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marshmAllows CAST IRON COOKING GARLIC FESTIVE FINGER FOOD PANAMA

WINTER 2017


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CONTENTS Winter 2017

7 What's Up Sweet Paul 12 My Happy Dish 16 Handmade 20 To Market, To Market 26 Friends Are For... 32 Bookmarked 36 This and That 42 A View with a Room 50 Healthy Appetite 56 Mormor's Kitchen 60 Put a Lid on It 64 Woof

features 70 Hidden Gems 78 Festive Finger Food 88 Pom-Pom Love 98 Garlic 108 Tin and Tinsel 116 When Paul Met Dorie 128 Dark Decadence 136 Cast Iron Cooking

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIETLIND WOLF

148 A Million Reasons to Return 162 Cheers 164 Pantry Confessions

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Gorgeous knitting, crochet & embroidery supplies

WWW.LOOPKNITTING.COM 15 CAMDEN PASSAGE, ISLINGTON • LONDON, ENGLAND FOLLOW US @SWEETPAULMAGAZINE


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Paul Lowe Founder & Editor-In-Chief paul@sweetpaulmag.com Paul Vitale Marketing & Business Development Director paulvitale@sweetpaulmag.com Joline Rivera Creative Director joline@sweetpaulmag.com Nellie Williams Graphic Designer nellie@sweetpaulmag.com Leigh Angel Copy Editor copyeditor@sweetpaulmag.com Advertising Inquiries advertising@sweetpaulmag.com General Inquiries info@sweetpaulmag.com

CONTRIBUTORS James Anthony Alexandra Bingham Lova Blåvarg Susanna Blåvarg Mary Choi Alexandra Grablewski Dorie Greenspan Micheala Hayes Jatta Heinlahti Dorie Herman Johanna Levomäki Minna Lilja Tux Loerzel Michael Marquand china squirrel Lacey Taylor Dietlind Wolf

Follow us on Instagram @sweetpaulmagazine @jolinerivera @otherpaul @paululowe @paulloweceramics


WHAT'S UP SWEET PAUL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES ANTHONY

WINTER IS HERE. When I was a kid, winter was my favorite time of the year. Not just because of Christmas, but because I loved snow and everything that came along with cold weather: hot cocoa, a warm fireplace, and cabin life. We had a small cabin up in the woods where we would spend our weeks off from school. It was so cozy: no electricity, no TV, just an old radio. We would read, play games, and just chat. It was truly magical. Well, the outhouse wasn’t magical. It was cold, windy, and kind of scary—especially at night. I’m not sure I could deal with the cabin now. I’m too connected to my phone and everything electronic. Maybe for a day or two, but a week? No! I could start writing my autobiography. It would be called “Still Covered in Glitter.” Whether you are in a cabin in the woods, the city, or the countryside, have a fab Christmas and winter. Stay warm and cozy!


SWEET PAUL'S WINTER PICKS

SWEET PAUL STOCKIST SPOTLIGHT

Scout Coffee Co. San Luis Obispo, California What makes Scout Coffee a sweet spot to visit? At Scout you get the quality of a big city coffee shop with the charm of a family-owned, independent business set in a historic building in the “happiest town in America.” We pay attention to the details and do things the hard way, like making our almond milk and seasonal syrups from scratch. We roast the best coffees from around the world at our roaster, HoneyCo. Coffee. We have our own bakery, a friendly, professional staff, and a well-curated retail shop, where we offer ceramics, tabletop gifts, craft-made chocolate, books, stationery, jewelry, and brewing equipment. We personally designed and built our stores to inspire each person who enters. In our two locations, we chose materials to convey an upbeat atmosphere with soul and a touch of whimsy. It’s hard to leave Scout without a smile on your face! How would our readers spend the rest of the day after visiting the coffee shop? After grabbing goodies at Scout, walk the streets of downtown and pop in to some other inspiring shops, like Len Collective, Ambiance, Moondoggies, Ruby Rose, and Pipsticks. Grab a picnic lunch at SLO Provisions or Old San Luis BBQ and head out for a hike on one of the seven peaks surrounding town or to Montaña De Oro State Park for a scenic drive through the eucalyptus. Take a blanket and a book Spooners Cove and just listen to the waves crash. Watch the sunset at the sand dunes in Pismo Beach, and then head to dinner at Ember in Arroyo Grande for a meal to remember. End the night with a soak at Sycamore Mineral Springs

Jon and Sara Peterson, owners of Scout Coffee

Hide Small Stool by Paper Dahlia

in Avila, hit up Sidecar for craft cocktails, or a nightcap at Luna Red for tapas and live music. SLO has tons of home-share options, and a boutique hotel and bistro, Granada. The Thursday Farmers Market has street food, music, and bountiful produce. There’s so much to see and do here, you need at least a couple days to get the whole picture of this little central coast gem! Where does Sweet Paul find a home in your shop and who takes it home? Sweet Paul sits on our “feature table," right in the heart of our retail section. We have a seasonal approach to the items we carry, and it’s such a good focal point. The beautiful covers always pop! I also keep a store copy for our customers to peruse while they sip their coffee. We have so many makers and creatives here in SLO, that it’s a welcomed purchase for most of our customers. What is your favorite Sweet Paul recipe or craft idea? I have a Scandinavian heritage as well, so I love all the nods to Norway. Food, drinks, entertaining, and crafting are the essence of what we do, so I really love it all! It’s such a treat to flip through the pages of such a beautiful publication. Personal favorites include the recipes for brunch and sweets: Hibiscus Donuts, Vanilla Lavender Canales, Swedish Apple Cake, and holiday crafts. We made variations of the Copper and Greens Wall Hanging last year for both our home and the shops. I cannot wait to see what is in the holiday issue this year.

Bell Jar Thank You Card by Pistols

Sierra Art Print by Fernanda Martinez

Apron with NYC Toile Print

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The to start start aa C O L L E C T I O N . The perfect time to

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“Advection” by Ariel Scholten, Seattle, WA. “Foam from Above” by Melanie Shaul, San Francisco, CA.

*excludes custom art


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Henry Street Studio handmade ceramics platters bowls plates pitchers mugs bottles spoons salt cellars & more

www.henrystreetstudio.com photo by Julia Gartland

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my happy dish This dish makes me happy because...

The Great Sage Food + Styling + Photography by Paul Lowe

Years ago I was in Milan during the holidays and was invited by a lovely, older Italian couple for dinner.

I sat in their kitchen drinking red wine from a jam jar while they cooked up this dish that has been a staple in my home ever since—no Christmas is complete without it! My hostess told me her secret was adding pepper when she fried the sage, and the smell of sage always reminds me of Christmas.

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Spaghetti with Pepper Sage and Parmesan SERVES 4

50 to 60 fresh sage leaves 3/4 cup (11/2 sticks) salted butter fresh black pepper 1 pound dried spaghetti salt 1 cup grated Parmesan 1. Melt the butter in a pan, and add sage and some pepper. Cook until sage starts to become crispy, about a minute or two. 2. Cook the pasta in salted water until al dente. (Al dente means soft but with a little chew in the middle.) 3. Drain and divide into bowls. 4. Top with sage, butter, Parmesan, and some extra pepper.


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Handmade Inspiring DIY Projects from Lova

A Star is Born When traveling in Laos earlier this year, I fell in love with the beautiful star-shaped paper lanterns that hung in every tree and window. I knew I had to recreate them for my own window at home. Text + Crafts by Lova Blåvarg. Photography by Susanna Blåvarg

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Laotian Paper Star Lantern SUPPLIES:

10 pieces light and flexible wood, like balsa wood (about 3⁄16 inch x 1⁄8 inch x 1 yard) a few sheets of translucent paper wood glue cord with a light bulb socket straight pins utility knife or small saw small clamps scissors ruler 1. Cut 10 of the wood strips into 31-inch-long strips. Make two marks on the strips, 11 inches from each end. Cut five 4-inch-long strips from the leftover pieces. Optionally, use a utility knife to carve the ends of the long sticks into wedges if you want the points of the star to be really pointy. 2. Start with two long strips and two short strips. Glue the two short strips to the 11-inch marks on one long strip. Use straight pins to hold things in place while the glue dries. Then glue the ends of the two short strips to the 11-inch marks on the other long strip, creating a sort of ladder shape. Repeat this process with four more strips. 3. When the glue has dried, starting with one of your two “ladders,” gently

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bend the ends of two long strips toward each other to make a triangle. I found it easiest to bend both ends at the same time to prevent your previous work from breaking. Glue the ends together, and clamp them together while the glue dries. Repeat on the other end and then with the other “ladder,” so you have two canoe shapes. 4. With two more long strips and the last short strip, glue the ends of the short strip to the 11-inch marks on the long strips. Glue two of the ends of the canoe shapes together. Keep assembling the star by overlapping with more longer strips until the whole star begins to take form. Make sure to wait for the glue to dry for a couple of minutes between each step, using clamps and pins to keep the drying parts together. 5. Cover the star with paper by cutting rough shapes a little bigger than the triangle- and pentagon-shaped holes. Cover each hole, piece by piece, and then trim off the excess paper using scissors. On top of the star, make smaller triangles for two of the holes so the light bulb cord has a place to go. Wait for the glue to dry and then hang in your favorite window!


RO S É G O E S

I R O O U L S. G ODUCI R T N I

NG GLORIA FERR ER

Brut Rosé

Rich with color and fresh, lively fruit flavors, the new Gloria Ferrer Brut Rosé showcases Pinot Noir from our estate vineyards in Carneros.

© 2017 GLO

GLORIAFER RER.COM

RIA FERRE

R CAVES &

VINEYARD

S, SONOMA

, CA

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Rediscover your

Cookbooks

For a 3 month trial enter the code SP17 when you sign up

Learn more at www.eatyourbooks.com FOLLOW US @SWEETPAULMAGAZINE


TO MARKET, TO MARKET Welcome Entertainment "Wabi-Sabi Welcome" isn't your typical cookbook—there are hardly any recipes in it. It is more a book about the joy of getting together and being together. It is all about a new way to entertain: easy-going, unfussy, and stress free. Every page will inspire you to invite friends over. The author, Julie Pointer Adams, is truly speaking my language. I thoroughly recommend it.

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EXCERPTED FROM WABI-SABI WELCOME BY JULIE POINTER ADAMS (ARTISAN BOOKS). COPYRIGHT © 2017. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JULIE POINTER ADAMS AND RYAN J. ADAMS.

Fresh food and finds


DeKalb Market Hall I’m lucky enough to live down the street from Brooklyn's newest food destination, DeKalb Market Hall. It’s one of the largest food halls in the country, with a diverse collection of 40 local food outposts—it even has a Trader Joe's. Some of the highlights include Polish pierogies, German kebabs, and Key lime pies. See you there! dekalbmarkethall.com

In Season

GREEN PLANTAINS

DELICATA SQUASH

Also known as cooking banana, green plantains are very starchy and need to be cooked. Slice and fry for an alternative to french fries.

IN BLOOM

Hypericum Hypericum is such beautiful flower for holiday decorating. It has a woody stem, and red or green berries that scream Christmas—perfect in wreaths or arrangements.I cut mine short and stick them in wet flower foam tucked in small clay pots as centerpieces. Thanks to flowermuse.com

One of the winter squashes. Cut into pieces, drizzle with oil, and bake with salt and pepper. Great in salads or as a side.

ON TREND

Peppers OKRA

CHINESE EGGPLANT

Okra, also known as lady fingers, is actually the edible seed pod of a flowering plant, and is commonly used in Caribbean cooking.

Chinese eggplant is the small and tender sister of the robust dark-purple eggplant we more commonly see. Slice in half and grill with garlic for a perfect side to grilled chicken.

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Nothing is hotter (pardon the pun) than chili peppers right now. They come in a wide variety of degrees of heat from mild to lava. Find the one you like the best. I love to roast chilies in the oven. Remove the seeds, chop, and mix with oil, salt, and parsley—makes a great little sauce for everything from fried eggs to steak.


TO MARKET, TO MARKET

THE INGREDIENT

Cured Olives After a trip to Morocco years ago, I discovered cured olives. They were in big barrels at a market and a seller offered me a taste—it was like a little salty flavor bomb in my mouth.

Olive and Parmesan Tart Great in salads, as snacks, or on a tart like this one, olives are the perfect winter treat. SERVES 4–6

all-purpose flour 1 sheet of puff pastry 1 cup cured olives, coarsely chopped 1/2 cup grated Parmesan 1 small red onion, thinly sliced 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme pepper olive oil 1. Preheat oven to 420ºF.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL LOWE

2. Sprinkle work surface with a little flour, and roll out the puff pastry to double its size. Transfer to a baking tray covered with parchment paper. 3. Top with olives, Parmesan, red onion, thyme, and pepper. 4. Finish off with a drizzle of olive oil. 5. Bake until golden, about 18–20 minutes. 6. Serve with another little drizzle of oil.

22 SWEETPAULMAG.COM SUMMER 2016

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TO MARKET, TO MARKET

Recipe Title SERVES

1½ 11⁄3 21⁄3 2²⁄3 2½ 1¼ 1¾ 1⁄3 ½ ¾ ¼ ²⁄3 1⁄8

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1½ 11⁄3 2 1⁄3 2²⁄3 2½ 1¼ 1¾ 1 ⁄3 ½ ¾ ¼ ²⁄3 ¹⁄8

Title

Serves

1 20 5 2 2

large sheet of puff pastry a little plain flour small baked beets oz chèvre, crumbled salt & pepper to taste fresh rosemary tablespoons olive oil tablespoons honey


Friends Are For... Getting together to bring out our best

Title here Deck here Food+styling+photography by Paul Lowe

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The Vintage Visionary With a career that’s taken him from Miami to Chicago to New York to Europe and back again, this artist-of-all-trades has an unmatched aesthetic as eclectic as his globe-trotting lifestyle. Text by Lacey Taylor. Photography by Paul Lowe SEAN SCHERER HAS ALWAYS HAD AN INTEREST IN BUILDING NEW WORLDS. When he was a kid, it was with building blocks or through the tip of his pencil. After completing his studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Independent Study Program of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, it was through his paintings, which have been exhibited both in North America and Europe. And after realizing that he wanted to further explore the opportunities within the creative realm, Sean took “a leap of faith” and created his future world by procuring the past as the owner of Kabinett and Kammer, “a contemporary curiosity shop of antiques, natural wonders, and art” in Andes, New York. When Sean isn’t busy traveling around the world in pursuit of vintage bird charts or a taxidermy zebra for the store, he can be found teaching as a Professor at SUNY Oneonta, hosting dinner parties at his antique-filled farmhouse, or drinking a Martini after a hard day’s work in New York City. Being an artist, teacher, entrepreneur, and designer is enough to make anyone feel pulled in every direction, but in the world of Sean Scherer, every creative pursuit works together as parts of a whole. Sean truly is a Renaissance man, and you can bet he has an artifact or two to prove it. Here, Sean dishes with “Sweet Paul” about what’s next for Kabinett and Kammer, his first “find,” and what’s inspiring him these days. How do you think your childhood influenced your art? I grew up in Miami, and I didn’t realize how exotic it was until I left high school to go to school at the Art Institute of Chicago. The colors of the subtropics, and the art deco district of Miami Beach, and the cultural mix has all influenced my work. Since Miami is a fairly new city, the idea of the old was a fairly abstract concept. I guess that’s why my love of antiques was born.

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FRIENDS ARE FOR...

Do you remember the first antique you bought? Yes, it was a brass art deco clock. I was 16. I still have it, and it still doesn’t work, but it was the shape and form that attracted me to it. It had an aura of good design. What’s the best creative advice you’ve received? Do what you know.

What’s your secret to happiness? I wish there was a secret I could share, but I think it’s always a work in progress for all of us. Do what you love is key. What’s the album/artist/song you most often reach for when you need to be inspired and why? “Keep on Movin’” by Soul II Soul. It’s just a great album, and it reminds me of a time that I do not think will be repeated in NYC.

How did Kabinett and Kammer start? My friend Brooke Alderson had an antique shop in Andes that I used to visit. She was instrumental in my opening my own store in Andes.

I saw them perform at the Palladium, which is now a NYU dorm.

What’s most important to you, design-wise, in your workspace? Comfort and a sense of inevitability. I want a space to feel like it evolved over time.

What can you be found doing to calm the nerves? Drinking a Martini after a long hard day’s work.

How do you think your taste in antiques has changed over the years? I keep refining my eye and have become braver in my juxtapositions.

Who or what is someone/something you really admire these days that motivates you creatively? Axel Vervoordt is always inspiring. My hero!

What is your favorite “find” to date? A 10-inch-long, 1940s, folding, leather and brass-nail screen. I found it in Helsinki years ago. What’s the weirdest thing you’ve ever found or sold?  A taxidermy zebra. When do you feel most creative? When I’m reinstalling the shop and creating dialogues/vignettes with the objects I collect. What is something about you people might not guess? I’m a Jane Austen hopeless romantic.

What’s your dream job? I’m living it.

What’s the theme song to the Life of Sean Scherer? “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” What accomplishment are you most proud of? Reinventing my life and career from being a selling artist to being a professor/ designer and antique dealer, and not being afraid of taking a leap of faith. What’s next for Kabinett and Kammer? A summertime pop up. I’m looking at the southern Mass area. What will you be doing when you’re 70?  Traveling, designing, living!

What would your perfect day be like, from start to finish? Waking up in a new city or country and spending the day exploring and meeting people. I love traveling on my own.

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FRIENDS ARE FOR...

Carrot and Parsnip Soup with Curry

Turkey Tourtiere

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FRIENDS ARE FOR...

Carrot and Parsnip Soup with Curry This soul-warming winter soup stores well and can be made a day or two ahead of serving. SERVES 6

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 large yellow onion, coarsely chopped 1 teaspoon curry powder 2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 pound carrots, scrubbed clean and cut into 1-inch pieces (you can peel but I don’t) 1 pound parsnips, scrubbed clean and cut into 1-inch pieces parsley leaves for garnish 1 32-ounce box of organic chicken stock 2 cups water 1. Heat olive oil in a large pot or saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, curry powder, salt, and pepper. Cook until onion is translucent, 3–5 minutes. 2. Add carrots, parsnips, stock, and water, and bring to a boil. Reduce to simmer, cover, and cook for about 20 minutes or until vegetables are fork tender. 3. In a blender, puree soup in small batches, filling less than halfway; then transfer puree back into pot over low heat to keep warm until serving. 4. Garnish with a few parsley leaves and serve.

Turkey Tourtière This recipe is even more delicious when made a day before serving, giving all the spices to a chance to meld and the flavor to become more intense. Just reheat before serving. SERVES 6

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 large yellow onion, chopped 2 or more garlic cloves, chopped 2 pounds organic ground turkey (not all white) ½ teaspoon ground sage 1 teaspoon ground cloves 1 teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon ground pepper 3 medium Yukon gold potatoes boiled and mashed (I don’t bother to peel since this is a rustic pie) ½ cups boiling water 2 pastry crusts 1 egg yolk 2 teaspoons water tomato ketchup 1. Heat olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic, and sauté, stirring every few minutes. 2. Add ground turkey and spices, and cook, stirring occasionally, to almost brown. 3. Add boiling water. Cover and lower heat to a simmer. Cook for 30–45 minutes, until turkey is done.  4. Stir in mashed potatoes and let cool. 5. Line a glass pie dish with pastry crust. 6. Fill pastry with meat and potato filling, and top with remaining pastry crust. I always add a sprinkle of salt/pepper and cloves over the whole pie before adding the top crust so every slice has a bit extra!  7. Crimp edges of pastry together, and cut four 1-inch vents in top of pie. 8. Whisk together egg yolk and water to make and egg wash. Brush entire crust with egg wash.

Learn more about Sean Scherer and the world of Kabinett and Kammer at kabinettandkammer.com

9. Bake at 350ºF degrees for 30–40 minutes or until crust is a golden brown and the turkey mixture is bubbling through the crust vents. 10. Let cool about 20 minutes before serving. Slice and serve with ketchup!

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Bookmarked Books we're loving this winter

LE CREUSET COOKBOOK by Le Creuset, $35 PARTY FOOD: MINI HORS D'OEUVRES, FAMILY-STYLE SETTINGS, PLATED DISHES, BUFFET SPREADS, BAR CARTS by Peter Callahan, $35 THE JUHU BEACH CLUB COOKBOOK: INDIAN SPICE, OAKLAND SOUL by Preeti Mistry and Sarah Henry, $30 BEEKMAN 1802: A SEAT AT THE TABLE: RECIPES TO NOURISH YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS, AND COMMUNITY by Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell, $30 THE WHOLEFOOD PANTRY: CHANGE THE WAY YOU COOK WITH 175 RECIPES FOR HEALTHY HOMEMADE ESSENTIALS by Amber Rose, $30 PRESERVATION PANTRY: MODERN CANNING FROM ROOT TO TOP & STEM TO CORE by Sarah Marshall, $25 THE FLEXIBLE VEGETARIAN: FLEXITARIAN RECIPES TO COOK WITH OR WITHOUT MEAT AND FISH by Jo Pratt, $35 THE ATLAS OF BEAUTY: WOMEN OF THE WORLD IN 500 PORTRAITS by Mihaela Noroc, $30 COMING TO MY SENSES: THE MAKING OF A COUNTERCULTURE COOK by Alice Waters, $27 SMORGASBORD: THE ART OF SWEDISH BREADS AND SAVORY TREATS by Johanna Kindvall, $18 CARVE: A SIMPLE GUIDE TO WHITTLING by Melanie Abrantes, $16

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A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Mix textured elements such as a unique fabric with a nice print and natural wood vessels.

Surprise your guests with smaller floral moments throughout the table and a few lidded jars or vessels filled with sweets for after dinner.

Limit your color palette to three important tones like we did here with the blue, yellow, and white.

Make it personal by adding a place card with hand calligraphy and a printed menu for each guest.


A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

Anatomy of a place setting Setting a beautiful table is like putting together the perfect outfit. Start with the basics: color, form, and texture. Use the season and setting to help inspire your color palette. Define your style by choosing forms such as modern, eclectic, or whimsical. Finally, layer textural elements to add depth and interest to the setting.

A deep, saturated color in the linen, such as this beautiful blue tone, adds instant drama to your table.

Available in 5 colors! Black, White, Grey, Navy, and Red

The Colorscapes collection features organic motifs subtlely interpreted as a tone-on-tone surface decoration. The entire collection is available in place setting components, as well as extensive accessories, to mix and match in your own curated dinnerware collection. Colorscapes offers 3 textures (Swirl, Dune, and Snow) and 5 colors (Black, White, Grey, Navy, and Red), all of which are perfect together or on their own. Featured: WoW (White-on-White) Swirl, and GoG (Grey-on-Grey) Swirl.

Layer your place settings with subtle tone for the first course plate and a clean neutral for the base plate.

noritakechina.com


THIS & THAT Sweet Paul's picks of the season

Ceramics trays with leather handles, $275, Cast bronze spoon, $185, dbohome.com

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Rainbow Swing Chair, $298, michelevarian.com

Gray Marble Ceramics Bowl, $175, simonpearce.com

New Candle Series from Village Common, $35, thevillagecommon.com

Brass and Wood Coffee Scoops, Facture Goods, $40, facturegoods.com/shop

Vintage Guatemalan Huipil Pillows, $200-$250, meridianny.com

Rainbow and Star Leather Pillows, $175, michelevarian.com

Ceramics and Silk Tassels, All Roads Design, from $65, allroadsdesign.com

Tibula 18" (stool or side table) in ebonized red oak $1000, materiadesigns.com

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THIS & THAT

Easy Carbonara There are many ways to make pasta carbonara, but this is the way I do it, and it comes out delicious every time. Carbonara is such an easy, fast, and filling dish to make, especially in hectic holiday months. SERVES 4

6 egg yolks (I use organic eggs) 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup grated Parmesan, plus more for serving salt and pepper 1 pound cooked warm pasta (I used spaghetti) 1/2 cup crumbled, crispy bacon 1. In a bowl mix 2 egg yolks, oil, Parmesan, a little salt, and lots of pepper. 2. Place the freshly cooked pasta in a bowl. Add the sauce, and mix well. 3. Place the pasta in bowls, and top with bacon. 4. Place an egg yolk on top of each portion and sprinkle with Parmesan and pepper. The warm pasta will “cook� the egg and make it into the most delicious sauce.

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“I try to make collections for children sophisticated in a way that also speaks to adults…” -Genevieve Gorder

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We’ve collaborated with designer Genevieve Gorder to bring you an exclusive collection overflowing with her signature style. With astrological accents, global patterns, and perfectly playful touches, this unreal lineup is everything kids (and grownups) have been dreaming of.

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landofnod.com • #landofnod


A View with a Room Welcome to Scribner’s, transformed from a drab 1960s lodge into a fab, modern mountain getaway with something for everyone. And of course, there will be cake. Cake Recipe by Mary Choi Text + Photography by Paul Lowe

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THE NEWLY RENOVATED SCRIBNER’S CATSKILL LODGE MAKES ME VERY HAPPY. With its comfy, dog-friendly accommodations and spectacular views, it reminds me of the chic ski lodges in Norway where I grew up. Scribner’s sits at the threshold of Hunter, New York, on a hilltop overlooking a beautiful landscape. I was there in early fall and the colors alone were breathtaking. The lodge was built in the 1960s and taken over by Marc Chodock and Glennon Travis in 2016. In their words, they “wanted to create a refuge for the city creative who craves a stylish, inspirational getaway.” And they sure got that right. Waking up in one of the comfy beds and drawing the curtain is like living in a movie—simply stunning. You can go for walks, take a swim in the heated pool, relax by the fireplace, and enjoy a meal or just cocktails at the Prospect restaurant. Helmed by Chef Joseph Buenconsejo, the restaurant draws from local flavors and ingredients. My favorite was the simple smoked cottage cheese served with the best melon I ever tasted. And then came the desserts. Pastry Chef Mary Choi is the brains behind Prospect’s delicious desserts. The last meal of our stay consisted of five different desserts lovingly made by Mary, and each one was better than last. My favorites are her bread pudding with birthday cake ice cream and the Sweet Potato and Chiffon Cake. Mary was kind enough to share her cake recipe for all of you to enjoy. Thanks, Mary!

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and bake until light brown for about 20 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean. 10. Let cool completely. For sweet potato filling

1. In a medium pot, combine heavy cream, milk, sugar, and butter. Heat until butter is melted and sugar is dissolved. 2. Pour mixture into a blender with the boiled sweet potato and blend until smooth; set aside in refrigerator to cool. For cinnamon syrup

In a small pot, combine all ingredients until sugar is dissolved; set aside in refrigerator to cool. For whipped cream

Sweet Potato and Chiffon Cake

For chiffon

SERVES 6

1. Preheat oven to 325°F.

FOR CHIFFON:

2. Grease two 6-inch round cake pans with butter or spray with cooking spray.

2 ounces butter 1 ⁄3 cup milk 6 whole eggs, separated ½ cup and ¾ cup sugar, amounts separated 2 cups cake flour FOR SWEET POTATO FILLING:

1 cup heavy cream 1 cup milk 1 ⁄3 cup sugar 3 ounces butter 3 cups boiled sweet potato FOR CINNAMON SYRUP:

1 cup sugar 1 cup water 2 tablespoons cinnamon FOR WHIPPED CREAM:

2 cups heavy cream 4 tablespoons powdered sugar

3. In a small pot, heat up milk and butter together until butter is completely melted; set aside to cool but not harden. 4. In the bowl of a stand-up mixer with a whip attachment, whip egg whites and ½ cup of sugar until soft peak stage is reached, then set aside in another clean large bowl. 5. Use the same bowl of a stand-up mixer to whip the yolks and ¾ cup sugar until yolks are pale, yellow, and fluffy. 6. Gently fold the egg yolk mixture into the egg white mixture. 7. Sift cake flour into the egg mixture while folding. 8. Add cooled milk and butter into mixture gently. 9. Pour the batter into both pans evenly

In the bowl of a stand-up mixture with a whip attachment, whip cream while gradually adding sugar until stiff peaks are achieved. For assembly

1. Cut the tops of the cakes off, then cut again in half across for 4 layers of cake. 2. Brush cinnamon syrup on each layer generously. 3. Spread sweet potato filling on three of the layers. 4. Stack each layer carefully. 5. Finish with whipped cream as the frosting. 6. Sift powdered sugar on top of cake and refrigerate until ready to serve! Optional decoration

1. Break up cake scraps and toast in oven until crunchy. 2. In a food processor, pulse the scraps until they are coarse crumbs. 3. Cover the entire cake with the cake crumbs.


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Charming recipes + Kitchen Crafts You Will Love Available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and IndieBound

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Healthy Appetite On my plate this season

Delightfully light These are some of the healthy winter dishes I go to when I want to cut down on carbs. Food + Styling + Photography by Paul Lowe

Roasted Beet and Orange Salad

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Warm Mushroom and Lemon Salad with Chili-Baked Eggplant

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HEALTHY APPETITE

Roasted Carrots and Farro Salad with Ricotta and Char

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HEALTHY APPETITE

Roasted Beet and Orange Salad A delicious salad on its own, it really shines as a side with roasted chicken. SERVES 4

3 large golden beets 3 large red beets 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 oranges, peeled and segments cut out 1 small red onion, thinly sliced 1 small bunch of fresh parsley olive oil sherry vinegar sea salt 1. Preheat oven to 380°F. 2. Peel the beets, and place in an ovenproof dish. 3. Drizzle with oil and bake until tender, takes about 30–45 min, depending on size of beets. 4. Take them out and allow to cool a little. 5. Slice the beets and divide on plates with orange, red onion, and parsley. 6. Drizzle with olive oil and sherry vinegar, and sprinkle with flaky sea salt.

Roasted Cabbage with Parmesan

3. Heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil in a large pan, and add the mushrooms. Cook them until they start to brown.

4. While the carrots are roasting, place the farro in a bowl and add water. Let it soak for 20 minutes.

4. Add garlic, salt, and pepper. Cook until golden.

5. Heat the oil in a pan, and add farro and red onion. Season with salt and pepper. Add carrots and stir until warm.

5. Add lemon zest, parsley, and red onion. Toss well and divide on 4 plates.

Warm Mushroom and Lemon Salad with Chili-Baked Eggplant

6. Top with eggplant, and a drizzle of olive oil.

Mushroom and lemon go really well together, and I love using Chinese eggplant for this dish, but you can totally use the regular kind.

Roasted Carrots and Farro Salad with Ricotta and Char

SERVES 4

4 Chinese eggplants, cut in half, lengthwise 7 tablespoons olive oil, divided salt chili flakes 2 pounds mixed mushrooms, cleaned, larger ones cut in half 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced pepper grated zest of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 1 small red onion, finely diced

I love making this dish. The ricotta becomes a sauce as you mix in the farro. It pairs well with any protein, like my favorite char, but it also makes magic of turkey leftovers. SERVES 4

10 small carrots, washed really well 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups farro 1 small red onion, finely diced 2 tablespoons olive oil salt and pepper 1 cup ricotta cooked salmon or char

1. Preheat oven to 380°F.

1. Preheat oven to 380°F.

2. Place the eggplant in an ovenproof dish and drizzle with 3 tablespoons of olive oil. Top with salt and chili flakes. Bake until soft, about 20 minutes.

2. Place the unpeeled carrots in an ovenproof dish and drizzle with oil.

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3. Roast until tender, about 25 minutes. Take out and cut into chunks.

6. Divide ricotta on 4 plates and top with the farro salad and char.

Roasted Cabbage with Parmesan This is a great way to serve cabbage to people who think they don’t like cabbage. Tender, savory, and served warm or cold, it’s a fab side dish at almost any meal. SERVES 4

1 small head of cabbage 4 tablespoons olive oil salt and pepper 1 cup grated Parmesan 1. Preheat oven to 380°F. 2. Cut the cabbage into small wedges, and place them in an ovenproof dish. 3. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. 4. Cover with foil and bake for 15 minutes. 5. Remove the foil, and add half of the Parmesan. Bake for another 20 minutes. 6. Remove from oven, and add the rest of the Parmesan.


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MORMOR'S KITCHEN Carrying on my Grandma's cooking

What She Did for Love One of our favorite holiday dishes to eat was Mormor’s least favorite dish to make—but she made it for us anyway. Food + Styling + Photography by Paul Lowe

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AS YOU KNOW BY NOW, my Mormor loved to cook, and she loved to make just about everything—with one exception. She was not into making the Norwegian specialty, lefse, which is best described as a potato flatbread or crepe. Lefse is eaten either plain, with butter, sugar, and cinnamon, or smeared with sweet mustard and filled with pieces of pork belly. It was always a staple on our Christmas day breakfast buffet. My dad’s all-time favorite was and is still pork-belly-and-mustard-stuffed lefse, and he would start begging Mormor in November to make them for him. She would say, “No, make it yourself.” I still don’t know why she didn’t like making them. They are quite easy, so what was the problem? All I know is, every year she would fill the kitchen with swearing and cigarette smoke between sips of sherry while making them. We just left her alone! But once they were done, the kitchen was filled with sunshine again. I loved tasting the lefse fresh off the griddle, warm with just a little sugar on top. And my dad would always look at her lovingly while eating his beloved lefse with pork belly.

Mormor’s Potato Lefse These taste best when they are freshly made. You will need a ricer and a griddle. There are special lefse griddles available, but a pancake griddle works fine—it just has to be really hot. MAKES ABOUT 20

.5 pounds russet potatoes 2 1/2 cup butter 1 ⁄3 cup heavy cream 1 tablespoon salt 1 tablespoon sugar 21/2 cups all-purpose flour 1. Peel the potatoes, and then boil until tender. 2. Run the hot potatoes through a ricer into a large bowl. 3. Mix in butter, cream, salt, and sugar. Cool mixture in the refrigerator. 4. Add flour and work it in well. (Return the dough to the refrigerator if you are not making the lefse right away.) FOLLOW US @SWEETPAULMAGAZINE

5. Roll the dough into walnut-sized balls with your hands. Then, with a rolling pin, roll balls into thin disks between two clean towels, dusted with a little flour. 6. Cook on a 400°F-griddle until golden brown on each side. Store wrapped in a damp towel until ready to eat. Serve with a smear of butter and a sprinkle of sugar and cinnamon.


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Sweet Paul Eat & Make “Sweet Paul has been inspiring my family and I for years with his stylish take on crafts and food. Paul’s Nordic roots and New York taste shine in the delicious and distinctive dishes he has created in Sweet Paul Eat Make.”­—Tyler Florence

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PUT A LID ON IT! The essential guide to canning and preserving

Pillows of Goodness Give your holiday cocoa a little zing with this zesty marshmallow recipe Food + Styling by Michaela Hayes Photography by Paul Lowe

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PICKLES AND MARSHMALLOWS? Am I pregnant, you might ask? No, just looking for a holiday-appropriate way to use up some leftover pickling liquid and, of course, making marshmallows was my first thought. As a food stylist, I’ve made marshmallows a couple of times for photo shoots, but never for the sheer fun of it. So I started deconstructing various marshmallow recipes to see what makes them tick. Marshmallow recipes usually combine sugar, corn syrup, gelatin, and water. What I discovered is that the liquid you add to help create the hot candy syrup can be just about any kind of liquid at all. One of the best and most underappreciated products of pickling is the pickling liquid, which contains much of the flavor and some of the nutrients, and I’m always looking for ways to use it— either from a jar of pickles or preserved fruit. It turns out that the little extra zing of vinegar from a sweet pickling liquid is the perfect accompaniment to the sugary marshmallow. I made three kinds of marshmallows (go high or go home, right?) and flavored them with pickled cherry and pickled beet liquid, pickled blueberry liquid, and citrus syrup. These little pillows of goodness are out of this world, and in a whole different league than their store-bought cousins. Good enough as a treat by themselves, covering the marshmallows with chocolate takes them to an irresistible new level. Happy holidays!

Tangy Marshmallows YIELDS ABOUT 3 DOZEN SQUARES

2 cups powdered sugar, sifted and divided 21/4 ounce packets of gelatin 1 ⁄3 cup water 1 cup granulated sugar ²⁄3 cup corn syrup 1 ⁄3 cup flavoring liquid (sweet pickling liquid or syrup) ¹⁄8 teaspoon salt 11/4 teaspoons vanilla extract food coloring (optional) 1/2 pound good quality chocolate (optional) FOLLOW US @SWEETPAULMAGAZINE

1. Spray a 9-inch square baking pan with nonstick cooking spray and dust generously with powdered sugar. 2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, sprinkle gelatin over the water to soften. 3. In a medium pot, heat granulated sugar, corn syrup, flavoring liquid, and salt over low heat until dissolved together. 4. Turn heat to medium and cook, swirling the pot occasionally, until the mixture reaches 240˚F on a candy thermometer. 5. Working quickly, remove pan from heat and with mixer on low speed, pour a stream of hot syrup into the gelatin. Increase the speed of the mixer to high, add vanilla, and beat until the mixture is very thick, 10 to 15 minutes. Add optional food coloring to boost colors. 6. Scrape mixture into prepared pan and smooth with a damp spatula. Sprinkle

generously with powdered sugar and press into pan with your fingers. 7. Let the marshmallows stand at room temperature until firm, about 2 hours. 8. Pull the marshmallow block from the pan onto a surface dusted with powdered sugar. 9. Using a pizza wheel, cut the marshmallow into 1-inch wide strips and then into squares. 10. Roll the squares in more powdered sugar and store in an airtight container. Or freeze marshmallows for an hour, temper chocolate, and dip the cold marshmallows into chocolate and dry on a rack. 11. Store uncoated marshmallows in an airtight container for up to a month. Chocolate-coated marshmallows should be eaten within a few days.


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Woof

Dogs have favorite things too! Chicken Treats

Every Good Dog Deserves Treats Fun holiday treat bags to make for all the good dogs in your life. Food + Styling + Photography by Paul Lowe

The perfect holiday gift for all the dog lovers in your life. And It’s so easy. Using your home printer, you can customize holiday gifts for everyone in your animal family. This one’s for Charlie. MAKES ABOUT 60 SMALL TREATS

11/2 cup whole-wheat flour 1 cup wheat germ 1 egg 1/2 cup chicken broth 1. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl until you have a smooth dough. 2. Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface until its 1/4-inch thick. 3. Use cookie cutters to make small bite-size treats. 4. Bake at 350ºF for about 30–40 minutes. The biscuits should be completely dry. If they are not, bake them for a little longer. 5. Allow to cool, and store in a sealed box.

Gift Wrap SUPPLIES: photo print out scissors cellophane bags paper glue ribbons 1. Print and cut out photo of the dog. 2. Glue photo to the bag using paper glue. Allow to dry. 3. Fill bags with treats, and tie with a ribbon.

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FETCH

Quirky finds for you and your best pal

Rambo Collar and Leeche, from $45, prunkhund.com

SWEET PAWS

Doing our best for our most loyal companions

Dog Bowl and Dog treat Container, from $64 prunkhund.de

Special Needs Dogs: All Love, No Pity This Florida-based fostering organization wants to create a space for all the “poor babies” to be treated like can-do pups Text by Dorie Herman LOVEYLOAVES is a special needs dog rescue that began in 2010 when Founder/ Executive Chairman Cheri Wells’ dog had his leg amputated. Through that experience, Wells and her husband, Ward, learned that many special needs dogs are surrendered to shelters or euthanized due to their conditions. Since its founding, LoveyLoaves has helped hundreds of animals nationwide find forever homes that can meet their needs. It is a common misconception that special needs animals have low or no quality of life, but those who love them know it is quite the opposite. Wells says, “Every single event we go to we hear, “Oh, you poor baby.” That’s why we have a shirt with Sassy [our mascot] on it that says, “Who you calling poor baby?”. LoveyLoaves relies entirely on in-home fostering to run its rescue, but their dream is to open a sanctuary near their central Florida base. Wells says, “We pull dogs from shelters, take in strays, as well as owner surrenders. We can only take dogs with certain disabilities as qualified fosters are available, so we rely heavily on our fosters. We need that sanctuary. And funding, of course.” Wells says 50% of their job is educating people about what they do and why. “If we can help a frazzled homeowner learn how to take care of their dog when [the dog] needs them the most so they choose to keep their family member, that’s a win for us!” If you would like to learn more, make a donation, or become a special needs foster, email Cheri@loveyloaves.org or visit loveyloaves.org.

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Leather Harness $128, houndcollection.com


the

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Find fresh & faux T R E E S , festive wreaths, botanical bunches & our entire holiday collection at SHOP TERRAIN.COM

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INTRODUCING

DETOX + AGE-DEFYING SKIN CARE HARNESS THE UNIQUE, NOURISHING ELEMENTS OF THE SEA TO DETOXIFY, RESTORE, AND PROTECT YOUR BEAUTIFUL SKIN.

A V A I L A B L E O N TA R G E T. C O M A N D I N STORES NATIONWIDE JANUARY 2018

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Winter PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIETLINDWOLF

2017

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HIDDEN

GEMS

Alexandra Bingham’s creativity is inspired by the beauty of her grandfather's rock and mineral collection, which she adds to, and the story each pieces tells.


Photography + Crafts + Styling by Alexandra Bingham


RockHandled Boxes

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Bookmark

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Tourmaline Frame

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MADE FROM SPARKLY, FESTIVE STONES, THESE PROJECTS MAKE THE PERFECT HOLIDAY GIFTS FOR YOUR LOVED ONES OR YOURSELF.

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Icicles

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Tourmaline Frame SUPPLIES

black tourmaline zip-top bag hammer old picture frame superglue flat paint brush

Bookmark

Icicle

SUPPLIES

SUPPLIES

3 lengths copper wire 2 feet leather cord round-nose jewelry pliers needle-nose pliers wire cutters 3 pieces rose quartz

gloves newspaper or kraft paper selenite wand round-nose jewelry pliers needle-nose pliers copper wire

1. Using one length of wire and the round-nose pliers, make a wrapped-wire jewelry loop that is the same diameter as the leather cord. To do so, gently bend one end of the copper wire around one jaw of the pliers, leaving a 2- to 3- inch tail. Once you have a loop, wrap the tail around the base of the loop 3 times to secure the loop in place. Trim the excess tail with wire cutters and squeeze tight with needle-nose pliers.

Note: Selenite can leave fine slivers so wear gloves while working with it.

2. Position one piece of rose quartz on the wire about 1/2 inch from the loop you just made. Tightly wrap the wire around the stone 5 or 6 times. 3. Wrap the remaining end around the base of loop you created, using pliers to secure the two ends of wire together. 4. Repeat steps 1–3 with the other two stones. 5. Feed the leather cord through the copper wire loops, and tie simple knots to secure the crystals at the spacing you desire.

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1. Cover your work surface with newspaper or kraft paper. Place tourmaline in a zip-top bag and crush the stones by lightly pounding with a hammer. 2. Brush a medium to thick layer of craft glue onto a picture frame of your choice. 3. Pour crushed tourmaline on glue-covered frame, and shake off excess like glitter. 4. Carefully glue larger decorative pieces into corners and center of frame.

1. Cover your work surface with newspaper or kraft paper.

5. Let glue dry for 24 hours.

2. Using pliers, carefully break selenite into long strips.

Rock-Handled Boxes

3. In one end of the copper wire using round-nose pliers, make a wrapped-wire jewelry loop. To do so, gently bend one end of the copper wire around one jaw of the pliers, leaving a 2- to 3- inch tail. Once you have a loop, wrap the tail around the base of the loop 3 times to secure the loop in place. Trim the excess tail with wire cutters and squeeze tight with needle-nose pliers.

large rocks or crystals vintage boxes fine sandpaper or emery board superglue or strong, clear-drying epoxy

SUPPLIES

1. Cover your work surface with newspaper or kraft paper. Place the rocks on the boxes first to see where you want them. (Once rocks are glued down, you can't move them!)

4. Leaving about a 1-inch tail on the other end of the wire, tightly wrap the copper wire around the stone 7 or 8 times.

2. Clean and sand the spot on the boxes where you’ll place your rocks. Wipe away the dust from sanding with a damp cloth and let dry.

5. Wrap the tail end around the base of the wire loop you created, using needle-nose pliers to secure two ends of wire together.

3. Using superglue, attach the rocks in place. Hold each rock for 30 seconds to make sure the glue is set.

6. Hang from 11/2-inch pieces of wire bent into an S-shape, like an ornament hook.

4. Let the glue cure for several hours up to overnight for a sure hold.


Festive

Finger Food

Thanksgiving Sliders with Rum Cranberry Relish

You all know I love a cocktail party, and no party is complete without fabulous food. I’m obsessed with anything bite-sized, so here are my best amuse-bouche for this winter. Cheers!


Food + Styling + Photography by Paul Lowe Butter Dipped Radishes


TIP Thirty minutes before serving, slice the radishes, and and place them in ice water. They become really crispy and mild.

Crab Toast with Radishes

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Cheese Balls

Crab Toast with Radishes These are not just pretty to look at, but they taste amazing too. Adding rice wine vinegar instead of lemon juice to the avocado makes it taste even better. Wanna a low carb version? Just swap the bread for a lettuce cup. MAKES 10

8 ounces lump crab meat 2 tablespoons mayonnaise 2 tablespoons finely chopped chives salt and pepper 1 avocado 2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar 10 slices good white bread 2 tablespoons butter 6 breakfast radishes, thinly sliced 1. In a bowl, mix crab, mayo, and chives, and season with salt and pepper. 2. In another bowl, mix avocado and rice wine vinegar with a fork until chunky. 3. Use a cookie cutter or a glass to press out circles in the bread. 4. Butter the bread on both sides, and fry until golden. 5. Arrange the bread on a platter, and top with avocado, crab, and radishes.

Cheese Balls I know it’s cheesy (no pun intended), but I always get very excited about a cheese ball. Make them small so they can be a bite or two. And don't worry, the rosè pepper isn’t too spicy. MAKES 18

8 ounces cream cheese 3 ounces soft goat cheese 5 ounces white cheddar, grated 1/2 cup finely chopped chives 2 tablespoons rosè pepper (red pepper) 1. In a bowl, mix cream cheese, goat cheese, and cheddar. 2. Use your hands to make 18 balls, a little smaller than a walnut. 3. Place the chives and pepper on a small plate, and roll the cheese balls in the mixture. 4. Plate and serve.

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TIP You can make the cheese balls ahead. Roll them in the chives/ pepper mixture just before serving.


Poke Bites with Tuna

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Winter Cruditè with Herb and Honey Yogurt

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Polenta Bites with Pecorino and Honey I love to make it easy for you guys, so for these bites, I used ready-made polenta. Simply slice and fry—so easy. The salty pecorino and the sweet honey make this a flavor bomb in your mouth. MAKES 18 BITES

1 packet ready-made polenta (usually 2 pounds) 3 tablespoon olive oil 5 ounces pecorino honey 1. Cut the polenta into 1-inch thick slices, and divide the slices into bitesized squares. 2. Heat the oil in a pan, and fry the polenta squares until golden on each side, 3–4 minutes. Let cool a little. 3. Arrange on a platter. 4. Break up the pecorino into small pieces, and add on top of the polenta. 5. Drizzle with a little honey, and serve.

The Perfect Cheese Platter When it comes down to it, there is nothing better than a good cheese platter, and it’s super easy to make one yourself. Follow these simple tips, and your cheese platter will be a winner every time. 1. Choose 3 cheeses: one soft cheese, like a brie or Camembert; one blue cheese; and one hard cheese, like pecorino or Parmesan. 2. Then you need something sweet, like fresh or dry figs, honey, or jam. 3. Next, add some nuts for crunch, like almonds, walnuts, or pecans. 4. Finally, of course, don’t forget the crackers.

Polenta Bites with Pecorino and Honey

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The Perfect Cheese Platter

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Rรถsti with Prosciutto and Raclette Cheese

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Rösti with Prosciutto and Raclette Cheese I grew up with rösti potatoes. We often made one large one, but making smaller bite-sized potato pancakes is just as easy. And topping just about anything with Swiss raclette cheese makes it better in my view. Not into grating potatoes? Just slice boiled potatoes and top with prosciutto and raclette. MAKES 10 PIECES

2 large russet potatoes 2 teaspoons all-purpose flour 1 egg white salt and pepper 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 2 tablespoons butter 5 slices of prosciutto 6 ounces raclette cheese

2 tablespoons chives, finely chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 2 tablespoons butter 10 slider buns mayonnaise micro greens 1. Start with the relish. Place cranberries, onion, rum, water, and sugar in a saucepan, and bring to a boil. Let it simmer for 10–15 minutes. Don’t let the liquid cook off. Set aside to cool. 2. In a bowl mix turkey, onion, chives, salt, and pepper. 3. Form the turkey mixture into 10 small patties.

Poke Bites with Tuna Everyone loves a poke bowl these days, so why not turn them into bites? And don’t be afraid to cook sushi rice. It’s so easy and doable. The secret is rice vinegar. MAKES 12

1 cup sushi rice 3 cups water 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons rice vinegar 1 cup seaweed salad (You can buy at any sushi restaurant or good grocery store.) 5 ounces sushi-grade tuna black sesame seeds toasted sesame oil 1. Start with the rice. Bring water and salt to a boil, and add the rice. Stir.

1. Grate the potatoes.

4. Heat butter in a pan, and cook the patties until golden on each side and cooked through, about 7–8 minutes.

2. Use your hands and squeeze out as much liquid from the potatoes as you can.

5. Cut the buns in half, and add some mayo and micro greens to the bottoms.

3. Drain off the water, and add the rice vinegar. Let it cool a little.

3. Mix potatoes in a bowl with flour, egg white, salt, pepper, and thyme.

6. Layer with turkey patties, relish, and the tops of the buns.

4. Cut the tuna into small cubes.

4. Heat the butter in a pan, and divide the batter into 10 flat small pancakes.

Butter Dipped Radishes

5. Cook until golden on each side, about 8 minutes.

A classic French treat, perfect to serve with any cocktail.

6. Transfer to paper towel before arranging on a platter.

MAKES ABOUT 26–30

8. Place the cheese on a baking tray, and melt it under the broiler in the oven. Keep an eye on it—it melts fast.

1/2 cup (1 stick) salted butter 2 bunches breakfast radishes salt (I used pink sea salt) toasted sesame seeds, white or black

9. Top each rösti with cheese, and serve.

1. Melt the butter in a saucepan.

Thanksgiving Sliders with Rum Cranberry Relish

2. Use a spoon to remove the cloudy top layer of the butter. Now you have clarified butter.

7. Top with prosciutto.

These sliders are like a bite of Thanksgiving. The spicy dark rum takes the cranberry relish to new heights—and you will never look back. MAKES 10

2 cups dried cranberries 1/2 small red onion, finely chopped 1/2 cup dark spiced rum 1/2 cup water 1/2 cup brown sugar 1 pound ground turkey 1/2 small red onion, finely chopped

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3. Clean the radishes, and leave one stem on each. It’s pretty and serves as a handle when you eat them. 4. Dip the radishes in butter, place on a plate, and cool in the fridge. 5. After 10 minutes dip them again and cool. 6. Dip them a third time, and drizzle with salt and sesame seeds. 7. Plate and serve.

2. Let the rice simmer until al dente, about 12 minutes.

5. Form the rice into small circles, and place on a platter. 6. Top with seaweed salad, tuna, and black sesame seeds. 7. To finish, drizzle with a small amount of toasted sesame oil.

Winter Cruditè with Herb and Honey Yogurt We don't have to wait for spring to serve cruditè. Use whatever vegetables look good, and dip them in the sweet and tart yogurt sauce. SERVES 4

32 ounces Greek yogurt 2 tablespoons honey 3 tablespoons mixed fresh herbs (I used chives and parsley.) salt and pepper carrots, fennel, and radishes cut into sticks 1. In a bowl, mix yogurt, honey, and herbs. Add salt and pepper to taste. 2. Fill the bottom of glasses or small jars with the yogurt, and garnish with the vegetable sticks. Serve.


Forest Gingerbread Cake with Pom-Pom Bunting

PomPom Love Making pom-poms just got a whole lot more fun! china squirrel shows us the art of making pom-poms for the holiday season.


For step-by-step images of the Pom-Pom Forest Animals (shown here), go to sweetpaulmag.com

Recipe + Crafts + Styling + Photography by china squirrel


Fork Pom-Poms SUPPLIES For step-by-step images of the Fork Pom-Poms, go to sweetpaulmag.com

fork yarn scissors 1. Wrap yarn horizontally around a small fork 22 times or a dinner fork 30 times. 2. Slip an extra length of yarn between the fork tines vertically and tie tightly in a knot. Slip wool off fork and cut the loops on each side. 3. Fluff the pom-pom and trim if necessary. (See step-by-step images at sweetpaulmag.com.) Note: To make a large pom-pom, use a dinner fork, 1-inch wide across tines; to make a small pom-pom, use a small fork, ½-inch wide across tines.

Bear with Pom-Pom Balloons Cake Topper An easy and fun cake topper idea for your next celebration cake. You can use other plastic animals too. Let your imagination go wild! SUPPLIES

2 paper-covered florist wires 2 large fork pom-poms 8-ply (DK weight) yarn in colors of your choice small plastic toy bear hot glue gun 1. Insert a wire into each pom-pom, and twist the top to secure into the pom-pom. 2. Twist wire ends together and trim. 3. Hot glue the wire end to the bear’s paw.

Pom-Pom Garland Bear with PomPom Balloons Cake Topper

A fun holiday craft the whole family can make together. SUPPLIES

long length of 8-ply (DK weight) yarn darning needle lots of large fork pom-poms 8-ply (DK weight) yarn in your favorite colors 1. Thread needle with yarn. 2. Thread pom-poms onto yarn. 3. Tie a knot on each end of yarn.

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Pom-Pom Garland

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For step-by-step images of the PomPom Christmas Puddings with Pom-Pom Cherries (shown here), go to sweetpaulmag.com

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Evergreen Pom-Pom Tree These miniature Christmas trees make the perfect place setting decoration for your Christmas table. SUPPLIES

cardboard pencil round cookie cutters or a large glass scissors green yarn string twig from garden small piece of air-dry clay brown acrylic craft paint paint brush hot glue gun thin twine small fork 1. Cut out two cardboard circles, using a 41/2-inch round cookie cutter or a

large glass as a template. Then cut out a smaller circle in the middle of each round, using a 11/4-inch round cookie cutter as a template. Cut a slit from the outer circle to the smaller circle to make the rings easier to remove once you have finished. 2. Lay the two cardboard rings on top of each other then wrap the green yarn through the center hole around the circle until you have almost filled the center hole. 3. Start cutting the yarn by pushing your scissors between the two cardboard rings. Slightly separate the cardboard pieces and tie a double piece of yarn tightly around the middle. 4. Remove the cardboard rings and trim the pom-pom into the shape of a tree. 5. Trim a twig to a 4-inch length. Take a small piece of air-dry clay and mold into a

disk about 1½-inch wide by ½-inch high. Press the end of the twig into the clay to make a hole, and then remove. Place the round of clay on a rack to dry, about 24 hours. Paint the clay disk brown once it’s dry. Use hot glue to secure the twig into disk, and allow glue to dry. Insert the twig into the base of the trimmed pom-pom. 6. To make the star for the top of the tree, wrap twine horizontally around a small fork 15 times to make a small pom-pom. 7. Slip an extra length of twine between the fork tines vertically and tie tightly in a knot. Slip twine off the fork, and cut the loops on each side. Fluff the twine pom-pom and trim if necessary. Hot glue to the top of the pom-pom tree.

Evergreen Pom-Pom Tree

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Pom-Pom Nose Reindeer Face Mask

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Forest Gingerbread Cake with Pom-Pom Bunting A deliciously moist gingerbread cake with fluffy cream cheese frosting, decorated with a forest theme to include a twig pom-pom bunting. SERVES 6–8

5 ounces whole milk 2 tablespoons molasses 1²⁄3 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger 2 pinches ground cloves 1¼ cups brown sugar pinch salt 2 large eggs 5 ounces vegetable oil 7 ounces buttermilk CREAM CHEESE FROSTING

3/4 cup butter, softened 1½ cups pure powdered sugar, sifted 11/2 cups cream cheese, at room temperature, chopped FOR DECORATION:

5 fork pom-poms a length of yarn darning needle small branches small plastic rabbit and deer toys sifted powdered sugar 1. Preheat oven to 360°F. Grease and line three 6-inch round cake pans with parchment paper. 2. Place milk and molasses into a medium saucepan. Stir over a medium-low heat until well combined. Remove from heat and allow to cool. 3. Meanwhile, sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, and cloves into a large mixing bowl. Stir in brown sugar and salt. 4. Combine eggs, oil, buttermilk, and milk mixture in a separate bowl. Add to dry ingredients and stir until just combined. Divide evenly between prepared cake tins. Bake in preheated oven for 30–35 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the center of cakes comes out clean. 5. Remove from oven; allow to cool in

tins for 5 minutes before turning out onto wire racks to cool completely. (Cakes may be made a day in advance and kept in airtight containers.) For the frosting:

6. Place butter and sugar into a medium-mixing bowl. Beat until light and fluffy using an electric mixer, about 5 minutes. 7. Add cream cheese and beat until smooth. To assemble:

8. If cake tops are domed, slightly trim each one straight using a serrated knife. 9. Place the first cake onto a serving plate or cake stand. Spread a thick layer of frosting over cake then repeat with remaining cakes, leaving about ½-cup of frosting to decorate top and sides. 10. Spread a thin layer of frosting on top of cake and then, using a flat bladed knife, spread a thin layer of frosting around sides of cake, allowing the cake to still be seen through frosting. To decorate:

11. Thread the pom-poms onto a small length of yarn using a darning needle. 12. Tie bunting to the 2 twigs. Press twigs with bunting into the top of cake. 13. Arrange plastic rabbit and deer on cake top. Dust with powdered icing to imitate snow if desired.

Pom-Pom Forest Animals These adorable little furry faces will make a fun holiday project for the whole family. They also can be made into gorgeous Christmas tree baubles. SUPPLIES

round cookie cutters cardboard pencil scissors black and white yarn brown, grey, or russet colored yarn plastic craft stuffed animal eyes (available craft stores) craft glue or hot glue gun jewelry makers fine wire (available at craft stores) small pieces of felt needle embroidery thread

1. Cut out two cardboard pieces, using 3-inch round cookie cutter as a template. Then cut out a smaller circle in the middle of each, using 11/4-inch round cookie cutter as a template. Cut a slit from the outer circle to the smaller circle to make the rings easier to remove once you have finished. 2. Lay the two cardboard rings on top of each other. Wrap a small section of black yarn through the center hole around the circle, about 1/4 inch wide. Wrap white yarn on either side of the black yarn—this will be the nose and face of your animal. If you want more white markings on the forehead of your forest animal, simply wrap a little more white yarn on one side more than the other (next to the black yarn). 3. Wrap brown, grey, or russet yarn around remaining cardboard section. 4. Now continue to wrap the main color you have chosen (brown, grey, or russet) over the black and white yarn sections and continuously around the cardboard circle until you have almost filled the center hole. 5. Start cutting the yarn, by pushing your scissors between the two cardboard rings. Slightly separate the cardboard pieces, and tie a double piece of yarn tightly around the middle. Remove the cardboard rings. 6. Trim the pom-pom into an animal-shaped face, trimming around the white section to create a snout and centering your design on the black yarn as the nose. 7. Glue the plastic eyes onto your pom-pom forest animal; insert small sections of jewelry wire for whiskers. Cut small rounds of felt for ears and sew or glue onto the pom-pom. Note: To make into baubles, simply tie a length of yarn around the center of the pom-pom.

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Pom-Pom Christmas Puddings with Pom-Pom Cherries

Pom-Pom Nose Reindeer Face Mask

Perfect as stocking stuffers or baubles for the Christmas tree.

A great holiday craft that the kids will love.

SUPPLIES

light-weight brown cardboard pencil scissors paint brush black and white watercolor paints hole puncher masking tape leaves twigs millinery elastic 1 small fork pom-pom made with black yarn hot glue gun

round cookie cutters pencil cardboard scissors white, brown, and red yarns craft glue or a needle and embroidery thread small, thin twigs 8-ply (DK weight) red yarn small fork small twigs 1. Cut out two cardboard circles, using 3-inch round cookie cutter as a template. Cut out a smaller circle from the middle of each round, using a 3/4-inch round cookie cutter as a template. Cut a slit from the outer circle to the smaller circle to make the rings easier to remove once you have finished. 2. Lay the two cardboard rings on top of each other, then wrap white yarn through the center hole until you have covered a quarter of the ring. Wrap brown yarn over the remaining section. Continue wrapping the white over the white and brown over brown until you have almost filled the center hole. 3. Start cutting the yarn, by pushing your scissors between the two cardboard rounds. Slightly separate the cardboard pieces and tie a double piece of yarn tightly around the middle. 4. Remove the cardboard rings, and trim the pom-pom. 5. To make the pom-pom cherry, wrap yarn horizontally around a small fork 22 times. Slip an extra length of yarn between the fork tines vertically and tie tightly in a knot. Slip yarn off fork, and cut the loops on each side. 6. Fluff the pom-pom and trim if necessary. Insert a small twig into each cherry pom-pom. 7. Use craft glue or sew a pom-pom cherry to the top of the pudding pom-pom. Note: To make into baubles, simply tie a length of yarn around the center of the pom-pom.

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SUPPLIES

1. Use scissors to cut cardboard into approximately 8-inch by 41/2-inch rectangles or sizes to suit children’s faces, then round the edges.

2. Use a pencil to mark holes for eyes then cut out with scissors. Nail scissors are good for this. 3. To reinforce the elastic holes, place 2 small pieces of masking tape on the back near the side edges, and use a hole puncher or scissors to make a hole on each side of mask. Thread a piece of elastic through holes and tie in a knot. 4. With scissors, trim the base end from leaves and trim twigs into short sections. Use tape to attach leaves as ears and twigs as antlers to back of mask. 5. Now have fun painting the mask with watercolor paints. 6. Allow paint to dry. Attach pom-pom nose to the mask using hot glue.


Garlic


Food + Styling + Photography by Paul Lowe

Life without garlic would be a much duller world. Not only is garlic good for you, but it makes so much food taste delicious and inviting. Here are some of my favorite recipes starring garlic.


Green Morning Eggs

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Garlic and Green Olive Pasta with Dill

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Black Garlic Risotto

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Vegetable Tart with Garlic, Feta, and Honey

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Roasted Garlic Garlic becomes sweet and tender when roasted, making it spreadable like butter. SERVES 4

4 whole heads of garlic olive oil salt 1. Preheat oven to 380°F. 2. Cut the top off the garlic heads and place on a sheet of aluminum foil. 3. Drizzle with a little oil and sprinkle with salt. 4. Wrap the foil around the garlic heads, and bake for 20 minutes. Spread on crusty bread.

Roasted Garlic and Leek Soup An easy and delicious vegetable soup for any time of day. SERVES 4

1 whole head of garlic 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for drizzling 2 leeks, just the white part, sliced 1 large potato, peeled and chopped 3 cups chicken stock 1 cup heavy cream salt and pepper 2 tablespoons chives, finely chopped 1. Preheat oven to 380°F. 2. Cut the top off the garlic head, and place on a sheet of aluminum foil. 3. Drizzle with a little oil and add a pinch of salt. 4. Wrap the foil around the garlic, and bake for 20 minutes. 5. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a pan, and sauté leeks and potatoes until soft. 6. Remove garlic cloves from the head, and add to the mix. 7. Pour in chicken stock and cream, and simmer for 5 minutes.

Roasted Garlic

8. With an immersion blender, blend the soup until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, and serve with chives.

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Roasted Garlic and Leek Soup

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Garlic Pancakes

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Green Morning Eggs

Black Garlic Risotto

One of my favorite breakfast treats, I love serving this dish with topped with egg or shredded chicken.

Black garlic is garlic that has been fermented. It has an earthy taste with a hint of mushrooms. If you can’t find black garlic, regular garlic works just as well.

SERVES 4

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 leek, washed and thinly sliced 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 green chili, finely chopped 1 bunch Swiss chard, cut into thin strips 4 ounces baby spinach ½ teaspoon dried oregano salt and pepper ½ cup crumbled feta 4 fried eggs fresh chives, finely chopped

SERVES 4

6 cloves of garlic, sliced ½ cup crumbled feta 2 tablespoons pine nuts salt and pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons honey

1. Heat the oil in a pan and sauté the leeks until soft.

2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped 1 whole bulb black garlic, chopped ²⁄3 cup risotto rice, such as arborio ¾ cup white wine (at room temperature) 3 cups hot vegetable stock 2 tablespoons butter 1 cup Parmesan cheese, freshly grated ½ teaspoon ground pepper, white or black

2. Add garlic and chili and mix well.

1. Melt butter and oil in a large pot.

3. Add Swiss chard and spinach, and cook until it starts to soften.

2. Sauté the onions and garlic over medium heat until soft.

Can be served hot or cold.

4. Stir in oregano and season with salt and pepper.

3. Add the rice to the pan and continue to sauté until the grains of rice turn slightly translucent.

Garlic Pancakes

5. Divide onto plates; top with feta and an egg, and finish off with some chives.

Garlic and Green Olive Pasta with Dill This is an easy, everyday dish. Shrimp pairs beautifully with this pasta if you want to add protein. SERVES 4

¼ cup olive oil 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 2 thick slices country-style bread, broken into small pieces 20 green olives, pitted and broken into pieces 2 tablespoons dill 1 pound cooked spaghetti salt and white pepper 1. Heat oil over medium heat in a large pan. Add garlic, bread, and olives. 2. Cook the mixture until the bread and garlic turn golden, taking care not to burn the garlic. 3. Add dill and cooked pasta, and mix well. Season with salt and pepper and serve.

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4. Pour in the wine. Stir the mixture, and, when the wine has been almost entirely absorbed, add a ladleful of the warm stock and continue to stir. 5. Keep adding small amounts of stock, and stir until the liquid becomes absorbed. Continue until the rice is al dente. Note: you may not need to use all of the stock. 6. Stir in butter, Parmesan, and pepper. Serve with more Parmesan and some fresh chives on top.

Vegetable Tart with Garlic, Feta, and Honey I love making tarts like this one. The salty cheese and sweet honey balance beautifully, making it the perfect brunch food. MAKES 2

1 large sheet of puff pastry (I love Dufour) all-purpose flour ½ bunch asparagus, trimmed and blanched 5 radishes, sliced

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. 2. Cut the pastry into two pieces, and roll it out to double size. 3. Sprinkle with a little all-purpose flour so it does not stick to the surface. 4. Place each pastry on a baking tray covered with parchment paper. 5. Top with asparagus, radishes, garlic, feta, and pine nuts; sprinkle with salt and pepper, and drizzle with oil. 6. Bake until golden, about 15–18 minutes. 7. Remove from oven and drizzle with honey.

My take on the scallion pancake. Serve it with your favorite dipping sauce or as “bread” for a sandwich. MAKES 20

2 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup boiling water 3 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 1 cup thinly sliced garlic ¼ cup olive oil

1. Place the flour in a food processor. 2. Add the water a little at a time. The dough should come together nicely around the blade. 3. Wrap the dough in plastic, and let it rest in the fridge for 2–3 hours. 4. Remove dough from fridge, and cut into 20 pieces. 5. Roll each piece of dough in some garlic so it becomes well incorporated. 6. Flatten out and brush both sides with toasted sesame oil. 7. Heat the olive oil in a pan, and cook the pancakes about 2 minutes on each side or until golden. 8. Transfer to paper towels to drain. Serve while warm with your favorite dipping sauce.


Tin and Tinsel Our Dietlind Wolf was inspired by the bright colors of Christmas in Mexico to create these festive decorations that incorporate natural elements with her unmistakable style. Styling + Crafts + Photography by Dietlind Wolf


Star SUPPLIES

metal wire dried flowers or straws thin, colorful wire tinsel small ornaments 1. Bend the metal wire into a star shape. 2. On each star tip, fasten small bunches of straw or dried flowers using the thin wire. 3. Twist tinsel and wire around the star, and decorate with small ornaments.

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Tumbleweed “Tree� SUPPLIES

tumbleweed platter or plate scissors candleholders metal wire or superglue candles small glass ornaments ribbons pearls and beads 1. Place the tumbleweed on a platter. Use scissors to trim the plant so it sits well on the platter. 2. Attach the candleholders to the tumbleweed with wire or glue, and place the candles in the holders. 3. Decorate the tumbleweed with ornaments, ribbons, pearls, and beads. Note: Never leave an unsupervised candle burning

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Metal Ornaments SUPPLIES

soda cans scissors protective gloves screwdriver cutting mat liquid acrylic paint punch tool 1. Cut off the bottom and the top of an empty and clean soda can. Cut the middle section in half lengthwise, and press flat. 2. Cut the foil into any shape you like. Score and make patterns in the aluminum using a screwdriver. 3. Decorate the design with acrylic paint. 4. Punch a hole for a hook, and hang on the tree.

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Allium Allium is an onion plant with stunning flowers. When the flower dries, it maintains its beautiful light-purple color. Allium is cute to use as a tree ornament or as table decoration with some tinsel around it.

Allium Flower Tree Allium flowers can be found all year-round. They dry beautifully and make stunning ornaments. SUPPLIES

metal wire dried allium flowers small holiday glass or wood ornaments 1. Fasten the wire around the stem at the base of the flower. 2. Attach a glass or wood ornament to the wire, and make a loop so it can easily be hung on a tree.

Allium

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Fennel Wreath

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Fennel Wreath SUPPLIES

colorful aluminum foil superglue dried fennel flowers or other dried plant parts copper wire scissors pliers 1. Start by cutting out simple flower shapes of varying sizes from the foil. Glue some of smaller pieces on top of the bigger ones for a dimensional effect. 2. In the middle of each foil flower, glue a small stem of fennel flower. 3. Make a wreath of copper wire by looping and coiling the wire around several times. 4. Fasten fennel flowers to the wreath with glue or by twisting some wire around the flower stems. 5. Glue on the foil flowers, and hang.

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Dorie wh en pau l m e t

Sweet Paul and Queen of Cookies Dorie Greenspan share a glass of milk and a chewy, chocolatey conversation about food, Paris, and everyone’s favorite crumbly confection.


Christmas Spice Cookies

Recipes by Dorie Greenspan Food Styling by Tux Loerzel Styling by Paul Lowe Photography by Alexandra Grablewski


My grandmother was my big cooking inspiration, who was yours? My mother-in-law helped me understand the pleasure of having people around the table, but I think France was my greatest cooking inspiration. I fell in love with the country, its chefs, its home cooks, its style of life, and the general sense of joie de vivre that was truly palpable no matter where I went. What can we find at all time in Dorie's pantry? Chocolate. Lots of it.

For those of you who don’t know Dorie Greenspan, you are in for a treat. She is a five-time James Beard Award winner, has written 12 cookbooks and is a columnist for “The New York Times Magazine.” Her specialty is baking, and she takes the art of baking cookies to new and delectable levels. We sat down for a chat, baked some cookies together, and talked about her cookie love. So why cookies? I have always loved cookies. They were a treat when I was a child, and I still think of them as special now that I’m very much grown up. As a baker, I find them an endless source of inspiration. I also love that we bake cookies in batches—it’s nice to have so many good things to share. Why is food important to you? For me, food is synonymous with family and friends, with sharing, generosity, and good times. I’m happiest when I’m either in the kitchen or at the table. I love making food—it’s a creative act in the true sense of the term—and I love sharing it with people I care about.

What is your favorite dish or favorite restaurant? This question is too hard to answer. Does ice cream count as a dish? Does the wine bar down the street from us in Paris count as a favorite restaurant? Does everything made with bread, potatoes, cornmeal, and/or pasta count? Tarts, sweet and savory? Cookies, big, small, and mostly crunchy? I’m moving on to the next question. What is Dorie’s dirty food secret? (Mine is Taco Bell) I don’t like to say “dirty food secret” or “guilty pleasure.” I like to think of all good food as pure pleasure, but now that you’ve mentioned it—M&Ms! What is your all-time favorite cookie? Another impossible question! I can’t name just one, but I’ll narrow down the field. Chocolate-chip cookies made with great chocolate that’s cut by hand, so the pieces are all different sizes. The World Peace Cookie, which I guess you could call a chocolate-chipper because it’s got chopped chocolate, but it’s also got cocoa, fleur de sel (salt makes a huge difference in cookies), and a fabulous texture—it’s both chewy and a bit crunchy. And the Classic Jammer—I love this cookie! The cookie is built on a thick, very delicious, buttery shortbread. It’s got a dollop of jam in the center and streusel all around the edges.

What’s the biggest mistake people do when baking cookies? Using a warm baking sheet. It’s a temptation, when you’re baking batches and you don’t have a stack of baking sheets, to bake the second batch on the sheet that’s just come out of the oven, but it’s a mistake. Your cookies start to melt before they start to bake. Invest in at least two baking sheets, so that you can always send your cookies into the oven on a cool sheet. What’s next? "Everyday Dorie"! It’s my new book that will be out Fall 2018. Recipes sweet and savory, some surprising, some comforting, all very doable, even for kitchen newbies, my favorite kinds of cooks and bakers.

"I have always loved cookies. They were a treat when I was a child, and I still think of them as special now that I’m very much grown up. As a baker, I find them an endless source of inspiration." FOLLOW US @SWEETPAULMAGAZINE


PistachioBerry Slims

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Mulled Wine Jammers

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Mulled Wine Jammers There’s a lot going on in this cookie, and all of it is great. You’ll recognize the Classic Jammer construction. But while the cookie is my beloved French Vanilla Sablé (such a good team player), the streusel has cornmeal and the jam is a mix of spicy mulled red wine, dried cherries, raisins, and cranberries, with store-bought cherry jam to pull it all together. It is one of my all-time favorite cold-weather cookies. A word on timing: Each of the elements in this recipe has to cool or be chilled before you can use it. Make the dough first and get it rolled out and chilled. Then move on to the streusel, pop that into the fridge, and make and cool the jam. The best move—if you can swing it—is to make everything a day or two ahead. Then, on baking day, making these beautiful cookies will be quick work. A word on quantity: You may have some of the mulled-wine jam left over—it’s hard to make a smaller quantity of this—but you won’t be sorry. MAKES ABOUT 24 COOKIES FOR THE STREUSEL

²⁄3 cup (91 grams) all-purpose flour 1 ⁄3 cup (53 grams) yellow cornmeal 3 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon light brown sugar ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt 5 tablespoons (2½ ounces; 71 grams) cold unsalted butter, cut into small cubes ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract

3 tablespoons plump, moist raisins 1 ⁄3 cup (108 grams) thick, fruity best-quality cherry jam FOR THE COOKIE BASE

1 recipe French Vanilla Sablé dough (page 102), rolled out and chilled To make the streusel:

You can make the streusel by hand or in a mixer. I prefer to use a stand mixer, but fingers are fine. 1. Whisk the flour, cornmeal, both sugars, the cinnamon, and salt together in the mixer bowl or a large mixing bowl. Drop in the cubes of cold butter and toss all the ingredients together with your fingers until the butter is coated. 2. If you’re working with a mixer, fit it with the paddle attachment and mix on medium-low speed until the ingredients form moist, clumpy crumbs. Squeeze the streusel, and it will hold together. Reaching this stage takes longer than you think it will—you might have to mix for 10 minutes or more. Sprinkle over the vanilla and mix until blended. Or, if you’re working by hand, squeeze, mash, mush, or otherwise rub everything together but the vanilla until you have a bowlful of moist clumps and curds. Squeeze the streusel, and it will hold together. Sprinkle over the vanilla and toss to blend. 3. Pack the streusel into a covered container and refrigerate for at least 1 hour; 3 hours would be better.

FOR THE JAM

To make the jam:

small piece of cinnamon stick (2 to 3 inches) 2 points from a star anise 2 whole cloves 1¼ cups (300 ml) fruity red wine (I like a California Syrah) 1 tablespoon honey 2 strips orange or tangerine peel (or 1 orange or tangerine slice) ½ cup (70 grams) plump, moist dried cherries, coarsely chopped ½ cup (60 grams) plump, moist dried cranberries, coarsely chopped

4. First, mull the wine. Tie the spices together in cheesecloth to make a little hobo bag. Toss the sachet into a medium saucepan, add the wine, honey, and citrus (peel or fruit), and bring to a boil over medium heat. Lower the heat and let the mixture simmer gently, uncovered, for 10 minutes.

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5. Add the dried fruits, cook and stir frequently over low heat until most of the liquid evaporates, about 8 minutes. 6. Remove the pan from the heat, pick out and discard the spice bag and the citrus, and stir in the cherry jam. Scrape

the mixture into a bowl and cool to room temperature (you can do this in the refrigerator, if you’d like). If you’re not using the jam now, cover it tightly and refrigerate until needed. To bake:

7. Center a rack in the oven and preheat it to 350ºF. Butter or spray a regular muffin tin, or two tins, if you’ve got them. Have a 2-inch-diameter cookie cutter at hand. 8. Working with one sheet of dough at a time, peel away both pieces of parchment paper and put the dough back on one piece of paper. Cut the dough and drop the rounds into the muffin tin(s). Save the scraps from both pieces of dough, then gather them together, re-roll, chill, and cut. Don’t worry if the dough doesn’t completely fill the cups, it will once it’s baked. 9. Spread about 1 teaspoon jam over the top of each cookie, leaving a slim border. Spoon or sprinkle enough streusel over each sablé to cover it (and the jam). 10. Bake the cookies for 20 to 22 minutes, turning the tin(s) after 11 minutes, or until the streusel and the edges of the cookies are golden brown; the jam may bubble, and that’s fine. Leave the cookies in the tin(s) for about 15 minutes before transferring them to a rack to cool to room temperature. 11. Repeat with the remaining dough, making certain that the tins are cool. To store:

12. The mulled-wine jam will keep, tightly covered, for a few weeks in the refrigerator. The streusel can be kept for up to 2 weeks in the fridge and up to 2 months in the freezer. The cookies can be assembled, wrapped airtight, and frozen for up to 2 months. Bake them straight from the freezer; they might need another minute or so in the oven. The baked cookies will keep covered at room temperature for up to 2 days and can be frozen for up to 2 months.


French Vanilla Sablés In many ways, the sablé, the classic French shortbread cookie, was the crown jewel of the Beurre & Sel collection. I’ve always thought of the sablé as the perfect butter cookie, the one all shortbread strives to equal, and in this recipe I think you have the model cookie — it’s rich, as it should be; sandy, as it should be; flavorful; and memorable. It’s basic but in no way ordinary. The sablé was often the first cookie someone bought at Beurre & Sel, and then it brought them back to try all the others. Because of its phenomenal texture and universally beloved flavor, I found it easy to construct new flavors based on it. It was the foundation of our Classic Jammers and of many variations after that. MAKES ABOUT 30 COOKIES

2 sticks (8 ounces; 226 grams) unsalted butter, cut into chunks, at room temperature ½ cup (100 grams) sugar ¼ cup (30 grams) confectioners’ sugar, sifted ½ teaspoon fine sea salt 2 large egg yolks, at room temperature 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 2 cups (272 grams) all-purpose flour sanding sugar, for sprinkling 1. Working with a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or in a large bowl with a hand mixer, beat the butter, both sugars, and the salt on medium speed for about 3 minutes, scraping the bowl as needed. The mixture should be smooth but not fluffy. Reduce the mixer speed to low and, one by one, beat in the yolks, followed by the vanilla. Turn off the mixer, add the flour all at once and pulse the mixer until the risk of flying flour has passed. With the machine on low, mix just until the flour disappears into the dough. Give the dough a couple of turns with a sturdy flexible spatula. 2. Turn the dough out onto the counter and divide it in half. Gather each piece into a ball and shape into a disk. 3. Working with one piece of dough at a time, roll the dough ¼ inch thick

between pieces of parchment. Slide the parchment-sandwiched dough onto a baking sheet — you can stack the slabs — and freeze for at least 1 hour, or refrigerate for at least 2 hours. To bake:

4. Center a rack in the oven and preheat it to 350°F. Butter or spray a regular muffin tin (or use nonstick), or two tins, if you’ve got them. Have a 2-inch-diameter cookie cutter at hand. 5. Working with one sheet of dough at a time, peel away both pieces of paper and put the dough back on one piece of paper. Cut the dough and drop the rounds into the muffin tin(s). The rounds might not fill the muffin cups completely now, but they will once they bake. Save the scraps from both pieces of dough, then gather them together, re-roll, chill, and cut. Sprinkle the tops of the cookies with sanding sugar. 6. Bake the cookies for 16 to 19 minutes, rotating the tin(s) after 10 minutes, or until they feel firm to the touch and are golden brown around the edges. Transfer the muffin tin(s) to a rack and let the cookies rest for about 10 minutes before carefully lifting them out onto the rack to cool to room temperature. 7. Continue with the remainder of the dough, using cool tins. Playing Around: Slice-and-Bake Sablés. These will be too

higgledy-piggledy to turn into Jammers or anything else that’s structured, but they’ll be delicious to enjoy any way you’d like. Divide the dough in half and shape each half into a log about 9 inches long. Wrap the logs and freeze for at least 3 hours and up to 2 months. When you’re ready to bake, slice the logs about 1⁄3 inch thick. Place the rounds about 2 inches apart on lined baking sheets and sprinkle with sanding sugar. Bake one sheet at a time on the center rack of a 350°F oven for 17 to 20 minutes. Ringed Sablés. If you have 2-inch baking rings, use the rings to cut out the rolled dough. Bake the dough—in the rings—on lined baking sheets just as you would the muffin-tin cookies. Leave the rings in place for at least 20 minutes before lifting them off, rinsing and reusing.

Espresso Chocolate Sablés My original recipe for these deeply coffee-flavored and amply chocolate-flecked cookies produced a classic shortbread with the melt-in-your-mouth texture that’s the hallmark of great shortbread and the result of using only confectioners’ sugar in the dough. When I adapted the recipe for Beurre & Sel and baked the cookies in metal rings, constraining their spreadability, the change was anything but subtle: The sablés were still tender, but their texture became denser and their flavor more intense. The trick of making an espresso extract to add to the dough is a good one to know. If you want to use it for other things—a spoonful is good in brownies, chocolate sauces, or even in chocolate chip cookies—make more than you need now and keep it in the refrigerator, where it will be fine for months. Of course these are good with coffee and coffee drinks, but they’re surprisingly nice with milk and not at all bad with cognac. MAKES ABOUT 40 COOKIES

1½ tablespoons instant espresso 1 tablespoon boiling water 2 sticks (8 ounces; 226 grams) unsalted butter, cut into chunks, at room temperature ²⁄3 cup (80 grams) confectioners’ sugar ½ teaspoon fine sea salt pinch ground cinnamon (optional) ¾ teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 cups (272 grams) all-purpose flour 4 ounces (113 grams) bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped 1. Dissolve the espresso in the boiling water. Set the extract aside to cool to lukewarm or room temperature. 2. Working with a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or in a large bowl with a hand mixer, beat the butter, sugar, salt, and cinnamon, if you’re using it, together on medium speed for about 3 minutes, scraping down the bowl as needed, until well blended. Mix in the vanilla and espresso extract on low speed. 3. Turn off the mixer, add the flour all at

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once and pulse to begin incorporating it, then mix on low speed until the flour almost disappears into the dough. Scrape down the bowl, add the chopped chocolate and mix until evenly distributed. Give the dough a few last turns with a sturdy flexible spatula. 4. Turn the dough out onto the counter and divide it in half. Shape each half into a disk. 5. Working with one piece of dough at a time, sandwich it between pieces of parchment paper and roll it to a thickness of ¼ inch. Slide the dough, still sandwiched, onto a baking sheet—you can stack the slabs—and freeze the dough for at least 1 hour, or refrigerate for at least 2 hours. To bake:

6. Center a rack in the oven and preheat it to 325ºF. Butter or spray a regular muffin tin, or two tins, if you’ve got them. Have a 2-inch-diameter cookie cutter at hand. 7. Working with one sheet of dough at a time, peel away both pieces of paper and put the dough back on one piece of paper. Cut the dough and drop the rounds into the muffin tin(s). The dough might not fill the molds completely, but it will once baked. Save the scraps from both pieces of dough, then gather them together, re-roll, chill, and cut. 8. Bake the cookies for 18 to 20 minutes, or until they feel firm to the touch and have some color. Transfer the muffin tin(s) to a rack and leave the cookies in the tin(s) for about 10 minutes before carefully lifting them out onto the rack to cool completely. Continue with the remainder of the dough, if you only baked one sheet, always using cool tins. To store:

9. The dough can be refrigerated for up to 2 days or frozen, well wrapped, up to 2 months; cut and bake directly from the freezer. The cookies will keep in a tin at room temperature for about 5 days or, wrapped airtight, in the freezer for up to 2 months.

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Espresso Chocolate Sablés


Pistachio-Berry Slims These are among the most elegant cookies I make. They have the looks of a confection you’d find in a Viennese pastry shop; the texture of a favorite childhood macaroon (indeed, these are macaroons, classy ones); the pure taste and brilliant color of pistachios; the sweetness and glisten of raspberry jam; and the beauty and sweet-tart flavor of fresh raspberries. That they’re also easy adds to their mystique. Serve them, and if you don’t want to admit that you prepared them in 10 minutes, don’t. A word on the egg whites: I can’t give you an exact measurement for them. In all likelihood, you’ll need both whites, but just before the last bit goes into the processor, pinch the dough—if it holds together and feels as though you’ll have an easy time shaping it with your hands, call it finished. Makes about 18 cookies 1½ cups (210 grams) shelled pistachios (rub off any loose skins) 1⁄3 cup (67 grams) sugar 2 large egg whites About 1⁄3 cup (108 grams) raspberry jam About 18 fresh raspberries 1. Center a rack in the oven and preheat it to 350ºF. Use an insulated baking sheet or stack two baking sheets one on top of the other; line the (top) sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. 2. Put the pistachios and sugar in a food processor and pulse until the nuts are ground. There should still be a few larger pieces of nuts scattered throughout the mix; be sure to stop before you grind the mix into a paste. 3. Pour the whites into a small bowl and stir them with a fork just to break them up. Add a bit of the whites to the processor, pulse to incorporate and then add some more. Keep doing this until you’ve got a dough that holds together when you squeeze it. You’ll probably use all the whites, but you might need a tad less. It’s better to have a moist dough than a dry one, so make a judgment call and then relax. 4. Scrape the dough out onto the center of the baking sheet and, using your fingers

and a flexible spatula, shape it into a slender log about 14 inches long and 1¼ inches wide. Steadying the edges of the log with the fingers of one hand, use the fingers of your other to make a trench (for the jam and the raspberries) about 1 inch wide down the center of the log, leaving about ¼ inch of solid (untrenched) dough at each end. It’s almost inevitable that the log will crack here and there as you press down to make the trench, but stabilizing the dough will keep it from cracking in two. When you’ve finished making the trench, you can push together and smooth over whatever cracks you see. 5. Bake the log for 16 to 18 minutes,

DoubleGinger Molasses Cookies

rotating the pan after 9 minutes, or until the log feels firm; it won’t color much. Transfer the baking sheet to a rack—you’re going to fill the log with jam while it’s still warm. 6. Put the jam in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil over low heat, or do this in a microwave. 7. When the jam is hot and liquefied, carefully spoon it into the trench you made; dab away any spots of jam that dribble, as they will, on the log. 8. Finish with a line of the fresh raspberries down the center of the jam, placing the berries one against the other. Let cool to room temperature. 9. Transfer the log to the refrigerator and chill for at least an hour before serving. To serve, use a long serrated knife and a gentle sawing motion to slice between the berries. Storing 10. It’s best to keep the log intact and to cut the slims as you need them. Store the log, or the cut cookies, covered in the refrigerator, where they’ll be good for
 up to 2 days. If you need to keep them longer, don’t add the fresh berries until serving time. (Warm the jam with a little heat from a hair dryer to soften it so that you can settle the berries in securely.) These are not cookies to be frozen.

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⁄3 cup (67 grams) sugar ⁄3 cup (67 grams) packed light brown sugar 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature ½ cup (120 ml) unsulfured molasses 1½ teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1 ⁄3 cup (55 grams) chopped crystallized ginger or 2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger mixed with 2 teaspoons sugar (see headnote) 7 ounces (200 grams) semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, chopped chip-size sugar, for rolling

Double-Ginger Molasses Cookies

1

I have my friend Christine Beck, who is, like me, a Paris part-timer, to thank for this recipe. The cookies belong to the chewy-molasses-cookie family, but they have so much flavor and so many surprises that they transcend the familiar. For starters, there’s both crystallized ginger and powdered ginger, lots of chopped dark chocolate and an optional bit of instant espresso too, which I tacked onto the recipe because I’m an incorrigible tinkerer. I also tinkered with the way these are baked. Classic molasses cookies are scooped, molded into balls, rolled in sugar, and then pressed with a fork before baking, and you can make these cookies that way. Or you can do what I do: Mold them in muffin tins, which turn out more uniformly shaped cookies that teeter on the brink of becoming gingerbread cakes. A word on crystallized ginger: Crystallized, or candied, ginger is sliced fresh ginger that is cooked in syrup, dredged in sugar, and dried. You can usually find it in the supermarket alongside other dried fruits or in the spice section. If the ginger isn’t moist and pliable, steam it before using: Put it in a strainer over a saucepan of simmering water, cover, and let warm and soften for about 5 minutes; pat dry, chop, and use. If you can’t find crystallized ginger, you can omit it or mix 2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger with 2 teaspoons sugar and let stand for about 10 minutes, until the ginger is syrupy.

1

MAKES ABOUT 36 COOKIES

2¼ cups (306 grams) all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 1 to 2 teaspoons instant espresso, to taste (optional) 1½ teaspoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground cloves ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon fine sea salt 1½ sticks (12 tablespoons; 6 ounces; 170 grams) unsalted butter, cut into chunks, at room temperature

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1. Whisk the flour, cocoa, espresso (if using), spices, baking soda, and salt together. Working with a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or in a large bowl with a hand mixer, beat the butter and both sugars together on medium-low speed for about 3 minutes, scraping the bowl as needed, until fully blended. Add the yolk and beat for 1 minute, then add the molasses and vanilla, beating until smooth. 2. Turn off the mixer, add the dry ingredients all at once, and pulse the mixer until the risk of flying flour passes. Working on low speed, mix the dough until the flour is almost but not completely incorporated. Add the crystallized ginger (or the sugared fresh ginger) and chocolate and mix until the dry ingredients disappear into the dough and the ginger and chocolate are evenly distributed. If you’ve got bits of dry ingredients on the bottom of the bowl, mix them in with a flexible spatula. 3. Gather the dough into a ball, flatten it, and wrap it in plastic. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours. To bake:

4. Position the racks to divide the oven into thirds and preheat it to 350ºF. Butter or spray regular muffin tins or, if making free-form cookies, line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. 5. Have a medium cookie scoop at hand. Alternatively, you can use a rounded

tablespoonful of dough for each cookie. If you’re using tins, find a jar or glass that fits into them and can be used to flatten the dough; cover the bottom in plastic wrap. Spoon some sugar into a wide shallow bowl. 6. For each cookie, mold a scoop or spoonful of dough into a ball between your palms, then turn it in the sugar to coat and put in a muffin cup or on a baking sheet, leaving 2 inches between each ball of dough. If using tins, use the jar or glass to flatten each ball until it almost reaches the sides of the cup. If it’s free-form, press to flatten to about ½ inch thick. 7. Bake the cookies for about 13 minutes, rotating the tins or sheets top to bottom and front to back after 7 minutes. The cookies should be lightly set around the edges and softer in the center. 8. Transfer the tins or sheets to racks, and let the cookies rest for 15 minutes before unmolding them and/or placing them on racks to cool completely. If you’re baking in batches, make certain to start with cool tins or baking sheets. To store:

9. You can refrigerate the dough for up to 3 days. You can also scoop out the dough, shape into balls, and freeze the balls on baking sheets; when they’re firm, pack them airtight, and keep frozen for up to 2 months. Remove the dough from the freezer and let the balls sit at room temperature for at least 15 minutes, then roll in sugar and bake. The baked cookies can be kept in a sealed container at room temperature for up to 4 days. They’ll get a little drier and a little less chewy, but that will make them even better for dunking.


Do-Almost-Anything Vanilla Cookie Dough This is the vanilla counterpart of the Do-Almost-Anything Chocolate Cookie Dough. Like its chocolate partner, the dough is good on its own, endlessly adaptable and exceedingly easy to work with. Singly, each one is great; together, they’re the Batman and Robin of baking for a crowd, capable of making you look like the host who does it all effortlessly. While I know you’ll find bunches of ways to use this dough—its full vanilla flavor and mix of crisp and sandy texture are chameleon-like in their capacity to welcome other flavors and shapes—there are four recipes in this collection to start your imagination spinning, including Christmas Spice Cookies below. If you’d like to ice the cookies, do it when the cookies have cooled completely. MAKES ABOUT 80 COOKIES

1 pound (454 grams) unsalted butter, cut into chunks, at room temperature 11⁄3 cups (262 grams) sugar 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 2 large egg whites, at room temperature 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract 4 cups (544 grams) all-purpose flour sanding sugar, for sprinkling (optional) 1. Working with a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or in a large bowl with a hand mixer, beat the butter, sugar, and salt together on medium speed until smooth and creamy, about 3 minutes. Reduce the mixer speed to low and blend in the egg whites, followed by the vanilla. The dough might curdle, but it will smooth out with mixing and the addition of the flour. 2. Still working on low speed, add the flour in 3 or 4 additions, beating only until it is almost incorporated each time before adding more; scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl a couple of times as you work and then continue to mix until the flour has disappeared into the dough.

3. The dough is ready to be divided, flavored (if needed), and scooped or rolled. (See the Christmas Spice Cookies recipe in the headnote). 4. Or, if you’d like to make plain cookies, divide the dough into quarters and shape each piece into a disk. Working with one disk at a time, place the dough between pieces of parchment paper, and roll it to a thickness of ¼ inch. Slide the dough, still between the paper, onto a baking sheet—you can stack the slabs—and freeze for at least 1 hour, or refrigerate for at least 3 hours. To bake:

5. Position the racks to divide the oven into thirds and preheat it to 350ºF. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. 6. Working with one disk at a time, peel away the paper on both sides of the dough, and return the dough to one piece of paper. Use a 2-inch-diameter cookie cutter (choose your shape, and change the size, if you’d like, knowing that the yield will change with it) to cut out as many cookies as you can and place them on the lined baking sheets about 1½ inches apart. Gather the scraps together, then combine with scraps from the other pieces of dough, re-roll, and chill before cutting and baking. 7. If you’d like to sprinkle the cutouts with sanding sugar, now’s the time. Bake the cookies for 19 to 21 minutes, rotating the sheets front to back and top to bottom after 10 minutes, or until they are golden around the edges and on the bottom. Cool on the baking sheets for 5 minutes before transferring them to racks to cool completely. 8. Repeat with the remaining dough, using cool baking sheets.

Christmas Spice Cookies When you start with something really good, it doesn’t take much to make it better. And that’s the story of this cookie. I started with my Do-Almost-Anything Vanilla Cookie Dough, and then I added the spices that always make me think

it’s Christmas: cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and allspice. The result is a cookie that’s perfect with coffee or tea, mulled cider, mulled wine, or a late-night cognac. The cookies are nice left plain or sprinkled with sanding sugar before baking, but I usually can’t resist the allure of a spiral of melted white chocolate in the center or a faint brushstroke of chocolate across the top. A word on batch size: This recipe uses one quarter of the Do-Almost-Anything Vanilla Cookie Dough. Make the full recipe of the dough then, if you’d like, you can double, triple, or quadruple this cookie recipe or use the vanilla dough to make other cookies. MAKES ABOUT 18 COOKIES FOR THE COOKIES

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground ginger pinch of ground cloves pinch of ground allspice ¼ recipe Do-Almost-Anything Vanilla Cookie Dough; just made and still soft (see headnote) sanding sugar or ½ cup (85 grams) white chocolate chips, for topping (optional) To make the cookies:

1. Mix the spices together in a small bowl and, using a flexible spatula, blend them evenly into the dough. Gather the dough together and shape into a disk. 2. Place the dough between pieces of parchment paper and roll it to a thickness of ¼ inch. Slide the dough, still between the paper, onto a baking sheet and freeze for at least 1 hour, or refrigerate for at least 3 hours. To bake:

3. Center a rack in the oven and preheat it to 350ºF. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. 4. Peel away the paper on both sides of the dough and return it to one piece of paper. Using a 2-inch-diameter cutter, cut out as many cookies as you can. (You can use any size or shape cutter you like, just know that the yield will be different.) Place them on the lined baking sheet about 1½ inches apart. Gather the scraps together,

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re-roll them between paper and chill. 5. If you’re using sanding sugar, sprinkle the tops of the cookies with it. Bake for 19 to 21 minutes, rotating the sheet after 10 minutes, or until the cookies feel firm to the touch. Transfer the sheet to a rack and let the cookies rest for 5 minutes before lifting them onto the rack to cool to room temperature. 6. Repeat with the rest of the dough, making sure your baking sheet is cool. To make the glaze and finish the cookies (optional):

before the last bit goes into the processor, pinch the dough—if it holds together and feels as though you’ll have an easy time shaping it with your hands, call it finished. MAKES ABOUT 18 COOKIES

1½ cups (210 grams) shelled pistachios (rub off any loose skins) 1 ⁄3 cup (67 grams) sugar 2 large egg whites about 1⁄3 cup (108 grams) raspberry jam about 18 fresh raspberries

whatever cracks you see. 5. Bake the log for 16 to 18 minutes, rotating the pan after 9 minutes, or until the log feels firm; it won’t color much. Transfer the baking sheet to a rack—you’re going to fill the log with jam while it’s still warm. 6. Put the jam in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil over low heat, or do this in a microwave. 7. When the jam is hot and liquefied, carefully spoon it into the trench you made; dab away any spots of jam that

1. Center a rack in the oven and preheat it to 350ºF. Use an insulated baking sheet or stack two baking sheets one on top of the other; line the (top) sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.

dribble, as they will, on the log.

2. Put the pistachios and sugar in a food processor and pulse until the nuts are ground. There should still be a few larger pieces of nuts scattered throughout the mix; be sure to stop before you grind the mix into a paste.

9. Transfer the log to the refrigerator and chill for at least an hour before serving. To serve, use a long serrated knife and a gentle sawing motion to slice between the berries. 10. It’s best to keep the log intact and to cut the slims as you need them. Store the log, or the cut cookies, covered in the refrigerator, where they’ll be good for
up to 2 days. If you need to keep them longer, don’t add the fresh berries until serving time. (Warm the jam with a little heat from a hair dryer to soften it so that you can settle the berries in securely.) These are not cookies to be frozen.

Pistachio-Berry Slims

3. Pour the whites into a small bowl and stir them with a fork just to break them up. Add a bit of the whites to the processor, pulse to incorporate and then add some more. Keep doing this until you’ve got a dough that holds together when you squeeze it. You’ll probably use all the whites, but you might need a tad less. It’s better to have a moist dough than a dry one, so make a judgment call and then relax.

These are among the most elegant cookies I make. They have the looks of a confection you’d find in a Viennese pastry shop; the texture of a favorite childhood macaroon (indeed, these are macaroons, classy ones); the pure taste and brilliant color of pistachios; the sweetness and glisten of raspberry jam; and the beauty and sweet-tart flavor of fresh raspberries. That they’re also easy adds to their mystique. Serve them, and if you don’t want to admit that you prepared them in 10 minutes, don’t. A word on the egg whites: I can’t give you an exact measurement for them. In all likelihood, you’ll need both whites, but just

4. Scrape the dough out onto the center of the baking sheet and, using your fingers and a flexible spatula, shape it into a slender log about 14 inches long and 1¼ inches wide. Steadying the edges of the log with the fingers of one hand, use the fingers of your other to make a trench (for the jam and the raspberries) about 1 inch wide down the center of the log, leaving about ¼ inch of solid (untrenched) dough at each end. It’s almost inevitable that the log will crack here and there as you press down to make the trench, but stabilizing the dough will keep it from cracking in two. When you’ve finished making the trench, you can push together and smooth over

"I love making fooD—-it’s a creative act in the true sense of the term—and I love sharing it with people I care about."

7. If you want to give the cookies a spiral or swipe of white chocolate, melt the chocolate in a microwave or in a bowl set over a pan of simmering water. 8. For the spiral, use a small pastry bag fitted with a tiny decorating tip or drizzle the chocolate off the tip of a small spoon. For the swipe, use a narrow pastry brush and only a little bit of chocolate and brush it across the cookie lightly. 9. Refrigerate the cookies for about 20 minutes just to set the decoration. To store:

10. The rolled-out dough can be wrapped and refrigerated for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 2 months. The cookies will keep in a covered container at room temperature for up to 1 week. They can be wrapped airtight and frozen for up to 2 months.

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8. Finish with a line of the fresh raspberries down the center of the jam, placing the berries one against the other. Let cool to room temperature.

To store:


dark decadence holidays are a time of indulgent giving, and these decadent cakes, cheeses, and truffles will sweeten the long, cold winter for you and the ones you love. Photography by Johanna Levomäki. Food by Jatta Heinlahti. Styling by Minna Lilja


Blueberry Licorice Layer Cake


Cranberry and White Chocolate Cake

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Glamorous Gingersnaps (Pepparkakor) 31/2 ounces butter, room temperature 1/2 cup sugar 1 ⁄3 cup dark syrup 1 egg 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground cloves 1 teaspoon ground bitter orange golden or bronze food coloring powder Cranberry and White Chocolate Cake SERVES 8–10

6 ounces butter, room temperature 1 cup sugar 3 eggs 11⁄3 cup all-purpose flour 1 ⁄3 cup almond flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 tablespoons cranberry powder 3½ ounces white chocolate, finely chopped butter for the pan almond flour for dusting ground chocolate, cranberries, cranberry powder, and edible glitter dust for decoration 1. Preheat oven to 350°F. In a large mixing bowl, beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs one at a time, stirring the whole time. 2. In a separate bowl, mix all-purpose flour, almond flour, baking powder, cranberry powder, and ground chocolate together. 3. Add the flour mixture to the egg and

sugar mixture, and turn into an even batter. 4. Prepare the pan with butter and a dusting of almond flour. Pour the batter into the pan, and bake in the bottom position of the oven for about an hour. 5. Let cool, and turn out the cake. Decorate with ground chocolate, cranberries, cranberry powder, and glitter dust.

Brie Cheesecake

1. Cut the butter into small pieces, and put in a large mixing bowl. Add sugar and, with a wooden spatula, cream sugar and butter. 2. In a small saucepan, bring the syrup to a boil, then pour over and combine with the butter and sugar mixture. Continuing to stir with wooden spatula, add egg. Mixture should have batter-like consistency.

SERVES 8–10

3. Mix the flours, baking powder, and spices together in a separate mixing bowl.

3 different-sized wheels brie cheese assorted cookies with glitter sugar honey 2 fresh figs, diced

4. Stir the flour mixture into the batter in small doses, stirring the whole time with a wooden spatula. As it stiffens, mix the dough by hand. Let the dough rest in fridge overnight.

1. Let the cheeses rest at room temperature for a couple hours before serving.

5. Preheat oven to 350°F. Divide the dough into small pieces on a lightly floured surface and roll out thinly.

2. Stack the cheeses from large to small in a layer cake design.

6. Cut into shapes using a variety of cookie cutters, and bake in the middle position of the oven for about 10 minutes.

Decorate with cookies and figs. Drizzle runny honey over the top.

7. Let cool and sprinkle the colorful powder on top.

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Glamorous Gingersnaps (Pepparkakor)

Brie Cheesecake

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Chocolate Truffle Stack

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Chocolate Truffle Stack

Blueberry Licorice Layer Cake

MAKES 20 PIECES OF EACH FLAVOR

SERVES 8–10

CRANBERRY TRUFFLES

FOR THE JAM

7 ounces dark chocolate 1 ⁄3 cup whipped cream scant ¼ cup cranberry juice cranberry powder, edible glitter dust, for topping

zest of 2 lemons juice of 2 lemons 14 ounces frozen blueberries 11/4 cup granulated sugar 3 tablespoons crushed salty licorice (salmiak) or sweet licorice

1. Bring the cream and juice to a boil in a pan. Dice the chocolate. Take the pan off the heat and add chocolate, stirring the mixture until the chocolate is completely melted. Let the mixture cool in the fridge for a couple hours. 2. Put cranberry powder and glitter dust on small plates. With a spoon, take chunks from the chocolate mass, and roll into balls by hand. Roll the balls in the berry powders. If the chocolate mass warms up too much, put it in the fridge for a while. 3. Let the truffles harden in the fridge for a few hours. Note: To make the other truffle flavors, follow the directions for cranberry truffles, but modify the ingredients as necessary. ALMOND TRUFFLES

7 ounces dark chocolate 1 ⁄3 cup whipped cream 1 tablespoon ground almonds 1 teaspoons cinnamon 1 tablespoon cream liqueur blueberry powder and glitter dust, for topping CLOUDBERRY TRUFFLES

7 ounces dark chocolate 1 ⁄3 cup whipped cream scant 1/4 cup cloudberry liqueur (Lakka) fresh berries, glitter dust for decoration, for topping To assemble truffle pyramid

1. Make a cone out of oasis sponge or cardboard. Cover the cone with golden silk paper. 2. Attach the truffles to the cone with cocktail sticks. Decorate the cone with bay leaves, sprinkled with glitter dust.

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1. Wash the lemons and zest them with a fine grater. Squeeze the lemon juice from the lemons. 2. Put all ingredients in pan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer the mixture for about 20 minutes. 3. Let the jelly cool and place in fridge. The mixture will thicken and turn jelly-like in the cold. Note: Prepare the jam the day before making the cake. FOR THE CAKE BASE

6 eggs 11/2 cups granulated sugar 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 ⁄3 cup almond flour 11/2 teaspoons baking powder butter and almond flour to prepare the pans FILLINGS AND TOPPINGS

1 portion of blueberry and licorice jam 17 ounces lemony cream cheese 2 tablespoons blueberry powder 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 ⁄3 cup diluted lemon juice 2 cups blackberries 1. Preheat oven to 350°F. In a large mixing bowl, beat eggs and sugar into a fluffy, white foam. 2. Mix all-purpose flour, almond flour, and baking powder together. Slowly combine the flour mixture with the egg foam. 3. Butter two 8-inch round cake pans, and dust them with almond flour. Divide the

batter between the pans, and bake in the bottom position of the oven for 30–40 minutes. 4. Let cool and cut each cake in half horizontally. 5. In a small bowl, mix together the cream cheese, blueberry powder, and vanilla sugar. To assemble the cake

6. Position first layer as the base, and moisten with diluted lemon juice, and spread 3/4 of the cream cheese filling over the cake. Place the second layer on top of the cake base, moisten, and spread 3/4 of the blueberry jam on it. 8. Place the next layer on top, moisten, and spread both the remaining cream cheese filling and blueberry jam on it. Place the last layer on top, and top the cake with blackberries.


CAST IRON COOKING I’ll never forget the stack of cast iron pans and skillets my Mormor had when I was growing up. She always said food tastes better cooked in cast iron, and I think she is right! These cast-iron cookware recipes are the best from my collection, and I hope you love them as much as I do.

Food + Styling + Photography by Paul Lowe Thanks to Lodge Cast Iron for the beautiful cookware.


Roasted Chicken in Milk with Lemons


No-Knead Skillet Bread

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Creamy Mushroom and Dill Pasta

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Baked Manchego with Chorizo and Salsa Verde

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Parsley- and ParmesanCrusted Arctic Char

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Chilaquiles Verdes with Eggs

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BaconWrapped Potatoes and Gruyere Delightness

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Ebleskiver with Blueberries

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Dark Chocolate and Caramel Share Brownie

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Roasted Chicken in Milk with Lemons This is my take on Jamie Oliver's famous Milk Chicken, and it comes out amazing every time—the meat just falls off the bone. You can also add some vegetables, like potatoes and carrots. SERVES 4

2 tablespoons butter 1 large organic chicken salt and pepper 11/2 cups whole milk 8 cloves garlic, peeled 8 sage leaves grated zest from 2 lemons 1. Preheat oven to 375ºF. 2. Melt the butter in a cast-iron dutch oven. 3. Rub the chicken with salt and pepper, and brown it on all sides. 4. Place the chicken, breast side up, in the dutch oven. Add milk, garlic, and sage leaves; sprinkle with lemon zest. 5. Cover with the lid, and bake for 11/4 hours. Remove the lid, and cook for 15 minutes more. 6. Cut the chicken into pieces, and serve with the sauce created while cooking.

No-Knead Skillet Bread Our take on the famous “New York Times” no-knead bread. This bread takes some time but the wonderful, crusty result is totally worth the wait. MAKES 1 LOAF

3 cups all-purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon dry yeast 11/2 teaspoon salt 11/2 cups + 2 tablespoons water extra flour for dusting

3. Coat your hands and a clean kitchen towel with flour, and use them to form the dough into a ball. You will need to work fast. Place the dough ball on the towel, and add more flour to the top of the dough. Cover with another towel, and let it sit for another 2 hours.

Baked Manchego with Chorizo and Salsa Verde

4. After 11/2 hours, place a heavy cast iron pot with a lid in the oven, and set it to 450ºF.

10 ounces manchego cheese, cubed 2 raw chorizo sausages 1/2 cup salsa verde, see Chilaquiles recipe

5. After 30 minutes take the pot out of the oven. Gently fold the dough into the pot—don't worry if it looks messy. Place the lid back on the pot, and bake for 30 minutes. 6. After 30 minutes, remove the lid, and bake for another 15–25 minutes, or until the bread is browned. Cool on a rack.

Creamy Mushroom and Dill Pasta My good friend Alexandra used to make me this dish back in Norway. The sauce is so good, not just on pasta, but also on fish or lamb. SERVES 4

1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced (I like fancy mixed packages.) 1 medium yellow onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, chopped olive oil 1/2 cup chicken stock 11/2 cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons fresh dill, chopped salt and pepper Parmesan for serving pasta for 4 water 1. Heat a cast-iron skillet over medium heat, and sauté mushrooms, onion, and garlic in olive oil until the mushrooms start turn golden and the onion is soft.

1. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl. The dough will be a little bit dry and sticky. Cover with plastic wrap and rest for at least 12 hours but no more than 18 hours.

2. Add chicken stock, cream, and fresh dill.

2. Lightly flour a work surface, and turn out the dough. Sprinkle the top of the bread with flour, and fold it over itself 2 times. Cover with plastic wrap, and let the dough sit for 15 minutes.

4. Cook up enough pasta for four people. Remember to add salt to the water!

3. Let it simmer for 5 minutes, and season with salt and pepper.

Warm gooey cheese with chorizo? Yes, please! A great snack with a glass of red wine, you can also substitute other kinds of cheese, like raclette or cheddar. SERVES 4

1. Preheat oven to 390ºF. 2. Divide the cheese into four small or one large cast-iron skillet. 3. Cook the chorizo until brown, no grease needed. 4. Top the skillets with chorizo and salsa verde. 5. Bake until the cheese is golden and bubbly. Serve with toast or chips.

Parsley- and Parmesan-Crusted Arctic Char Mild Arctic char is perfect for a topping like this. Bread crumbs give it a little crunch. You can also use salmon instead of char; just increase the baking time a little. SERVES 4

4 tablespoons olive oil 2 large Arctic char fillets, about 2 pounds salt and pepper ½ cup grated Parmesan ¼ cup finely chopped parsley ½ cup homemade bread crumbs (I used leftover white bread.) 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped, plus extra whole cloves 1. Preheat oven to 425ºF. 2. Heat 1/2 the oil in a large cast-iron skillet over medium, and add the fish, skin-side down. 3. Season with salt and pepper.

5. Strain and place in a bowl.

4. In a bowl, mix Parmesan, parsley, bread crumbs, and garlic.

6. Add the sauce, toss, and serve with shaved Parmesan on top.

5. Add the topping to the fish, and finish off with the rest of the olive oil.

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6. Place some extra garlic cloves in the skillet, and bake for about 18–20 minutes or until the bread crumbs are golden.

Chilaquiles Verdes with Eggs The perfect dish for brunch. Making your own tortilla chips is so easy and much better tasting than store bought. Salsa Verde is delicious on everything from grilled fish to pork. SERVES 4

SALSA VERDE (MAKES 11/2 CUP):

2 cloves garlic, chopped 1/2 cup green olives, pitted and chopped 1/2 cup parsley, chopped 1/2 cup mint, chopped 1/2 cup olive oil 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar salt and pepper 1. Place all ingredients in a food processor. Blend until you have a chunky sauce. 2. Add more olive oil if it’s too thick. 3. Set aside to allow the flavors to meld before serving. CHILAQUILES VERDES WITH EGGS:

2 cups vegetable oil 10 soft tortillas, cut into 8 wedges salt 11/2 cup salsa verde 1 cup chicken stock TO SERVE:

4 fried eggs sour cream scallions grated Cotija cheese 1. Heat the oil in a cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Once warm, fry the tortilla chips until golden on each side. Transfer to paper towel, and season with salt. 2. Place salsa verde and chicken stock in a small saucepan, and bring to boil. 3. Add the chips and coat well. Place chips in small skillets or bowls. 4. Top with eggs, scallions, sour cream, and cheese.

Bacon-Wrapped Potatoes and Gruyere Delightness

3. Beat the egg whites until soft peaks form, and fold into the batter.

There is no better way to describe this dish than delightful. The grease from the bacon will cook the potatoes and, mixed with the cheese, it's one of the best things I have ever tasted. Eat as is or serve alongside a good steak.

4. Heat the ebleskiver pan over medium-high heat, and add about 1/2 teaspoon butter in each well. The butter is warm enough when it starts bubbling.

SERVES 8

11/2 pounds bacon, sliced (but not too thinly) 3 large russet potatoes, thinly sliced salt and pepper 2 cups grated gruyere cheese 1. Preheat oven to 370ºF. 2. Layer the bacon like a fan in a cast-iron skillet. 3. Add a layer of potatoes, season with salt and pepper, and add a third of the cheese. 4. Continue with two more layers. 5. Fold the bacon over the cheese layer and bake for about 11/2 hours. 6. With a small, sharp knife, test for doneness all the way through. 7. Let dish sit 15 minutes before cutting into wedges.

Ebleskiver with Blueberries Ebleskiver is a Danish speciality that can best be described as small round pancakes. Often filled with jam, I find them easier to make with fresh berries. You will need an ebleskiver pan to make this recipe. MAKES ABOUT 25

13/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 tablespoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 eggs, separated 13/4 cups buttermilk 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, melted 1 cup blueberries confectioner’s sugar, for serving maple syrup, for serving 1. In a bowl, mix all the dry ingredients. 2. Stir in egg yolks and buttermilk.

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5. Add 1 tablespoon of batter to each well, and let it cook about 4 minutes. Add 3 blueberries to each and, using two wooden sticks, like skewers or chopsticks, flip the ebleskiver over. Cook until golden brown on the other side. Total cooking time is about 6–7 minutes. 6. Transfer to a plate, dust with confectioner’s sugar, and drizzle with maple syrup.

Dark Chocolate and Caramel Share Brownie Such a fun way to serve a brownie. Bake a large one, top with ice cream, nuts, and caramel sauce, and let everyone dig in. SERVES 8

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, melted 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 4 tablespoons caramel sauce (I use store bought for this.) 4 tablespoons quality dark, baking cocoa 1/2 teaspoon baking soda pinch of salt 3/4 cup all-purpose flour ice cream, for serving slivered almonds, toasted, for serving caramel sauce, for serving 1. Preheat oven to 325ºF. Grease a 9-inch cast-iron pan with butter and set aside. 2. In large bowl, mix butter and sugar until light and creamy. Add eggs, vanilla, and caramel sauce, and mix well. 3. In a smaller mixing bowl, combine cocoa, baking soda, salt, and flour. Slowly add to wet mixture, stirring until smooth. 4. Pour the batter into the prepared cast-iron pan. 5. Bake until set, about 25 minutes. 6. Cool a little, and serve with ice cream, toasted almonds, and caramel sauce.


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Photography + Text by Michael Marquand


Brightly colored Spanish colonial buildings on the streets of the historic district in Panama City Opposite page: Palm trees on Coiba Island

Panama’s lush rainforest, mountain terrain, and tropical flair attracts adventure seekers and beach-lovers alike, but its fresh food, warm people, and laidback atmosphere keep travelers and locals coming back—and some to stay.


“12 hours ago we were in New York,”

my friend explains to a Spanish tourist as we all stare at a small waterfall. The air is wet, and there’s a freshness to it. It’s the type of smell they try to put into laundry detergent, but it’s never quite right. The rainforest smells like it’s alive. I have to ponder that statement for a moment before realizing that we were, in fact, in New York only 12 hours earlier and it seems impossible. We took an overnight flight to Panama City and then flew north to Boquete. We found a cheap hotel in town and met some other travelers who told us how much there was to see. “Let’s just go on a hike right now! We can sleep tonight,” I insisted. My friends obliged. The mountains are as green and lush as I had hoped, and it feels like the perfect introduction to the country. The half-day hike turns out to be a challenging one considering we’re running on very little sleep. That evening, we get back into town, hungry and weary, and visit the closest bar where the evening greets us with sangria, veggie burgers, and red rum margaritas—the local specialty. We sleep for 12 hours and wake up a little more alive and ready for the week ahead. In the morning, we manage to get a driver in town to take us to the local swimming hole, Los Cangilones De Gualaca. We’re surprised to find that our driver, John, speaks perfect English with no accent. After some prodding we learn that he was in fact born in Panama but went to high school in Tennessee. He’s still close with his American host family, and they visit him in Boquete every year. He had the option to stay in the U.S. but decided to come back to Panama.

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“I wouldn’t trade this life. I go hiking almost every day. I have a house on a big plot of land where I farm. Almost everything grows on my property.” This quickly turns into a guessing game. “Avocados?” “Yes.” “Tomatoes?” “Of course.” John’s story is not uncommon. We meet Panamanian surfers, hikers, cab drivers, and the like who went to school in Ohio or Kentucky or California and had the option to stay. When I ask why they came back, they’ll often just gesture to

Over the course of the next week we tour the country as aggressively as we can while still trying to sufficiently decompress. We travel south to Santa Catalina, a sleepy beach town on the Pacific ocean. Santa Catalina is everything you want a beach town to be, with a handful of modest hotels, bungalow rentals, and a few small beach-side restaurants, but not a single resort. The restaurants and guesthouses in Santa Catalina are run by both Panamanian people and European and Australian expats who want to live somewhere cheap where they can surf

Panama City. In the city we wander through the historic district, admiring the colorful old-world architecture. The streets are gritty and buzzing with energy, and the country suddenly feels a lot less remote. Panama City is a beautiful mixture of old and new architecture with colorful graffiti murals, stone monuments, small open-air markets, public gardens, and probably a record number of urban palm trees. On our final day in the country we walk a few miles and visit the rainforests on the edge of town, where we hike to the top of the park and view the skyscrapers of

the mountains or the beach or the palm trees and I respond, “Yeah, ok, I get it.” We get to Los Cangilones De Gualaca, and it’s packed. I don’t see a single tourist outside of our little group. It’s clearly the local hangout. The landscape is made up of red volcanic rock formations with a river of fresh water running through. Kids are diving off the edges of the rocks into the water—it’s a steep drop. Some backflip from the top or climb up the side of the rocks from underneath and fall backwards into the river. A couple of kids hang off the cliffs by their feet. The site has a free-spirited atmosphere that feels unique to Panama. After the swim, we visit an organic coffee farm outside of town. Wandering through the grounds, there are rows of coffee plants sprouting beans of varying shades of green and red. The rows of coffee plants are surrounded by avocado trees, brightly colored flowers, and cactus plants next to several bright orange stucco houses. Huge wooden beds of picked coffee beans lay out to dry in between the crops. It’s explained to us that this method is more environmentally friendly than what commercial farms do. Usually the beans are washed many times over before drying to remove the outer layers of the bean. Drying the beans slowly requires significantly less water but it takes longer and that’s ok. “We’ve got time,” according to the heavily tattooed hipster expat girl showing us the grounds. This should be Panama’s motto.

or scuba dive during the day. We often see the owners of our hotel, an Australian man and a German woman, coming in from surfing or just laying out in the sun. The town itself is just a small collection of houses with a few dive shops and a couple bars. Kids play in the streets and on the beach with roaming packs of stray dogs while people swim or lay on the beach, drinking one-dollar Panama lagers. The next day we take a boat trip to Coiba Island for snorkeling. Coiba is actually a small collection of islands surrounded miles of ocean in every direction. The land is protected, so the islands themselves are just sand and palm trees—they look like every postcard you’ve ever seen of a tropical island. We take the boat from island to island and occasionally dive into the calm waters next to the reef. We find collections of colorful fish, sea turtles, and stingrays so close I can almost touch them. After snorkeling we walk back to our bungalow, tired and slightly sun burned, and half jokingly come up with ways we could move here like all the other expats on the island. We pass a combination coffee shop/law office, which, while hilarious on its face, prompts contemplation on the ways we could live here and keep our respective occupations. One last swim in the ocean, more one-dollar beer, and a spaghetti dinner before packing our bags. The next morning we catch a bus in town and take another long and bumpy ride to

downtown Panama through the foliage of the forest. Even the most concentrated part of the country is so close to so much nature. That’s Panama’s charm. Worn out from our final hike, we decide to take a cab back into town before heading to the airport. A conversation starts up between us and the driver as we start complaining about leaving Panama for a bitterly cold east coast winter when our driver chimes in. “United States? I went to school in the United States.” We get to talking and inevitably ask why he came back. We didn’t need to ask because we know the answer. He looks out the window at the rainforest we just hiked out of and gestures toward it. “It’s beautiful here.”

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From top to bottom: Local kids diving and swimming at Los Cangilones De Gualaca; Street scene in Boquete; Margarita made with Panamanian red rum.


Clockwise from top: Bungalows by the beach in Santa Catalina; 1 dollar Panama Lager; Freshly roasted coffee at Cafes De La Luna coffee farm in Boquete; kids playing in the streets in Santa Catalina; Beach house in Santa Catalina

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Clockwise from top: Freshly picked coffee beans at Cafes De La Luna coffee farm in Boquete; Cow on a local farm in Boquete; Boats along the coast of Santa Catalina

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Palm trees on Coiba Island

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This page top to bottom: Restaurant and graffiti mural overlooking the beach in Santa Catalina; Political graffiti in Panama city Opposite page clockwise from top: Graffiti in Panama city; Hammock and Bungalow in Santa Catalina; Surf boards outsite the bungalows in Santa Catalina

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Locals playing on the beach at Santa Catalina

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This page clockwise from top: View of downtown from a public park in Panama City; Spanish colonial style architecture of Panama City Opposite page: The beaches Santa Catalina

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CHEERS Golden Sage Winter Sage is very much a winter herb, often used with turkey and stuffing. It’s also delicious in a cocktail with some bourbon and honey. Cheers! Food + Styling + Photography by Paul Lowe

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Bourbon & Sage Cocktail This versatile sage syrup can also be used as the base in a fruit salad, perfect for your holiday table. MAKES 4 COCKTAILS

1 cup sugar 1 cup water 10 fresh sage leaves 1 cup bourbon juice from 2 lemons ice lemon peel and fresh sage, for garnish 1. Start with the syrup: Combine sugar and water in a saucepan, and bring to the boil. 2. Reduce heat, and let simmer for 5 minutes. 3. Remove from heat and add sage; let sit 10 minutes. 4. Remove the sage, and allow syrup to cool. 5. To make the cocktails: Divide bourbon, lemon juice, and sage syrup evenly across four glasses filled with ice. 6. Garnish with lemon peel and fresh sage sprigs.


pantry confessions

We asked our favorite reality mom and actress Tori Spelling about inspiration, food, and the perfect Sunday. Where do you live? Los Angeles, California What inspires you? My 5 beautiful children: Liam, Stella, Hattie, Finn, and Baby Beau What do you always have in your fridge? Almond milk, Le Croix sparkling waters, Mott’s applesauce pouches, green grapes, lemonade, string cheese, sliced turkey, turkey hot dogs, burrata, salami, eggs, butter, tomatoes, fruit (seasonal), iceberg lettuce, baby carrots, hummus, celery, broccoli, vanilla and fruit yogurts Any food you don’t like? Cilantro and fennel Coffee or tea? Coffee. Please, I have 5 kids I need it!

Favorite guilty pleasure? Dominos pizza, my own specialty pizza (white creamy garlic sauce, cheddar cheese, feta, black olives, mushrooms, and jalapeños) Necessary luxury? Truffle salt (I must have it in the house at all times) Favorite restaurant? French Laundry in Napa Best everyday meal? Rotisserie chicken, Brussels sprouts with bacon crumbles, and tri-colored baby potatoes roasted with oil and truffle salt

Song/artist that always makes you wanna dance? “Manic Monday” by The Bangles Dream role? To host a lifestyle show where I can do everything I love, like cooking, baking, crafting, and party planning What’s your perfect Sunday? Cuddling in bed with my hubby and five babes, and having a blanket bed picnic and watching a movie Life motto? If you want it, create it!

Cookbook you use all the time? Dean McDermott’s “The Gourmet Dad” of course!

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Profile for Sweet Paul Magazine

Sweet Paul Magazine - Winter 2017  

Sweet Paul Magazine - Winter 2017