PART LABORATORY, PART DINING SPACE; IN THE ATTIC OF OEP VE KOEP, KOBUS EXPERIMENTS WITH MAKING VERMOUTH AND LIQUEURS INFUSED WITH INDIGENOUS BOTANICALS

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ICE PLANT LEAF SNACK

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West Coast Oyster in its Element SERVES 6

6 medium oysters, shucked large handful of soft lettuce (or sea lettuce if you can find it) a few endive leaves green beans, blanched, salted flat leaf parsley squeeze of fresh lemon 1. Top the freshly shucked oysters with pieces of lettuce, endive, beans, and parsley. 2. Add a squeeze of lemon. 3. Serve immediately, balanced on chilled beach stones.

Ice Plant Leaf Snack SERVES 6

17 oz fresh filleted firm white fish like snapper or grouper half lemon, just the juice 6 medium lettuce leaves 6 ruby grapefruit segments salt and white pepper, to taste edible flowers, we used cucumber flowers 1. Finely slice the fish fillets and dress with lemon juice.

opened, stirring occasionally to evenly distribute heat. 5. Strain mussels, retaining the stock. 6. Remove mussels from shell, and add back into the stock. 7. Heat through. 8. Ladle 5 mussels and some sauce into bowls. 9. Add the fresh gooseberries, flower petals, and leaves, and serve immediately.

handful of fresh mint leaves, finely chopped fresh lemon juice for serving

full cream yogurt fresh spinach leaves edible flowers 1. Mix all the chopped ingredients together until well blended. Dress with lemon juice and set aside until plating. 2. Add a spoonful of yogurt to each plate.

Venison, Seaweed, & Bitter Leaves from the Garden SERVES 4

1½ lbs venison loin, finely sliced 60 ml nara or pumpkinseed oil 12 shards crisply baked nara (or freshly picked seaweed) bitter leaves from the garden, like chicory, endive, celery tops 12 purple pea flowers kombucha vinegar

3. Top with the freshly pan-fried angelfish skewers and some spinach leaves. 4. Add a spoonful of bokkom sambal. Top with edible flowers and serve.

1. Dress bitter leaves with nara or pumpkinseed oil and kombucha vinegar. 2. Arrange slices of springbok loin on 6 plates. 3. Top with the dressed bitter leaves, seaweed shards, and pea flowers.

2. Season with white pepper and salt. 3. Top the fresh lettuce leaves with a grapefruit segment each. 4. Add some fine slices of marinated fish. Top with fresh edible flowers and serve immediately, encouraging guests to eat these by hand, taco style.

Mussels, Gooseberries, Sauvignon Blanc, & Edible Flowers SERVES 4

2 tablespoons olive oil 30 fresh black mussels, cleaned 150 ml Sauvignon Blanc 15 gooseberries handful of edible flowers, leaves 1. In a large pot, over high heat, bring olive oil up to just below smoking point. 2. Add mussels all at once and immediately cover with the lid. 3. Cook for a couple of minutes until shells just start to open, then add wine. 4. Cook until all mussels shells have

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Angelfish Kebabs SERVES 4

1½ lbs freshly filleted white firm fish, in 18 cubes 2 tablespoons fish masala spice salt and pepper, to taste lemon juice vegetable oil, for frying 1. Skewer 3 cubes each onto 6 bamboo skewers. 2. Dust each generously with fish masala and fry in a skillet for a couple of minutes each side until just cooked. 3. Dress with freshly squeezed lemon juice. Bokkom Sambal

1 small onion, finely diced 2 fillets anchovies, finely diced 1 hard boiled egg, white, yolk finely diced handful of fresh coriander leaves, finely chopped

ABOVE: THE WEST COAST IS HARSH. SEARING HEAT IN SUMMER, COLD WINDS AND RAIN IN WINTER, AND ICY OCEAN WATER YEAR ROUND (IT’S OFTEN COLDER IN THE SUMMER THAN IT IS IN THE WINTER). FROM PLANTS TO ANIMALS AND PEOPLE, IT PAYS TO BE HARDY AND EQUIPPED WITH THORNS, HORNS, AND AN ABILITY TO FIND YOUR OWN FOOD

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WEST COAST OYSTER IN ITS ELEMENT

ABOVE: VENISON, SEAWEED, & BITTER LEAVES FROM THE GARDEN. AT RIGHT: MULTICOLOURED SEA URCHINS. TRICKY TO HANDLE, BUT WORTH THE EFFORT

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t n i M & n e k c i Ch h t i w d a l Sa e am m a Ed

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SERVES 4

1 lb spaghetti salt, to taste 1 cup peas, fresh or frozen ½ cup edamame ½ cup grated Parmesan+extra for serving 1 lemon, just the juice pepper, to taste 1⁄3 cup toasted pine nuts handful of watercress ½ lemon, just the grated zest 1. Cook the pasta al dente in salted water. 2. When the pasta is done, add the peas and edamame and cook for 30 more seconds. 3. Drain and reserve ½ cup of the pasta liquid. 4. Place pasta and liquid in a bowl and add Parmesan, lemon juice, and some pepper. Toss well. 5. Stir in pine nuts and watercress. 6. Serve in bowls or plates with more Parmesan and a sprinkle of lemon zest.

CHICKPEA & WATERCRESS HUMMUS

Cannellini Beans with Prosciutto & Eggs This dish is perfect for a weekend brunch, if you want to skip the bread you can add the rest on top of greens. SERVES 4

Chickpea & Watercress Hummus Watercress adds a wonderful flavor to this hummus and also makes it a delicious green color. I like my hummus really lemony—add a little at a time to make it just right for you. Serve as a dip or on top of a toasted pita with watercress, edamame, mint, and some red chili flakes.

1. Place chickpeas, watercress, garlic, and tahini in a food processor and process until you have a coarse mixture. 2. Add lemon juice and water and process until smooth. 3. Season with salt and add more lemon juice if you want. (If it feels too dry just add a little more water and blend.)

SERVES 6

1 can chickpeas, drained ½ cup packed watercress 2 cloves garlic 1⁄3 cup tahini 2 lemons, just the juice salt, to taste 2 to 4 tablespoons water

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Pasta with Peas, Edamame, & Lemon This is a really easy everyday pasta dish. The tip here is to mix in some of the boiling pasta water, it creates a delicious sauce with the Parmesan and lemon. You can also add some grilled chicken or salmon.

3 cups cannellini beans, soaked and cooked 2 tablespoons olive oil salt and pepper, to taste pinch of red chili flakes ½ teaspoon fresh thyme+extra for serving 4 slices of good country style bread, toasted 8 slices of prosciutto 4 poached eggs 1⁄3 cup grated Parmesan 1. Heat the oil in a pan and sauté beans with the spices until warm. 2. Place 2 slices of prosciutto on each piece of toast, top with beans, eggs, Parmesan, and some extra thyme.

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amame, & Lemon d E , s a e P h t i w Pasta

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Cannellini Beans with Prosciutto & Eggs 84 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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Lentil & Hazelnut Crackers These are really good served with some cheese. They are also gluten free. MAKES ABOUT 24 PIECES

½ cup lentil flour

 ½ cup hazelnut flour

 1 tablespoon sesame seeds

 1 teaspoon fresh thyme

 ¼ teaspoon salt

 2 tablespoons olive oil+extra for brushing

 water

 flaky salt 1. Preheat oven to 400°F. 2. In a bowl, mix together lentil flour, hazelnut flour, sesame, thyme, salt, and oil. 3. Add water a little at a time—you want the dough to hold together and not get too sticky. 4. Roll it out using a rolling pin between 2 sheets of parchment paper. 5. Transfer to a baking tray, brush with oil, and sprinkle with salt. 6. Bake until golden and dry, about 15–18 minutes. 7. Cool on a wire rack and store in a paper bag.

LENTIL & HAZELNUT CRACKERS

Pea & Ricotta Falafels These are really easy to make and so delicious. Perfect snack or appetizer food. Serve with a side of good ricotta. SERVES 4

1 can cannellini beans, drained ½ cup peas 1 ⁄3 cup packed watercress, chopped 1 tablespoon chopped parsley 1 ⁄3 cup ricotta 1 tablespoon all purpose flour salt and pepper, to taste vegetable oil, for deep frying 1. Place beans, peas, watercress, parsley, ricotta, flour, salt, and pepper in a food processor and run until smooth. 2. Heat the oil in a large pot. It’s warm enough when you place a wooden spoon in it and it bubbles around it. 3. Make walnut-sized falafels and place in the oil.

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4. Cook for about 3 minutes or until golden brown. 5. Drain on paper towels and serve warm.

3 cups peas 1 teaspoon thyme pepper, to taste 1 lemon, thinly sliced

Lemon Peas with Garlic Shrimp My mormor used to make lemon peas like these. She would serve hers with salmon while I like mine with shrimp. I love shrimp with the peel on, they become more juicy that way. SERVES 4

16 shrimp 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 lemon, juice, grated zest 1 teaspoon red chili flakes salt, to taste 10 garlic cloves 2 tablespoons butter 1 lemon, just the juice

1. Mariniate the shrimp with oil, lemon juice, lemon zest, chili, salt, and garlic. Leave it for 20 minutes. 2. Melt the butter in a pan and add lemon juice, peas, thyme, salt, and pepper. Stir until warm. 3. Cook the shrimp in a pan with the garlic and lemon slices. They need about 1–2 minutes on each side. 4. Spoon peas and sauce into bowl and top with shrimp, garlic, and lemon slices.

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PEA & RICOTTA FALAFELS

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hrimp S c i l r a G h t i w s ea P n eL mo FOLLOW US @SWEETPAULMAGAZINE

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ROASTED PARMESAN & ROSEMARY CHICKPEAS

1 can coconut milk salt and pepper, to taste 10 oz cod filet 2 tablespoons butter micro kale, for serving red chili flakes 1. Heat the oil in a big pan and add onion, celery, and carrot. 2. Sauté it all until the onion goes soft. This will take about 10 minutes. 3. Add the peas and stock, and let the soup simmer for about 15 minutes. 4. Add the coconut milk and cook for 10 minutes more. 5. Use blender to purée the soup. If it’s too thick just add some more stock. 6. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 7. Cook the fish in butter with some salt and pepper, about 2 minutes on each side. Serve the soup in bowls with some fish, micro kale, and red chili flakes. Farro & Edamame Salad with Chicken & Mint Such a beautiful salad. Great for lunch or a light dinner. SERVES 4

Roasted Parmesan & Rosemary Chickpeas Great snack! Small protein bombs that are so good for you. Tastes best straight from the oven with a glass of white wine. SERVES 6

1 can chickpeas, rinsed, drained 2 tablespoons olive oil pinch of salt pinch of chili powder 2 sprigs of rosemary, just the leaves 1 ⁄3 cup Parmesan 1. Preheat oven to 380°F. 2. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and spread all out on a baking tray. 3. Roast in the oven for about 20–30 88 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

minutes. Give the tray a good shake every 5 minutes. They are done when they are golden and crispy. Best to eat right away, they can get a bit soggy if you leave them overnight.

Split Pea & Coconut Soup with Cod I love a good creamy split pea soup. Not into fish? Serve it as is or with some grilled chicken or some shrimp. SERVES 4

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 yellow onion, finely chopped  1 celery stalk, finely chopped 1 carrot, finely chopped 1 cup split peas  4 cups vegetable stock 

2 large chicken breasts salt and pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon butter 2 cups cooked faro 1 cup blanched edamame 1 bunch watercress 2 mini cucumbers, cut into wedges 12 mint leaves 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 1. Rub the chicken with salt and pepper and pan fry in butter until done. 2. Let it sit for 10 minutes and slice. 3. Mix faro, edamame, watercress, cucumber, mint, and chicken in a large bowl. 4. Mix oil, lemon, and vinegar and pour over the salad. 5. Season with salt and pepper.

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Split Pea & Co c onut So u pw

C ith od

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LEATHER Crafts by Susanna Blåvarg+Lova Blåvarg | Photography by Susanna Blåvarg

workshop

SHELF; RABBIT WALL POCKET

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BAG TAGS

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LEATHER OR FELT TRAY

LEATHER

requires minimal sewing and makes accessories that are both durable and stylish. Working with it is quick and easy, just make sure you have some basic tools like a sharp hobby knife, a good hole puncher, and also a special leather hole punch (which looks like a fork), used for making evenly spaced holes to sew through. While making these projects we fell in love with a lighter tan-colored leather that feels simultaneously retro and modern. Sew with a large needle and a strong thread—waxed thread or book binding thread will do!

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TOOL KIT SWEETPAULMAG.COM 93


WATCH BAND

CAMERA STRAP

KEY HOLDER 94 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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Camera Strap

Tassels

SUPPLIES:

SUPPLIES:

leather, 1” wide and very long hobby knife leather hole punch button studs keyring

rectangular piece of leather (we also used reflective textile!)+extra scissors hot glue gun and hot glue key ring

1. Fold the long strip 2” from each end.

the camera.

1. Cut narrow strips with scissors until you have ½” of the material left. 2. Cut a little broader strip of leather, fold it into a bow. 3. Use a hot glue gun and put glue on the backside of the ½” you didn’t cut through. 4. Roll it around your folded piece of leather, making sure that the glue is still hot. 5. Attach a key ring.

Key Holder

iPad Cover

2. Cut the strap a little narrower on each side of the fold with a hobby knife. 3. Punch 2 holes through both layers. 4. Attach button studs. 5. Fasten a 1” key ring in each end. You might also need a very small key ring in each end to attach the larger key ring to

SUPPLIES:

1” strip of leather leather hole punch button studs key ring lobster claw clasp key ring 1. Fold the leather strip twice. 2. Punch 2 holes through all 3 layers.

SUPPLIES:

iPad leather pen scissors or hobby knife saucer leather hole punch large needle strong thread

3. Attach button studs to fasten the layers together.

1. Put your iPad on a piece of leather.

4. Attach a 1” key ring in 1 end and a lobster claw clasp key ring in the other.

2. Mark with a pen an area ½” wider than the iPad on 2 sides and add a lid on the last side.

Apple Watch Leather Band

3. Cut out with scissors or a hobby knife.

SUPPLIES:

4. Cut out a similar piece but without a lid.

2 Apple Watch fasteners, available from amazon.com 1” leather strip+extra hobby knife leather hole punch large needle strong thread button stud

5. Cut a rounded piece of leather to make it easier to grab the iPad when taking it out of the cover (just trace the edge of a saucer with a hobby knife).

1. Fold a 1” leather strip around the fastener. You might need to scrape the leather a little on the backside with a hobby knife to make it more foldable.

8. Sew.

TASSELS

IPAD COVER; SEWING KIT

6. Cut out a 1” strip to hold the lid. 7. Punch holes with a leather hole punch tool ¼” from the rim on 3 sides.

2. Punch 2 holes through the folded leather and sew multiple times. 3. Cut the band to the right length and, after trying on your arm, punch a hole in each end and attach a button stud.

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Sewing Kit SUPPLIES:

rectangular piece of leather thick wool felt leather hole punch large needle strong thread ribbon 1. Cut out a rectangular piece of leather. 2. Cut out a slightly smaller piece of thick wool felt and put it on top of the back of the leather. 3. Fold in the middle to make a mark, unfold, and punch holes with a leather hole punch along the fold. 4. Sew. 5. Punch a hole on 1 side of the leather and attach a pretty ribbon.

Leather or Felt Tray These trays will look great on your table or nightstand! SUPPLIES:

square or rectangular piece of leather heavy wool felt leather hole punch nail studs golden paint (optional) 1. Use a square or rectangular piece of leather or heavy wool felt, and squeeze each corner together.

3. Punch holes with a leather hole punch ¼” from the rim, and in horizontal lines right across to make pockets.

1. Cut out the shape you prefer with a hobby knife or scissors.

4. Sew.

waterproof ink pad) or by punching metal letters into the leather.

5. Punch a hole close to the top and attach a pretty ribbon.

2. Decorate with stamps (use a

3. Attach a keyring or leather strips to fasten to your bag.

Shelf SUPPLIES:

First Aid Kit

wooden board 2 straps of leather, 1–2” wide

SUPPLIES:

1. Cut the leather straps to the right length and punch a hole in each end. 2. Fasten to the wall with a screw.

Rabbit Wall Pocket SUPPLIES:

piece of leather, 6”x6”+extra for rabbit head sharp hobby knife saucer leather hole punch large needle strong thread key ring screw 1. Cut a 4” wide, 2” deep half circle in the middle of the top of the leather (this is easy if you trace a saucer with a hobby knife). 2. Fold it twice (make it overlap 1” on the

paper envelope pieces of leather in 2 colors pen scissors leather hole punch button stud paper glue 1. Dismount a paper envelope. Put it on a piece of leather and trace with a pen. Make sure that all 4 triangles will lap over the center point when folded, all envelopes are not constructed that way, so you might have to lengthen the triangles. 2. Cut out the pieces with scissors. 3. Fold and punch a hole through the 3 bottom triangles, in the middle of the leather envelope. 4. Fasten a button stud through all 3 layers.

backside) to make the pocket.

5. Punch a hole through the uppermost layer and close it with the stud.

layers with a punch, fasten with binding nail studs.

3. Make holes along the bottom with hole punch.

6. To make the cross, cut out a cross and put another color leather behind the hole.

3. Paint the rim of the tray with

4. Sew.

golden paint.

5. Cut out a rabbit head (circle + 2 ears) and punch 2 holes for the eyes.

7. Glue it with paper glue to hold it in place while sewing.

Tool Kit

6. Put the head on the pocket.

8. Use a leather hole punch tool to make holes for sewing through both layers.

7. Punch 4 small holes where you want

9. Sew.

2. Make a hole right through both

SUPPLIES:

leather wool felt hobby knife leather hole punch large needle strong thread ribbon 1. Cut a house-shaped piece of leather and a similar piece of thick wool felt. 2. Cut a vertical line through the wool where you want the pocket openings.

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the nose, through all layers, and sew a cross for the nose. 8. Fasten a key ring on the backside with some stitches and hang it on a screw.

Bag Tags SUPPLIES:

leather hobby knife or scissors stamps or metal letters keyring or leather strips

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FIRST AID KIT

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The

humble egg The humble egg has become a hit ingredient and has made an appearance in magazines, on blogs, and on the menus of trendy restaurants all over the world. It’s no wonder, as it is both cheap and has a subtle, versatile flavor Recipes+styling by Sanna Kekalainen Photography by Reetta Pasanen

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HUEVOS RANCHEROS

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Egg & potato

lovers for life. In this

simple salad, the egg accompanies the subtle flavor of the new potatoes in just the right way

SALAD WITH NEW POTATOES

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GREEN SHAKSHOUKA

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SPAGHETTI, GREEN VEGETABLES, & POACHED EGGS

The elite of fall

pastas Ladle your plate with

green veggies and pasta and top it with a poached egg. The deliciously runny yolk not only tastes great but also acts as a sauce 102 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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Spaghetti, Green Vegetables, & Poached Eggs

4. Let the water simmer over medium heat.

SERVES 4

5. Using a spoon, stir the water in 1 direction until it is spinning around smoothly.

spaghet ti

14 oz spaghetti 4 poached eggs (see recipe below) sea salt flakes and white pepper from the mill, to taste sauce

16 oz green vegetables (flat sugar snap pea pods, zucchini, asparagus) 4 slices bacon 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons cooking cream or double cream Âź cup freshly grated Pecorino or Parmesan cheese

6. Gently pour an egg into the water. 7. Keep the cup as close to the surface of the water as possible. 8. Cook for approximately 3 minutes. 9. Remove the eggs from the pan with a slotted spoon. 10. Trim the edges if necessary.

1. Cook the pasta in salted water until done, according to the cooking instructions on the packet. 2. Cut the vegetables into bite-sized chunks. Remove the hard ends of the asparagus spears. 3. Parboil the asparagus and the zucchini chunks for 5 minutes and the pea pods for a few minutes in salted water. You can also cook them with the pasta. 4. Chop the bacon into small cubes. Fry the cubes in a frying pan. 5. Add the butter, oil, and cream. 6. Combine the bacon mixture, the cooked, drained spaghetti, and the vegetables. 7. Season with pepper and add some salt, if needed. 8 . Spoon the pasta onto plates. 9. Garnish with poached eggs. Poached Eggs SERVES 4

4 eggs at room temperature 6 cups water 1 tablespoon white vinegar 2 teaspoons salt

1. Crack the eggs into separate cups. 2. Bring the water to a boil. 3. Add the vinegar and salt.

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TRADITIONAL EGG SALAD SANDWICHES

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Crispy layers of

meringue take turns with layers

of cake in this laid-back layer cake. GIVE THE CAKE A FESTIVE TOUCH with fresh fruit cubes or wow your guests with juicy berries

MERINGUE LAYER CAKE

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Huevos Rancheros

SERVES 4-6

2. Peel and chop the garlic cloves.

SERVES 4

sal ad

3. Slice the spring onions and celery.

8 small corn tortillas sauce

1 onion 2 garlic cloves 1 mild fresh chili pod 3 tablespoons rapeseed oil 3 tablespoons taco seasoning mix 16 oz canned tomatoes 1½ cups boiled beans, black or kidney beans salt and black pepper from the mill, to taste ¼ cup chopped fresh coriander to serve

8 eggs 1 cup shredded cheddar 2 tomatoes, in cubes 2 avocados, in cubes chopped coriander

2 lbs new potatoes 4 eggs ¼ cup chopped fresh dill ¼ cup chopped fresh chives or flat-leaf parsley sauce

1 garlic clove 1 tablespoon coarsely ground Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon runny honey 3 tablespoons vinegar ½ cup olive oil salt and black pepper, to taste 1. Wash the potatoes well. Boil them until cooked. 2. Boil the eggs almost hard. Let them cool. 3. Peel and halve the eggs. 4. Peel and chop the garlic.

1. Peel and chop the onions.

5. Add the mustard, honey, and vinegar.

2. De-seed the chili and remove the stem. Chop the chili.

6. Pour in the oil. Season with salt and pepper.

3. Sauté the chopped onion, garlic, and chili in the oil for a few minutes.

7. Halve or slice the hot potatoes.

4. Add the taco seasoning. Stir the mixture for a few moments.

9. Garnish with the eggs.

5. Pour in the canned tomatoes and beans.

8. Add the sauce and the herbs. Tip: You can add chopped summer onions to the salad!

6. Let simmer over mild heat for at least 15 minutes.

Green Shakshouka

7. Season with pepper. Taste the mixture. Salt may not be necessary as the taco seasoning mix has salt.

2 garlic cloves 4 spring onions or 1 small leek 1 celery stalk 1 fresh green chili pod 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 thick bunch young kale 1 large bag baby spinach 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon paprika sea salt flakes and black pepper from the mill, to taste ¼ cup heavy cream 8 oz feta cheese 4 eggs

8. Fry the eggs on a frying pan. 9. Warm the tortillas. 10. To assemble, spoon the bean sauce on the tortillas and sprinkle with cheese. 11. Top with the eggs and the tomato and avocado cubes. 12. Garnish with coriander. Tip: You can add braised mince into the bean sauce!

Salad with New Potatoes This salad makes a great accompaniment to meat, fish, or chicken. You can also serve it as a part of a buffet.

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SERVES 4

rustic bread, for serving cherry tomatoes, for serving

4. De-seed the chili and remove the stem. 5. Chop the chili into small cubes. 6. Put the onions, celery, and chili into a frying pan and sauté in oil for a few minutes. 7. Add the kale and spinach in a few batches, stirring all the while. Keep frying for 3 minutes or until the kale has softened. 8. Season and stir well. 9. Pour in the cream and crumbled feta. 10. Let the mixture simmer until some of the cream has been absorbed. 11. Make 4 wells and crack the eggs into them. 12. Place the frying pan into the oven and bake for 7–10 minutes, until the eggs are done to your preference. Serve with peasant bread and cherry tomatoes.

Traditional Egg Salad Sandwiches SERVES 4

4 hard-boiled eggs ½ small celery stalk ¼ cup real mayonnaise 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard, regular or coarse ground a few drops Tabasco sea salt flakes and white pepper from the mill, to taste toast or rustic bread, for serving rocket or watercress, for serving toasted pine nuts, for serving 1. Peel and cube the boiled eggs. 2. Chop the celery into tiny cubes. 3. Combine the eggs, celery, mayonnaise, and mustard. 4. Season with Tabasco, salt, and pepper. 5. Toast or grill the bread, if preferred. 6. Spoon the egg salad over the bread. 7. Add the rocket or watercress. 8. Garnish with pine nuts and watercress.

1. Preheat the oven to 380°F.

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Meringue Layer Cake SERVES 12 meringue

4 egg whites 1 cup sugar cake

1½ sticks melted butter 4 egg yolks ¾ cup sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla sugar 1 cup flour 2 teaspoons baking powder ¼ cup heavy cream filling

1¼ cups heavy cream ½ cup raspberry jam or lemon curd 15 oz fresh berries (raspberries, blueberries, chopped fruit) decor ation

berries edible flowers 1. Preheat the oven to 360°F. 2. To make the meringue, separate the yolks from the egg whites. 3. Whisk the egg whites until they form stiff peaks. 4. Add the sugar and whisk until smooth. Put the mixture aside. 5. For the cake layer, melt the butter and let it cool while you prepare the other ingredients. 6. Whisk the egg yolks and sugars. 7. Mix the flour and baking powder together. 8. Add the flour mixture into the egg yolk mixture, alternating with the melted butter and the cream. 9. Pour the batter into 2 loose-bottomed cake tins (9”) that have been lined with baking parchment. Smooth the surface with a spoon. 10. Gently spoon the meringue on top of the cake mixture. 11. Bake on the bottom rack of the oven for approximately 25 minutes. Cool completely and remove from the cake tins. 12. Whip the cream. 13. Flavor the cream with vanilla sugar, if preferred.

Top with berries, whipped cream, and jam or lemon curd. 15. Place the other cake on top of the first. Garnish the cake with the rest of the berries and some flowers, if preferred. Serve the rest of the whipped cream in a bowl with the cake. Tip: You can add pistachios or shredded white chocolate for decoration and additional flavor!

14. Put 1 of the cakes onto a serving plate.

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Warming spices Now is the time to light those fireplaces and cozy up! We show you how to get the smell and taste of warming spices Food+crafts+photography by Dietlind Wolf

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Mortar To get the best flavor you should use whole spices and crush them in a mortar. The whole spices contain aromatic oils that will increase the flavor. The mortars will also look beautiful in your kitchen.

Banana Cake 1 tablespoon flaxmeal 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar ¾ cup cashew milk or oat milk (unsweetened) 3 figs, stemmed, chopped 1 apple, peeled, grated 2 to 3 bananas, chopped 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1½ teaspoons baking soda ¾ cup walnuts, chopped ¾ cup cashews, chopped 2 teaspoons 9 spice powder (see recipe) 1½ cups brown rice flour 1 ⁄3 cup arrowroot flour/starch ½ teaspoon baking powder 2 tablespoons molasses ¼ cup coconut oil+more for the pan 1. Preheat oven to 475°F. 2. Grease a loaf pan (8 ½”x4 ½”) and set aside. 3. Mix the flax meal and 2½ tablespoons of water in a small bowl and set aside. 4. Place the apple cider vinegar and non-dairy milk in a small bowl and set aside. 5. Cook figs, apple, banana, ¾ cup of water, and vanilla in a medium-sized pot over medium-high heat until water evaporates and mixture is thick. 6. Take off heat and add 1 teaspoon of baking soda and set aside to cool. 7. Toast the nuts in a skillet over medium heat until golden—about 4–5 minutes. 8. Add the 9 spice mixture and toss to coat. Pour into a small bowl and set aside. 9. Mix the brown rice flour, arrowroot, baking powder, and remaining ½ teaspoon of baking soda, and set aside.

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10. In a large bowl combine fruit mixture, nut mixture, flax mixture, molasses, vinegar/milk mixture, and dry ingredients, and mix thoroughly to combine. 11. Pour into a greased loaf pan and bake for 35 minutes. 12. Bring temperature down to 350°F, run a knife around the edges of the cake, invert onto a sheet pan, and continue to bake for 10 more minutes or until a cake tester comes out clean.

MORTAR

13. Let cool completely. The cake is easier to cut when it’s cooled for 2 hours.

Chocolate Sauce 4 oz bittersweet chocolate, chopped ½ cup oat or cashew milk 3 tablespoons light brown sugar ¼ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cardamom 1. Place the chocolate in a heat proof bowl and set aside. 2. Heat the milk, brown sugar, salt, and cardamom in a small saucepan until almost boiling, quickly take off the heat and pour hot milk over the chocolate, let it sit for 5 minutes, then whisk until smooth. Let the chocolate sauce cool at least 15 minutes or until it thickens.

WARMING 9 SPICE POWDER

Warming 9 Spice Powder Use as many whole spices as you can for this spice mix. It’s great for baking, hot chocolate, and cookies

3 teaspoons ground cinnamon 2 teaspoons ground cloves 1½ teaspoons ground cardamom 2 teaspoons ground ginger ½ teaspoon ground star anise ¾ teaspoon ground coriander ½ teaspoon ground fennel ½ teaspoon ground black pepper ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg 1. In a small bowl mix all the spices together.

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Banana cake

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Spiced Buckwheat Crackers

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Spiced Buckwheat Crackers 2 cups buckwheat flour+extra for rolling out
 1 teaspoon cinnamon
 4 egg whites
 salt
 1 tablespoon melted coconut oil 1 teaspoon cardamom 1 teaspoon fennel
 1 teaspoon ajowan 1 teaspoon paprika powder 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon grains of paradise
 pinch of salt 1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. 2. In a large bowl mix buckwheat flour, cinnamon, egg whites, and a pinch of salt. 3. Mix it until a smooth dough. 4. Roll it out in a little buckwheat flour until 1⁄3” thick. 5. Use a cutter and turn them into cookies. 6. Brush a thin layer of coconut oil on each side and place them on a parchment covered baking rack. 7. Bake until dry and crisp. 8. Mix together all the spices in a small bowl and sprinkle a little on each cracker while they are warm. BUCKWHEAT CRACKER SPICES

THE SMELL OF CINNAMON: ADD SOME LONG CINNAMON STICKS TO TAKE THE FALL FIRE TO THE NEXT LEVEL. IT WILL CREATE THE MOST AMAZING SMELL ALL AROUND YOUR HOUSE. IT WILL FEEL WARM AND COMFORTING.

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Star Anise Branches Supples: branch whole star anise copper wire wire cutter 1. Twist the wire around the star anise and fasten it to the branch.

Bowls of Spices Instead of buying potpourri, simply fill bowls with spices like cloves or star anise. Not only does it look beautiful but the smell is really intoxicating.

Spiced Nuts 1½ cups walnuts 1 teaspoon 9 spice powder 1 tablespoon coconut oil 2 tablespoons light brown sugar 1. Toast walnuts in a small skillet over medium heat until golden brown about 4 minutes. 2. Add the coconut oil and then toss in the spices to coat. 3. Add the brown sugar and 2 tablespoons of water and cook until it thickens a bit, about 2–3 minutes.

STAR ANISE BRANCHES

4. Take off heat, pour onto a sheet pan, spread out, and let cool.

BOWLS OF SPICES

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Spiced nuts

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Garam Masala

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Garam Masala This spice mix is a must in any Indian cooking. Some of the spices are a little hard to get, try specialty stores or online.

24 grams fennel seeds 6 grams cinnamon 50 grams cumin 1 gram mace 6 grams cardamom 6 grams cloves 1 gram nutmeg 24 grams black cardamom 6 grams star anise ½ gram saffron 1. Place all spices except saffron in a dry pan and roast them until they darken and start to become fragrant. 2. Place in a mortar or a spice blender and add the saffron.

CINNAMON & NUTMEG NECKLACE

3. Work until fine powder. CINNAMON COASTER; CARDAMOM COFFEE

4. Sift the spices after to get rid of any larger pieces.

Cinnamon & Nutmeg Necklace Supplies: 18 oz whole nutmeg cinnamon sticks in different sizes sharp knife string 1. Thread the cinnamon on the string. 2. To make the nutmeg necklace, make an incision on each side of the nutmeg using a sharp knife and use 2 strings to tie each nutmeg together. 3. Hang on wall and enjoy the amazing smell.

Cinnamon Coaster Supplies: 40 to 50 cinnamon sticks, around 2" each string 1. Place the cinnamon sticks next to each other in a circle and tie the string around them really tight. 2. When you place something warm on it it will warm up the oils in the sticks and smell wonderful.

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Cardamom Coffee MAKES 4 CUPS FOR A FRENCH PRESS

4 tablespoons ground coffee 1½ teaspoons crushed cardamom pods 6½ cups boiling water 1. Add coffee and cardamom in a French press. 2. Add water and let it sit 2 minutes before serving. 3. Add sugar and cream if needed.

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Tiffani When Paul met

Recipes by Tiffani Thiessen | Styling by Paul Lowe Photography by Alexandra Grablewski | Illustration by Brady Smith


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I’M GOING TO ADMIT IT—

I had no idea who Tiffani Thiessen was before I moved to the US. But spending many a Sunday morning watching re-runs of Saved by the Bell, I certainly knew who Kelly Kapowski was. It was only after watching the show White Collar that I became a big fan of Tiffani’s. So you can imagine my delight when I found out that she was a Sweet Paul Magazine fan! We emailed back and forth a little and she invited me to meet her and her family in NYC. I’m always a bit nervous about meeting new people—throw a celebrity into the mix and I’m kind of a wreck—but Tiffani made me feel like I had known her for years. She was very sweet, genuine, and she calls everyone darling—which I love! Just as she was well-known as Kelly, Tiffani has found the limelight again in her awesome Cooking Channel show called Dinner at Tiffani’s. I love how casual the show is—it’s a mix between a cooking show and a talk show, where she cooks surrounded by friends. I was lucky enough to hang out with her at this year’s Sweet Paul Makerie and asked her some questions about cooking and life. Why is food important to you? Food is important to me because it allows people to connect. Besides needing food to nourish my body, it nourishes my mind as well. Sitting down over a great meal is truly one of my most favorite things to do. I love how it brings people together. I love how food can change the way you’re feeling by the first bite. Food feeds my soul… literally.

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It also allows me to be creative in a different way; I am a creative person by nature and if I am not getting my creative juices flowing as an actress you will find me in the kitchen getting creative with food. I grew up with a grandmother who was a great cook. Who inspired you to start cooking? I was raised by a long line of women who cook: my grandmother, my mother, and my aunt. I was always next to them in the kitchen learning everything I could. I have vivid memories of being on my tippy toes watching these three women together in a kitchen whipping up magic. To me they were like artists—mixing things together in bowls like a painter mixes colors on a palette… and in the end the finished piece is a beautiful dish or work of art.

have a problem with them. Ha! Oatmeal, quinoa, and farro. Ketchup and hot sauce (because I’m married to a Texan). Spices galore, different varieties of citrus from my citrus trees, fresh herbs from my garden. Cacao of every type. And then being that I have two kids… I have seaweed snacks, freeze-dried fruit, applesauce pouches, granola bars, graham crackers, and quick mac n’ cheese… for those nights. You know what nights I mean. Favorite all-time dish? I can never say no to a good grilled cheese with caramelized onions and homemade roasted tomato soup. Of course it has to be accompanied with a big glass of wine. And then there’s nothing wrong with ending a great meal with something sweet like my chocolate espresso brownies.

When I was around nine my mom was working the evening shift and I was the only girl left at home. So being that my dad didn’t cook, I was placed as head chef, fixing my dad and brothers dinner every night. It was my first real lesson in cooking for others. I love how your daughter calls making pizza “decorating” pizza. Has having kids changed your cooking? Completely. And every year it seems to change more. I have a daughter who has finally become my little side-kick in the kitchen and loves to cook along side of me. As well, I have a baby boy who I call my gourmet baby. He eats anything and loves it. He has a big appetite and a love of food… and I am not talking baby food. Once that kid got a taste of real food, he never went back. I can’t tell you how much it puts a smile on my face to see my son loving all different types of food. What do you always keep in your pantry? Infused oils and an array of different types of pasta. Dark chocolate, dried fruit, and nuts of all sorts. Nut butters because I may

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Cherry Green Tea Cocktail SERVES 6

5 green tea bags ¼ cup sugar ½ cup frozen pitted cherries, thawed ¼ cup good quality Maraschino cherries such as Luxardo brand+more for garnishing ¾ cup vodka 1. Bring 3 cups water to boil in a medium pot. 2. Add tea bags, take the pot off the heat, and steep for 4 minutes. 3. Remove tea bags and stir in the sugar until dissolved. 4. Cool. 5. In a pitcher, muddle together the cherries, Maraschino cherries, and vodka. 6. Add tea and stir to combine.

CHERRY GREEN TEA COCKTAIL

7. Serve over ice in glasses or teacups. 8. Garnish with more Maraschino cherries.

We all have our dirty food secrets (mine is Taco Bell). What’s yours? I grew up on Taco Bell. Paul, that’s mine too! Taco Supreme or Nachos Bellgrande and a Diet Pepsi all the way. Funny how I would have a diet soda with a meal like that. Hello, Tiffani… that makes no sense! I would hit the beach on the weekends with my family or friends and we would always stop by Taco Bell on our way home to fill that craving. (Shhhh, don’t tell anyone.) How do you plan your shows—the food and guests? I plan my menus and themes first then build the guests around those menus, hoping that it all works out with their schedules. Of course that doesn’t always happen, so we always have back up plans in place just in case. But I have to say we have been pretty lucky. I also have to work with certain people’s dietary restrictions as well. I have many friends who are vegans, vegetarians, and gluten free. So like my

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mother taught me a long time ago… always be prepared for anything.

Chicken & Dumplings SERVES 6 stew

What’s the one thing we don’t know about Tiffani? I hate tomatoes on my sandwiches. And I used to be a vegetarian for almost 15 years. I broke that streak when I was pregnant with my daughter. After a yoga class I walked into an In-N-Out and ordered a cheeseburger. I never went back. I later found out I was low in iron, so I understood why I was craving meat so badly. What’s next? Season 3 of Dinner at Tiffani’s. I’m also doing a summer special of Dinner at Tiffani’s in NY and a holiday special. And then between nursing the baby, no sleep, making food for my first grader, and an always hungry husband… I will be able to finish my cookbook. You have done many of those, Paul! Any pointers?

3½ lbs bone-in, skin on, chicken thighs Kosher salt ground black pepper 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 4 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 large onion, chopped 2 medium carrots, peeled, sliced ¼” thick 1 small bulb fennel, trimmed, quartered, sliced crosswise ¼” thick 1 parsnip, peeled, sliced ¼” thick 2 cloves garlic, minced 10 tablespoons all purpose flour ½ cup dry sherry 4½ cups chicken broth 4 to 5 sprigs fresh thyme 2 bay leaves 3 to 4 sprigs fresh Italian parsley

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CHICKEN & DUMPLINGS

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dumplings

2 cups all purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ¾ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper ¾ cup buttermilk 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh thyme leaves 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill

ROASTED CHICKEN POT PIE

1. For the stew, pat the chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. 2. Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. 3. When the oil is shimmering, add half of the chicken and cook until golden on both sides, about 10 minutes. 4. Transfer to a plate and repeat with the remaining chicken. Set aside to cool. 5. Add butter to the pan and melt over medium-high heat. 6. Add onion and ½ teaspoon of salt and cook until soft, about 5 minutes. 7. Add carrots, fennel, and parsnip, and cook until just tender, 4–5 minutes. 8. Add garlic and when it releases its fragrance stir in flour and cook, stirring, for 2–3 minutes. 9. Add sherry and stir, scraping up any bits stuck to the pan. 10. Add stock and stir to combine. 11. Tie thyme, bay leaves, and parsley together with kitchen twine, drop the bundle into the broth, and add the chicken, taking care to fully immerse it in the liquid. 12. Bring stew to a boil, reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer until the chicken is fully cooked, about 1 hour. Remove from heat. 13. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board. 14. Remove the bundle of herbs and discard.

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15. When chicken is cool enough to handle, remove skin and bones, and discard.

flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and pepper.

16. Tear the meat into bite-size pieces.

21. Add the butter, buttermilk, and herbs, and stir to form a thick, very sticky dough.

17. Using a skimmer or wide spoon, skim the fat from the surface of the sauce in the pot.

22. Using your hands, roll the dough into balls about the size of a golf ball.

18. Return the chicken and any drippings to the stew.

23. Drop the dough balls into the stew, spaced about ¼” apart.

19. For the dumplings, bring the stew to a simmer.

24. Cover and simmer over low heat until the dumplings are firm and cooked through, about 15 minutes.

20. In a medium bowl, whisk together the

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Beef & Mushroom Stroganoff Over Creamy Polenta

1. For the polenta—in a medium saucepan, bring water to a boil with salt.

SERVES 4-6

2. Whisk in polenta and reduce the heat to medium low.

polenta

4 cups water 1¼ teaspoons Kosher salt 1 cup instant polenta stroganoff

2 yellow Spanish onions, thinly sliced 1 large shallot, thinly sliced 
 1 tablespoon garlic, minced 2 to 3 thyme sprigs 4 tablespoons olive oil
 4 cups wild mushroom mix 12 oz beef sirloin, thinly sliced ¼ cup brandy 1 cup beef stock
 2 handfuls baby spinach, stems trimmed sour cream, for serving, garnishing parsley, chopped, for garnishing lemon zest, for garnishing

3. Continue to stir so there are no lumps and polenta starts to thicken, about 7 minutes, stirring so the bottom does not burn. 4. Scrape down the sides of the pan. 5. Remove from heat. 6. For the Stroganoff, add enough olive oil to coat the bottom of a large skillet. 7. Sauté onions and shallots for about 4 minutes over medium heat.

3 lbs bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs, rinsed, patted dry 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ teaspoon paprika ½ teaspoon granulated garlic 1 teaspoon Kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper, for seasoning filling

17. Add the stock and let simmer. 18. Add the spinach leaves until wilted and then return the vegetable and meat mixture to the pan and heat through.

1. For the crust, combine flour, salt, butter, and cheese in work bowl of a food processor fitted with the pastry blade.

19. Add salt and pepper, if needed.

2. Pulse a few times until the mixture resembles fine gravel.

8. Add garlic and thyme and cook until lightly golden around the edges. 9. Season with salt and pepper. 10. Add mushrooms and cook about 5 minutes until caramelized. 11. Transfer the contents of the pan to a bowl, remove thyme sprigs, and set aside. 12. Sprinkle beef with salt and pepper.

the beef.

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roast chicken

6 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 large onion, chopped fine Kosher salt ground black pepper 3 medium carrots, peeled, cut crosswise to ¼” pieces 1 small fennel bulb, cut into quarters, sliced crosswise to ¼” pieces 1 parsnip, peeled, cut crosswise to ¼” pieces 4 cloves of garlic, minced ¼ cup dry sherry 6 tablespoons flour 4 cups chicken stock ¼ cup milk 4 cups roasted chicken, torn to bite-size pieces ¾ cup frozen peas 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves 1 egg, for egg wash

13. Return the pan to the stove and add 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil and

I LOVE HOW FOOD CAN CHANGE THE WAY YOU’RE FEELING BY THE FIRST BITE. FOOD FEEDS MY SOUL... LITERALLY

¼ cup finely grated Parmesan cheese 2 to 4 oz ice water

14. Sauté until browned on 1 side, flip, and brown on the remaining side, 1–2 minutes per side. 15. Remove the meat to the bowl with vegetables. 16. Add the brandy and deglaze the pan, scraping up any brown bits that are stuck to the bottom.

20. Top polenta with meat and mushroom mixture. 21. Garnish with sour cream, parsley, and lemon zest. Roasted Chicken Pot Pie SERVES 6 crust

2½ cups all purpose flour pinch of salt 8 oz unsalted butter, cut to ½” cubes

3. Add the water a few tablespoons at a time until the dough comes together and forms a ball. 4. Remove from food processor, form the dough into a disk, wrap it in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or until ready to use. 5. For the roast chicken, preheat oven to 325°F. 6. In a large bowl, slather chicken with

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APPLE PIE

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23. Fold the overhang under itself to create a lip around the edge of the pan and use your fingers to flute the edges (or use the tines of a fork to create an attractive edge). Alternatively, tuck the overhang dough into the side of the pan.

until the dough comes together and forms a ball.

24. Cut 4–6 1” vent holes in a large pie or a 1” vent hole in a smaller pie. 25. In a small bowl, lightly beat egg with 1 tablespoon water.

7. For the filling—in a large bowl, combine the apples, sugar, crystallized ginger, cornstarch, lemon juice, cinnamon, vanilla bean paste, and salt.

10. For the filling, heat the butter in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat.

26. Lightly brush pie crust with beaten egg.

8. To assemble the pie, preheat oven to 425°F.

11. When the butter has melted, add the onion, ½ teaspoon salt, and a dash of ground black pepper and cook until soft,

27. Bake pie until the crust is golden brown and filling is bubbly, about 60 minutes for large pies, 45–50 minutes for smaller pies.

9. Remove 1 of the disks of dough from the refrigerator.

olive oil and seasonings and set on a rack in a roasting pan. 7. Roast until the skin is golden and crispy and a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh reaches 165°F, 45–60 minutes. 8. Set aside to cool. 9. When cool enough to handle, remove the skin, pull the meat from the bones, and tear into bite-size pieces.

about 3 minutes. 12. Add carrots, fennel, and parsnip, and cook until the vegetables are brightly colored, 2–3 minutes. 13. Add garlic and, when fragrant, stir in flour. 14. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring constantly. 15. Add sherry and scrape up any bits stuck to the pan. 16. When liquid has almost evaporated, stir in stock and milk, and stir until thickened, about 10 minutes or until the sauce coats the back of a spoon. If sauce is too thick, add chicken stock to reach desired consistency. 17. Remove from heat, stir in chicken, peas, herbs, 1 tablespoon salt, and ½ teaspoon ground black pepper (or to taste). 18. To assemble, preheat oven to 350°F. 19. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough to a ¼” thick rectangle about 15”x11”. 20. If using individual ramekins, cut 6 circles in the shape of the ramekins plus an extra 1” around the circumference of the dishes. If using a single baking dish, cut to that shape leaving an extra 1” around the sides. 21. Pour filling into the ramekins or a 9”x13” pan or similarly sized shallow baking dish. 22. Lay dough over the filling and trim to ½” from the edge of the pan.

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Apple Pie SERVES 8 crust

2½ cups all purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar ¾ teaspoon salt 8 oz unsalted butter, cut to ½” cubes ¼ cup ice water+more if needed filling

3 peeled and thinly sliced Granny Smith apples 3 peeled and thinly sliced McIntosh apples ²⁄3 cup sugar 2 tablespoons crystallized ginger, finely chopped 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste pinch Kosher salt 1 egg, for egg wash serving

vanilla ice cream 1. For the crust, put flour, sugar, and salt into the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the pastry blade. 2. Pulse a few times to combine. 3. Add butter. 4. Pulse a few times until mixture resembles fine gravel. 5. Add water a few tablespoons at a time

6. Remove from food processor, divide the dough in 2, form each piece into a disk, wrap in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or until ready to use.

10. If necessary, leave to soften for 10 minutes or so. 11. On a floured surface, roll out the disk to 12” round and about 1⁄8” thick. 12. Transfer to a 9” pie dish and gently press into place, eliminating any air pockets. 13. Trim the dough overhang to ½”. 14. On a floured surface, roll the second disk to 12” round and about 1⁄8” thick. 15. Transfer the apple filling to the dough-lined dish. 16. On top of the filling, add the second crust, allowing each to overhang by ½”. 17. Fold top crust edges over the overhang of the bottom crust and crimp edges to seal. 18. Cut 6 slits into the top crust. 19. Beat the egg with 1–2 tablespoons of water. 20. Using a pastry brush, lightly paint the crust with egg. 21. Using aluminum foil, make a “collar” around the edges of the pie to prevent it from browning too quickly. 22. Bake for 15 minutes. 23. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F and continue baking until the crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbly, about 1 hour. 24. Remove the foil collar for the last 10–15 minutes. 25. Transfer pie to a rack and cool completely. Serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

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apple a day

An

Text by Kim Moreau Jacobs | Photography by Pernille Loof

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BELOW: FABIO CHIZZOLA AND LAURA FERRARA, OWNERS OF WESTWIND ORCHARD. PHOTO BY MARCO GUADAGNINI.

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It’s not uncommon for New Yorkers to dream of decamping to the charms of upstate New York... but it’s a little less common for them to go from working in the fashion business to running a full-scale apple orchard and certified organic farm, in addition. But for Laura Ferrara and Fabio Chizzola, owners of Westwind Orchard in New York’s Hudson River Valley, the apples couldn’t be stopped. Their quest for a country getaway lead them to a 32-acre plot of land covered in untended knotty apple trees. Fourteen years later, Westwind Orchards is a testament to the resilience of Mother Nature (and its hard-working owners who balance the business with city life). For Laura and Fabio, the entire orchard has felt fated. “It has to be destiny in some respect.” There are parallels to the farm’s previous owner—like Fabio, he was a photographer from NYC. Then there are the pictures that Laura recently found, snapshots of her as a child surrounded by her parents and uncles and their friends drinking wine, playing music, and hanging out in the backyard. Pictures that could just as easily have been taken on their farm today, with the sense of community and good energy radiating parallel in the past and the present. “It’s all come full circle in that way,” the couple said. But back to the beginning. Following the birth of their son, Laura and Fabio spent plenty of time in the Catskills, fly-fishing and rock climbing. Soon after, the time seemed ripe to find a place that allowed Laura and Fabio a little nature. While hunting for a place near their rock climbing haunts, they came across an overgrown apple orchard. “We had no idea what we were getting ourselves into, but the serene setting of

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the landscape, complemented by the old majestic trees, was impossible to pass up,” Laura said. Fruit farmers advised them to cut down the trees and get new ones, but those knotty trees stirred their Italian roots. “We just kept thinking about how the shapes of these old trees looked like olive trees and even if they never produced apples they would be beautiful to look at,” Laura said. “In some people’s eyes, these trees and apples were disfigured—we saw beauty and nature at its best with no human intervention. When we had our first harvest of apples, it was as if we had tasted an apple for the first time—perfect, pure, and simply delicious.” That first apple harvest was a bumper crop. “It was really like we didn’t do anything to the trees. The trees all bloomed and it was so beautiful,” Laura said. “We had so many apples we didn’t know what to do. Friends came. We made applesauce.” Fabio worked with a local pomologist to research the varieties, finding that the trees were heirloom apple strains like Stayman and Ida Red. His research and tending revived the trees and in 2008, the doors swung open. Over the years, operations evolved—now the farm also grows pears, paw paws, berries, garlic, winter squash, tomatoes, and grapes, and is home to honeybees, pigs, and chickens. The family produces maple syrup, jams, handmade wood cheese boards, wood butter, cider vinegar, and applesauce. Last year, they built a wood-fired oven to make pizzas to feed the many guests coming by. This fall, visitors can pick their own apples and raspberries, or drop in for movie nights and performances from local artists, or to sample their latest endeavor: hard cider. “There is something special when the sweet juice from our apples ferments into a kind of divine, natural effervescent hard cider,” Fabio said. “We have been experimenting for a few years, and finally we found what we like. Old style cider-making and natural fermentation are the key.” To be fair, the couple aren’t total novices. Growing up in Rome, Fabio

NONNA PIA

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spent summers in the country farming a small plot of land with his dad. Laura was born on a farm in the Campania region in Southern Italy, before immigrating to Brooklyn at the age of four. Her maternal grandfather packed a fig branch and a grapevine for the trip, and Laura watched as her father tended the trees to yield figs and grapes in America. “Those branches always symbolized the importance of planting roots in a new country but still keeping your traditions and heritage close to your heart,” Laura said. Both of their mothers help with that heritage, working during their visits—when Fabio’s mother arrives from Rome she cooks tomato sauce and baked goods, and spends time foraging for dandelions. “When people come to the farm they actually ask for Nonna Dora and Nonna Pia,” Laura said. “It amazes us that each of them, in their eighties, still have so much life within them and bring such joy to the guests that visit the farm.” The elders aren’t the only ones involved. When Matteo, their son, is not in school, he loves working at the farm store during harvest season, packaging honey, and hand pressing the cider. But his biggest contribution is the logo—which was designed based on a Valentine’s Day card he drew at age six. When asked what’s been the biggest surprise of running the business, Laura demurs. “I can’t say anything has been a surprise, because we never knew what we were getting into. We went into this

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with our hearts, not our heads.” In that way everything has been a surprise, from learning about tractor tires to garlic rot. Laura credits the years they spent in other careers, helping them to manage the dualities that come with running a business that requires you to wear every hat. That doesn’t mean it’s easy: Laura and Fabio refuse to call themselves farmers. “Farming is physical and mental,” Laura says. “A farmer has to be a chemist, a scientist, a mechanic. You need so much knowledge to run a farm and to grow crops. I’m in awe and so appreciative of them.” Every year she’s thankful that the apples return. When folks call and ask if there will be apples in a few weeks, she often says, “I’m not sure, call back.” But resilience of the trees soldiers on, surviving frost and El Niño. “We have developed a magical connection with the land throughout the years. It truly has filled us with joy and inspired us to continue on this journey.” Like the apples returning, Laura’s also been shocked to see the people come back to the orchard. She’s embraced its role in the community and delights in seeing people take joy in eating apples or just enjoying their time in nature. “That was another surprise: that people wanted to pick apples and hang out with us,” Laura says. “We’ve gotten to meet lovely people we wouldn’t have met otherwise. It’s our home, but it’s also become a home to many other people. We never had time to think about it.”

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Nonna Pia's Apple Pie apples

¾ lb organic mixed apples ¹⁄8 cup Sambuca 2 oz organic sugar cane mix

4 eggs ¼ cup canola oil pinch of salt ½ g Vanillina Pane degli Angeli 10 oz organic flour 16 g of lievito Pane Degli Angeli ¾ cup warm whole milk * Pane degli Angeli is an Italian baking powder. You can purchase on Amazon or in your local Italian grocer 1. Cut apples thin, pour Sambuca, add sugar. 2. Mix and let it sit for 1 hour. 3. Mix eggs and sugar with electric mixer at 5–6 speed. 4. Add salt and Vanillina Pane degli Angeli, mixing until you don’t feel the grains of the sugar. 5. Add flour and work it with a spoon, then add lievito, milk, and canola oil. Mix first with a spoon then with electric mixer until desired consistency. 6. Preheat oven to 350°. 7. Put a bit of canola oil into the pan. 8. Spread it with your hand, so the entire pan is oiled and then spread a bit of flour on top. 9. Pour all mix into pan, add the apples 1 by 1 putting them in the mix and also the surface. 10. Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes. 11. Insert a knife into the cake—if the knife comes out dry, the cake is cooked.

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Autumn in

Australia Recipes+crafts+styling+photography by china squirrel

china squirrel takes us on an autumnal journey to the enchanting Southern Highlands of New South Wales, Australia. As days become cooler, home grown potatoes are baked crunchy and crisp and served drizzled with warm bacon jam, a fresh garden harvest of sweet potatoes is baked into a delicious caramel tart, and lazy afternoons are spent hand stitching fallen autumn leaves and crafting rescued potato sacks FOLLOW US @SWEETPAULMAGAZINE

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home grown CARAMEL SWEET POTATO TART

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Caramel Sweet Potato Tart A simple and delicious tart created from crisp puff pastry and sweet potato slices smothered in a warm caramel sauce. SERVES 6

10”x10” good quality sheet of puff pastry 14 oz sweet potatoes ½ cup superfine sugar 3 tablespoons water 1 oz butter, chopped ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract pinch of ground nutmeg pinch of ground cinnamon ice cream, for serving

14. Top with pastry round, tucking the edges of the pastry down. 15. Use a sharp knife to make a few slits in the top of the pastry then bake in preheated oven for 40–45 minutes or until pastry is golden and puffed. 16. Remove from oven and allow tart to stand 10 minutes before inverting tart onto a serving plate. 17. Slice into wedges and serve warm with ice cream.

1. Lightly grease a 9” shallow pie tin. 2. Place pastry onto work surface then place pie tin onto pastry. 3. Use a sharp knife to trace around tin edge to form a circle of pastry, discarding pastry trimmings. 4. Place pastry circle onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate until needed. 5. Preheat oven to 375ºF. 6. Peel sweet potatoes, thinly slice using a mandolin, cover, and set aside. 7. Place sugar and water into a saucepan, stir to mix. 8. Place over a low heat and cook, stirring constantly, until sugar completely melts. 9. Increase the heat to medium and cook, without stirring, until sugar syrup caramelizes and is light golden in color. 10. Remove from heat; gradually stir in chopped butter, mixing well until combined. 11. Add vanilla, nutmeg, and cinnamon and mix well. 12. Working quickly, pour caramel into the base of prepared pie tin and spread to coat the base of the tin. 13. Cover caramel with sweet potatoes slices, starting in the center and overlapping in spiraling circle.

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Hand Sewn Leaves A simple and organic craft project for recycling fallen leaves. Pretty as decorations around your home and can be strung together to make a lovely garland. SUPPLIES:

leaves lengths of 8 ply (or less) wool hole punch embroidery needle 1. Gather fallen leaves; use a hole puncher to carefully make holes around the edges. 2. Sew wool through the holes in a pattern of your choice around each leaf.

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fallen autumn leaves

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Crafting with Potato Sacks Up-cycle potato sacks with paint or hand dye using fabric dyes then create textural craft projects for your home, like placemats, drink coasters, or cushion covers. SUPPLIES:

potato sacks scissors acrylic paint fabric dye To paint: 1. Use scissors to cut potato sacks into the shapes you require, then paint with your choice of acrylic paint and allow to dry. To hand-dye: 1. Thoroughly wet the potato sack then squeeze out excess water. 2. Prepare your choice of fabric dye, following packet directions. 3. Using gloves, place burlap into dye; mix until well coated in dye. Note: the longer it is in the dye liquid the deeper the color. 4. Remove from dye when your required color is reached. 5. Squeeze out all excess liquid and allow to dry naturally before using in your craft projects.

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Twine from Potato Sacks A great way to recycle potato sacks is by making useable twine—great for gift wrapping and everyday craft projects. SUPPLIES:

potato sacks fabric dye For natural color twine: 1. Cut the edges of potato sacks, then carefully unravel row by row of the twine to create rustic natural twine. For variegated color twine: 1. Hand dye the sacks (before unraveling the twine to achieve this effect)— thoroughly wet the potato sack then squeeze out excess water. 2. Prepare your choice of fabric dye, following packet directions. 3. Using gloves, place burlap into dye; mix until well coated in dye. Note: the longer it is in the dye liquid the deeper the color. 4. Remove from dye when your required color is reached. 5. Squeeze out all excess liquid and allow to dry naturally. 6. Cut edges of potato sack then carefully unravel row by row of the twine to reveal a variegated colored rustic twine. For solid color twine: 1. Cut the edges of potato sacks then carefully unravel row by row of the twine then dye the twine lengths using your choice of fabric dyes. 2. Thoroughly wet the burlap twine lengths then squeeze out excess water. 3. Prepare your choice of fabric dyes, following packet directions. 4. Using gloves, place twine into dye, mix until well coated in dye. Note: the longer it is in the dye liquid the deeper the color. 5. Remove from dye when your required color is reached. 6. Squeeze out all excess liquid and allow to dry naturally.

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CRISPY SMASHED POTATOES WITH HOMEMADE BACON JAM 142 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

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Crispy Smashed Potatoes with Homemade Bacon Jam These make perfect food to serve on a shared table and enjoy with friends in the sun on an autumn day.

large fork. 9. Brush potatoes with olive oil and bake a further 20 minutes or until golden and crisp.

SERVES 6

10. Serve hot with Homemade Bacon Jam.

12 medium potatoes olive oil

Homemade Bacon Jam

1. Preheat oven to 400ºF. 2. Line a large baking tray with parchment paper. 3. Wash and dry potatoes, leaving skins intact. 4. Place potatoes into a large bowl; add 2–3 tablespoons of olive oil and toss to coat well. 5. Transfer potatoes to lined baking tray.

MAKES ABOUT 2 CUPS

12 oz bacon 2 brown onions, sliced ½ cup brown sugar ½ cup strong brewed black coffee ½ cup water ¼ cup cider vinegar ½ cup pure maple syrup 1. Roughly chop the bacon.

7. Remove potatoes from oven.

2. Heat a non-stick fry pan over a medium heat; add bacon and cook, stirring until bacon is tender, but not brown, about 6 minutes.

8. Working 1 at a time, gently squash each potato using a potato masher or

3. Remove from pan to a plate using a slotted spoon.

6. Bake for 25 minutes or until a skewer easily inserts into the center of potatoes.

4. Pour out all but 1 tablespoon of the bacon fat from the pan. 5. Add onions to pan and cook over medium heat until softened, about 3 minutes. 6. Reduce heat to low and stir in brown sugar. 7. Cook for 8–10 minutes, stirring until onions are caramelized. 8. Stir in cooked bacon, coffee, water, vinegar, and maple syrup. 9. Bring to boil then reduce heat to low and cook, stirring occasionally, until thick and syrupy, about 30 minutes. 10. Remove from heat and allow to cool for 15 minutes. 11. Spoon into a food processor and pulse until mixture is coarsely chopped. 12. Serve warm. Note: Bacon jam can be stored in a clean sealed jar in the refrigerator. Warm bacon jam before serving and eat within 2 weeks.

Homemade

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Fall Picnic Food+styling+photography by Linda Pugliese

Food+styling by Jeanne Lurvey

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TARALLI WITH FENNEL SEED, BLACK PEPPER, & ROSEMARY

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Sour Cherry Compote

Chicken Liver Pâté

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Spinach, Rainbow Chard, & Ricotta Pies MAKES 8

2 sheets puff pastry ½ lb baby spinach, cleaned 1 cup Parmigiano Reggiano, grated 3 cups ricotta, strained if liquid 10 eggs salt and pepper, to taste 1. Cook spinach in a pot of salted boiling water until just wilted, a minute or 2. 2. Strain and cool. 3. While the spinach cools, prepare your large ramekins/enamel mugs. You will need 8. 4. Roll out the puff pastry sheets on a floured surface, thin. 5. Quarter each sheet so you have 8 pieces. 6. Line each ramekin/mug with the pastry sheets so you have enough overhang to cover the top when filled. 7. Prick the pastry sitting inside the vessel with a fork all around. 8. Chill until filling is ready. 9. When the spinach is cool enough to touch, squeeze out all extra water with your hands. 10. Coarsely chop. 11. Preheat your oven to 350°F. 12. Place chopped spinach in a large mixing bowl. 13. Add ricotta, Parmigiano, salt, and pepper to taste. 14. Add 1 egg and stir to incorporate. 15. Fill pastries halfway with the filling, then crack in 1 egg, salt and pepper the egg, and fold the hanging pastry over the top carefully. The vessel should not be overflowing at this point as the egg and filling will puff up and expand when baked. 16. Beat the final egg and brush the top of each pie with the egg wash. 17. Place vessels on a baking sheet, and bake for 25–30 minutes or until lightly browned and crisp. 18. Cool and serve at room temperature.

Spinach, Rainbow Chard, & Ricotta Pies


Apple Hand Pies

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Carnival Squash, Apple, & Sage Focaccia

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Chicken Liver Pâté This version is more chicken liver and less butter, so you can eat it any and all the time. It’s perfect served on grilled bread topped with sour cherry compote. I love keeping some ramekins in the freezer to break out for last minute entertaining. Leave it out at room temperature for an hour or 2 and it’s ready to serve!

3 shallots, thinly sliced 1 lb chicken livers 6 springs thyme, leaves and tips only 2 large pinches Maldon salt 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, +more for storing pinch of cinnamon 1 tablespoon dark rum 1. Place shallots, chicken livers, thyme, and 1⁄3 cup water in a frying pan on medium-high heat. 2. Bring to a simmer and turn down to medium low. 3. Simmer until chicken livers are cooked through, 3–5 minutes. 4. Pour into a food processor. 5. Add the salt, butter, cinnamon, and rum. 6. Process until smooth. 7. Transfer the pâté to your favorite small jars/ramekins, cover lightly with plastic wrap, and chill overnight.

1. Place the cherries and their liquid in a saucepan on medium heat.

10. Oil a 12”x9” baking pan and dust lightly with flour.

2. Reduce liquid by half, and then add the cinnamon, sugar, and red wine.

11. Carefully pour the dough out into the pan, stretching it out to fill the pan.

3. Continue to cook down until you have nothing left but a glaze and cherries, then mix in the balsamic and lemon peel.

12. Go up and down the length of the pan making indentations with your fingertips all over.

Let cool and store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

13. Cover with the toppings and use your fingertips to lightly push them into the surface of the dough.

Carnival Squash, Apple, & Sage Focaccia

14. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons olive oil, cover with a damp tea towel, and set aside to rise for another 45 minutes.

Not sure there is anything better than a hot, crisp piece of focaccia fresh from the oven topped with a slice of prosciutto.

7 g sachet active dry yeast 4 cups AP flour extra virgin olive oil Maldon salt ½ small carnival squash, thinly sliced 1 Gala apple, thinly sliced ¼ red onion, thinly sliced 8 sage leaves 1. In a liquid measuring cup, combine active dry yeast and 11⁄3 cups of warm water. 2. Stir to combine and let sit for a few minutes until bubbles appear and you can smell the yeast. 3. Place flour in a large mixing bowl with 2 big pinches of Maldon salt.

15. Finally, remove the towel and bake for 20–25 minutes, turning the pan half-way through. 16. As soon as it comes out of the oven, drizzle generously with your best quality olive oil and sprinkle with more Maldon salt. Let cool and enjoy toasted or room temperature with cured meats.

Taralli with Fennel Seed, Black Pepper, & Rosemary The ultimate crunchy, savory bites.

4 cups AP flour 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary 1 teaspoon coarsely cracked black pepper 1 teaspoon fennel seeds 7 oz dry white wine ½ cup extra virgin olive oil Maldon salt

If you don’t plan to eat it right away, cover with a thin layer of melted butter to seal, cool until hardened, then wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 1 week or freeze for up to 2 months.

4. Burrow a hole in the middle and add 1 tablespoon olive oil and the water-yeast mixture. 5. Using a wooden spoon, starting at the center, bring the dough together. When the wooden spoon can no longer help you, use your hands.

1. Mix flour, salt, rosemary, black pepper, and fennel seeds in a large bowl.

Sour Cherry Compote

6. Once the dough is combined, pour it out onto a floured work surface and knead for 10 minutes.

3. Pour in the wine and olive oil.

Sweet, tart, rich, and full bodied like a good glass of red wine, this compote is divine on chicken liver pâté, in your morning yogurt, on cheese, pork, steak, or on a spoon straight out of the jar.

24 oz jar sour cherries, pitted 1 cinnamon stick 3 tablespoons light brown sugar 1 cup dry red wine 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar half lemon, just the peel 150 SWEETPAULMAG.COM FALL 2016

7. Grease a bowl with olive oil, place the dough inside, coat with olive oil, cover with plastic wrap, and allow to rise in a warm place for 45 minutes. 8. While the dough rises, prepare the squash, apple, onion, and sage, and preheat the oven to 400°F. 9. Drizzle the toppings with olive oil and sea salt, then toss to coat.

2. Use your hands to burrow a hole in the middle. 4. Mix with a wooden spoon from the center out. 5. When the dough becomes too thick for the wooden spoon, pour out onto a lightly floured workspace and knead until the dough is soft and smooth, about 10 minutes. 6. Cover dough with a bowl or wrap with cling wrap and allow to rest for at least 30 minutes at room temperature.

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7. Working in quarter portions, roll the dough into cigar thickness, cutting 1 cm pieces with a knife or pastry cutter.

Pickled Apples

8. Then, roll each piece thinner, about the size of a thick pencil, 5” long, and attach the 2 ends kneading the ends back and forth together lightly with your fingertips until there is no seam. 9. Repeat until you’ve finished shaping all the taralli. 10. Preheat the oven to 400°F. 11. Bring a large pot of water to boil. 12. In batches, boil the taralli until they float to the top. 13. Remove with a spider onto a kitchen towel–lined baking sheet and allow to dry. 14. Once dry, transfer to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, sprinkle with a few pinches of Maldon salt, and bake for 20-25 minutes or until lightly browned. Rotate the pan halfway through. 15. Allow to cool and store in an airtight container at room temperature. These are good for up to a month.

Apple Hand Pies MAKES 6 pastry

2¼ cups sifted AP flour 1 teaspoon salt ¾ cup+2 tablespoons unsalted butter 5 tablespoons cold water filling

3 to 4 lbs mix of local apples (Macoun, Empire, Granny Smith), peeled, cored, sliced ½ cup sugar ½ cup light brown sugar, packed 3 tablespoons AP flour ¾ teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg a pinch of salt 2 tablespoons butter ½ cup whole milk 1. In a bowl, whisk flour and salt.

4. Shape into 5 equal sized balls, flatten to discs, and wrap separately in cling film. 5. Rest in the refrigerator for half an hour. 6. Preheat the oven to 425°F. 7. In a large bowl toss together apples with sugars, flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, and a pinch of salt. 8. On a floured work surface, rollout each dough-round to approximately 8”. 9. Spoon filling inside leaving 1 inch of dough empty around the perimeter. 10. Fold dough over to enclose and secure the filling. 11. Dot the exposed filling of each pie with butter.

2. Using 2 forks/knives, cut butter into the dry ingredients until the pieces are pea sized.

12. Place pies carefully on 1 or 2 parchment-lined baking sheets.

3. Gradually add water until the dough comes together.

14. Bake for 35 minutes, until browned and crisp.

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13. Brush the pastry with milk.

Pickled Apples Sweet, tart, savory, and super easy to make—the perfect addition to your antipasti table.

12 small apples, washed, halved ½ cup apple cider vinegar ½ cup white vinegar 3 tablespoons light brown sugar 1 cup water 1 teaspoon salt 8 cloves 2 cinnamon sticks ½ teaspoon all spice berries 3 bay leaves 1. Bring all ingredients excluding the apples to a simmer until sugar dissolves. 2. Add apples and simmer until you can pierce easily with a knife. 3. Let cool. 4. Refrigerate with liquid in an airtight container.

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Forest & friends

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: CRAFTY LUNCH; FABRIC TIED TAKEAWAY BOXES; PICNIC SITE MARKER; MINI BOOK OF FOREST FINDS. OPPOSITE PAGE: TEEPEE

From Holly Becker’s new book, Decorate for a Party Styling by Holly Becker Text by Holly Becker+Leslie Shewring Photography by Holly Marder+Holly Becker

Our forest party is perfect for parents of young children who love to explore nature. Do you live near a forest or park and have access to pubic picnic tables? Do you want to venture further and pack a folding table and benches in your car? An outing in autumn, as temperatures start to cool, is an idea your friends will love


What inspired us...

A rustic traditional German beer garden table; a favorite wool blanket; simple brown takeaway boxes; colorful floral fabrics sourced from a shop with a lovely owner who always cuts more than you’ve ordered without adding a penny to the price; specimen kits that we enjoyed as children recreated in a simple way to encourage exploration for our younger guests; the weather and mood of late summer/early autumn weather with its changing leaves and crisp air; teepees; the challenge of creating something special and memorable out of very little; and keeping the overall look inexpensive and relatively simple to prep.

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Children’s Space: Construct a teepee using found branches and pine. You can google scouting websites before you set off so you know how to make it safe and secure.

cone, fern, moss, an empty snail shell, etc. The number of items to find shouldn’t be overwhelming and it’s more fun when children join in. The first person to find the most from their list wins a prize.

Crafty Lunch: We packed lunch in Kraft paper takeaway boxes. To personalize, each was tied with torn fabric strips and presented with a sprig of something green from the forest plucked before guests arrived.

Make It Cozy: Bring extra throws and sheepskins to add warmth for guests (old and young!) who prefer to sit on the forest floor instead of at the table.

Finishing Touches: Wooden cutlery, paper cups wrapped with ribbon applied using a glue stick, a sandwich wrapped in white wax paper, a white paper bag cut short to fill with chips—think of sweet little ways to present lunch that are easy and cost next to nothing. Mark the Spot: Make a simple marker to direct guests to the picnic site. This is a branch wrapped with string, faux fur, and linen scraps. We used a wooden knife as our arrow and stamped PICNIC on it so friends could easily locate us. Create Mini Books: Encourage kids to tape their forest finds into little books and label them (provide the books when they arrive). Parents can help so the project can be fun and educational for all. Personalized Pretzels: Line a wooden fruit crate with a large fabric napkin and tuck away some lovely fresh pretzels from the local bakery. Use fabric scraps to add tags with guests’ names on them—use a hole punch to slip the fabric through. You can write a personal message on the other side of your tags specific to each guest. Scavenger Hunt: Print out favorite photos and tape to a tree as a something pretty to behold. But there’s more… after you’ve eaten, invite guests to take a photo and they will find a scavenger hunt listed on the back—a fallen branch, flower, pine

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: PERSONALIZED PRETZELS; SCAVENGER HUNT; COZY FOREST FLOOR; HOLLY BECKER’S NEW BOOK, DECORATE FOR A PARTY

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Oslo(ve) Photography and text by Studio Dreyer Hensley

SUNSET ON BYGDØY

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: COOL KIDS ON BRENNERIVEIEN JUST OFF AKERSELVA RIVER; SHEEP GRAZING ON THE HOVEDØYA ISLAND; THE NEW WATERFRONT PROMENADE; SIDEWALK DINING IN GRÜNERLØKKA


I fell in love with Oslo 25 years ago,

FIRST ROW: WALKING THE ROOF OF OSLO OPERA HOUSE. THE ARCHITECTS, SNØHETTA, PLANNED FOR THE BUILDING TO BE MORE THAN JUST A LANDMARK. THEY WANTED IT TO BE A SOCIAL ANCHORING. SECOND ROW: THE NEW NEIGHBORHOOD OF TJUVHOLMEN IS A COLLECTION OF MODERN ART, RESTAURANTS, AND SHOPPING ALL HOUSED IN CUTTINGEDGE ARCHITECTURE. BOTTOM ROW: BIKING ALONG AKERSELVA RIVER IS A GOOD WAY TO VISIT THE CITY’S HIPPER NEIGHBORHOODS.

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shortly after I fell in love with a girl who called it home. Falling in love with people really isn’t much different than falling in love with cities; you can fall easy, or you can fall hard. Sometimes it’s love at first sight, sometimes it takes a few attempts, and often enough it’s a long-distance romance instead of the “love the one you’re with” type of thing. Either way, city or person, the hard part is keeping the romance going. I’ve been lucky: I still love the girl and I still love the city. I supposed I’ve changed in all these years. I’m a responsible adult now. For example, I don’t so often get to see that fantastic Oslo summer sunrise at 3:30 a.m. like I did when I was younger. I worry about adult things like parking, and taxes, and getting to my appointments on time. I have gotten a little older, I suppose. Funny thing is that city of mine, Oslo, has gotten younger. It is not a huge capital city like Stockholm or Berlin. Oslo is modest at first glance. It was built between the deep water of Oslo fjord and a thick belt of high-forested hills more then 1,000 years ago. When I first came to Oslo it seemed like a secret place on the edge of an antique map. I knew almost nothing about it then. What I found was a city that was organized around different neighborhoods, stretching from a more or less working class Eastside to a more affluent Westside. I learned to find my way around by making landmarks out of the high 19 th century church spires above the colorful apartment houses and the lush parks alongside the sidewalks. It was summer when I came. Let’s

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face it… it’s a great summer town. This far north the sky never really gets dark that time of year, and all that sunlight creates a green canopy of leaves almost everywhere. Oslo is a city that lives with nature up close and personal—few cities can offer so much natural variation. If you are the type to walk the paths, you are in luck. In Oslo you can easily go from beach to forest, through meadow, and along shoreline all before lunch. Many of the city’s cultural highpoints, such as the Viking Ship Museum and the Norsk Folkemuseum are located on an idyllic peninsula called Bygdøy on the Westside. Folkemuseum, or Folklore Museum, contains the royal farm manor, which is a working farm open to the public. It is a little piece of the 1700s not more than a half hour’s walk from the city. If time doesn’t exactly stand still on Bygdøy, it doesn’t move any faster than the milk cows chewing peacefully in direct sight of city hall. Not to say that time has stood still in the rest of the city. Although people tend to think about themselves as either coming from the East or the West, that geographical demarcation has a different meaning now. The two sides are less rivals and more compliments to one another. Westside neighborhoods like Frogner and Majorstua have always been a few notches more posh than the areas further east. Frogner is a place of classic late 19 th century architecture with wider streets and more exclusive shops. It still feels like a slightly more mature neighborhood compared to others, however. It has an international feel that sets it apart from the rest of Oslo. The area is anchored at one end by the enormous and astounding Frogner Park—with its extensive sculpture garden completed by in 1943 by Gustav Vigeland after more than 20 years and 200 works of art. Over on the Eastside, the parks and buildings are perhaps a little less grand,

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but noticeably livelier. Oslo tends to wake up when the sun shines, but nowhere is it more precious than the sidewalk cafes and coffee shops of Grünerløkka. What was once a rather gray working class area has transformed into a hip and colorful enclave of students, artists, and young families who have all set their marks on this neighborhood. Grünerløkka’s transition has been as fast as it is complete. Twenty years ago the only cup of coffee to be had was one you made yourself. Today it is ground zero for a unique coffeehouse movement that has managed to keep the otherwise invading international chains at bay. Along the main streets like Thorvald Meyers Gate and Markveien there is seldom more than three doors between cafes, restaurants, and coffeehouses. Several of the area’s baristas have won world championships, many of them roast in the shops, and they all take their coffee very seriously. Perhaps the most dramatic change in Oslo these past years is the revolution in eating. Until a few years ago the few really fine restaurants were confined to either the Westside or the city center and tended to be rather traditional. Now young chefs are riding the wave of Nordic cuisine and introducing the use of local ingredients. One of my favorite streets is Torgata that leads from Grünerlokka into the center of town. The area around Torgata has always been a kind of melting pot for Oslo’s growing cultural diversity, but lately the kebab stands and Thai joints have been joined by a new generation of ethnic as well as Nordic establishments. Place like Taco Republica and Piscoteket bring tastes from a different part of the world to an already exotic neighborhood. Jor serves a more casual version of the type of Nordic-inspired cuisine that has made Restaurant Maaemo one of the hottest tables in Europe. Scandinavian design, young Norwegian designer clothes, and vintage finds are

LOTS OF NEW EATING AND DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS ARE POPPING UP ALONG THE RIVER. ESPECIALLY AROUND GRÜNERLØKKA

part of Eastside shopping. Kollekted By was started by two of Norway’s best stylists as a way to promote the newest trends in Scandinavian and European interior design. If a design shop can be called playful, then Kollekted By is playful. Jannicke and Allesandro’s elegant store is a kind of representation of the modern face of Oslo. It looks out into the world from the secure and careful beauty of home. Norwegians walk. They walk to work, they walk through the forest, and they walk into the mountains. In Oslo they can walk on the roof of the opera house that seems to rise out of the fjord like a sheet of ice. From here the city faces out into the fjord on one side and looks back into the growing skyline on the other. Out there in the fjord, just a few minutes away by public boat, the traces of Oslo’s first settlements can be explored on Hovedøya Island. City life drops away. From here it’s easier to imagine that the changes of 25 years mean less in the big picture, and the bustle of the city seems more distant than it really is. As exciting as it can be to watch a place reinvent itself, it is just as important to remember that a good love affair should last a very long time.

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SHOPPING Clothes: • Cathrine Hammel, Spazio, Riddervolds gate 12, cathrinehammel.no • Mardou and Dean, Aker Brygge, Sorgenfrigata 17, mardouanddean.com • Mette Møller, Thorvald Meyers gate 32, mettemoller.no • ZuzannaG, Helgesens gate 14C, zuzannag.com • Yme, Paleet, ymestore.com (skal finne navn på en fin i Torggata) • Eger, Karl Johan, egerkarljohan.no • F5concept store, Øvre Slottsgate 5, f5conceptstore.com Market: • Vestkanttorget Interior: • Kollekted By, Rathkes gate 4, kollektedby.no • Norway Design, Stortingsgata 28, norwaydesigns.no • Eske, Sofies gate 16, eskeinterior.no • Josefines Gate 23, hayshop.no • Nye Expo Nova, Drammensveien 134, expo-nova.no • Fransk Bazar, Grünersgate 5, franskbazar.no

FIRST ROW: THE OPEN AIR SATURDAY MARKET AT VESTKANTTORGET; VINTAGE FINDS IN GRÜNERLØKKA. SECOND ROW: MODERN DESIGN SHOP KOLLEKTED BY. BOTTOM ROW: CATHRINE HAMMEL IN HER SHOP IN FROGNER; ZUZANNA IN GRÜNERLØKKA; VINTAGE KNICK KNACKS AND COFFESHOP HYBRID RETRO LYKKA

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EATING + DRINKING: • Focaceria, Markveien 34, foccaceria.no • Tim Wendelboe, Grüners gate 1, timwendelboe.no (kaffebar) • Supreme Roastworks, Thorvald Meyers gate 18A, srw.no (kaffebar) • Skur33, Akershusstranda 11, skur33.no • Jor, Torggata 18, jor.no • Happolati, St. Olavs plass 2, happolati.no • Mathallen Oslo, Vulkan 5, mathallenoslo.no • Territoriet, Markveien 58(vinbar), territoriet.no • Vingen kaffebar, Strandpromenaden 2, vingenbar.no • Theatercafeen, Stortingsgata 24-26, theatercafeen.no • Torggata Botaniske, Torggata 17b • Taco Republica, Torgata 30, tacorepublica.no • Sentralen, Øvre Slottsgate 3, sentralen.no, nordic kitchen • Small Hans, Waldemar Thranes gate 10 a, smallhans.no • Hanami, Tjuvholmen, Kanalen 1, hanami.no

FIRST ROW: SEAFOOD AT SKUR 33; FOOD TRUCK IN FROGNER. SECOND ROW: SKUR 33. BOTTOM ROW: CASUAL NORDIC CUISINE AT JOR

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FIRST ROW: NORDIC-ASIAN FUSION AT HAPPOLATI. SECOND ROW: FOCCACIARIA IN GRÜNNERLØKKA SERVES UP AUTHENTIC AND TASTY FAST FOOD ITALIAN STYLE; OSLO’S NEW FOODHALL ALONG THE RIVER IS THE PLACE FOR TASTING THE CITY’S DIVERSITY. BOTTOM ROW: VENERABLE AND STILL ELEGANT THEATERCAFE IS A PIECE OF HISTORY; TERRITORIET IN MARKVEIEN IS PROBABLY ONE OF THE HIPPEST BARS IN THE CITY

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FIRST ROW: CAMILLAS HUS IS A CHARMING SMALL HOTEL JUST OF THE PARK SURROUNDING THE ROYAL PALACE; A RICHARD PRINCE PAINTING DOMINATES THE LOBBY OF THE THIEF, OSLO’S MOST IMPRESSIVE DESIGN HOTEL. SECOND ROW: CHECKING IN AT THE THIEF

HOTELS: • The Thief, Tjuvholmen, Landgangen 1, thethief.com • Hotel Continental, 26, Stortingsgata 24, hotelcontinental.com • Camillas Hus, Parkveien 31, camillashus.no • First Hotel Grims Grenka, Kongens gate 5, firsthotels.no • Carlton Oslo Hotel Guldsmeden, Parkveien 78, gusmedenoslo.findhotel.no

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cheers Fall in a mug This drink is truly fall in a mug. It’s perfect on a crisp, clear fall day. I love serving it in a vintage copper mug, but a glass will do the trick as well Food+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

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Fall Mugs MAKES 4 COCKTAILS

1� fresh ginger 2 fresh thyme sprigs 1 lemon, just the juice 3 cups apple cider 1 cup bourbon ice crushed ice sliced ginger and fresh thyme, as garnish 1. Place ginger and thyme in a large pitcher and muddle well. 2. Add lemon, cider, bourbon, and ice and mix well. 3. Fill your glasses or mugs with crushed ice and fill with cocktail. 4. Finish off with a slice of ginger and some thyme.

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pantry confessions

We asked our favorite supermodel-turnedphotographer Helena Christensen about her likes and loves in and out of the kitchen

Where do you live?

Necessary luxury?

Favorite restaurant?

I’ve lived in New York City for 15 years now. But I spend most weekends upstate near Phoenicia in the Catskills.

It’s a luxury when it isn’t necessary.

Oh man… this is a tough one. Lately I’ve gone to Via Carota in NY a lot—delicious Italian food.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTY BUSH

What inspires you?

Nature; the ocean, birds in flight, flowers, naked tree branches, the flickering of candles, dew on leaves, the still surface of a dark forest lake… but also food, movies, books, and music. But most of all my kid. Favorite color?

Dusty green and faded blue. Favorite flower?

Fritillaria Affinis (I think they’re called Mission Bells in English).

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Guilty pleasure?

I love hot chocolate with more whipped cream than chocolate. But it’s not something I feel guilty about, really…

Cookbook you can’t live without?

Favorite song?

Going back to Denmark for the summer, spending long, lazy, balmy days on the northern shore.

Most Depeche Mode songs.

My mom’s inner mind. Ultimate vacation destination?

Last purchase?

Film idol?

A Morphologically candle called Hinoki Forest.

Jean Seberg, among many…

Perfume/cologne?

Perfect meal?

My friend and I have a little perfume brand, strangelove NY, and we’ve created two lovely perfumes so far, deadofnight and meltmyheart. They both have pure oud in them, which makes them magically poetic.

Pasta with sea urchin and avocado.

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Sweet Paul Issue #26 Fall 2016  

Dive into my FALL issue and find all the inspiration, recipes, and easy DIY and craft projects that will help you celebrate the beautiful co...

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