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SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

Sustainable Business Magazine is committed to promoting sustainable printing. This magazine is printed on Forest Stewardship Council certified material and manufactured using environmentally sustainable procedures. All lithographic printer inks used are vegetable-based.

SBM Media Ltd Norwich Enterprise Centre, 4B Guildhall Hill, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 1JH, United Kingdom • T: +44 (0)1603 516519 Email: info@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net www.sustainablebusinessmagazine.net Editor: Fiona FitzGerald Assistant Editors: Thomas Massey Liam Kelleher Profile Writers: Michael Anjos Carl Long Contributors: Brad Bradford Dave Burley Marie Capy Eric Davis Derek Eisel Stephanie A. Herrera Web Administrator: Steve Phipps

CONTENTS ISSUE 04/14

Welcome to the latest issue of Sustainable Business Magazine Sustainable Business Magazine aims to spread awareness of the values of sustainability, as well as the brilliant ways in which institutions continue to meet challenges and champion corporate social responsibility. The publication’s content is based around the three core components of sustainable business development; economic sustainability, environmental sustainability, and social sustainability. In this issue Chip Duffie, Senior Vice President of Compliance and Sustainability at Clean Harbors, talks to us about how one of the largest environmental and industrial recycling companies in North America is providing sustainability solutions that help keep business in balance with the environment. Sustainable Business Magazine also spoke to Matthew Marsh, founder and President of First Class Vending, who explains how efforts to improve sustainability have helped them remain one of the most successful vending machine companies in the United States. This month’s issue includes guest editorials by industry experts Derek Eisel, Director of Sales at Scope 5, Eric Davis, Research Manager at EnerKnol, Marie Capy, Business Development Manager at JobCSR.com, as well as a Q&A with Dave Burley, Director of Environmental Affairs at the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board. Our sustainability news page contains current sustainability related headlines from around North America, while our events calendar details upcoming sustainability events. This month’s highlighted event is the International District Energy Association’s (IDEA) evolvingENERGY conference, which was recently held in Toronto. The event is Canada’s premier forum for the district energy and combined heat and power (CHP) industry and enables industry-wide discussion about the continuing evolution of community energy systems. Sustainable Business Magazine is once again working with some of North America’s most influential associations to promote sustainability. This edition contains major features on the U.S. Green Building Council and the Canadian Renewable Fuels Association. This month’s issue also contains the latest installment of the AASHE ‘Sustainable Campuses’ series. The series is being run in partnership with AASHE (the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education) and celebrates the continuing efforts of North American universities to develop and operate sustainably, as well as the role they’re taking in educating students and the wider public about the importance of sustainability. This month’s installment features the University of Houston, Duke University, Central Connecticut State University, the University of Prince Edward Island, and the University of the West Indies. The series is prefaced by a foreword from AASHE Executive Director Stephanie A. Herrera. We hope that you find this issue both interesting and inspiring. Thank you for reading. The Sustainable Business Magazine Team

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Sustainable News

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Economic Report Scope 5

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Energy Report EnerKnol Inc

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Social Report JobCSR.com

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Q&A Dave Burley Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB)

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Global Events

14

The International District Energy Association (IDEA) evolvingENERGY Conference

20

U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)

26

Canadian Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA)

32

Clean Harbors / Safety-Kleen

42

First Class Vending

48

The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE)

50

University of Houston

56

Duke University

62

Central Connecticut State University

68

University of Prince Edward Island

74

University of the West Indies

80

Advertisers Index

© SBM Media Ltd 2014. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form for any purpose, other than short sections for the purpose of review, without prior consent of the publisher.

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

SUSTAINABILITYNEWS KOHLER REMAIN TOP FOR

WATER CONSERVATION The US Government’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has granted Kohler its Sustained Excellence Award for the second year in a row. The title recognises companies for their dedication to the development of water-saving products and education of consumers on issues of water conservation. In 2006 the EPA introduced WaterSense, a voluntary public-private partnership programme intended to enhance water-efficiency in products throughout the market. Kohler has led innovation since its introduction by engineering its toilets, bathrooms, taps, urinals, and many of its showerheads to use significantly less water without compromising on performance or design. Kohler has won excellence awards from the EPA since 2008 when the manufacturer won the government department’s WasterSense Manufacturer Partner of the Year award, including the inaugural Sustained Excellence Award in 2013. “To win this award for the second time is evidence of our continuing efforts in the area of water conservation and our strong long-term association with the EPA,” explains senior channel manager of sustainability Robert Zimmerman. Alongside its engineering accomplishments, the EPA also identified Kohler’s extensive educational activities as a source of excellence. These include a “Trust the Flush” tour in which a bus toured 185 events across the U.S. exhibiting WaterSense-labelled toilets, social media marketing campaigns, and establishing principles of green building by training 280 staff as LEED® Green Associates. For more information visit www.kohler.com

CVS Health Awarded Platinum Certification CVS Health has received its first Platinum level LEED certification for its outlet in West Haven, Connecticut. The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) recognised the CVS Pharmacy store for its innovative design features that promote improved environmental and human health performance. The CVS Pharmacy has a number of progressive features in its design including recycled materials used in its building, a solar photovoltaic system for improved energy efficiency, highly efficiency HVAC and plumbing systems, and an electric car charging station. These and other features mean the West Haven store uses 40% less energy and 50% less water than other buildings of a comparable size. Across its 7700 retail pharmacies and 900 walk-in medical clinics, CVS Health operates an ongoing CSR platform known as ‘Prescription for a Better World’ that seeks to reduce the environmental impact of its business. The West Haven pharmacy is the company’s eighth building to receive LEED certification and, as senior vice president of Corporate Social Responsibility & Philanthropy Eileen Howard Boone points out, will be a blueprint for the future. “CVS Health is proud to celebrate this model store, which allows us to pilot environmental innovations and best practices we can apply to other facilities.” For more information visit www.cvs.com

Manufacturing Waste Eliminated in Europe and North America RB, global manufacturer of health and hygiene products, announced that its sites across Europe and North America (ENA) have achieved ‘zero manufacturing waste to landfill’. “Since launching our betterbusiness strategy in 2012, we’ve seen a rapid transition towards zero waste,” says Victoria Wood, RB’s Global Head of Sustainability. “We’ve gone from 4 to 31 factories achieving zero manufacturing waste to landfill status. That is over 60% of our factories globally.” The betterbusiness concept focuses on reducing environmental impact through a combination of co-operation and competition between its factories. A ‘Reduce to Zero’ competition was launched, for example, while a partnering scheme

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was set up with zero manufacturing waste to landfill sites helping those yet to meet their targets. As a result more than 32,000 tonnes of waste has been diverted from landfill during the first six months of 2014 alone, leaving only 15.6% of waste being sent to landfill during this period. This is a dramatic drop from 19.7% in 2013. EVP of Global Supply Amedeo Fasano is optimistic for the future. “When you consider the complexity and scale of our manufacturing processes and the variety and volume of our raw and packaging materials – our rapid progress is a testament to our team’s focus. Our next challenge will be to share best practice amongst sites to get to 100%.” www.rb.com/sustainability


DOUBLE ACHIEVEMENT FOR MAJOR BOTTLING COMPANY Coca Cola HBC has received an A rating from the Carbon Disclosure Product (CDP) for its commitment to environmental impact accountability. This plaudit comes just months after being named the global beverage industry leader on the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices (DJSI). Coca Cola HBC is the second largest bottler of Coca Cola Company products, operating in 28 countries with a customer base of around 585 million people. Through the introduction of new environmentally friendly initiatives, the company has reduced total carbon emissions by 5.3% compared to 2013. Notable initiatives include expanding capacity of the Russian sugar beet industry to eliminate the need to import sugar by 2015, and removing all HFC-based coolers throughout its network.

Lighting Pioneer Rebranded Ellipz Lighting Pte Ltd is the new name of LED lighting pioneers Lemnis Lighting Asia Pte Ltd. The corporate rebranding reflects years of business growth, improving lighting solutions, and worldwide success. It is accompanied by a brand new website at www.ellipzlighting.com. The company also opened its first North American office in Los Angeles, California, opening new market and educational opportunities. Since its inception in 2005, Ellipz Lighting has prided itself on being an innovator first and manufacturer second. Recognising that 20% of the world’s electricity is used for lighting, inventor John Rooysman developed superior LED lighting technologies for Ellipz Lighting that are optimised not just on photopic measurements but scotopic measurements as well. This better mimics optimal functioning conditions for the human eye, reducing wasted energy compared to conventional LED lights. “Even as LED is developing into a mature technology, we believe that the real understanding of what can be achieved with LED technology is still to come. Ellipz Lighting wants to play an important role in that development,” says founder and chairman Frans Otten. Since 2005, Ellipz Lighting has sold more than 50,000 LED lighting solutions across the world and won numerous awards including Technology Pioneer at the World Technology Forum in 2009. www.ellipzlighting.com

This was complemented by an 89% score on the DJSI, up from 81% in 2013, with notable improvements made in brand and customer relationship management, health and nutrition, supply chain management, talent attraction and retention, and human capital development. CEO Dimitris Lois says of the two achievements: “We are delighted to be recognised as an industry leader by these two benchmarks of corporate sustainability performance. Our substantial improvement this year in the DJSI, and our rating upgrade from B to A by CDP demonstrate that sustainability is at the heart of our business, and these two awards are a firm endorsement of the good work we are doing.” For more information visit www.coca-colahellenic.com

ARCADIA POWER BECOMES A B CORP

Arcadia Power has been recognised as a certified B Corp for its social and environmental standards. The Washington, D.C. based company brings easy fossil fuel-free energy options to the American public by partnering with wind and solar power projects across the country. In doing so it joins more than 1000 B Corporations operating in over 60 industries across the world. “We’re thrilled to join so many great companies who share our values of social responsibility and sustainability,” says Kiran Bhatraju, Arcadia Power CEO and co-founder. “We all have to step up to combat climate change and build a better future, and B Corporations are helping lead the way.” As the first US-wide Clean Energy utility option for both private and corporate customers, Arcadia Power launched in early 2014 and is already helping small and medium-sized businesses in more than 25 states – including other B Corp certified companies. Arcadia Power’s unique offering allows clients to transfer their source of energy without the need for additional equipment then represents all the energy impact, savings, and reward data on a user friendly web dashboard. For more information visit: www.arcadiapower.com

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ECONOMIC REPORT

ECONOMICREPORT

By Derek Eisel, Director at Scope 5.

The Three R’s of a Real Sustainability Program I went to a sustainability dinner a few weeks ago so I could ambush one of the speakers. I was trying to be helpful in a real way and said “your company has a great sustainability reputation. What is that based on?” I’ve worked in this business long enough to have tired of hearing people say and believe that their companies are sustainable, without providing any data or even definition of what 4 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

it means for them to say they’re sustainable, especially when they have a clear opportunity and ability to lead. This particular industry leader did not have good answers to my questions. I didn’t press it, but he contacted me to have coffee later and discuss what might be done to have better answers next time. I told him the same thing I tell everyone, if you want to have a real sustainability effort, start with


I tell everyone, if you want to have a real sustainability effort, start with the three R’s: Report, Results, and Role. If you don’t like acronyms you can just pronounce it rrr like a low growl.

the three R’s: Report, Results, and Role. If you don’t like acronyms you can just pronounce it rrr like a low growl. Report: Know your scope one and scope two emissions. Know your scope 3 emissions as well, if they are important to your business (material in industry parlance). Please don’t call your company a sustainability leader if you’re not tracking CO2 data. Do I need to illustrate this point? Imagine you went to buy a gluten free tempeh burger and instead of paying for it you said, “Hey, I’m financially sustainable. You trust me right? No need for me to have money in a checking account somewhere as proof.” You’d probably go hungry. And yet, even with the general ease of collecting and calculating (even automating) kilowatts of fuel and other data, I still hear “it’s too hard to keep track of our environmental data” or “calculating a footprint is hard.” It’s not 2005 anymore. You cannot call yourself sustainable without data. Period. It’s over. Collect your bills, do it yourself, get a consultant, buy software, whatever, there are many simple ways to know your footprint. Call me. I am happy to help. And if you’re not reporting your footprint, I don’t believe you and I

won’t buy your product either, thinking of a large online retailer. It’s lovely that a lot of you out there are trying. Now start reporting. Results: So you measure, but do you make a difference? If you have data to back up your story you’re way ahead of the pack and on your way to realness. And if you’ve tracked data for a year or two you’re probably realizing that it’s not that easy to reduce your footprint. Most companies are trying to “grow” and that means expanding into additional locations, using more energy, burning more fuel. What do the numbers say about your emissions per square foot? Are you at least becoming more efficient per employee even if your overall expenditure and footprint are increasing. What projects are you launching and measuring to reduce your footprint? Who are you partnering with? Go after results. Share results. Results fuel the sustainability effort. Role: I started my sustainability career in an organization that hadn’t done that before, where my boss believed that sustainability is everyone’s job. I agree. Just like, generally, making money is everyone’s job in a company. However it’s not everyone’s job to compile a profit and loss statement or to file a company’s tax return. If you want results you need to hold qualified people accountable. Have you heard of a financially successful company that has no accountants? If you want to call your company’s sustainability effort real, then appoint or hire or contract or consult with someone who is accountable for the sustainability effort and make it a full time job. Not a Pinocchio job, a real job. Then you can make that person responsible for the reporting and the results and you can feel confident that no one’s going to call you out at the next sustainability event. If you’re not doing these things it’s not real, but the good news is, it’s pretty easy to do these things. What do you think? Am I asking for too much? Should we just be nice and applaud each other for things we’re not sure why we’re applauding? Let me know at derek@scope5.com. c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ENERGY REPORT MR. ERIC DAVIS RESEARCH MANAGER, ENERKNOL

ENERGYREPORT

By Eric Davis, Research Manager at EnerKnol.

The Changing Energy Landscape and Utility Business Model Federal and state policies will continue to promote integration of intermittent renewable energy 6 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Traditional power generation and transmission is undergoing a significant shift as federal and state policies support increasing levels of renewable energy resources. Integration of renewables and other distributed energy resources (DERs), increasing energy efficiency, and new energy management solutions are challenging the utility business model, which is fundamentally tied to energy demand growth. In addition to a shifting business model, utilities are also faced with rising transmission and distribution (T&D) costs


and reliability challenges with increasingly severe storm threats. To address these challenges, utilities must invest in system upgrades, hardening, and microgrid technology, offering the ability to operate independent of the bulk power system. FEDERAL OVERSIGHT The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) oversees various aspects of interstate and regional electricity markets and transmission. With the emergence of decentralized power generation, FERC has issued a series of rules to support a fair and sustainable transition for the evolving energy sector. These rules include, but are not limited to: • • •

CALIFORNIA In August, The California Public Utilities Commission (PUC) instituted a distributed resource plan (R.14-08-013) to prepare utilities for, and fully understand the impacts of increased DER integration in the state. This is particularly important for California, as the state is leading in solar energy capacity (Figure 2) and recently announced an energy storage goal of 1.3 gigawatts by 2020.

Figure 2 2013 Cumulative Installed Solar Energy Capacity – Leading States

Source: EnerKnol analysis of SEIA data

Order No. 706 (January 2008) - Reliability standards for critical infrastructure protection Order No. 764 (June 2012) - Integration of variable energy resources Order No. 1000 (July 2011) -  Transmission planning and cost allocation requirements

STATE ACTIONS Recognizing the energy landscape shift, several states are drafting and implementing energy regulatory reform. NEW YORK The New York Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) initiative – announced by Governor Cuomo in April 2014 – tasks the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) to move the state’s energy sector towards a decentralized, market-based structure. By incorporating distributed energy generation, demand response, energy efficiency, and greater customer interaction through outreach and technology, REV aims to lower energy costs and create a cleaner, more efficient, and more reliable electric grid. This initiative is key as New York’s peak demand resources trend closer to reliability requirements (Figure 1).

Figure 1 NY Power Resources and Reliability Requirements

Source: EnerKnol analysis of NYISO data

HAWAII Hawaii’s average (cross sector) electricity rates are the highest in the nation. In April 2014, the Hawaii PUC ordered the Hawaiian Electric Companies (HECO) to create a plan to reduce energy costs and address renewable energy integration challenges. The PUC offered guidance in its “Commission’s Inclinations on the Future of Hawaii’s Electric Utilities” white paper, and in August, HECO submitted an ambitious plan to reduce electric bills by 20 percent, and procure more than 65 percent of the companies’ energy from renewable energy sources by 2030. The PUC is currently evaluating the findings. NEXT STEPS Going forward, federal and state policies will continue to promote integration of intermittent renewable energy sources through new compensation and coordination reforms. As these and other distributed energy resources continue to proliferate, many utilities will need to be flexible and work with regulators to sustain their business and ensure a resilient, reliable, and efficient energy system. An energy industry outlook was arguably stated best by Gil Quinones, President and CEO of the New York Power Authority, at the opening ceremony of New York Energy Week 2014: “The technology investments that we will make, and the infrastructure investments that we will make, and the regulatory rules that we will write and implement over the next five to ten years, will determine what the grid will look like over the next fifty years.” c For more information, please visit www.enerknol.com SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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SOCIAL REPORT

MARIE CAPY, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER AT JOBCSR.COM

SOCIALREPORT

By Marie Capy, Business Development Manager at JobCSR.com

The Challenge of Employment in an Increasingly CSR Conscious Business World Recruitment efforts need to look beyond university degrees and expected professional backgrounds to find experts. 8 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

As expressed by legendary football coach Vince Lombardi, “perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.” A growing need for qualified Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) experts on projects around the world is making this quote more valuable than ever before as job seekers and providers look for ways to meet the growing demand. In the past decade, major changes have taken place in the public minds and in the business sector in regards to corporate social responsibility. Companies can no longer escape public scrutiny


of their activities, and the practice of managing social, environmental, and economic impacts has decisively moved to the forefront of business strategies. As a result, today’s CSR efforts typically have top down support, which implies targeted recruitment efforts in companies across the globe. JobCSR.com is the only website that specializes in matching companies and top CSR talent in energy sectors (mining, oil & gas, renewable energy), or infrastructure projects such as pipelines, transmission lines, damns, plants, and railways. The need for such a platform was propounded because CSR experts, more than any other, have a seemingly endless array of educational backgrounds, past work experiences, and personal interests. Some practitioners have decided on a CSR career at the university level, however because this is an emerging field, a great number of professionals are entering the field from a vast number of unrelated backgrounds. According to a joint survey conducted by the ISSP and Sustainable Plant, “The most common educational backgrounds of sustainability professionals don’t match the skill sets that are considered most important to be successful.” Soft skills such as communication, problem solving, and the ability to inspire and motivate ranked as most invaluable for sustainability jobs. With this in mind, recruitment efforts need to look beyond university degrees and expected professional backgrounds to find experts with the set of hard and soft skills that match each

particular job description. The same survey explains that the most common areas of previous background training are: health and safety (77%), quality control (67%), environmental hazardous materials management (66%), risk Management (64%), and compliance (62%). JobCSR’s mission is to help companies find qualified professionals at the international level and to help job seekers from every background successfully profile their related and seemingly unrelated expertise. As an aggregating platform for professionals, JobCSR.com plays an important role in ensuring that qualified CSR employment can effectively lead to economic growth and social development across the globe. Ever since “ignore CSR at your own peril” became a new motto for the corporate world, staffing to meet the growing demand has become an essential part of doing business. JobCSR.com is helping to support this effort with in-depth industry knowledge, international contacts, and an A-list of corporate partners that are actively involved in ensuring the growth and relevancy of the platform. Corporate partners include companies of all sizes with projects and staffing needs in the CSR sector. Corporate partners use the site to connect with job seekers with the right set of skills while giving their brand some of the visibility that is so direly needed to maintain a social license to operate. As a talent aggregator JobCSR.com is a match maker that serves the interests of both job seekers and corporations alike. c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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Q&A DAVE BURLEY

Dave Burley

Director of Environmental Affairs Canada-Newfoundland & Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

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Can you tell us a little about the history of the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB)? In 1985, the Government of Canada and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador signed the Atlantic Accord, which is an agreement on joint management of the offshore oil and gas resources off Newfoundland and Labrador and the sharing of revenues from the exploitation of these resources. The Atlantic Accord also established the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB) to regulate the industry on behalf of both governments. There are seven Board members – three appointed by the Government of Canada; three appointed by the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, and a Chair and CEO jointly appointed. We have 80 very well educated and highly skilled staff in areas like safety, environmental assessment and compliance, reservoir engineering, well operations engineering, reservoir geology, geophysics and petroleum technology. Our mandate has four pillars – offshore safety, environmental protection, resource management and industrial benefits. Safety and environmental protection are paramount in all Board decisions, with safety being first and foremost. Our enabling legislation grants autonomy to the Board for regulating the industry. Some decisions however, such as Calls for Bids and Development Plans, are Fundamental Decisions, which require federal and provincial government approval. Over time, the C-NLOPB has matured to become a world-class offshore regulatory agency. The Board is a well respected member of the International Regulators Forum, which is a group consisting of the some of the top offshore safety regulators in the world. Members include Norway, UK, USA, Australia, Netherlands, Brazil, New Zealand, Mexico, C-NLOPB, and CNSOPB. The C-NLOPB also was a founding member of IOPER, the International Offshore Petroleum Environmental Regulators, whose members currently include Norway, UK, USA, Australia, Brazil, New Zealand, C-NLOPB, and CNSOPB. How do you engage with companies who have offshore operations in the Newfoundland and Labrador area? The Board’s role is to provide the necessary regulatory oversight of Operator activities to confirm that legislative and regulatory obligations are met. Prior to the issuance of an authorization, Operators must demonstrate that risks have been reduced to a level that is as low as is reasonably practicable. Our engagement with companies starts well in advance of any offshore work being undertaken and continues until all work is completed. In some ways, our role is similar to that of a referee in that we enforce compliance with the rules. Generally speaking, it is the role of governments to set those rules through legislation and regulations. If the rules are not followed, the legislation provides a suite of enforcement tools that can be applied including the issuance of Notices of Non-compliance, prosecution, and/or pulling an Operator’s work authorization. How do you make sure that the environment is protected during offshore operations? The Atlantic Accord legislation places ultimate responsibility for safety and environmental protection on the Operators. Prior to the issuance of an authorization, there must be a project-specific environmental assessment completed. In addition, the Operator’s operational documentation must include an Environmental Protection

Plan (EPP) that demonstrates it has taken every reasonable effort to protect the environment. The EPP describes the responsibilities, expectations and methodologies for environmental protection associated with the work, or activity, and it includes the following elements: • A description of how the Operator’s management system will be applied to comply with environmental regulatory requirements; • A summary of measures to avoid, prevent, reduce, and manage environmental risks, including environmental protection measures identified as part of the environmental assessment; • A list of environmentally-critical structures, equipment and systems, and plans in place for their inspection, testing and maintenance; • A description of procedures for selection, evaluation, and use of chemical substances; • A description of equipment and procedures for treatment, handling, and disposal of waste material; • A description of discharge streams and the limits upon those discharges, and the system for monitoring compliance with those limits; and • A description of arrangements for monitoring compliance with the EPP and for measuring environmental performance. An Operator’s application for authorization also must include contingency plans for potential emergencies, including pollution events such as oil spills. The Federal Government and their provincial partners recently made changes to the absolute liability and financial responsibility requirements for offshore operations. By raising the absolute liability for companies operating in the Atlantic offshore to $1 billion from $30 million, governments are strengthening our offshore regulatory regime and recognizing the need for Canada to be in line with international standards. Also, we shouldn’t lose sight of the fact that all parties who are at fault for or negligent in a spill are jointly and severally liable, without limit, for any loss or damage incurred by any person as a result of a spill. What challenges do you face when reviewing offshore proposals? Our Board has been in existence for almost 30 years, and our technical staff has decades of experience in offshore regulation. Nevertheless, in comparison with some of our international counterparts, we are a relatively small organization regulating a relatively small number of installations. This makes it particularly important for us to remain aware of experiences gained, and lessons learned, in other jurisdictions. Even in today’s highly-interconnected world, this can be a challenge in a time when many organizations face budget restraint. Our contacts with the International Regulators Forum and the International Offshore Petroleum Environmental Regulators are especially valuable to us in maintaining this awareness. What does sustainability mean to the C-NLOPB? The Board was established to regulate the extraction of a non-renewable resource. Sustainability is viewed in the context of our legislated mandate, which has four pillars – safety, environmental protection, resource management, and industrial benefits. Taken in the context of responsible oil field management, it means minimal safety incidents, maximum environmental protection, minimal waste of the resource, and maximum industrial benefits for Canadians, and particularly Newfoundlanders and Labradorians. c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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GLOBAL EVENTS

NOV

2014

3rd - 5th

Sustainable Brands 2014 London, UK www.sustainablebrands.com

Influential brands have the power to become a net positive force for restoring healthy environments, communities, families, and people while delivering market leading business performance.

6th - 8th

2014 Net Impact Conference Minneapolis

The “2nd World Symposium on Sustainable Development at Universities” (WSSD-U-2014) will focus on “transformative approaches to sustainable development across disciplines”.

9th - 11th

25th Annual SRI Conference on Sustainable, Responsible, Impact Investing Colorado Springs, CO, USA www.sriconference.com

Celebrating 25 years, The SRI Conference on Sustainable, Responsible, Impact Investing (formerly SRI in the Rockies) is the premier annual gathering of investors and investment professionals investing for positive impact and a truly sustainable future.

10th - 12th

29th Annual Sustainable Agriculture Conference Greenville, SC

The Sustainable Agriculture Conference brings together those new to the movement and experienced veterans to network and collaborate. You can learn from the experts about cutting-edge techniques and innovative programs while connecting with others.

2nd International Ocean Research Conference Barcelona, Spain www.iocunesco-oneplanetoneocean.fnob.org

An opportunity for the scientific community to come together to plan the coming decade of international collaboration in marine science and technology, with a view to improving ocean governance.

http://www.haw-hamburg.de/en/ ftz-als/veranstaltungen/wssd-2014

SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

PROMOTE YOUR EVENT HERE If your organization has a trade show or event, please let us know and we will promote your event on our global events pages. For more information please contact us at: art@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net

www.carolinafarmstewards.org/sac/

17th - 21st

1st - 3rd

11th Annual Canadian Bioeconomy Summit Toronto, Canada

http://www.greenfuels.org/en/industry-information/conference.aspx

The Canadian Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA) will host its 11th annual conference – which is expanding to become the first national Canadian Bioeconomy Conference. The Canadian Bioeconomy Conference will continue to include a wide range of topics and information on the emerging bioeconomy.

5th - 7th

Workshop: Sustainability Leadership Training Bard College, Annandale on Hudson, NY, USA

C2C Fellows workshops are for current students and recent graduates who want high-impact careers in sustainable business and politics. Join C2C to learn the leadership skills necessary to succeed, such as how to raise money, tell your story, build your network, pitch your idea, and know what you’re good at.

Yosemite Sustainability Conference Yosemite National Park, Yosemite Village, CA

The conference will provide information about some of the most concerning environmental issues such as climate change, greenhouse gas reduction, water management, energy management, waste stream reduction, and transportation fuels.

http://www.bard.edu/cep/c2c/events/ upcoming/

8th - 10th

www.yosemitegatewaypartners.org/ yosemite-sustainability-conference

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DEC

2014


ATLANTA, USA (NOV. 13-24) DUBAI, UAE (DEC. 07-08)

The Centre for Sustainability and Excellence (CSE) has hosted its Advanced Certified Sustainability trainings in 25 countries in 5 continents and has trained 5,000 professionals from non-for-profit, governmental, and Fortune500 organizations. Topics discussed include: • Current Global and Local Legislation for CSR and GHG emissions • Strategy and Related Global Standards & Guidelines (UN Global Compact, GRI G4, CDP, SROI) • The importance of Sustainability in Supply Chain and Carbon Footprint reduction • External Assurance and how to communicate and gain credibility in your report and many more trending topics.

Are you in the MENA region?

Are you in the USA?

Join us in Atlanta, November 13-14 Image Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

Join us in Dubai, December 7-8 Image Source: www.hdwallpapers.in

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to become the next certified CSR Practitioner! For more information visit http://www.cse-net.org/article/127/upcoming-trainings or contact us at sustainability@cse-net.org

Victoria Karkouli, Marketing Coordinator • T: 3122146464 • 70 W Madison Str.,Suite 1400, Chicago, IL 60602, USA

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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IDEA

EVOLVING

ENERGY The International District Energy Association (IDEA) held their evolvingENERGY conference in downtown Toronto between October 28-30, 2014. Written by Brad Bradford, Community Energy Planner, IDEA.

Leading district energy practitioners from across North America assembled in Toronto in late October for the International District Energy Association’s (IDEA) evolvingENERGY conference, Canada’s premier forum for the district energy and combined heat and power (CHP) indus-

try. The conference enables dialogue across the public and private platforms of the Canadian district energy industry, exploring the evolution of community energy systems in each of the provinces while featuring operational best practices, emerging business models, system NATIONAL INDUSTRY LEADERSHIP PLENARY PANEL MODERATED BY IDEA PRESIDENT & CEO ROB THORNTON (FROM LEFT TO RIGHT): BRUCE ANDER, MARKHAM DISTRICT ENERGY; STACEY BERNIER, CREATIVE ENERGY; JEAN-CLAUDE MICHEL, CDH SOLUTIONS AND OPERATIONS; RAY MONTEIRO, ENWAVE; DAVID REHN, ENMAX; AND KEN SMITH, DISTRICT ENERGY ST. PAUL.

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IN HIS OPENING REMARKS, IDEA CHAIR KEN SMITH EMPHASIZED THE ACCELERATING PACE OF CHANGE IN THE ENERGY INDUSTRY IN NORTH AMERICA.

deployment, technical innovations, and the rapidly-evolving regulatory environment for utilities and local distribution companies. Following opening welcome remarks from IDEA Chair Ken Smith of District Energy St. Paul, two plenary panels kicked off a robust and compelling technical program. INDUSTRY LEADERSHIP PLENARY PANEL The Industry Leadership Panel featured executives from operating systems across Canada, including Bruce Ander, Markham District Energy (Markham, ON); Stacey Bernier, Creative Energy (Vancouver, BC); Jean-Claude Michel, CDH Solutions and Operations (Montreal, ON); Ray Monteiro, Enwave (Toronto, ON); David Rehn, ENMAX (Calgary, AB); and Ken Smith, District Energy St. Paul (St. Paul, MN). IDEA President and CEO Rob Thornton moderat-

ed the discussion, urging panelists to share insights on best practices in business development, emerging customer expectations and other factors driving industry growth. With coast-to-coast representation, panelists shared their views on the fundamental importance of highly reliable operations and economic competitiveness in the context of a supportive policy framework. Consensus emerged among the panelists about the critical importance of regular communications with local municipal leaders to create a business environment supportive of district energy development. DISTRICT ENERGY IMPLEMENTATION PLENARY PANEL The second plenary panel, moderated by Linda Bertoldi, Senior Partner of Borden Ladner Gervais, a leading energy law firm in Canada, focused on a range of implemen-

tation strategies to deploy district energy systems. Panelists included Joseph Brillhart, Johnson Controls; Devin Causley, Federation of Canadian Municipalities; Scott Clark, Burns & McDonnell; Richard Damecour, FVB Energy; Dennis Fotinos, Enwave; and Rob Kerr, Guelph Municipal Holdings. Discussion focused on securing new customers, risk mitigation, navigating regulatory requirements, assembling capital, business case development, and garnering political support. The featured panelists shared ‘proven-in-practice’ lessons with attendees to help community leaders with moving their own projects forward. KEYNOTE ADDRESSES Colin Andersen, CEO of the Ontario Power Authority (OPA), and Bob Delaney, Parliamentary Assistant to the Ministry of Energy both delivered keynote addresses SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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IDEA

ALL ENERGY SYSTEMS REQUIRE MONITORING AND MAINTENANCE TO ASSURE THEY PERFORM AS ANTICIPATED WHEN CALLED UPON

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY’S ENERGY PLANT MANAGER TED BORER SHARES INSIGHTS ON MICROGRID OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE.

to provide their perspectives on recently released provincial energy programs and the Province’s approach to efficient, clean energy generation. Mr. Andersen highlighted the efficiency of district energy with CHP and its role in helping the province meet its energy conservation targets. After outlining the OPA’s new Combined Heat and Power Standard Offer Program (CHPSOP 2.0), Mr. Andersen stated that “the future looks very bright for district energy” in Ontario. Similarly, Mr. Delaney made note of the importance of alternative forms of clean, reliable, and efficient generation now that the province has completely phased out coal power plants. Following the opening panels, conference participants were given the opportunity to choose between two tracks of 16 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

presentations, workshops, and seminars focused on operational issues, plant management best practices, regulatory and policy programs, and tools for community energy development. CHPSOP 2.0 WORKSHOP In the Combined Heat and Power Standard Offer Program 2.0 (CHPSOP) Workshop, participants were provided with information to assist them in evaluating and responding to the OPA’s latest round of CHP procurement. OPA’s Darryl Yahoda reviewed the evolution of CHP procurement in the province and pointed out key differences between the previous programs. Workshop participants were provided with detailed information regarding eligibility requirements, target sector definitions, prioritization, and

connection availability, and key contract terms to help them understand the process. Richard Chan from Union Gas and Michael Angemeer from Veridian Connections were on hand to provide perspectives from the natural gas and local electricity distribution company sectors, respectively. While an application will require strategic coordination with numerous stakeholders, both the gas utilities and LDCs are interested in exploring opportunities to collaborate with CHPSOP 2.0 applicants in the district energy target sector. RESILIENT MICROGRIDS: OPERATIONS + MAINTENANCE SEMINAR All energy systems require monitoring and maintenance to assure they perform as anticipated when called upon. Princeton Uni-


COLIN ANDERSEN, CEO, ONTARIO POWER AUTHORITY, AND ROB THORNTON, PRESIDENT & CEO, IDEA.

versity Plant Manager Ted Borer delivered a comprehensive Microgrids Operations and Maintenance Seminar. Tested and proven during Super Storm Sandy in 2012, Princeton University’s district energy/microgrid maintained mission-critical operations during the devastating storm event. Ted brought forward proven-in-practice insights to the audience, with hands-on training for microgrid operations and optimization. The session provided important lessons and considerations with respect to assess-

ing operational objectives, equipment sizing, control schemes and grid inter-operability, parallel operations and islanding from the grid, planned maintenance procedures, fuel management, synchronizing with intermittent renewable resources, and storm protocols. ANATOMY OF A PLANT DISASTER In keeping with the operations-focused content, evolvingENERGY featured an emergency preparedness seminar to high-

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IDEA CHPSOP 2.0 WORKSHOP PANELISTS (FROM LEFT TO RIGHT): RICHARD DAMECOUR, FVB ENERGY; MICHAEL ANGEMEER, VERIDIAN CONNECTIONS; RICHARD CHAN, UNION GAS; AND DARRYL YAHODA, ONTARIO POWER AUTHORITY.

evolvingENERGY FEATURED AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS SEMINAR TO HIGHLIGHT HOW QUICKLY EMERGENCY EVENTS CAN ARISE, AND WHAT PLANT MANAGERS MUST DO TO RESPOND

light how quickly emergency events can arise, and what plant managers must do to respond. Richard Franki and Brad Cochrane from York University shared their personal experience with a worst-case scenario event and the protocol for mitigating damage and restoring operations. Drawing from this experience, Richard and Brad took participants through emergency preparedness planning, identifying, and prioritizing mission-critical services, fire-related design considerations, securi18 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

ty and perimeter access control, evacuation and shut-down protocol, and essential staffing and emergency response scheduling. PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM In the Planning and Development Symposium, IDEA, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), and the City of Toronto provided training and tools for planners, sustainability directors, and community leaders interested in deploying district energy.

Raymond Boulter demonstrated NRCan’s District Energy Economic Model (DEEM) tool, which was developed to help predict potential local and provincial economic benefits such as jobs, wages, GDP, and tax revenue associated with district energy development. The tool was developed in recognition that municipal decision makers often lacked evidence-based tools beyond traditional financial analyses for determining the value of pursuing a district energy system.


to provide a high level prospectus before becoming overly invested in time and engineering studies, and to determine if the project warrants additional study. Case study examples were provided to walk the participants through the model inputs and outputs, definitions of assumptions, aggregated load profiles, cash flow projections, and sensitivity analysis. The City of Toronto’s Jane Welsh shared multiple energy planning initiatives currently underway in response to the city’s tremendous growth and development pressure. The City is acutely aware of the impacts related to extreme weather. The 2013 ice storm caused more than $170 million in storm related damage in Toronto, highlighting the challenge facing many cities: the need to aggressively reduce greenhouse gas emissions in response to a changing climate combined with the need to build more resilient energy infrastructure. Jane shared a number of policies and strategies currently under development within the planning department to support district energy deployment. TECHNICAL TOURS At the conclusion of the conference, attendees had the opportunity to participate in two Technical Tours showcasing local district energy systems in Toronto and Markham.

Community Energy Planner Brad Bradford walked participants through IDEA’s own district energy screening tool which aims to provide the project proponent with an understanding of the potential for successful district energy development. The IDEA screening tool synthesizes a large volume of information essential for making district energy development decisions, runs analysis across various scenarios, and determines if it would be worthwhile to pursue a more detailed feasibility study. The goal is

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO The system at the University of Toronto was commissioned in 1912 and was the first district heating system in operation in downtown Toronto. Today, the system heats about 12.4 million square feet in 99 buildings, serving high performance sports venues, world class research facilities, museums, retail outlets, and student residences. The Central Power Plant is the center of a three mile distribution network, where energy is generated by four water tube boilers with a cogeneration facility equipped with flue gas heat recovery through both direct and indirect systems. MARKHAM DISTRICT ENERGY The Markham District Energy (MDE) system is owned by the City of Markham, one of the fastest growing communities in Canada, and includes a 4 MW CHP facility, 5 MW of standby generation, 4000 tons of cooling, 15 MW of hot water heating and 5 MW of steam capacity serving over 1 million square feet of building area. MDE has demonstrated the reliability, efficiency and emissions reductions possible through a district energy system integrated into a well-planned community. In 2013, MDE won IDEA’s System of the Year Award. c

ROB THORNTON, PRESIDENT & CEO, IDEA, WITH BOB DELANEY, MPP AND PARLIAMENTARY ASSISTANT TO MINSTER OF ENERGY.

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USGBC

U.S. GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL Sustainable Business Magazine talks to CEO and Founding Chairman Rick Fedrizzi about how the U.S. Green Building Council’s “LEED Green Building Rating System” is putting sustainability at the forefront of how buildings are designed and operated. Written by Michael Anjos.

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USGBC

LEED IS THE WORLD’S FOREMOST PROGRAM GUIDING THE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND OPERATIONS OF GREEN BUILDINGS.

CANNON DESIGN HQ LEED PLATINUM

In 1993 Rick Fedrizzi, David Gottfried, and Mike Italiano founded the U.S. Green Building Council; a non profit organisation focused on making sure buildings are developed and maintained with sustainability in mind. In 1999, Along with seven other national councils, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) founded the World Green Building Council.

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LEED The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is best known for developing the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System; a program that provides buildings with third party verification. LEED is the world’s foremost program guiding the design, construction, and operations of green buildings. The

USGBC states that its mission is to “see a sustainable built environment within this generation,” and the LEED program is a big part of trying to achieve that. To date, there are more than 23,500 LEED-certified commercial projects worldwide, as well as over 63,000 certified housing units. An impressive network of 198,000 LEED-credentialed professionals are distinguishing


PROXIMITY HOTEL LEED PLATINUM

themselves as leaders in their fields, bringing value to their firms and expertise to green building projects. “One of the most important things to recognize about the extraordinary growth of LEED is that it has been market driven,” explains Rick Fedrizzi, CEO and founding chair of the U.S. Green Building Council. “As the market has increasingly recognized the multifaceted benefits associated with green buildings; lower utility bills, healthier indoor environments for workers, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions among many others, the demand has sky-rocketed. Worldwide, people recognize LEED certification as the mark of a high-performing building, and

accordingly, they increasingly demand it for their homes, schools, and workplaces.” LEED-certified buildings provide healthier indoor environments for workers, students, and community members. They also save money for building owners through reduced energy and water bills, as well as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, making the LEED program an effective tool in the strive for sustainability. GREEN SCHOOLS AND HEALTHY LEARNING The USGBC established the “Center for Green Schools” to drive the transformation of all schools into sustainable and GISH APARTMENTS LEED GOLD

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USGBC

“ALL PEOPLE, REGARDLESS OF NATIONALITY, DESERVE TO LIVE AND WORK IN GREEN BUILDINGS THAT FACILITATE, RATHER THAN DETRACT FROM, THEIR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING.”

USGBC HQ LEED PLATINUM

healthy places to learn and teach. The Center’s mission is green schools for everyone within this generation and it works directly with teachers, students, administrators, elected officials and communities to create programs, resources and partnerships that transform all schools into healthy learning environments. “I’ve witnessed the profound impact green buildings have on our lives and the

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innovation they have poured into the marketplace, and I believe no other market speaks more powerfully to the benefits and potential of green buildings than our schools,” said Fedrizzi. The Center for Green Schools at the USGBC is helping to engage educators in creating sustainable learning environments for their students and apply solid research to inform leadership, from school boards to college presidents, about the benefits of healthy, high-performing schools. “We are working with state and local governments to draft smart, practical policies, and we provide trainings and helpful resources to those who need it most, K-12 schools serving lower-income families, under-resourced institutions and community colleges,” added Fedrizzi. The Center serves to convene conversations with key decision makers, collaborate

with leading education and environmental associations and create tools and resources that help make green schools possible. THE FUTURE The USGBC has been trying to encourage organizations to improve energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy technologies by awarding “LEED points” to building projects that attempt to incorporate design features that are more energy efficient. Through earning LEED points, projects can reach higher levels of LEED certification and can be rewarded by the organization, inspiring more companies to invest in greener building strategies. Having raised the bar for sustainability nationally, it’s not surprising that the USGBC have started to set their sights abroad. “We are particularly excited about our international growth,” Mr. Fedrizzi enthuses. “All


people, regardless of nationality, deserve to live and work in green buildings that facilitate, rather than detract from, their health and well-being. Accordingly, we have put particular focus on expanding in nations like Brazil, China, and India, places that are increasingly realizing the environmental impacts of their economic growth and the imperative to green their built infrastructure. To facilitate this expansion, we have signed agreements with local partners and instituted new region-specific pathways in LEED in order to speed uptake and make it easier for international project teams to achieve LEED certification.” The USGBC’s LEED program has seen incredible uptake since it was launched in 2000. Today, more than 50 percent of LEED-registered projects are outside the United States, and LEED projects have been established in more than 150 countries. This is a phenomenal achievement by any standard and underlines the USGBC’s commitment to global sustainability. To date, LEED certification has been secured for some of the world’s most iconic and well-known buildings, including the Empire State Building, the U.S. Treasury Building, the Merchandise Mart in Chicago, the Clinton and Bush presidential libraries, and Taipei 101, one of the tallest buildings in the world. The USGBC is also involved in a large number of exciting initiatives. The organization continues to explore documented connections between green building and human health through programs like USGBC”s Green Health Partnership with the University of Virginia and the launch of the

LEED for Healthcare rating system in 2013, the building of a LEED platinum orphanage in Haiti, the William Jefferson Clinton Children’s Center, and the introduction of the LEED Dynamic Plaque, a new tool for measuring ongoing performance in LEED-certified buildings.” The success of the LEED certification system, as well as other projects and initiatives, means that the U.S. Green Building Council continues to make an extraordinary contribution to global sustainability efforts. Their hard work and dedication means that a sustainable built environment is becoming ever closer to a reality for both this, and future, generations. c AULANI RESORT LEED PLATINUM

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CRFA

BY INVESTING IN CANADIAN INNOVATION AND THE BIO-ECONOMY, CANADA CAN BECOME A CLEAN ENERGY SUPERPOWER

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INNOVATING FOR

THE FUTURE OF CANADA’S RENEWABLE

FUELS MARKET Scott Thurlow, president of the Canadian Renewable Fuels Association, talks to Sustainable Business Magazine about their action plan for the future of renewable content and saving the world. Written by Liam Kelleher.

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CRFA ENERKEM, INC. ETHANOL FACILITY CREDIT TO ENERKEM, INC.

W. SCOTT THURLOW, PRESIDENT

IMAGE BY VANESSA DEWSON PHOTOGRAPHY + DESIGN

Founded in 1984, the Canadian Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA) is a non-profit organization with a mandate to promote the use of value added products made from renewable resources through consumer awareness and government liaison activities. CRFA members and supporting organizations provide Canadians with renewable, clean burning ethanol and biodiesel – fuels that help to fight climate change, smog, and pollution. Simultaneously they are working hard to develop the next generation of innovative biofuels in order to provide even greater economic and environmental benefits. ORIGINS AND EVOLUTION “It started as an offshoot of the Ontario Corn-growers association” Scott Thurlow explains. “At the time they were very much focused on ethanol, through their partnership and coalition with commercial alcohol 28 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

producers it morphed into a larger ethanol producing industry. The real up tick of our association happened in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s with a program called the ethanol expansion program that our association lobbied for and then the establishment of the renewable content regulation for gasoline and diesel.“ For Mr. Thurlow, who joined the CRFA in April 2012 as its president, a deep understanding of the legislative and regulatory processes has been critical to the associations continued efforts. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, Mr. Thurlow’s expertise in the laws governing legislative processes, lobbying, and elections in Canada make him an effective president for the association as it prepares to expand the uses for renewable fuels and biodiesel, products he states, that have bountiful resources; “There are several feed stocks for both ethanol and biodiesel, on the ethanol

CANADIAN RESEARCHERS ARE RECOGNIZED AROUND THE WORLD FOR THEIR ADVANCES IN BIOFUELS TECHNOLOGY


EXPANDING BIOFUELS USE TO NEW MARKETS WOULD REDUCE GHGS FROM OTHERWISE EXTREMELY CARBON INTENSIVE INDUSTRIES

GREENFIELD SPECIALTY ALCOHOLS ETHANOL FACILITY, CHATHAM, ONTARIO, CANADA CRFA MEMBER

side you have corn, wheat, municipal solid waste, forestry residue, basically anything that has fiber in it can be converted into a sugar and into ethanol. On the biodiesel side you have rendered animal products, you have waste cooking oils from deep fryers, used cooking oils rather, nothing in our industry is a waste.” What began as a small, core group representing an emerging business that few Canadians recognized or understood has grown into an established industry of biofuel producers, petroleum distributors, and true innovators from across the country. CRFA members have built a capable platform for biofuels production and technology. Across the country, 26 renewable fuels plants are now generating gross economic benefits in excess of $3.5 billion to the Canadian economy every year. Since 2007, Canada’s renewable fuels industry

has delivered more than 14,000 direct and indirect jobs and $5 billion+ in economic activity. All told, the federal government will realize a net return on investment of more than $3.7 billion. THE PATHWAY FORWARD The CRFA is building on the success of Canada’s renewable fuels industry by developing and promoting a more innovative, sustainable and competitive business environment for Canada’s emerging bio-economy. In April, the CRFA will launch its new vision and action plan entitled, ‘Evolution and Growth’ which puts forward recommendations to create a virtual cycle of investment for Canadian innovation in biofuels and the bio-economy. This action plan has three key priorities. The first is becoming a clean energy superpower by investing in Canadian innovation and the bio-economy “Canada has a reputation as being one of

the producers of petroleum based products, we want that reputation to resonate that we are also a producer of renewable products. We have more available biomass than any other country on the planet and that is incredibly important to understand based on our arable land and based on massive forest reserves that we have.” The second is growing the market access and expanding the use of biofuels, which Mr. Thurlow is positive about. “Instead of a 5% ethanol blend, we’d like to see product available into the E20 to E30 range. There are a lot of reasons for that but the most important is that this high ethanol blend will have a very high octane number.” This would enable the automotive sector to produce smaller engines that would serve as the future of biofuel driven transport. “It will allow them to have a higher powered fuel that will be able to drive these smaller engines more effectively. On the diesel side SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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CRFA

“I REALLY DO BELIEVE THAT THE PRODUCTS THAT WE ARE PUTTING OUT INTO THE MARKET FOR CONSUMERS ARE REALLY HELPING TO SAVE THE PLANET.”

RENEWABLE FUELS INNOVATION IS AT THE HEART OF THE BIOECONOMY

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BIOFUELS IN CANADA ARE AN AGRICULTURAL SUCCESS STORY – INCREASING MARKETS AND PRICES FOR FARMERS ACROSS THE COUNTRY

of the equation, we just want to see more renewable content used period.” And third, Canada needs to find a way to effectively monetize the environmental benefits that come from using their sustainable biofuels and effectively establishing a fair market value for renewable content and the GHG emissions that they displace, “In Europe this is something that you are very familiar with, there are several different models that are being advanced both on the carbon market side of the equation as well as incenting what would be described as a low carbon fuel standard across Europe, these are ideas that we are very much interested in pursuing over here in Canada.” SAVING THE WORLD The efforts of the CRFA have had an unexpected response from Oil and Gasoline companies across Canada, with many seeing the advantage of using a higher ethanol blend in their products. As Mr. Thurlow remarked “the legal requirement is 5% ethanol to be blended with gasoline pool in Canada, interestingly, oil and gas companies are voluntarily electing to blend upward of 8, 9 and 10 percent depending on where they are geographically. There are several reasons for this; the most important one is that ethanol is cheaper than gasoline, so if you have fuel that you can blend in the gasoline with something that costs less than gasoline and still charge the price of gasoline. Blending ethanol in gasoline helps

lower fuel prices at the pump while improving octane performance.” Indeed, one of the exciting potentials of high blend biofuels is the potential benefits to consumer’s pockets as well as reducing their environmental impact. “ethanol is cheaper than gasoline. We think that having pump turnover will provide greater familiarity to consumers and also give them a break at the pumps, as I said before ethanol is significantly cheaper than gasoline. If the technology that consumers have is able to take a higher content blend then they should be able to take advantage of it.” The future of sustainable fuels in Canada looks bright thanks to the efforts of Mr. Thurlow and the CRFA, for his part Mr. Thurlow takes a certain glee from his work, “I tell my friends that I wake up every day and go and save the world, I’m only partly kidding. I really do believe that the products that we are putting out into the market for consumers are really helping to save the planet.” c BIOFUELS HELP CREATE THE GOOD, GREEN JOBS OF THE FUTURE

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CLEAN HARBORS

ADVANCING INDUSTRY

SUSTAINABILITY Chip Duffie, Senior Vice President of Compliance and Sustainability at Clean Harbors, talks to Sustainable Business Magazine about how one of the largest environmental and industrial recycling companies in North America is providing sustainability solutions that help keep business in balance with the environment. 32 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


EAST CHICAGO, INDIANA USED OIL RE-REFINERY

CLEAN HARBORS’ 1.5 MEGAWATT SOLAR ARRAY IN BRIDGEPORT, NJ

of American and global industry. According to Duffie, “Businesses are focusing on and committing to sustainability because it just makes sense. For a responsible company, remaining profitable over the long term is impossible without protecting your people and the environment in a sustainable manner. Businesses need to be productive but must also constantly minimize their impacts on their communities and the environment. Clean Harbors and Safety-Kleen play an important role in helping North American businesses meet this need. ” Clean Harbors has taken the lead in identifying the most cost-effective, environmentally sound options for waste manage-

ment. Beyond its various methodologies to reduce or reuse waste, they offer a wide range of recycling, treatment, incineration, and waste management facilities that bring practical alternatives to its customer base. Duffie continued, “Clean Harbors offers sustainability solutions to most of the Fortune 500, thousands of smaller private entities and numerous federal, state, provincial and local governmental agencies.“ Clean Harbors plays a major role in helping a wide variety of industries manage their environmental issues and maintain their compliance with applicable regulations. Key sustainability solutions for which business relies upon Clean Harbors include:

December 2012 saw the combining of Clean Harbors and Safety-Kleen, resulting in the collective expertise of two of the largest environmental service companies in North America. That combination has resulted in significant benefits for the hundreds of thousands of customers that the company now supports. “Providing our customers with a broad menu of sustainability solutions is what we do every day”, said Chip Duffie, the company’s Senior Vice President, Compliance and Sustainability. Clean Harbors sees the advancement of sustainability as a priority for all sectors SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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Vantage Builders Ltd. is pleased to have worked for Clean Harbors on their expansions in Conklin, Ruth Lake, Edmonton, Leduc and Ft. McMurray, Alberta, providing them with renovations and new buildings. We are proud to have affiliations with the leading provider of environmental, energy and industrial services throughout North America. We wish them the best in their continued success and look forward to working with them again in the future.

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Consolidated Container Company-LLC:

Sustainable Packaging Solutions to industry for over 100 years. • Advanced Drum and IBC Reconditioning and Recycling Services • Steel Drum Manufacturing • General Line Container Distribution • Equipment Fabrication Specialists for the Reconditioning Industry General Inquires Toll-Free 800-577-0715

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www.robbiedwood.com PROVIDING A GREEN TOMORROW ONE LOAD AT A TIME ROBBIE D. WOOD, INC. mission is to become the front runner in the hazardous waste transportation industry by exceeding customer expectations through proficient personnel and our commitment to a safe clean environment. ROBBIE D. WOOD, INC. is a private; family owned and operated truck line which specializes in the transportation of hazardous and non-hazardous waste. We emerged into this field after 20+ years of hauling bulk commodities throughout the southeast. The company was organized in 1965 and incorporated in the state of Alabama in 1975. We started transporting and specializing in the hazardous/ non-hazardous waste business in 1980 and have been providing excellent service to our customers, including Clean Harbors since the mid-1980s. Over the years competition has increased significantly and sustainability has been the answer to giving Robbie D. Wood, Inc a competitive advantage in our industry.

Lhoist North America is a subsidiary of The Lhoist Group, a global company that is celebrating its 125th year in the lime and limestone business. Headquartered in Ft. Worth, Texas the company supplies lime and mineral products into many major industries, including steel, building, civil engineering, glass agriculture, paper, chemical, mining and environmental protection. For more information, please visit our website: www.lhoist.com/us.

ROBBIE D. WOOD, INC. has made strides in many areas to become a more sustainable business by reducing fuel consumption. Our trucks are built to maximize fuel efficiency and are SmartWay Certified since 2008. All of our trucks have been equipped with auxiliary power units reducing green house emissions by eliminating excess idle time. These units prevent nearly 200,000 gallons of diesel fuel waste every year. Since 2010 we have added aerodynamic side skits to our van trailers reducing wind drag helping with diesel fuel conservation. Most truck and trailers repairs are completed in-house at our facilities where we recycle all used oils and lubricants taken from the equipment during services. We purchase retread tires and have existing tires retreaded extending the life of our tires versus discarding and purchasing new. When a tire is no longer useable, we send all of our tires to be recycled. All discarded steel and aluminum from our equipment is also recycled. Robbie D. Wood, Inc. is continuously researching ways to improve our business and the environment by becoming more sustainable. ROBBIE D. WOOD, INC. has safely transported over a million loads of our customer’s bulk commodities, general freight, hazardous waste and non-hazardous waste across the United States and Canada for 45+ years. We take pride in cleaning up our environment and ensuring our children a safer place to live. We are always looking for new professional, reliable, and environmental-conscious drivers to help achieve our goals.

Give us a call today (800)356-7457 x27 SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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CLEAN HARBORS

“AS A LEADING ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES COMPANY, SUSTAINABILITY HAS BEEN A CORE FOCUS OF OUR BUSINESS SINCE WE FIRST OPENED CLEAN HARBORS’ DOORS IN 1980. FROM THE BEGINNING, WE HAVE PUT SUSTAINABILITY IN ACTION BY HELPING PEOPLE, THE PLANET AND THE ECONOMY COEXIST IN MORE SUSTAINABLE WAYS.” ALAN MCKIM, FOUNDER AND CHAIRMAN, CLEAN HARBORS

BRESLAU, ONTARIO CANADA USED OIL RE-REFINERY

waste collections and disposal, used oil collection and re-refining, waste recycling, laboratory chemical packing, spill and natural disaster response and household hazardous waste collection among many others. In fact, every year in North America, Clean Harbors is called upon to urgently answer thousands of emergency response calls. “Being able to safely and quickly answer the call when communities need us most is an important part of who we are”, according to Alan McKim, the company’s Chairman and CEO. “Protecting the environment is a pillar of sustainability, and the combined assets and expertise of Clean Harbors and Safety-Kleen allow us to bring sustainability solutions to the marketplace”. 36 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

SAFETY-KLEEN Through its Safety-Kleen subsidiary, Clean Harbors is the largest used oil collection and re-refining company in the world, and largest recycler of industrial cleaning solutions in North America. The company has three primary oil re-refining sites which are located in Breslau (Ontario, Canada), Newark (California), and East Chicago (Indiana). The last of these is the largest re-refining site in the world. Safety-Kleen prides itself in providing true sustainability services for industry; in fact its business model is dependent on sustainability. “We recycle industrial solvents and used oils for our customers and allow them to close-the-loop on these waste streams,” explains Mr. Duffie.


A closed-loop process generally follows this simple formula: Produce or purchase the product, use the product, collect the product, repeat. Using a closed loop technique provides an infinite cycle of production, utilization, and collection. This means that Safety-Kleen can continue to re-refine used oil to create fresh, clean base oil. Using that base, they can safely produce the same high-quality products over and over again to meet the demands of the market. According to the Life Cycle Assessment performed by ENVIRON, a leading global sustainability consultancy, Safety-Kleen has demonstrated that the re-refining process for used oil requires around 85% less energy than the refinery

process for crude oil. Mr. Duffie explains that this closed-loop process is where Safety-Kleen differs from many of their competitors. “In the United States, if you burn oil for energy recovery, it’s considered recycling. While burning for energy recovery is an important environmental solution, we believe that there is a higher use for used oil: re-refining. Instead of burning it one time, our primary goal is to feed our three re-refinery sites with used oil collected by our vast network of branch locations. When an automotive shop takes your used oil, we then collect that oil from the auto shop as our feedstock. From there, additives are blended and we can make various grades of lubricants, from

passenger car motor oils to heavy duty diesel engine and natural gas engine oils. Returning the green, high quality oil back

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Tank Fabricators & Erectors, Refractory Constructors

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CLEAN HARBORS

SAFETY-KLEEN MODEL 270 PARTS WASHER

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to the marketplace continues the closedloop process. The oils are made from 100% re-refined base oils, the feedstock for which was sourced in North America.” Compared to the burning of oil for energy recovery, the environmental benefits of re-refining are significant. Because the feedstock has already been re-refined, the process requires up to 85% less energy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions by up to 80%, compared to oil made from virgin crude. The re-refining process also avoids the GHG emissions that come with burning used oil and the potential for soil and water contamination that would result from improper dumping of used oil. One of Safety-Kleen’s best-selling products is EcoPower® Re-refined Oil. This motor oil is made from used oil that is blended with a combination of high performance additives that are specifically engineered to protect engines and protect the environment. EcoPower® has been successfully tested by U.S. armed forces combat vehicles in some of the toughest terrain in Iraq and meets or

exceeds the highest standards for engine protection set by OEMs and industry authorities such as the Society of Automotive Engineers, the American Petroleum Institute, and the International Lubricant Standards Advisory Committee. An additional benefit of using re-refined oil is that it reduces America’s dependence on foreign crude oil, because it takes 42 gallons of crude oil to make the same amount of high quality engine oil made from recycling 1 gallon of used engine oil. Customers using re-refined motor oils realize all these benefits while using a more environmentally friendly product without sacrificing protection and quality. “ON THE JOURNEY” “As North America’s leading environmental services company, we are keenly aware of the critical role we play in helping industry prevent the release of hazardous materials into the environment”, said Duffie, who is helping lead the Company’s internal sustainability efforts. “Just like many of our customers, Clean Harbors is


“OUR COMPANY IS, ACROSS MULTIPLE INDUSTRIES, UNIQUELY QUALIFIED TO BRING SUSTAINABILITY SOLUTIONS TO THE MARKET PLACE.”

on the sustainability journey with them and is constantly looking for ways to improve our business and reduce our impacts.” From Supply Chain engagement to fleet efficiency initiatives to measuring its energy intensity, Clean Harbors has committed resources to drive its sustainability program into the future. “Sustainability cuts across every department and line of business.” said Duffie. “Driving

costs out of the business is a key aspect to our program and various fleet and energy initiatives have returned real dollars to the bottom line. If it does not make financial sense, then it’s not worth doing – it’s not a true sustainability project.” “We have learned so much from our customers and suppliers, and will continue to collaborate on best practices. For us, sustainability is about delivering long-

term value and solutions to business and leveraging the fact that we are uniquely qualified to bring sustainability solutions to the market place. By sharing information with our customers and providing services that help them achieve their sustainability goals, we are achieving our own goals of providing sustainability solutions to the marketplace, or what we like to call – sustainability in action.” c

• Environmental • Hazmat • Logistics

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FIRST CLASS VENDING INC

FIRST CLASS SUSTAINABILITY EFFORTS Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Matthew Marsh, founder and President of First Class Vending, who explains how efforts to improve sustainability have helped them remain one of the most successful vending machine companies in the United States. Written by Thomas Massey.

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FIRST CLASS VENDING INC

THE INSTALLATION OF 1100 SOLAR PANELS AT THE HQ SITE WAS COMPLETED THREE YEARS AGO AT A COST OF $1.8 MILLION. WHILE THAT IS A SIZABLE INVESTMENT, FCV IS ALREADY REAPING THE FINANCIAL REWARDS.

First Class Vending Inc. (FCV) was started by founder and President Matthew Marsh with just one other employee. Having recently passed its twenty-year anniversary, the company has successfully become a nationally known business that now employees over three hundred people. Located in Los Angeles, California, the headquarters of FCV covers approximately 60,000 square feet on a four acre site. The site requires a considerable amount of energy to function, mainly because of the refrigeration units required to chill the products they supply. Mr. Marsh explains that it was only a few years ago that his company fully realized the potential that sustainability, and particularly

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renewable energy sources such as solar energy, had for their business. “Our power bills were so high and at the same time the U.S. Government was offering rebates and bonus depreciation on solar energy. So I investigated it and what I learned from the numbers was that it might be worth it, purely from a financial standpoint. At the time I was viewing it purely from a business standpoint. Once I saw that it worked financially, it made me think about different things to do that actually would be sustainable, such as reducing our carbon footprint.” A SUSTAINABLE REVAMP Having crunched the numbers from a business perspective, Mr. Marsh now had to look at the physical viability of implementing a more sustainable approach; starting with whether FCV could fit the required solar arrays at the HQ site. Mr. Marsh explains that all of the specifics in assessing the HQ site were handled through an external moderator, Blue Sky Energy Inc., industry experts when it comes to renewable energy. “The owner Gary Rochlin came in and did an analysis. It was a fairly conservative analysis that looked at our power bills, the size of the building, and what we could fit into our building physically.” The assessment

yielded positive results and meant that FCV could move forward with what would prove to be a monumental change in terms of how their energy was used and supplied. The installation of 1100 solar panels at the HQ site was completed three years ago at a cost of $1.8 million. While that is a sizable investment, FCV are already reaping the financial rewards. “We ended up moving forward on the project thinking it would be a four year return on our investment based on power savings and the credits we would get from the government. We have just passed our third year and have already made a return.” The installation is currently producing approximately half a megawatt of electricity per year. Mr. Marsh puts this into context by explaining the monetary savings FCV has made since its completion. “For a facility of our size, producing that much power allows us to more or less break even on our power bills. The only bill I receive for public utilities is fee required to hook up to the grid, taxes, licenses, and all the mandatory connection fees. We are actually running at a neutral rate, at a zero. We have two power inverters, one runs slightly over each month, the other runs slightly under. We get paid for our energy savings each month on one of the inverters and this


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FIRST CLASS VENDING INC

IN CONJUNCTION WITH THEIR RECYCLING EFFORTS FCV IS ALSO CURRENTLY EXPERIMENTING WITH ALTERNATIVE FUEL SOURCES FOR THEIR DELIVERY TRUCKS.

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offsets the excess from the other. We’re operating for the most part without the grid at our headquarter facilities.” It’s not just on the technical side of things that FCV are signaling their sustainable intent. Operational changes are being made at a similar rate. At the HQ facility alone, 75,000 lbs. of cardboard, along with 10,000 lbs. of surplus plastic and metal is now being recycled each month. “We are solving a lot of problems,” explains Mr. Marsh. “The recyclers love the metal, they love the plastic, and they love the cardboard. We are disposing of it in a responsible way and we are getting paid to do so. It’s a win, win, win.” In conjunction with their recycling efforts FCV are also currently experimenting with alternative fuel sources for their delivery trucks; choosing to use propane gas instead of the standard gasoline. As well as this, all management personnel on the HQ site use hybrid or electric vehicles. EXPANDING THE FIRST CLASS VENDING MARKET SHARE The success of the sustainability revamp at First Class Vending Inc. has meant less expenditure on energy. A businessman first and foremost, Mr. Marsh was naturally quick to realize that this meant a potentially larger profit margin. He explains that FCV is hoping to increase their presence in the market place through a partnership with Avanti Micromarkets, with whom they’re hoping transform the industry with an initiative called the micro-market. “There are different chains of convenience store across the country, as well as gas stations with convenience stores attached,

where you can pick up a soda and a snack. You can also pick up non-food items at these places such as laundry detergent, toothpaste, and so on. We are currently participating with one of our manufacturers, Avanti, in making miniature convenience stores in places of business. This means we will install shelving, refrigeration units and so forth where you can go and grab anything you want, not from a vending machine but from an open-air market. You will then pay for it at a self-service checkout inside your place of business. By taking away the machine it means we can give the customers more options, they can read the ingredients, they can touch and feel the product. This is new and exciting; it turns the vending machine inside out.” Also in development is a program that shows how FCV is looking to the future. They are hoping to implement a cashless way of paying for products that involves using a pre-paid account from a smart phone application. “We are always looking at new technologies in the industry,” says Mr. Marsh. SMART SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS First Class Vending have realized the potential benefits of operating sustainably. The use of renewable energy has significantly reduced costs and allowed them to increase their profits. New plans to revolutionize the vending machine industry should provide more people with more choices and Mr. Marsh sees no reason why anything should compromise their ongoing efforts to be sustainable. “If I can save the environment, and save money, and produce income, then there’s no reason not to do it. It’s win, win.” c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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AASHE

BABSON UNIVERSITY

SUSTAINABLE

CAMPUSES A foreword by AASHE Executive Director Stephanie A. Herrera.

VIRGINIA TECH

RAIN GARDENS AROUND THE UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON CAMPUS ARE DESIGNED TO COLLECT, RETAIN AND SLOWER ABSORB WATER RUNOFF FROM SURROUNDING SURFACES OR ACT AS A NATURAL FILTER SO WATER IS CLEAN BY THE TIME IT ENTERS A STORM SEWER.

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BABSON UNIVERSITY CHARGING STATION


SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY TO END COAL INVESTMENTS: THE SFSU FOUNDATION HAS AGREED TO NOT INVEST IN COMPANIES “WITH SIGNIFICANT PRODUCTION OR USE OF COAL AND TAR SANDS.” THE FOUNDATION WILL ALSO SEEK TO LIMIT INVESTMENTS IN FOSSIL FUEL COMPANIES.

The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education’s (AASHE) vision and mission to lead higher education to be a foundation for a thriving, equitable, and ecologically healthy world is especially relevant today. In order to achieve this mission, AASHE continues to focus on its annual Conference and Expo, its Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating System program, publications and professional development webinars, and of course, putting its members first. AASHE’s annual conference is the largest gathering of higher education sustainability professionals and students in North America. Attendees from around the world come together to network and share new innovations, activities, frameworks, learning outcomes, tools, strategies, research, theories and leadership initiatives that are changing the face of sustainability on their campus and in surrounding communities. The annual Conference and Expo is a very important ‘must attend’ event for like-minded higher education sustainability professionals to come together to learn and share best practices which they can then take back to their institutions. AASHE also prides itself on its signature program, the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating System (STARS), which allows institutions to access a

transparent, self-reporting framework to measure their sustainability performance. 669 institutions have registered to use the STARS Reporting Tool and are taking steps toward increasing sustainability efforts. Our latest STARS Annual Review was recently released and found notable trends that include an increase in reports submitted from Associate and Baccalaureate colleges this year, and an increase in average scores within subsequent STARS reports. It is an amazing publication, and I feel fortunate to have such incredibly talented people to lead. To date, institutions of higher education in 17 countries have reported their sustainability progress in STARS. This is a major achievement. Members can also expect high quality and relevant publications throughout the year that advance clean energy practices by highlighting thought leadership pieces with accompanying resources and professional development opportunities. This year we have made strong efforts to extend the AASHE footprint even further around the globe. I was honored to provide the keynote address at the International Symposium for the Establishment of Sustainable Campuses at Kyoto University. As AASHE looks forward to celebrating its ten-year anniversary in 2015, we

realize that the organization is vital to the higher education sustainability community and needed by a world where carbon emissions, greenhouse gases and plastic pollution pose serious threats to the global climate and the people of the earth. We applaud publications such as Sustainable Business Magazine for their ongoing coverage of these and other crucial sustainability issues. c DELTA COLLEGE LIVING WALL

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UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

COUGAR WOODS DINING HALL, UH’S FIRST LEED SILVER CERTIFIED BUILDING PHOTO COURTESY OF SLYWORKS PHOTOGRAPHY; ARCHITECT, ENGINEER AND LEED CONSULTANT: PAGE

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EMBRACING THE FUTURE Sarah Kelly, Sustainability Program Manager at the University of Houston, speaks to Sustainable Business Magazine about how the university’s sustainability efforts are embracing current trends and incorporating new technologies and practices.

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UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

INCORPORATING ENERGY EFFICIENT PRACTICES HAS REDUCED ENERGY USE BY 36% FROM FISCAL YEARS 2005 TO 2013 WHILE CAMPUS SQUARE FOOTAGE HAS INCREASED BY 71%.

AERIAL SHOT OF THE CAMPUS AND DOWNTOWN HOUSTON

The University of Houston is increasing its efforts to be sustainable by embracing current trends and looking at new technologies. Sarah Kelly, Sustainability Program Manager, has made significant progress re-launching the Office of Sustainability since she started at the university in March 2014. Mrs. Kelly is

a former student of the University of Houston and was a member of the sustainability task force during her time there. Her history with the university means she has seen the University of Houston’s sustainability efforts expand and develop significantly. “Really it was a grass roots effort on campus,” explains Mrs. Kelly. “It has now become more coordinated and we’re really looking at a holistic approach to sustainability.” GREEN BUILDING An increased emphasis on sustainability has been evident at the university since 2007, when the Burdette Keeland Jr. Design and Exploration Center received the first and only sloped green roof in Houston, Texas. It was however a year later in 2008, when the

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University of Houston submitted their Campus Sustainability Report Card and received a “D” grade, that the University of Houston regrouped and knew that a more coordinated approach was necessary to optimize the effectiveness of their efforts. In the seven years that have passed since that worrying report, the University of Houston has made massive strides in its sustainability efforts. The institution is now at a point where it is frequently engaging in new sustainable programs and initiatives. The opening of the Cougar Woods dining hall was a significant moment for the University. The building, a 25,265 sq. foot glass pavilion which seats 600 people, has become the first University of Houston building to achieve LEED certification, on


“A,A” SCULPTURE IN FRONT OF THE MD ANDERSON LIBRARY COMPRISED OF POETRY AND PROSE FROM LANGUAGES ALL OVER THE WORLD, REFLECTING THE WIDE CULTURAL DIVERSITY ON CAMPUS. UH WAS THE FIRST TEXAS STATE INSTITUTION TO ESTABLISH A PERCENT FOR ART PROGRAM AND CURRENTLY HAS ONE OF THE LARGEST UNIVERSITY ART COLLECTIONS IN THE COUNTRY.

SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM MANAGER SARAH KELLY TALKS TO COUGAR CUB CAMPERS ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY AND ORGANIC GARDENING.

this occasion at the silver standard. The building acts as a hub for socialization between staff, faculty, and students. As well as being adjacent to on-campus student housing, the hall is an entry point for students travelling to the campus from surrounding neighborhoods. Mrs. Kelly explains that

the success of the building has acted as a catalyst for further engagement with the LEED process. “Our facilities planning and construction team have guidelines for all new buildings to be built to the LEED silver standard.” Throughout the construction process, 85% of construction waste was diverted from landfill and sent to local recycling sites instead. When it comes to the interior of the building, materials were carefully selected and 32% of materials were extracted from within 500 miles of the campus. Aesthetic materials such as wood, carpet, flooring, sealants, and paint were selected with either low or no volatile organic compounds (which can be detrimental to the air quality within a building and may even cause migraines).

The University of Houston’s investment in the Cougar Woods project has enabled them to make drastic savings on the essential day-to-day resources required by a food preparation area. Thanks to the installation of more energy efficient light fixtures, high efficiency kitchen equipment, high performance HVAC systems, and variable frequency exhaust hoods, the hall has reduced energy usage by 32% compared to normal buildings of a similar nature. Water conservation has also been made a priority on campus. Cougar Woods dining hall has installed some of the most efficient plumbing fixtures available within the hall’s restrooms. Once again comparing Cougar Woods to a conventional building, SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

IMPROVEMENT OF THE CULLEN FAMILY PLAZA HAS SAVED 33,000 GAL/DAY OF WATER.

HIGH WATER CONSUMPTION WAS IDENTIFIED AT THE CULLEN FAMILY PLAZA FOUNTAIN DUE TO A FAULTY FLOAT ASSEMBLY. A NEW SYSTEM AND SENSOR WAS INSTALLED DROPPING WATER USAGE BY 63 PERCENT IN THE FOUNTAINS.

the results equate to a reduction of 20% (equivalent to approximately 46,000 gallons of water per year). In total, upgrading and switching to more energy efficient practices has seen a 36% reduction in campus-wide energy use during the fiscal years 2005 to 2013. This comes despite a 71% sq. foot increase in campus space. Mrs. Kelly explains that this extraordinary

success has no downside. “Incorporating sustainability principles not only makes our campus more beautiful and efficient but also reduces costs. Ultimately, we’re educating the campus community about sustainable development and hopefully sparking a change in their mindset which leads them to living more sustainably and encouraging others to do the same.”

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The way the dining hall is operating, along with the initiatives being implemented within the dining hall itself, go above and beyond what sustainable action would usually entail. Initiatives in place to improve sustainability currently include: trayless dining to reduce water usage and food waste, food waste donation, re-usable to go containers, the use of fair trade coffee,


STUDENTS FROM EARTH AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES LAUNCH A WEATHER BALLOON OUTFITTED WITH OZONE MEASURING EQUIPMENT AT SUSTAINABILITY FEST.

STUDENTS EAT IN COUGAR WOODS DINING HALL. DINING SERVICES INCORPORATES SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVES LIKE FAIR TRADE COFFEE, TRAY-LESS DINING, VEGAN AND VEGETARIAN MEAL OPTIONS, REUSABLE TO-GO CONTAINERS AND FOOD DONATION. PHOTO COURTESY OF SLYWORKS PHOTOGRAPHY; ARCHITECT, ENGINEER AND LEED CONSULTANT: PAGE

REECYCLE TEAM MEMBERS, FROM LEFT, SUSAN TRAN, CASEY MCNEIL, CASSANDRA HOANG AND BOBBY JACOBS WON BIG AT THE ENERGY DEPARTMENT’S NATIONAL CLEAN ENERGY BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION. PHOTO COURTESY OF C. T. BAUER COLLEGE OF BUSINESS.

donating unused food, eliminating the use of Styrofoam, buying local produce, as well as recycling cooking oil. A BRIGHT FUTURE The University of Houston is looking for new technology to significantly contribute to planned reductions in energy and resource expenditure. Technological advancement is expected to play a vital role in tackling future sustainability issues and Mrs. Kelly explains that university researchers are seeking funding for a living campus initiative that incorporates building occupants' feedback and real time energy use data. The use of “smart” sustainability apparatus has also extended to the landscape

irrigation system. The planned installation of a central control system will allow centralized monitoring of the irrigation systems and automatically shuts down a zone if a leak is detected. The system also utilizes in-ground soil moisture censors to adjust watering times to maintain optimum soil moisture for plant growth. Students at the University of Houston are also coming up with imaginative solutions to sustainability issues. The REEcycle project recently took first place in the Energy Department’s National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition, part of President Obama’s Startup America Initiative. “The REEcycle team is made up of four students from the Bauer College of Business at the University of Houston,” explains Mrs. Kelly. “They were part of the university’s entrepreneurial program, which has been consistently thought of as one of the best programs since its inception. The team used technology developed by Allan Jacobson, PHD student Pradeep Samarasekere, and Robert A. Welch, Chair of Science and director of

the Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston. The technology extracts rare earth elements and minerals that can be recycled to power cell phones, wind turbines, and other renewable energy technologies.” The success of this business project has resulted in funding to expand. This project not only provides a boost to the reputation of the University of Houston, but could also hold long-term economic potential for the United States as a whole. China currently owns the vast majority of the market share in this particular field. The implementation of forward thinking initiatives is allowing the University of Houston to prosper. Since Sarah Kelly was appointed as Sustainability Program Manager, improved engagement and communication has facilitated collaborations and increased outreach efforts. Combined with the work that’s been done to improve the efficiency of the facilities and operations, the University of Houston is left facing a bright and sustainable future. c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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DUKE UNIVERSITY

EDUCATING, INSPIRING,

AND EMPOWERING Sustainable Business Magazine talks to Katie Kross, Managing Director of the Center for Energy, Development, and the Global Environment (EDGE) at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, as well as Sustainability Outreach Coordinator Casey Roe. Together they provide an insight into how one of America’s leading universities is promoting sustainable thinking, sustainable business, and sustainable operations. Duke University was established in 1838 and is one of the leading private research universities in the United States. With three main campuses consisting of over 220 buildings, and including Duke Forest, a 56 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

forest which is managed by Duke University for research, teaching, and recreation, the university covers an incredible 34.4 KM2. Over the past decade, Duke has increased its global presence by partnering

with the National University of Singapore, as well as opening the Duke Kunshan University (DKU) in Kunshan, China. A primary research area for DKU will be climate change. These initiatives have cemented Duke


University’s status as an academic research powerhouse, with global health being a particular focus of both Duke University and their institutes abroad. CUTTING EDGE Duke University prides itself on producing future leaders who bring a forward thinking mentality to American industry. To help ensure this, Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business includes the Center for Energy, Development, and the Global Environment (EDGE). “My role is to manage the operations of the center,” explains Katie Kross, Managing Director of EDGE. “I put together the pieces of the curricula and

extra-curricular offerings, help to organize events, connect students and executives with the research they are interested in. I also work closely with students to help them access experiential learning projects and career opportunities in energy and environmental disciplines.” The EDGE program, described as “a dynamic hub for education, thought leadership, and industry engagement”, aims to ensure that business leaders of tomorrow are prepared for the increasingly complex challenges presented by sustainability issues in the 21st century. The curriculum comprises core units such as Business Strategies for Sustainability while the EDGE Seminar on Energy and

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DUKE UNIVERSITY

DUKE UNIVERSITY IS COMMITTED TO ENSURING THAT ALL MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY ENGAGE WITH SUSTAINABILITY ISSUES.

Environment includes a collection of guest speakers from industry stakeholders. EDGE also co-hosts two annual public conferences. Not only does engaging with industry professionals provide students at the Fuqua School of Business with insight into the business world, but Ms. Kross explains that it also provides students with immediate opportunities. “We act as a hub for connecting companies and industry lead58 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

ers in both the energy sector, and those in roles that involve sustainability management in industry, with students and faculty at Fuqua.” The extraordinary platform that the EDGE program provides for Fuqua School of Business students and faculty is not the only thing which sets them apart. “I think one of the things that makes Fuqua’s position unique is that while other business schools may have programs on each

subject separately, we have deliberately put the subjects of energy and environment together in our education program,” explains Ms. Kross. “We believe that if we are going to train our students to be leaders of consequence in the energy industry over the course of their careers, then they can’t be adequately prepared to fulfill that role unless they have a solid understanding of the environmental context in which that


industry operates.” Ms. Kross explain that these issues are not just significant for EDGE program students who are planning on a career in business, but also for those who are planning on a sustainability-related career where they’d be working with the energy sector. “Likewise, if students are going into a career related to sustainability, we believe that it is essential for them to have knowledge and training on how we

produce, distribute, and consume energy and how that relates to sustainability.” GREEN CAMPUS ENVIRONMENT Duke University is committed to ensuring that all members of the university community engage with sustainability issues. Large-scale assessment and investment in campus buildings has made a substantial impact. Duke University’s policy requires

new buildings constructed on campus to earn LEED certification, with a goal of LEED Silver. Casey Roe, Sustainability Outreach Coordinator, explains how the university reacted to assessments of campus buildings which showed that more could be done to improve energy efficiency. “One of the ways that we have addressed this is we have developed what we call a LEED plus policy. This policy specifically SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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DUKE UNIVERSITY

“THE PEOPLE ON CAMPUS PICK UP OUR MESSAGES AND INCORPORATE THEM INTO THEIR WORK ETHIC OR SOCIAL LIVES, WHICH IS REALLY EXCITING FOR US.”

defines, for each of our building types, what we want our energy use per square foot to be in that type of building. It also identifies specific items within LEED that we want to achieve within these buildings. It really ensures that we are building the

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most energy efficient buildings possible.” Assessment of the Duke University campus is aided not just by external standards such as LEED, but also by the university’s own Campus Action Plan, and their Sustainability Strategic Plan which addresses a

broader range of sustainability issues such as water, dining, and land management. It’s not just students involved with the Fuqua School of Business’ EDGE program who are embracing sustainability. Duke has a renowned graduate


CHANGING THE LANDSCAPE Duke University is committed to helping the business and industrial landscape transition to being more sustainable. The university educates the business leaders of tomorrow on environmental issues, provides opportunities for all members of the university community to engage with sustainability issues, and strives to produce a sustainable energy efficient campus environment. “The people on campus pick

up our messages and incorporate them into their work ethic or social lives, which is really exciting for us,” explains Ms. Roe. “Seeing staff work with their co-workers to become a green certified workplace, or seeing people walking to lunch instead of driving. When those stories come back to us, after we have empowered leaders on campus to go out and engage with people, that’s the most exciting thing for us to see.” c

environmental program in its Nicholas School of the Environment, which recently moved into a new 70,000-square-foot green building on campus. Campus-wide programs through the Duke Sustainability Office also provide opportunities for all students to engage with sustainability issues. One such initiative is the Green Grant Fund. “The Green Grant Fund has been really successful,” explains Ms. Roe. “We have $50,000 per year which, after we have evaluated them, gets allocated to projects around the campus. It has been used as a way to get projects off the ground, providing funding for a year which allows them to search for further funding elsewhere. It can be used for a diverse number of things but we especially like the projects that have an ongoing impact on campus.” SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY

TAKING ACTION Domenic Forcella, Director of Environmental Health and Safety and Sustainability at Central Connecticut State University, talks Sustainable Business Magazine through the steps they’re taking to promote sustainability within the university community and beyond. Written by Thomas Massey. Over the years Central Connecticut State University (CCSU) has attempted to ensure that sustainability is engrained in university policy and is an articulated priority for the institution. Domenic Forcella, Director of Environmental Health and Safety and Sustain62 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

ability, explains how initiatives such as their impressive recycling program, the installation of low flow toilets, and the installation of hydration stations across campus (so that students can refill their own containers and avoid using plastic bottles) allow members

of the university to contribute to the sustainability efforts. On a larger scale the university has made upgrading campus buildings a priority. “Every year we renovate a residence hall by toughening up the windows and putting in more energy efficient lighting,”


says Mr. Forcella. “We’ve gone through all our parking garages and made the lighting more efficient, and recently, we’ve taken 550 light posts that are on campus and upgraded them to LED bulbs, which has reduced usage by 75%, saving hundreds of thousands of kilowatt-hours.” In conjunction with efforts to upgrade and retrofit aging campus buildings, the university enforces stringent standards for new construction projects. “Our newest building was built to the LEED Gold Standard. We have a mandate at CCSU to come in at the Silver Standard, but have bettered that with our newest building. Our technology staff have a professor who teaches them about LEED

when a building is in construction. That way we can show our students that we are taking courses in it, while it is going on. We want to show them we are putting our money where our mouth is.” As well as the work that CCSU has done with LEED, it also participates in more fun, student-orientated programs such as the GameDay Recycling Challenge. The GameDay Recycling Challenge is a friendly competition for colleges and universities to promote waste reduction at their home football games. Throughout the challenge, colleges and universities employ waste reduction and recycling initiatives. The participating institutions are then required

to monitor and track waste reduction and disposal data, before submitting the results. Universities are subsequently ranked based on the effectiveness of their efforts. “Two out of the three years we have been in it, we have won it,” Mr. Forcella says proudly.

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CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY

AS WELL AS THE WORK THAT CCSU HAS DONE WITH LEED, IT ALSO PARTICIPATES IN MORE FUN, STUDENT-ORIENTATED PROGRAMS SUCH AS THE GAMEDAY RECYCLING CHALLENGE.

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“We’ve been the number one university in waste reduction. We’re also the only school in Connecticut that is taking part.” STEPS TOWARDS SUSTAINABILITY Mr. Forcella’s role involves implementing the necessary measures to make CCSU a greener and more sustainable university. While doing so he must ensure cohesion between departments so that any changes or new programs are introduced and implemented

as seamlessly as possible. The introduction of the President’s Advisory Council for Environmental Sustainable (PACES), has made this significantly easier to achieve. “PACES is a broad based group appointed by the President. It is co-chaired by one faculty member and one member of Facilities Management,” explains Mr. Forcella. “You get a variety of different things coming from a variety of places. I like to think of them as the ideas people. With PACES, it is

not somebody coming to us saying, “You want to be doing this” or “You want to get this big piece of equipment.” They look right at what they are doing and what their staff are doing and find ways to make that more green and more sustainable.” PACES essentially acts as a think tank which focuses on sustainability issues that affect the CCSU campus. “A lot of what gets done is down to the fact that Facilities Management have got the staff to do it. They will look at some

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CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY

A PRO-ACTIVE APPROACH TO SOLVING ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IS BENEFITING BOTH THE UNIVERSITY, AND THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT.

of the trends that might be out there to improve our buildings and move forward. An example is electric vehicles. We have put two electric vehicle charging stations on campus as part of a statewide program to make travelling in electric vehicles less anxious for people. They’ll know that they can charge them up if they need to.” Facilities Management has also helped to make the everyday functioning of CCSU more sustainable. Initiatives have included a drastic overhaul of the cleaning products being 66 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

used by the university, as well as a switch to using ionized water. Much of the success of the Facilities program has been attributed to the efforts of the campus staff. “They look at the little things that other people with other responsibilities might not think about. When you start pushing the issue of sustainability, people tend to focus on where their responsibilities are. CCSU has taken part in a statewide electric vehicle initiative, the sustainability push has also introduced other successful

projects which have benefited CCSU both environmentally and financially. Examples include the installation of a 1400 kilowatt fuel cell on campus which provides energy savings and a system which captures waste heat and produces steam to supplement the steam generation required for heating. Numerous buildings have also been retrofitted, with LED lighting now being widely used. In an effort to further reduce their carbon footprint, CCSU has partnered


with the CTTransit bus system to offer students a free bus pass that they can use to travel around numerous metro areas in Connecticut. Known as a UPASS, the scheme has proved extremely popular and many students are now choosing to use the service instead of running and maintaining their own vehicle. The university considers the bus passes a worthwhile expense considering the significant reduction in emissions that they have resulted in.

SUSTAINABILITY IN ACTION Central Connecticut State University has successfully incorporated sustainable thinking into the maintenance, construction, and operating of its facilities. The university intends to build upon their success through continued engagement with the surrounding community. This engagement may be best exemplified by their partnerships with a local organic farm and businesses. CCSU’s Summer Institute for Sustainability, which is run by the Business School, has

resulted in successful conferences which have accommodated both internal and external professionals. This setup provides an opportunity for members of the CCSU community to build lasting relationships with local businesses. The long-term vision of Mr. Forcella and the CCSU leadership has led to a well-deserved reputation for sustainable action. Their pro-active approach to solving environmental issues is benefiting both the university, and the state of Connecticut. c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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UNIVERSITY OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

LEADING BY

EXAMPLE An interview with David Taylor: Manager, Environmental Services at the University of Prince Edward Island. Written by Carl Long.

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UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

When David Taylor joined the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI) as Manager of Environmental Services in August 2007, he was charged with creating a culture on campus that would promote sustainable thinking. The aim was to create operational clarity from which the university could clearly and effectively take action on sustainability issues. Prince Edward Island sits on Canada’s eastern edge and is the country’s smallest province in terms of both land mass and population. Despite this the island’s university is at the forefront of sustainable thinking, both intellectually and operationally. Since his arrival at UPEI, Mr. Taylor has overseen the university receiving the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) Building

UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

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UNIVERSITY OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Environmental Standards (BESt) certification (the only university in Atlantic Canada to do so), the establishment of policy and energy guidelines that have had a pronounced and positive effect on not just the campus but the entire province, instilled a pro-active approach in both the student body and wider community to living sustainably, and raised the profile of both the school and the area among its peers (Greenpeace Canada were in attendance for the Making Connections: Cooperating for a Sustainable Future conference that was held at the University in June). The university has also developed academic programs that will see UPEI as an intellectual forerunner in the fields of environmental studies, engineering, and sustainable deUPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

sign. Mr. Taylor explains that the work is very much ongoing. “We try to do energy audits every five to six years. Technology is continually changing, especially around lighting.” Raising awareness about sustainability issues and building a sense of academic and social community is also a key priority. The amount that the university has already achieved represents a fantastic start to an ongoing process. “Here’s our road map, now we know where to go.” COMPETITIVE EDGE The Residence Energy Conservation Challenge began six years ago among students residing on the UPEI campus. “We wanted to try to find a way to raise awareness

around energy efficiency and sustainability and simple things that students could actually do. Maybe to an individual doing these things doesn’t seem like much but cumulatively it adds up to a fair amount.” Base readings of the residents’ energy use was recorded for one week prior to the challenge and then tracked on a daily basis for a short time during which the residents actively attempt to keep their energy usage to a minimum. A quick comparison is done and a winner is determined. Competition was upped when resources were pooled after a regional meeting between Mr. Taylor and a number of his counterparts from other institutions and organisations. Over the last five years the competition has expanded well beyond the UPEI campus. At last count, thirty-seven residencies were participating in the competition this year. Mr. Taylor is proud of the impressive impact that the competition has had. “One of my counterparts in the region looked at “is this a sustainable thing, does it actually make a sustainable impact going forward?” What they found when they analysed the data was that while energy usage was reduced during the challenge, after the challenge it did not increase back to pre-challenge levels. Participating individuals were able to make habitual changes to their lifestyle and prove that minor behavioural changes can make a difference; you’re actually actualising change.” The study showed people that their efforts were more than the proverbial drop in the ocean. UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

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UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

“WE WANTED TO TRY TO FIND A WAY TO RAISE AWARENESS AROUND ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND SUSTAINABILITY AND SIMPLE THINGS THAT STUDENTS COULD ACTUALLY DO”

GREENING THE CAMPUS It is the ability to influence the innate thinking of, not just individuals, but institutions and organisations that is the key to living sustainably. The energy guidelines implemented by Mr. Taylor have seen many changes on campus. Scrutinizing all aspects of the university, from the techno-

logical to the logistical, has led to different ways of working. The award of the BOMA BESt certification to the University has been critical for assessing and identifying where exactly their processes need modifying and where they can make tangible improvements. The BOMA BESt program evaluates environmental performance and

management practices, providing not only a platform for certified organisations to proceed, but also a clear and public commitment to operating sustainably. “The greenest building you can build is the one you don’t have to build. BOMA BESt allowed us to put some best practices in place in terms of how we operate and

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UNIVERSITY OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

THE SCHOOL ALSO USES 100% RECYCLED PAPER, AN ACT THAT HAS SAVED MONEY LONG-TERM AND WHICH, AS A RESULT, HAS SEEN MANY FOLLOW UPEI’S LEAD.

UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

green existing buildings. They didn’t just look at energy, they also looked at water management, chemical management, and they looked at hazardous materials.” Prince Edward Island also houses the Wind

Energy Institute of Canada (WEICan), a joint research centre that investigates new wind power technologies and is run primarily by the Canadian government. Since WEICan’s inception in 1981, an industry UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

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has developed around the institute and as a result several wind farms have been installed on the island. Wind energy now provides an impressive 20% of the island’s power requirements, including UPEI. The


UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

UPEI PHOTOGRAPHY

school also uses 100% recycled paper, an act that has saved money long-term and which, as a result, has seen many follow UPEI’s lead. RENEWABLE EXPERTISE The University of Prince Edward Island has incorporated sustainability into life on campus, as well as its teaching practices, in various ways. As well as concentrating their evening classes into as few buildings as possible, the university is also tailoring some of its academic programs to complement their environmental ambitions. The extension of its existing environmental studies programs and the creation of a new program in engineering and sustainable design will breed new expertise in the field and raise the profile of UPEI and the work it’s doing. “I think the new engineering program in sustainable design and renew-

able energy will be huge. Hopefully we’re attracting world class individuals to teach in that program.” UPEI already boasts Dr. Adam Fenech, winner of the 2007 Noble Peace Prize, as the man that runs their climate lab. Much like the way Prince Edward Island harnesses the power of wind for use as renewable energy, so the faculty intends to make itself self-sustaining in knowledge and expertise by attracting new minds to the university that can learn, teach, and develop. This should allow the school to forerun its future activities in raising awareness and ensuring its development and adherence to sustainable policy. Concurrently, this new talent can go forth into the world and spread their knowledge for the better of us all. “There are quite a few committed individuals, especially on the faculty side, who really see this as a burgeoning opportunity. It’s not just an opportunity, it’s something

important. They really see this as a world changer in terms of developing students who take this stuff to heart. This is where they want to be and this is where they want to make a difference.” c

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UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES

SUSTAINABLE

ISLANDS Dr. David Smith, Coordinator of the Institute for Sustainable Development at the University of the West Indies, explains how they’re promoting sustainability throughout the region. Written by Thomas Massey.

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Since being established in 1948, the University of the West Indies (UWI) has expanded well beyond the original Mona campus in Jamaica. “I think it’s very important to understand that the University of the West Indies is different from most universities in that it has campuses in several different countries,” explains Dr. David Smith, Coordinator of the Institute for Sustainable Development (ISD) at UWI. “There are campuses in Jamaica, Barbados, and Trinidad and Tobago. To put that in perspective, the distance between the Mona Campus in Jamaica and the Saint Augustine Campus in Trinidad and Tobago is something like 1200 miles.” Despite the logistical problems that naturally accompany successful international expansion, UWI has continued to implement initiatives that ensure that operations are sustainable and environmentally responsible.

THE INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT In order to aid Caribbean nations in addressing vital environmental and economic concerns, UWI established the Institute for Sustainable Development in 2006. Communication is vitally important to the university, particularly due to its unique international nature and because issues are constantly changing. Ensuring good communication is a key part of Dr. Smith’s role as coordinator of the ISD. “The role of coordinator in the ISD basically entails making sure people are communicating with each other. If there is the possibility of people being able to work together then they must take advantage of it. My role is to create synergies. I build networks and opportunities within the university, as well as collaborating externally with other universities and even governments.” SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES

The ISD consists of many departments whose research has addressed issues including disaster risks from natural hazards, waste management and recycling, economic valuation of natural resources, and environmental risks to ecosystems. Research provides UWI, as well as government bodies, with vital information that amongst other things can help prepare Caribbean nations for natural disasters such as the tropical storms that many of them see on an annual basis. THE UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM OF SMALL ISLAND STATES Dr. Smith explains that the work of the UWI and ISD has been expanded thanks to the establishment of the University Consortium

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of Small Island States (UCSIS). “We have a group of seven universities at the moment, who have come together to highlight research and teaching on issues that affect small island states. The consortium includes the University of Malta, the University of Las Palmas in Spain, the University of the Virgin Islands, the University of Mauritius, the University of the Seychelles, and the University of the South Pacific. Between us we work on issues that are of importance, not just in terms of research interests, but also in terms of development imperatives for small island states, in particular, Caribbean states.” The long-term aim of the UCSIS is to “enhance graduate education institutions in Small Island States by facilitating the development

of the capacity needed to implement the Barbados Program of Action.” The Barbados Program of Action (BPOA) is the popular name of the United Nations Programme of Action on the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States. The program aims to address the specific needs of small island states by outlining strategies to mitigate environmental and economic vulnerabilities. The program recognizes that island states often face unique challenges that set them apart from other nations and has therefore allocated them special recognition as Small Island Developing States (SIDS). Members of the consortium, including UWI, implement and support teaching and research that may help SIDS prosper in the future. Important issues include climate change and sea level rise, energy resources, freshwater resources, land resources, tourism resources, biodiversity resources, culture, health, management of waste, science and technology, transport and communication, coastal and marine resources, natural hazards and environmental disasters, national and regional enabling environments, implementation of the SIDS program of action,


“WE HAVE A GROUP OF SEVEN UNIVERSITIES AT THE MOMENT, WHO HAVE COME TOGETHER TO HIGHLIGHT RESEARCH AND TEACHING ON ISSUES THAT AFFECT SMALL ISLAND STATES.”

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UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES

COLLECTIVE RESEARCH EFFORTS PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE BEHAVIOR AND WILL HOPEFULLY ENSURE A PROSPEROUS FUTURE FOR MANY SMALL ISLAND STATES.

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knowledge management and information for decision making, sustainable capacity development and education for sustainable development. This collective research effort promotes sustainable behavior and will hopefully ensure a prosperous future for many small island states. A PROSPEROUS AND SUSTAINABLE FUTURE The majority of the action that UWI has taken to combat sustainability issues has involved significant collaboration. Communication between the university and its affiliates has been a vital part of ensuring the successful implementation of ambitious initiatives. UWI continues to concentrate on creating an effective long distance learning environment while collaborating with suppliers to improve energy efficiency and assisting governments of SIDS in trying to guarantee a prosperous and

sustainable future. Dr. Smith is clear that this remains the main aim of UWI’s collaborative efforts, and he explains that a new initiative is helping to make it a reality. “At the beginning of May we launched the Caribbean Chapter of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network, a network of universities and practitioners. There was already a global Sustainable Development Solutions Network with chapters in Amazonia, the Sahel, South and southeast Asia, the Mediterranean, and Australia. The point of this network is to pull together all of the universities, all the wisdom we can get from people working on sustainable development, and to come up with practical solutions for sustainable development problems. It’s really about trying to make sure that your politicians, your policy makers, the people who are actually running countries, have access to solutions for the problems they face.” c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ADVERTISERS INDEX A Afton Chemicals Arkansas Lime Company

Filtration Plus

P72

I Industrial Container Services Infineum

P38 P34

J Johnson Controls

P54

P45

L Lhoist North America Liquid Environmental Solutions

P35 P34

P38

M ML Smith Jr LLC

P38

P39 P34

C Carbon Activated Corporation P39 Chartwells Inside Back CIBC Mellon Back Cover Consolidated Container Company P35 D D & S Vending F Fountain Industries LLC

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Microtronic US

P45

O ORG CHEM Group

P35

R Robbie D. Wood, Inc

P35

S SJ Transportation Sysco

P41 P39

V Vantage Builders

P34


Sustainable Business Magazine  

Issue 04/14

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