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SUSTAINABLE ISSUE 07/15

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

PCL T&TEC

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

ELECTRICITY COMMISSION

MMM GROUP MOOSE POWER SUNPUMP SOLAR INC ALSO FEATURED THIS ISSUE

CanSIA • CARILEC • NEIA

S U S TA I N I N G T O M O R R O W. T O D AY


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SUSTAINING TOMORROW. TODAY www.sustainablebusinessmagazine.net


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Sustainable Business Magazine is committed to promoting sustainable printing. This magazine is printed on Forest Stewardship Council certified material and manufactured using environmentally sustainable procedures. All lithographic printer inks used are vegetable-based.

SBM Media Ltd Norwich Enterprise Centre, 4B Guildhall Hill, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 1JH, United Kingdom • T: +44 (0)1603 516519 Email: info@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net www.sustainablebusinessmagazine.net Editor: Fiona FitzGerald Assistant Editors: Thomas Massey George Newell Profile Writer: Marcus Bonnano Contributors: Donald Baldeosingh Earl Bridges Olivia Fussell John A. Gorman Kieran Hanley Thomas Hodge Charles Miers Web Administrator: Steve Phipps

CONTENTS ISSUE 07/15

Welcome to the latest issue of Sustainable Business Magazine Sustainable Business Magazine aims to spread awareness of the values of sustainability, as well as the brilliant ways in which organizations continue to meet challenges and champion corporate social responsibility. In this issue we are proud to present the first installment of our ‘Caribbean Energy’ series. The series is being run in partnership with the Caribbean Electric Utility Services Corporation (CARILEC) and features detailed profiles of CARILEC members, showcasing how their efforts are contributing to a more sustainable Caribbean energy industry. Each installment is prefaced by a foreword from CARILEC’s Interim Executive Director Thomas Hodge, and the first installment features the Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC). Alongside the first installment of the CARILEC series we are delighted to feature an in-depth article on the Southern Caribbean Cable Project, a proposed power and telecommunication interconnection between Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and Suriname. We spoke to Donald Baldeosingh, President of the ENMAN Group and the Southern Caribbean Cable Company, and Southern Caribbean Cable Company board member Paul Quesnel, about how the project would transform the energy and telecoms landscape of the Caribbean. This issue also features the second installment of our ‘Solar Leadership’ series, in partnership with the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA), which celebrates how CanSIA members are producing and delivering clean and reliable renewable energy. As always the series is prefaced by a foreword from CanSIA President and CEO John Gorman, and this installment features articles on PCL, SunPump Solar Inc., and Moose Power. To complete this issue we spoke to Steve Kemp, Partner and Vice President of Buildings – Sustainability at MMM Group Limited, about MMM’s long history of sustainable building, and we spoke to Peter Tsantrizos, President of Terragon Environmental Technologies, about how they are eliminating waste through the development of compact, clean, user-friendly technologies. Details of upcoming sustainability events can be found on our events calendar. This issues’ highlighted event is Newleef 2015. The event, held by the Newfoundland and Labrador Environmental Industry Association (NEIA), took place on the 8th and 9th of October and is the province’s premier green economy conference. This issue’s three guest editorials have once again been provided by a selection of industry experts and feature an economic report from Olivia Fussell, Managing Director of Carbon Credit Capital LLC., a food report from Charles Miers, Managing Director of Footprint, and a social report from Earl Bridges, President and Co-Founder of Good Done Great. We hope that you find this issue both interesting and inspiring. Thank you for reading. The Sustainable Business Magazine Team

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Economic Report Carbon Credit Capital LLC

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Food Report Footprint

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Social Report Good Done Great

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Caribbean Electric Utility Services Corporation (CARILEC)

10

Trinidad & Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC)

18

Southern Caribbean Cable Company

22

Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA)

24

PCL

32

SunPump Solar Inc.

38

Moose Power

44

MMM Group Limited

50

Terragon Environmental Technologies Inc.

56

NEIA’s Newleef 2015 Event Review

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Global Events

62

Advertisers Index

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FRONT COVER IMAGE ORILLIA SITES 1, 2 & 3. IMAGE PROVIDED BY PCL.

© SBM Media Ltd 2015. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form for any purpose, other than short sections for the purpose of review, without prior consent of the publisher.

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ECONOMIC REPORT

CARBON CREDIT CAPITAL LLC.

ECONOMICREPORT

By Olivia Fussell, Managing Director of Carbon Credit Capital LLC.

The 4th ‘P’ - Profit, People, Planet, and Purpose We are at a major crossroads between business and society. With the agreed upon Trans-Pacific Partnership, 18,000 tariffs placed on U.S. products will end, helping businesses in auto, machinery, IT, consumer goods, and agriculture (According to The Office of the USTR). The TPP will be a boon for consumers, offering lower prices. However, critics warn of reduction and layoffs for other U.S. sectors. How will progressive companies with triple-bottom line approaches react to globalization? And how will they react to economic volatility and uncertainty? The New York Times believes Harvard Business School Survey’s on U.S. Competitiveness “offers good reason to temper optimism” 2 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

on corporate social change. Harvard’s Survey found “inequality, poverty, and related economic outcomes to worsen in America.” So I ask again, this time to directors and managers, how will you balance social responsibility and sustainability priorities during economic uncertainty? In order to answer that question, executives must ask themselves, “What is your company’s corporate purpose?” Several years ago, Murphy’s Law struck the carbon-offset industry. First it was plunging prices, then the financial crisis, and finally major headlines surrounded the effectiveness and ethics of carbon-offsets. These were difficult times. Could we still compete? Did we still have trust and credibility among our clients? And


OLIVIA FUSSELL,MANAGING DIRECTOR, CARBON CREDIT CAPITAL LLC.

as months went by, I wondered, “Would I be able to make next month’s payroll?” While many executives proclaimed they were able to ‘right the ship’ with bold leadership during the financial crisis, I made difficult choices based on our values. We changed business models, reorganized our corporate structure, and adapted to situations as they arose. An impactful corporate purpose did not keep the lights on but by prioritizing People, Profits, and Planet, it directed our corporate strategy. We tackled our market awareness and the credibility issue through the application of our corporate purpose. For example, Carbon Neutral Checkout™ was created to dispel the misnomer that carbon-offsets were “the guilt-free way for cheating.” Our service provides: 1) a full accounting of a company’s carbon footprint. The accounting practice is complimentary, educating firms on their consumption and emissions through daily operations and supply chain. 2) Afterwards, we recommend solutions to offset the emissions emanating from a company’s waste. Carbon-offsets are not a form of cheating. For many industries, it is one of many solutions to help neutralize emissions emanating from waste. For example, the hotel industry is a leader in environmental initiatives. Nonetheless, the average 150-room hotel will emit 2,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases annually, the equivalent of 1,000 round-trip flights between New York and San Francisco. Carbon-offsets offer a method to

minimize the impact while firms look to improve on consumption and reduction initiatives. Executives must have both clarity of purpose for boom times and during economic hardship. What is your company’s purpose of existence and what does it stand for? Where does your company’s purpose fit with Profit, People, and Planet? And most importantly, how will you adapt during economic hard times? c For more information visit: www.carboncreditcapital.com

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FOOD REPORT

FOODREPORT

By Charles Miers, Managing Director of Footprint.

Can we ever really ‘feed the world’? GM crops have been given the ‘thumbs up’ by the European Union, sugar farmers in South America are being squeezed by large corporations, and dangerous substances are being found in products in India. These scandals, alongside global agricultural upheaval and increased populations, means the food supply chain has never been more important to scrutinize. Charles Miers, Managing Director of leading sustainability consultancy Footprint, based in London, shares thoughts on tackling the challenges of today to meet the demands of tomorrow. Securing the food supply chain is very easily one of the most important issues of our time. The global population is growing exponentially; the United Nations predicts that there will be 9.7 billion mouths to feed in 2050, an increase of 2.4 billion on today’s count, which will require 70% more food. But it’s not production that is the issue; we are certainly able to grow the food we need for everyone. 4 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

The main challenge is enhancing the sustainability of the food supply chain on an international level, incorporating economic, social, and environmental elements. It’s by no means an easy task, but it’s one which must be achieved to avoid some very dire consequences. Collaboration is key. Governments and the private sector must work together on this important issue and it must transcend borders because it is a worldwide issue, and one that threatens to be highly explosive; we all witnessed the winter of 2010 when rising food prices contributed to civil unrest in the Middle East and led to the toppling of two leaders. Then we have to look at the issues of climate change which will continue to have a huge impact on the wider agricultural Industry. In 2010, Russia suffered a severe heatwave, generally considered to be the result of global warming, which led to huge crop losses costing billions of dollars. The farming sector will always be at the mercy of


Governments and the private sector must work together on this important issue and it must transcend borders because it is a worldwide issue. the extreme weather occurrences which have been more frequent over the past decade; this must lead us to question the ways we protect our supply chain. An excellent example of the radical re-thinking that has to take place is the U.S. ‘Feed the Future’ initiative which aims to tackle rural poverty and the challenge of food insecurity by working with 19 partner countries to increase agricultural productivity and access to trade markets. By supporting smallholders and farming communities, and empowering them economically in a large scale public-private sector partnership, the programme is setting the scene for long-term economic and social sustainability and redefining the ways in which food security can be effectively addressed. It is crucial we also look at the other end of the scale, and ensure that responsibility is taken on a micro level. There is no other word to describe the levels of unnecessary food waste in developed countries than criminal. In a world where one in nine people do not have enough to eat it is shameful to see stats that show that the United Kingdom alone throws away almost 5 million tons of food every year which could have been eaten. Educating

the masses on this important issue is increasingly important, as the rising middle classes in countries such as India and China is leading to patterns of consumption the world will struggle to keep up with, putting further strain on depleting resources. In a funny way, the many food scandals of recent years have been a good thing; it has led to a general increased awareness of where our food comes from and the concept of looking back up the chain. Since the European horsemeat scandal, whereby products labelled beef and pork actually contained horse, the sales of organic food has risen while meat consumption has gone down across many EU countries – a hugely positive conclusion to a very negative period. There is still a long way to go and there is no simple answer; any viable solution to global food security will have to go far beyond producing more or eating a little less meat. We’ll have to embrace the contributions made by businesses, governments, NGOs, farmers, and consumers alike to drive positive change and have any chance of truly ‘Feeding the World’ as those famous lyrics urge us to do. c

CHARLES MIERS, MANAGING DIRECTOR OF FOOTPRINT.

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SOCIAL REPORT

SOCIALREPORT

Written by Earl Bridges, President and Co-Founder of Good Done Great.

Corporate Sustainability Programs:

A Win-Win Proposition Consumers are now more attuned than ever to the social and environmental practices of the companies they purchase products and services. According to the Nielson Global Survey on Corporate Social Responsibility, 55% of global consumers will pay more for

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products and services produced by socially responsible companies. Companies are rounding corporate responsibility programs, which traditionally include corporate and employee giving and volunteerism initiatives, with programs that reduce their carbon footprint. As of October 19th 2015, 68 large U.S. corporations joined a White House-initiated pledge to reduce carbon emissions and support a United Nations global warming deal. Corporations are partnering with environmentally conscious suppliers to green their supply chains and incorporate sustainable business practices. In addition, they are also mobilizing their employees to positively impact the environment. Multiple studies highlight the importance of employee engagement and corporate citizenship as a tool to recruit members of the socially conscious millennial generation as well as its ability to increase employee satisfaction and retention. According to Net Impact’s Talent Report ‘What Workers Want in 2012’, employees who have the opportunity to make a positive social or environmental impact are more satisfied by almost a 2:1 ratio. As a provider of technology-enabled corporate social responsibility services, Good Done Great works with Fortune 500 companies to integrate sustainability into their CSR programs. We know


that when corporations challenge their employees to take action surrounding sustainability, it is a win-win proposition. The corporation saves costs for their businesses and consumers while reducing energy, water, and fuel use. Our technology encourages and enables employees to track those actions including using energy efficient light bulbs, carpooling to work, utilizing public transportation, reducing paper usage, recycling, and using reusable cups and silverware. Some companies incentivize sustainable practices with reward programs and/or reimbursing public transportation and awarding outstanding employees with gift cards or formal awards. Two corporations leading the charge in combining employee engagement efforts with sustainability are Grainger and Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart encourages their associates to incorporate principles of environmental sustainability into their daily lives through a “Personal Sustainability Practice”, a pledge to take action on behalf of the environment. Pledges may include choosing healthier foods, volunteering in their communities, and using environmentally friendly products. Through this initiative, Wal-Mart hopes associates will encourage their families, friends, and community to take action as well. Grainger spearheaded a “Green Stewards” initiative, similar to an Employee Resource Group or Affinity Group. Green Stewards is a group of 700 team members across the United States who volunteer as Green Ambassadors. This group of individuals works to inspire employees to take action on behalf of the environment through volunteerism. In 2014, the Green Stewards organized an Earth Day volunteer event. They planted 5,000 trees at their headquarters and in state parks. Furthermore, they donated trees to the Green Ribbon Foundation.

Corporations are partnering with environmentally conscious suppliers to green their supply chains and incorporate sustainable business practices. In addition, they are also mobilizing their employees to positively impact the environment. You do not have to be a Fortune 500 company to make a substantial impact upon environmental sustainability. As a growing company of 40 plus employees, Good Done Great protects the environment through recycling, utilizing a water cooler and reusable cups, using public transportation, and volunteering with Keep Charleston Beautiful, a local chapter of Keep America Beautiful. Through our volunteerism with Keep Charleston Beautiful, we collected over 740 pounds of trash in the Charleston area. As a Certified B Corporation, we are audited to our environmental impact to include: Emissions, energy use, transportation and distribution, as well as whether or not our products solve an environmental issue. As a cloud-based technology provider, we champion paper reduction and the benefits of online solutions! c About Good Done Great: Good Done Great revolutionizes the way corporations and individuals give back to the communities and causes they care about. Through strategic consulting supported by our integrated software solutions, the Good Done Great team helps Fortune 500 and other companies maximize their corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs. Launched in 2009 and headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina (with offices in Tacoma, Washington), Good Done Great was certified as a groundbreaking B Corp in 2012 and incorporated as one of South Carolina’s initial B Corporations in 2014. Good Done Great customizes employee engagement and corporate philanthropy platforms for global brands, delivering targeted and measurable impact. More than 1.4 million employees currently rely on GDG’s innovative tools and more than 60,000 non-profits benefit from Good Done Great’s broad philanthropic reach.

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CARIBBEAN ELECTRIC UTILITY SERVICES CORPORATION

CARILEC TEAM, CHAIRMAN AND EDF CEO.

THE CARIBBEAN ELECTRIC UTILITY SERVICES

CORPORATION (CARILEC) SUPPORTS THE CARIBBEAN

IN ITS THRUST TOWARD SUSTAINABLE ENERGY CARILEC EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MR. THOMAS HODGE.

A foreword to the ‘Caribbean Energy’ series by Thomas Hodge, Interim Executive Director of CARILEC. The Caribbean power sector is witnessing important changes in the energy landscape: Changes to the regulatory framework, high-penetration of renewable energy technologies, increased use of electric vehicles, and greater customer demands. Electric utilities are at varying stages of readiness, and have their own unique challenges for renewable energy adaptation, and future demands. CARILEC recognizes the benefits of the changes in the power sector and welcomes them.

CARILEC TECHNICAL TOUR AT BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION.

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BACKGROUND CARILEC was formed in 1989 (as part of an electric utilities modernization project funded by USAID) nearly 16 years after the oil crisis of 1973. The corporation’s main focus was on “modernization of electric utilities” – which at the time, was not particularly

focused on generation diversification or renewable energy production. By 2008, oil prices skyrocketed, and the levelized cost of electricity for wind power and solar PV continued to decline. Almost overnight, renewable energy had firmly asserted its position in the region’s energy landscape and things began to change rapidly. CARILEC’s role in the region’s thrust toward sustainable energy is to facilitate capacity building, communication, and cooperation among its electric utility members, associates, and other stakeholders. In the context of this task, CARILEC’s role is particularly important. CARILEC’S SERVICES CARILEC understands the importance of collaboration, shared learning, and networking in improving utility operations.


quakes, flooding, and volcanic eruptions. This service is especially important to strengthen energy security for all member utilities. Some of the activities undertaken by the secretariat under this programme include the deployment of engineers to undertake damage assessments and line crews to carry out transmission and distribution line restoration work.

With the introduction of IPPs, regulatory bodies, and consumer groups, forums are necessary to promote effective communication between stakeholders. In this regard, CARILEC organizes several utility symposiums and conferences for utility industry professionals and stakeholders. CARILEC understands the need to promote engagement and effective communication between utilities, governments, regulators, and other stakeholders. Since 2010 CARILEC has brought over 550 utility personnel and Caribbean regulators together in renewable energy and regulatory forums. Technological advances in the industry (such as AMI and Internet of Things)

have brought changes to the way power is served to consumers. Today’s customer also demands a higher quality of service, is digitally connected, and sensitive to the environment. In preparing Caribbean utilities for the new environment, CARILEC trains approximately seven hundred utility employees in about 35 courses each year. The courses cover diverse disciplines ranging from utility-specific technical courses to management training. CARILEC also offers technical certifications and web-based training. CARILEC’s Disaster Assistance Programme (CDAP) is one of the many benefits afforded to members of CARILEC and is a service which is opportune during times of major disasters such as hurricanes, earth-

THE PURSUIT OF PARTNERSHIPS CARILEC is aware of the importance of partnerships and the potential to influence change on a larger scale. As part of its strategic objectives, CARILEC fosters relationships with organizations that have mutual interests or shared visions including CARICOM, CDB, IDB, OAS, the Clinton Foundation, Carbon War Room, and Rocky Mountain Institute, amongst others. With varying perspectives and a diverse pool of strengths, CARILEC’s collaborative projects bring the best in experience, research and financing to the region. THE FUTURE CARILEC will continue to play a constructive role in the transformation of the region’s electrical sector to a more robust, modern, and sustainable model. Although oil prices are low, the utilities know that history is capable of repeating itself. U.S. Vice President Joe Biden recently quipped, “There’s an old saying: The best time to fix a roof is when the sun is shining.” The sun is shining now, figuratively speaking. The time is now. c

BOUILLANTE GEOTHERMAL PLANT, GUADELOUPE.

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TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO ELECTRICITY COMMISSION

CARIBBEAN ELECTRICITY

EXPERTS Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Courtenay Mark, Assistant General Manager - Engineering at the Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission, about how an inexpensive, reliable supply of electricity can boost national development.

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TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO ELECTRICITY COMMISSION

“WE DO EVERYTHING WE CAN TO KEEP RATES DOWN, IN ORDER TO ENCOURAGE INDUSTRIALIZATION.”

The Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC) was founded in 1946, and is a creature of statue as well as the sole retailer of electricity in Trinidad and Tobago. T&TEC is a State owned Public Utility with the responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the country’s electrical transmission and distribution network, and also generates its own electricity on the island of Tobago. These responsibilities make T&TEC an indispensable partner for the country’s 12 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

development. Trinidad and Tobago has the 3rd highest GDP in the Americas, and, unusually for the Caribbean region, a principally industrial economy. “We do everything we can to keep rates down, in order to encourage industrialization,” explains Courtenay Mark, Assistant General Manager – Engineering at T&TEC. “Our rate right now, at the lowest level, is just over 5US cents per kilowatt hour. I challenge you to find a lower rate than that in the world. We now have a large industrial customer base. These are

220KV OUTDOOR STRANDED CONDUCTOR BUS AT THE NEWLY CONSTRUCTED TGU POWER STATION.


REMOTELY OPERATED POLE MOUNTED AUTO RECLOSER CONTROL PANEL.

REMOTELY OPERATED POLE MOUNTED AUTO RECLOSER.

TWO SETS OF ANEMOMETERS INSTALLED IN JANUARY 2015 TO OBTAIN WIND SPEED DATA.

large users of energy who have been attracted partly because of the low electricity rates. This is a big benefit to the people of Trinidad and Tobago.” Mr. Mark has 32 years’ experience and heads T&TEC’s Engineering Division, which fulfils essential functions involving the supervision of the grid. The division is split into four departments. Generation Interface and Control is responsible for the administration of 4 Power Purchase Agreements (PPA’s) as T&TEC purchases bulk power from Independent Power Producers (IPP’s). This department is also responsible for monitoring and distributing power throughout the grid. System Planning and Research studies developments for the grid, as well as conducting other research including the use of renewable energy in the country’s production mix. Protection and SCADA is responsible for the relay protection systems, and acquires real-time data to inform operational decisions. Finally, the Communications department designs,

operates and maintains the wholly owned T&TEC communications infrastructure. This includes: an extensive fiber optic system, microwave system, mobile radio system, as well as surveillance systems CONSTANT SUPPLY Among the Engineering Division’s many responsibilities, maintaining the consistency of the electricity supply is one of its most vital roles. “The generation plants have an installed capacity in excess of 2000MW of power to meet a peak demand of a little under 1400MW,” explains Mr. Mark. “They’re all gas fired plants, and the way we ensure we keep power flowing is by ensuring that the generation and the fuel supply is available to us. In Trinidad and Tobago, we still have quite a large reserve of natural gas, and T&TEC gets the highest priority in the country for that gas. This means even when there are curtailments the generating plants are still running and electricity is not affected.” T&TEC also has

COVE POWER STATION.

DEMOLITION OF A RETIRED STEAM POWER STATION AT PENAL, SOUTH TRINIDAD.

DEMOLITION OF A RETIRED STEAM POWER STATION AT PENAL, SOUTH TRINIDAD.

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Caribbean Power Solutions Ltd Proud to support The Trinidad & Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC) Caribbean Power Solutions Ltd, 85-87 Old Southern Main Road Mc Bean Village, Couva. Trinidad W.I.

Tel: # 1-868-679-0500/0501/0502 Fax: # 1-868-636-2861 Email: llewellyn.mcintosh@cpstt.ca

The Electrical Industries Group is well-recognized as the premier producer of electrical cables, lighting fixtures, power solutions, plastics for construction and packaging material in the Caribbean with a combined history of over 80 years in manufacturing. EIG manufactures the Century Eslon, EIL and Agos Lighting brands while also distributing internationally well-known products such as GE, DAB Water Technology and Rheem.

Electrical Industries Group - #1 Century Drive, Trincity Industrial Estate, Macoya, Tunapuna, Trinidad, West Indies

GE is the world’s Digital Industrial Company, transforming industry with software-defined machines and solutions that are connected, responsive and predictive. Each invention further fuels innovation and application across our industrial sectors. With people, services, technology and scale, GE delivers better outcomes for customers by speaking the language of industry. GE has been present in Central America and The Caribbean for more than a century, providing a wide portfolio of high-tech solutions that contribute to build a sustainable infrastructure in 40 territories in the region.

In Trinidad & Tobago, GE started operating as a key player in the Oil & Gas industry. Currently, GE has consolidated its presence in sectors such as water, healthcare, lighting, power generation, smart grids, energy management and distribution to support customers optimize their operations and power their expansion in the country.

www.ge.com

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Tel: (868) 233 - 1294 Fax: (868) 645 - 6161

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Lucy Electric is a global leader in secondary power distribution solutions. We develop and supply intelligent innovations and services for utility, industrial and commercial applications. Our latest products include the vacuum circuit breaker Sabre RMU fully extensible range equipped to operate in the most extreme environmental conditions and the Gemini 3, an upgrade to our highly successful remote terminal unit from our range of cutting edge automation solutions.

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TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO ELECTRICITY COMMISSION

SOLAR POWER PILOT PROJECT.

MODERN PROTECTIVE RELAYS USED ON THE T&TEC GRID.

strict reliability criteria in place. “This means we allow for a degree of redundancy when committing generation on the grid. System security comes first then economics second in the supply to the country,” explains Mr. Mark. “In this way, generators can be offline for maintenance or can be forced out under certain conditions, and we can still sustain supply to our customers.” ENERGY EFFICIENT The Engineering division also works to ensure the efficiency of the grid. “We collaborate with the gas supply company to make sure we’re being efficient in our use of natural gas,” says Mr. Mark. “The more efficient we are, the more gas becomes available for other downstream revenue-earning activities. The Engineering Division works closely with our Distribution engineers to ensure that system losses are kept to a min16 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

SOLAR POWER PILOT PROJECT.

imum.” To that end, T&TEC has embarked on an extensive pole-mounted capacitor installation project to improve voltages and reduce system losses. “We also look at the specification and design of the system to minimize losses,” says Mr. Mark. “There are heat losses associated with high currents on circuits, so our Transmission circuits are now using larger conductors and higher voltages to achieve lower currents. Our engineering affords us the opportunity to optimize how we deliver power. Finally, our management of our skilled work force tends to be very tight, so we’re safety conscious, target driven and very productive. At the same time, our workers have the one of the most established and recognized unions in the country. The union works closely with the management to ensure high levels of safety compliance and ensures that their members is treated well.”

T&TEC AND CARILEC Trinidad is home to the St. Augustine campus of the University of the West Indies (UWI), which houses the Faculty of Engineering. “Because of this, most electrical engineers produced throughout the Caribbean comes from UWI and Trinidad,” explains Mr. Mark. “T&TEC is also the biggest electrical utility in the Caribbean. As a result of this, CARILEC has learned a lot from Trinidad and Tobago, from an academic standpoint and in terms of technical support.” T&TEC has also had a significant impact on CARILEC as a result of Trinidad and Tobago’s unique position in the region. Unlike many Caribbean countries, Trinidad and Tobago is outside the hurricane belt, and is relatively sheltered from natural disasters. “Because of this, when other islands suffer from hurricane damage, T&TEC can respond in a meaningful, material way,”


FOR T&TEC, IT ALL COMES BACK TO THE WELFARE OF THE PEOPLE OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO. ELECTRIFICATION IS APPROACHING 100% IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO.

explains Mr. Mark. “We have sent our field crews for periods of months, together with trucks loaded with materials, and have provided support. We also have a Human Resources department which is capable of training our workers in-house. Some other islands don’t have this, so T&TEC has contributed towards training whenever CARILEC has called on us to.” COMMITMENT TO THE FUTURE T&TEC recently concluded a significant negotiation with an independent power producer. “It’s a fifteen year agreement which is likely to be in the order of billions of U.S. dollars over its lifespan,” explains Mr. Mark. “This comes on the heels of the 720 MW TGU power station which was commissioned 3 years ago, and we’re developing plans to bolster the capacity available to the sister isle of Tobago. We intend to leverage

more of our communications infrastructure to generate revenue, which can then fuel other kinds of expansion programs. Also, the Engineering Division has been very involved at the policy level in shaping new strategic policies which will have an impact on the direction of T&TEC.” A particular area the Engineering Division has worked on is renewable energy. “Currently, Trinidad and Tobago doesn’t have very deep renewable energy penetration,” explains Mr. Mark. “The tariffs are so low, it’s currently unattractive for entry. But we know a time will soon come when entering into renewables will become very tempting. We’ve made sure to prepare a framework and lay the groundwork. For example, we’ve produced a document titled ‘Wiring for Renewables’, which gives all the guidelines for a customer to get their installation into a state of readiness. We’ve

also worked closely with our line ministry as well as the Ministry of Energy to produce a significant document on the policy governing a Feed-In Tariff. So we’re almost ready with a framework for renewables.” For T&TEC, it all comes back to the welfare of the people of Trinidad &Tobago. Electrification is approaching 100% in Trinidad and Tobago. “Every residential customer who can afford a supply has one,” says Mr. Mark. “We’ve not only made electricity affordable, but it’s within reach of every citizen. You’d be surprised to see the public lighting here. You fly over Trinidad &Tobago and one has to literally search for a dark spot in the night. We have playgrounds lit with competition-level floodlighting, so fast-moving ballgames can be played at night in public places. Things like this have really contributed to the people and the development of our country.” c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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SOUTHERN CARIBBEAN CABLE COMPANY

THE LARGE RIVERS OF GUYANA AND SURINAME HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO GENERATE OVER 14,000MW OF ELECTRICITY – ENOUGH TO POWER EVERY CARILEC COUNTRY.

CARIBBEAN ENERGY

INTEGRATION

Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Donald Baldeosingh, President of the ENMAN Group, and Paul Quesnel, Board Member of the Southern Caribbean Cable Company, about a project which would transform the energy and telecoms landscape of the Caribbean. The Southern Caribbean Cable Project is a proposed power and telecommunication interconnection between Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and Suriname. By connecting the island of Trinidad to Guyana by a submarine cable, continuing the cable overland to Suriname, and subsequently developing hydroelectric dams in the two South American countries, the Southern Caribbean Cable Project would create a new economic landscape in the region, based on affordable energy which would combine the long-term dependability of renewables with the reliability of Trinidadian gas reserves.

18 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

“Currently, countries the world over are revising their energy plans,” explains Donald Baldeosingh. Mr. Baldeosingh is a former Chairman of the Board of Directors for the Petroleum Company of Trinidad and Tobago (Petrotrin). Now, he is President of the ENMAN Group, a set of technologies-based companies operating in Trinidad and Tobago and across the Caribbean. In addition to this role, Mr. Baldeosingh is President of the Southern Caribbean Cable Company. “These other countries are eking out cleaner, cheaper, and more sustainable alternatives to oil and gas. The Caribbean region is well-poised

to follow suit, given our range of hydro, geothermal, solar, and wind resources.” The Southern Caribbean Cable Project would be a transformative project for the region, bringing inexpensive energy and telecoms to Guyana and Suriname, and giving Trinidad a new market for the excess energy it currently produces and access to a viable landscape for the development of renewables. Mr. Baldeosingh completed BSc and MSc degrees in Electrical Engineering and started his career at the Trinidad & Tobago Electricity Commission, where he met his mentor and co-director at the South-


ern Caribbean Cable Company, Eur Ing Aldwyn Lequay P.E., HBM, BSc (Eng.), CEng, FIMechE, FIET, FAPETT, FASME. Mr. Lequay previously served as Power Station Manager and Deputy Chairman of the Trinidad & Tobago Electricity Commission. At 88, Mr. Lequay insists that he will turn on the switch when the regional grid is constructed such as in Europe and North America.

Company. “Having proven that hydro power exists here, and that it offers the best price and the cleanest source of power, we recognized the need for power interconnection in order to take it to the market,” explains Mr. Baldeosingh. “Trinidad and Tobago has enough energy available today to establish the power connection by selling electricity to Guyana and Suriname. Once that connection is established, we can begin to bring power back from the hydro facilities into an integrated power system.” In Phase One of the Southern Caribbean Cable Project, a cable will run along the south-east of Trinidad to a substation and a convertor station, which will convert the AC power into DC. A submarine cable running parallel to the Venezuela-Guyana coast will come ashore near Georgetown, where another substation and converter station will convert the current back to AC, and from where power can be sold to the Guyanese market at a rate of US$0.12-0.15 cents/kWh which is less than half of the present cost. Additional overland cables will bring the power to neighboring Suriname. Accompanying all of these power cables will be fiber optics cables to provide inexpensive telephone and internet access to the two South American countries. Phase Two of the Southern Caribbean Cable Project will involve connecting to an 800MW hydroelectric dam at the Turtruba

site on the Mazaruni River in Guyana. This power will then be used in Guyana and sold to Trinidad and Tobago and Northern Brazil. An additional link will be constructed to the Kabalebo hydropower site in Suriname, incorporating more clean power which will be used locally and exported. SUSTAINABLE TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO “Trinidad and Tobago has exported oil and gas for more than a century,” says Mr. Baldeosingh. “However, we have to face reduced gas reserves, high carbon emissions, and competition from cheaper sources of hydrocarbon. At the same time, we need to diversify our economic base.” The Southern Caribbean Cable Project offers Trinidad and Tobago a path to reduction of fuel subsidies, a solution to high carbon dioxide emissions, and a life beyond dependency on non-renewable oil and gas. Once the Guyanese and Surinamese dams are built, Trinidadian natural gas can be freed up to be used for methanol, ammonia, liquefied natural gas, and other applications. Furthermore, continued economic cooperation with Guyana and Suriname could offer Trinidad and Tobago opportunities for downstream manufacturing, access to Brazilian markets, and all-important food security. Mr. Paul Quesnel, a Director of the Southern Caribbean Cable company, is a

DONALD BALDEOSINGH, PRESIDENT OF THE ENMAN GROUP.

PROCESS OF DEVELOPMENT Over a decade ago, an assessment found that hydroelectric dams in Guyana and Suriname offered the greatest potential source of clean, renewable energy in the Caribbean. The large rivers of Guyana alone have the potential to generate over 7,000MW of electricity – enough to power every territory in the region. The main obstacle to developing Guyanese and Surinamese hydro is the absence of an immediate market for these capital-intensive projects. “The Guyanese and Surinamese markets are too small today to absorb the amount of available energy,” explains Mr. Baldeosingh. “Furthermore, the countries lack an easy way to export this energy.” It was this discovery which prompted the formation of the Southern Caribbean Cable SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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SOUTHERN CARIBBEAN CABLE COMPANY Available energy Manufacturing capabilities Training resources Excess Liquidity Project Experience

Benefits to Trinidad & Tobago Free up gas reserves, Lower Carbon Downstream Manufacturing Food/Energy/Water Security

Benefits to Region

✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔

Lowest energy costs Economic Development Human Capital Development Action on Climate Change Taxes and Royalties to govts

Benefits to Guyana, Suriname Rapid economic development, Lower energy costs, Employment

Copyright ENMAN Services Ltd 2013

former President of the Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association, and correspondingly understands the need for regeneration of Trinidad’s manufacturing sector. “What we lack are people and raw materials for processing,” says Mr. Quesnel. “When we go to Guyana and Suriname, we’re offered available manpower, raw materials, space, and ultimately a more sustainable source of energy through hydropower. All these are benefits which will return to Trinidad and Tobago as a result of the Southern Caribbean Cable Project.” In recognition of its potential to bring sustainable economic growth, all of Trinidad and Tobago’s major business associations have endorsed the project. The project has been listed by invesTT, Trinidad and Tobago’s national investment agency. PROSPERITY FOR GUYANA AND SURINAME “Guyana and Suriname have a tremendous amount of natural resources which are untapped and undeveloped,” explains Mr. Baldeosingh. “This is primarily because affordable energy is not available. Cheap 20 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Economic Cooperation energy will open up opportunities for manufacturing and processing.” Both countries will see expansions of their respective power transmission grids, their manufacturing sectors, their port facilities, and an improved balance of trade. The fiber optic cable will provide lower telecoms bandwidth costs to a region where current phone and internet connections reroute via satellite to Europe, opening up new opportunities in the IT sector. The construction of hydro power facilities will open Guyana and Suriname up to the potential of becoming net exporters of energy. “Northern Brazil is an existing market, very close to Guyana and Suriname, which is in need of electricity,” says Mr. Quesnel. “This market is also hugely in need of additional bandwidth from the fiber optic cable.” Moreover, inexpensive energy will result in an attractive landscape for business. A relationship with developed Trinidad and Tobago would offer Suriname and Guyana access to financing, project development capabilities, manufacturing skills and technology, and training. Both Guyana and

Natural resources Hydroelectric Power Access to Brazil Market Human Resources Space

Suriname have untapped bauxite resources; with inexpensive electricity available, a refinery and aluminum smelter would become viable. The country also has high-quality silica, which could be used for the manufacturing of solar PV panels. CARIBBEAN ENERGY SECURITY The Southern Caribbean Cable Project is intended to be the first stage in implementing a regional power system. The cable has the potential to be extended north to volcanic Caribbean islands like St. Vincent, St. Lucia, Dominica, Grenada, Nevis, and Montserrat, all of which have a high potential for geothermal energy far beyond their market sizes. “In the long term, the project will give all these countries the opportunity to become net exporters of energy,” says Mr. Baldeosingh. “It makes lower-cost electrical power available to all, and it promotes energy security for the entire region.” With regional energy integration, the system could have more than 1600MW of hydro, 500MW of geothermal, and 300MW of wind and solar within ten years. Territories in the region will


have access to an integrated, extremely reliable, renewables-based power system, with the dams in Guyana and Suriname useable as an energy storage point, and Trinidad and Tobago’s natural gas available to ensure reliability during periods of peak demand and low seasons of available power in the other supplies. A pan-Caribbean cable could eventually link to the ongoing SIEPAC project in Central America, which was financed by the Inter-American Development Bank, forming a large ring of electrical connections. “The SIEPAC model is very similar to what we are building here,” says Mr. Baldeosingh. “Once you get the first leg of it going, more and more countries will tie into it as it grows.” The project sponsors are pursuing deeper engagement with the key stakeholders: Governments, investors, financial institutions, power utilities, CARICOM, and CARILEC. They are using the Public Private Partnership model and are promoting inclusion and cooperation. Washington D.C. based attorney, Robert Shelton is the project’s legal advisor. Mr. Shelton has worked on very large infrastructure projects and sees this

High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) is the technology of choice for moving bulk power over long distances

Project Name

Connection

Capacity (MW)

NorNed

Norway - Netherlands

700

580

Basslink

Australia - Tasmania

500

370

Baltic Cable

Germany - Sweden

600

250

Nord Link (Under Development)

Norway - Germany

1400

516

Southern Caribbean Cable Company (Proposed)

Trinidad - Guyana

500

400

interconnection as very “doable”. “In my experience, when you have a project that makes economic sense, has a sound business plan and corporate structure and a good credit, the world (of finance) will beat a path to your door,” he explains. This project has all the ingredients to be a game changer for the region. The Southern Caribbean Cable Project represents a truly integrated solution to Caribbean energy security, to renewable energy, and to the furthering of human and environmental prosperity and welfare. “It’s

Distance (kms)

about creating a more universal means of trading energy for the region than simply moving oil and gas around,” explains Mr. Baldeosingh. “It reduces carbon emissions to the lowest possible levels, because you can use the cleanest sources of energy in the region, and it creates a new paradigm for economic development based on affordable, reliable power and telecommunications. It’s not just a cable connection. This is Caribbean integration, mapping a collective history, and creating an honorable legacy for generations to come.” c

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CANADIAN SOLAR INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION

“OUR GOAL IS TO BUILD A CANADIAN SOLAR ENERGY INDUSTRY WHICH IS STRONG, EFFICIENT, ETHICAL, AND PROFESSIONAL.”

SOLAR LEADERSHIP A foreword by John A. Gorman, President and CEO of the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA).

JOHN A. GORMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF CANSIA.

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On behalf of the members of the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA), I am pleased to offer this foreword to the “Solar Leadership” series in Sustainable Business Magazine. The Canadian solar industry is proud of the sector we have built, with nearly 2 GW installed by the end of 2014! As CanSIA members, the solar industry is poised to solidify solar electricity as a mainstream energy source and an integral part of Canada’s diversified electricity mix. The sun provides an inexhaustible supply of clean fuel to power our homes and our economy. Solar energy is posi-

tioned to play a key role in our transition to carbon-free lives and a carbon-free economy. Our goal is to build a Canadian solar energy industry which is strong, efficient, ethical, and professional, with capacity to provide innovative solar energy solutions and to play a major role in the global transition to a sustainable, clean-energy future. CanSIA members are companies involved with the delivery of solar energy products and services in Canada, or with the delivery of other products and services to Canada’s solar energy sector. CanSIA proudly represents manufacturers, installers, project developers, builders, architects, en-


gineers, consultants, and a variety of other companies and organizations who contribute directly to the growing number of solar projects in Canada. In Ontario, where the vast majority of Canada’s solar is installed, government support for solar has enabled rapidly declining costs for manufactured components. Capital costs for solar have declined by 65% over the last 6 years, to where solar + storage technology is getting cheaper than anyone ever imagined. The value of solar + storage is exactly what electricity systems of the future need (i.e. empowered consumers and a clean, cost effective solution that enhances the predictability, reliability, flexibility, and resilience of the electricity grid) with none of the unwelcome and costly social, health, and environmental externalities.

Innovations in solar + storage, with announcements like Elon Musk’s Powerwall energy storage system, designed to connect to a home solar installation, will revolutionize our energy system and make every home energy independent. The solar world has been anticipating this day, and is abuzz with the possibilities. Solar + storage is the key to making solar dispatchable as it circumvents the energy source’s main difficulty, that the energy it generates is only available when the sun is shining. Distributed generation like solar on rooftops can delay distribution system upgrades as demand on a circuit grows, because less power has to be shipped into the circuit. It also can reduce the need to build new transmission lines to carry power from distant grid-scale generation. Solar’s unique nature as a distributed

source of energy means that it can empower Canadians to reduce their carbon footprints not only with respect to their electricity use, but also by enabling carbon reductions in buildings, industry, and transportation. As we learn to adapt to a carbon-constrained future, growing load on the electricity system with plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), a new model of energy consumption is emerging. Getting that energy from renewable sources like solar is a primary objective. As we hope to demonstrate in this series, the solar industries sector recognizes the importance of clean fuels to Canadians. We encourage you to read more about CanSIA and the work of the solar industry at www.cansia.ca, or contact me with your questions or comments at jgorman@cansia.ca. c

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PCL ORILLIA SITES 1, 2 & 3 (RECURRENT ENERGY).

THE FUTURE OF CONSTRUCTION Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Terry Olynyk, Manager of Renewable Energy at PCL, about what sets them apart from other construction companies. PCL is a group of independent construction contractors located throughout Canada, the USA, and Australia. It has a long-established history within traditional construction sectors including civil engineering, commercial construction, infrastructure, residential building, and heavy industry. More recently, 24 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

through its company in Ontario, Canada, PCL took the opportunity to establish a specialized division within the renewable energy sector. When it became public knowledge that the Ontario Government would be awarding FIT contracts, PCL set in motion

a campaign to establish itself as a player within the renewable energy sector. Terry Olynyk, Manager, Renewable Energy, explains more about how this came to be. "When the Green Energy Act was initiated we created an executive-agreed business plan to go out and campaign


WILLIAM RUTLEY (CANADIAN SOLAR).

as if we already had a renewable energy division. PCL is associated with building hospitals, high-rise towers, and airports but not many really understood our capabilities in renewable energy. With our campaign, they quickly realized how serious we were. At the beginning we had just 3 people but the division peaked at 85 people, with quite a program of construction during this peak time. Today, though the market in Ontario is softening, our division still exists and is looking at taking the experience it has gained to projects outside of Ontario."

HIGH CAPACITY CAPABILITIES An example of this peak time for Mr. Olynyk and his team was during 2013 when they partnered with California-based Recurrent Energy after PCL won the tenders for the FIT program. PCL were awarded 14 solar projects with Recurrent Energy, all of which required building within a year, and all of which were spread across nearly 1000 kilometers in the province of Ontario. Despite this monumental challenge, PCL was able to undertake and complete all 14 projects, even while building another 2 solar projects for customers during the same year - bring-

BROCKVILLE 2 (CANADIAN SOLAR).

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PCL MIDHURST 4 (RECURRENT ENERGY).

PCL HAS BEEN ABLE TO CREATE HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF JOBS, FROM THE SMALL AND TEMPORARY TO THE MAJOR AND LONG-TERM.

ing 2013's renewable total for PCL to 16 simultaneous constructions. More recently, PCL have just completed four projects for Penn Energy Renewables, Ltd., based in Philadelphia, USA, as well as building the BeamLight and Illumination projects for Canadian Solar. These 10 megawatt (MW) solar sites are located across different municipalities in Ontario and aim to provide low-scale local energy to the areas. Currently they are working on their 34th project, named Port Hope.

26 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

HOLISTIC ENGINEERING Alongside these solar projects, PCL is also excited about the sustainability possibilities of modular construction. "This means off-site construction and engineering solutions where, instead of being exposed to weather issues, we build it at our facility and transport it to the site after it has been constructed," explains Mr. Olynyk. "On traditional sites you begin with the groundwork then put in the foundations before filling in the building. At the same

time your interior finishers are developing the building as it progresses. You can imagine how many trips in a vehicle getting people and materials to and from the site requires. By building components offsite a lot of that is consolidated and reduced. We are now just delivering fully built out washrooms, kitchens, or apartment suites with far greater efficiency.� “We see this as a very sustainable approach to construction using what are essentially LEED concepts and it is amazing how our experience in renewable energy lends itself to this way of working. An example is a four-story home for the aged we are looking at right now. It possesses a large roof space. We are looking at using our experience in renewable energy to offset their load and install a photovoltaic (PV) application. On top of this we will also be building washrooms and kitchens, and maybe even entire office suites, as well as battery backups off site before installing them locally. Using the experience and knowledge


Utility, Micro-grid and Rooftop Scale

DESIGN-BUILD COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICAL ROOFTOP SOLAR ENGINEERING, PROCUREMENT AND CONSTRUCTION GROUND MOUNT SOLAR INSTALLATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT PANEL MANUFACTURING AND WATER PURIFICATION/GENERATION

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PCL ADELAIDE 1 (RECURRENT ENERGY).

BURRITTS RAPIDS (CANADIAN SOLAR).

BREEN 2 (RECURRENT ENERGY).

gained in renewable energy, combined with our modular construction techniques, we are able to take a holistically sustainable approach. This makes us different and unique in the market. We believe it will be the future of construction." A COMMUNITY PROJECT Underlying PCL's sustainable approach is a model the company calls the 5Ps: Partners, SUNDERLAND (AMP SOLAR).

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people, projects, practices, and places. Of particular note are people - ‘the sustainability of our workforce’ and places – ‘the sustainability of communities where we work’. When PCL entered into the renewable energy sector it provided life-changing opportunities for people who could now enter a sector that was previously unavailable or for people with renewable expertise who gained the opportunity to work with

a major company such as PCL. Through this, many people have developed their personal and vocational skills far faster than perhaps they had ever expected. Furthermore, due to the rapid lifecycle of work in the renewable energy sector, Mr. Olynyk estimates that PCL has been able to create hundreds of thousands of jobs, from the small and temporary to the major and long-term.


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Tulloch provides a broad range of engineering services to hydro, wind and solar power developers, from environmental studies and preliminary design through to construction management.

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www.skycan.ca

• Skyhigh Canada offers a full and complete installation service for the Racking and Modules for solar farms

• Skyhigh Canada provides a quality specialized and unionized workforce with over 20 solar farms worth of experience

• Skyhigh offers their service across all provinces within Canada

Contact Information: Adrian Spellman - Skyhigh Canada Inc. Regional Manager- Central Canada 34 Nixon Rd, Bolton Ontario, L7E 1W2 • Tel.: (905) 951- 5407 • Fax: (905) 951- 5704 • Cell: (416) 688- 0979 • Email: adrian.spellman@skycan.ca

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PCL MIDHURST 3 (RECURRENT ENERGY).

PCL ENTERED INTO THE RENEWABLE ENERGY SECTOR IT PROVIDED LIFE-CHANGING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PEOPLE WHO COULD NOW ENTER A SECTOR.

The ‘places’ part of the model represents PCL’s desire to be a positive presence in the communities where they work. Community development and giveback takes different forms, starting with being open and transparent to the members of those communities. During construction the organization ensures everyone understands the reasons and pro-

cesses of the project and, once completed, PCL collects feedback from the community. Other forms of giving back include giving staff the opportunity to be part of a team tasked with researching and finding a charity of choice that PCL can support, with Habitat for Humanity being of particular note, as well as giving staff weekly paid leave in order to

work within those communities. Sometimes PCL's own employees will be living within the affected areas, so gaining an important personal outlook on issues. TURNING TO THE OUTSIDE Looking to the future, Mr. Olynyk is sensible in his expectations. He outlines what

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INGERSOLL 1 (RECURRENT ENERGY).

ERIE RIDGE SOLAR FARM (SUNEDISON).

the company is engaging with now, and what they already have lined up: "There is another new wave of tenders coming through Ontario called the Large Renewable Procurement (LRP), which is going to award up to 140MW of solar, 200MW of wind, and 50MW of biomass and hydro. PCL has had numerous phone calls and

emails from developers to get involved with budgeting for developers that will be bidding for the LRP in September 2015. Our engineering and estimating side, involved in that program, is very active. We are also helping with budgeting for clients outside of Ontario, in Alberta and Saskatchewan. PCL is keeping an eye on

those provinces as the next most likely to establish programs for renewable energy, alongside opportunities in the U.S. and possibly even the Caribbean. We will also continue to focus on our modular building techniques as a means of offering the most environmentally sustainable construction projects possible." c

SMITH FALLS 3 (RECURRENT ENERGY).

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Earth Moving, Site Servicing & Environmental

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SUNPUMP SOLAR INC

“WE’VE DEVELOPED A TWO-LAYER PANEL SO THE TOP IS PV AND THE BOTTOM IS THE PHOTON THERMAL PANEL, WHICH GIVES OUR DEALERS THE ABILITY TO OFFER ELECTRICITY ALONGSIDE HEAT, MEETING ALL DOMESTIC ENERGY NEEDS.”

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AT NIGHT Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Bruce Gray, CEO and Founder of SunPump Solar Inc., about a system which generates energy 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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SUNPUMP SOLAR INC

SunPump Solar Inc., based in Vancouver, is a manufacturer of renewable heating systems. Their unique technology is capable of generating heat during all weather, and even at night. By circulating a refrigerant at -50°C, SunPump’s panels remain colder than the surrounding atmosphere; even if it’s raining or snowing they attract warmer energy, and so are able to exchange and produce heat on demand.

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SunPump was founded five years ago, in 2010. “We started up to make a sustainable difference in the way people choose energy,” says Bruce Gray, CEO and Founder of SunPump. “I was personally motivated to do something for my kids. We started small, in a home office, but we’re growing like a hockey stick at this point. This previous year we were around 300% growth, and we’re expecting to

maintain around 200% growth per year for the foreseeable future.” NASA TECHNOLOGY In the 1960s, NASA developed the first Solar Heat Pump for manned space flight. “They still use that technology,” explains Mr. Gray. “It was too expensive to commercialize, however we innovated ways to improve Solar Heat Pumps down to residen-


cloudy day, and not at all at night. Solar PV averages about six hours a day, over the course of a year. The SunPump system is a game-changer because it can produce solar thermal on demand and has a built in 10 kW Thermal Battery, plus an electric backup, to act as a primary system. The combination of 24-hour energy and solar storage allows SunPump to completely replace the need for a boiler or furnace. Our Vision is a compact and economical SunPump appliance that provides all the power, heat, cooling, and hot water for a Net Zero Energy or Passive Plus building.”

tial levels using off-the-shelf HVAC components.” The SunPump system can be compared to a geothermal system, but instead of circulating water for ground source heat, a new Photon panel directly evaporates refrigerant on the roof. “Because our fluid is so cold SunPump can harvest energy from the wind, rain, snow, or any atmospheric conditions,” says Mr. Gray. “That heat differential can then be transformed by a heat pump compressor for any application, from space heating, to domestic hot water, to air conditioning, to heating a pool.” Because the SunPump panel draws heat from the Sun or the ambient environment allowing it to produce day and night, the system is extremely cost-effective. “The downside to solar PV systems and wind and other renewables is intermittency,” says Mr. Gray. “In other words, a solar panel works when the sun is on it, but not on a

SUSTAINABLY-RUN BUSINESS In addition to the sustainability benefits of SunPump’s product, the way the company is run reflects a long-term approach to doing business. SunPump is employee-owned and engineer-driven. “It makes good business sense, actually,” says Mr. Gray. “We invest in our people and make sure they’re rewarded for doing their job well, and then because they love what they’re doing, their passion spreads out virally to the customers and continuous by word-of-mouth. After one system gets installed, even in a really small town, pretty soon afterwards the Dealer starts getting calls for estimates. Our goal was to have 100 really, really happy customers.” SunPump have taken a series of measures to ensure that its operations are run with an eye towards environmental sustainability. The first SunPump office is located by Mount Arrowsmith, which is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. “It’s a remarkable place,” says Mr. Gray. “It’s has

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SUNPUMP SOLAR INC

old-growth forest, pure water, and clean air. We conserve power, water, and resources, and use renewable energy.” SunPump has taken other practical measures, too. “I don’t travel as much as I used to,” says Mr. Gray. “We encourage people to connect online instead. We’re moving to hybrid electric vehicles. We always make sure we’re looking at our footprint, and how much carbon is involved in our operations. Our core value

36 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

as a company since the beginning days has always been to improve the environment and to run the business sustainably.” PLANS FOR THE FUTURE So what’s next for SunPump? One development will be the integration of solar PV into the SunPump panel. “We’ve developed a two-layer panel so the top is PV and the bottom is the Photon thermal

panel, which gives our Dealers the ability to offer electricity alongside heat, meeting all domestic energy needs,” says Mr. Gray. SunPump will release Smart models that can double the performance by using Off-Peak electric rates, and can use water heating to produce free cooling. In addition to this, the company is investigating opportunities for Partnerships and Joint Ventures with PV players. “We want bigger teams,” says


Mr. Gray. “A Solar City partnership allows us to complement their PV with SunPump. Heating and cooling is a much larger market than PV” As for SunPump’s many achievements, for Mr. Gray, the proudest is the company’s ability to attract young talent – including his own children. “My three oldest teenagers are all aboard,” says Mr. Gray. “My son left a high-paying job on an Alberta oil pipeline to come to us. Young people want more than just pay; they want belonging. They

want to do something that matters. That’s what we’ve been able to deliver for our employees. We’re a high growth company that pays well, while we’re making a difference. We posted a job a while ago for sales rep, and within a week we had eight hundred applicants. We were just flooded; we didn’t know where to start!” It’s not just prospective employees who are clamoring to get involved with SunPump. “There’s a real pent-up demand among customers,” says Mr. Gray. “Business

is booming. The perception has been that you’d have to pay more to get renewables, so the barrier is front-end cost. We’re able to cost a third of solar PV or Geo-Exchange, and less than heating using fossil fuels. Solar at less than non-renewables is a game changer. If you’re not paying more for it, and you could have clean energy instead of dirty energy, and you could save utility cost and make your property more valuable, why wouldn’t you go renewable? We’re trying to be a little piece of that solution.” c

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MOOSE POWER

PIONEERS Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Scott McLorie, President at Moose Power, about being an innovative and pioneering Canadian solar developer.

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MOOSE POWER

THE COMPANY PRIDES ITSELF ON ITS COMPLETION RECORD; SOMETHING THEY FEEL SETS THEM APART IN THE ONTARIO MARKET.

Since 2009 Moose Power has been delivering solar projects to clients throughout Ontario, Canada, with a focus on rooftop arrays. It began when the founders saw an entrepreneurial opportunity in the recently introduced Green Energy Act (GEA), a legislation intended to expand the province’s renewable energy economy 40 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

through feed-in-tariff (FIT) policies. Over 40 projects ranging in size between 75 to 875 kilowatts (kW) have been completed to date, both developed organically and acquired from other developers. The company prides itself on its completion record; something they feel sets them apart in the Ontario market. “There were few build-

ings properly vetted for structural capacity or connection capacity prior to 2010,” explains President Scott McLorie. “Before that, the industry simply hadn’t carried out enough engineering work in Ontario, or even across North America. To complete projects that had hit engineering roadblocks, we were able to achieve commer-


without exception, time has proven them to be profitable projects.” THE NEXT GENERATION Moose Power recently secured a deal to supply TerraForm Power, Inc., a NASDAQ-listed clean power asset owner based in the United States, with 17 operating plants totaling more than 6 megawatts (MW). The projects are a mix of rooftop as well as ground mounted sites and are all located within Ontario. TerraForm Power, Inc. is owned by SunEdison and will act as the long-term owner of the projects. Moose Power continues to work on a large number

of other rooftop and ground-mount projects under the GEA FIT 4 program. Moose Power’s landlord partners participate by either entering into a lease agreement under which they rent out a building or facility’s roof space to Moose Power in exchange for lease revenue, or have the option of going into a profit-share agreement in which they receive a return over the lifetime of the array. Mr. McLorie explains that the former option has been most popular with customers to date. “Moose Power is always transparent with our financial assumptions, so that a building owner can make an informed decision

cial operation by cooperating with suppliers and even competitors to find innovative solutions. We also successfully worked creatively with local distribution companies to connect projects where the first attempts to connect had been unsuccessful. Moose Power is happy to have invested the time and money to move those forward because SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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MOOSE POWER about whether they want the landlord or partner model. Understandably, landlords are wary when they are being locked into a 20-year contract. Most are sophisticated real estate professionals and have to balance the benefits of a new income stream with the unknowns involved in a relatively new aspect of facility management. Where possible we provide them with the option of becoming a partner, but in most cases it makes more sense for them to avoid any performance-based risk and to simply take the solar installation on as an additional source of leasing revenue.� Either way, building owners and landlords are increasingly happy with the opportunity to transform a facility’s roof from a cost center into a profit generator. Traditionally the rooftop has been a lease agreement challenge, with landlords and tenants redrawing leases to try and pass its responsibility onto the other party. Rooftop solar arrays provide a clean, safe, profitable option that can also reduce the need for maintenance. This type of distributed generation also provides excellent benefits to the wider utilities market. Mr. McLorie explains that, taking Ontario as a specific example, the generation profile of solar generation compliments the province’s load profile. Peak generation occurs during the work day, coinciding with plant and processor operation times as well as air conditioning loads. Distributed generation acts much like conservation, and can reduce the need for costly system upgrades, becoming an important asset in a region where the grid is already decades old.

42 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


AS THEY CONTINUE TO PLAY A LEADING ROLE IN ONTARIO, MOOSE POWER IS ALSO WELL POSITIONED TO TAKE ON EMERGING MARKETS.

FLEXIBILITY None of this would be possible without a development team that is flexible and creative. Mr. McLorie says that the company’s greatest asset is the team it has built. “I think that the company - our people - have been recognized within the industry as having the ability to source creative opportunities and to complete any solar project. We are proud to have been able to put the team together. It is our greatest success to date and we are banking on it to enable Moose Power to grow into the future.” As the market changes, the industry matures and the policy justifications for supporting solar diminish, this flexibility will involve more than simply creative engineering work. New models for project development will emerge in the Ontario market, based on much lower costs of installed

solar. Soon, Mr. McLorie feels projects will be justified solely on the avoided cost of energy, along with a small recognition of the system benefit and role that distributed generation plays in reducing transmission and distribution costs. THE FUTURE The Company is represented on a number of industry working groups both industry-organized and those arranged by the official industry body, the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA). This enables Moose Power to use their experience and knowledge to help inform and shape policy. The goal is to further the role solar will play in our energy mix moving forward, and to create a better business environment for themselves, their colleagues, and the industry as a whole.

As they continue to play a leading role in Ontario, Moose Power is also well positioned to take on emerging markets. “In a lot of jurisdictions, solar generation is the cheapest and cleanest option available,” explains Mr. McLorie. “Across North America and around the world, regulatory frameworks are being adjusted to recognize the benefits of clean renewable generation as well as the benefits of smaller distributed generation, especially in markets without legacy transmission infrastructure. Part of our job is to stay on top of changing policy, to forge new partnerships, and to hunt for emerging opportunities. The experience that has been gained here at home puts us, along with our suppliers and partners in the Ontario solar industry, in a very strong position to be leaders abroad.” c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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MMM GROUP

MMM IS RESPONSIBLE FOR MORE LEED-CERTIFIED BUILDING PROJECTS IN CANADA THAN ANY OTHER FIRM, AND IS ALSO A LEADER IN USING BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION SOFTWARE.

DESIGNED TO LAST Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Steve Kemp, Partner and Vice President of Buildings - Sustainability at MMM Group Limited, about MMM’s long history of sustainable building, and what the future holds. At 2000-employees strong, MMM Group Limited is one of the largest consulting engineering firms in Canada. Founded in 1952 in the Toronto suburb 44 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

of Thornhill, Ontario, the group’s recent multi-award-winning projects include one of South America’s busiest airports, a $1.5 billion 42 km highway in Quebec,

and British Columbia’s largest healthcare project, an eight-story critical care tower serving 1.6 million people. MMM leads the industry, providing multidisciplinary


expertise in a broad spectrum of consulting; including program and project management, engineering, planning, and geomatics. MMM is also an industry leader when it comes to sustainable building design. Since bringing in Enermodal Engineering, Canada’s largest consulting firm exclusively dedicated to green buildings and communities, MMM is responsible for more LEED-certified building projects in Canada than any other firm, and is also a leader in using building energy simulation software

to achieve designs which are energy efficient, LEED-certifiable, and cost-effective. With the LEED Gold certification of Ottawa’s Performance Court Building, MMM reached 284 LEED-accredited projects across Canada. Steve Kemp, Partner and Vice President of Buildings – Sustainability, was at Enermodal Engineering before the company joined MMM. “We started 30 years ago, and our only focus was on sustainability. We developed tools for understanding windows, doing research for governments,

developing energy modelling software. Now, with MMM, we’re doing very large projects like hospitals and courthouses, but in terms of the day to day work, actually very little has changed.” SUSTAINABLE BUILDING One of MMM’s most impressive projects is the Drake’s Landing Solar Community. The 52 homes use 800 solar thermal collectors, all roof-mounted, to harness solar energy that powers 90% of the community’s space heating and 60% of its water heating. In SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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MMM GROUP DRAKES LANDING.

2012, Drake’s Landing achieved a new world record when a huge 97% of its space heating was powered by solar energy. “The community has won several awards,” notes Mr. Kemp, “especially out of Europe.”

Perhaps even more extraordinary is MMM’s success in making challenging building types energy efficient. With Waterpark Place, a $400 million Royal Bank of Canada office tower, MMM used state-of-

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46 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

the-art energy modelling and innovative sustainability solutions. Mr. Kemp explains how the argument for energy modelling is often easy to make in financial terms. “You get a return on your investment

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Another challenging building type for incorporating energy efficiency is healthcare buildings. “It’s got to be a hospital first, and it’s got to do the job of a hospital,” Mr. Kemp explains. “They’re one of the highest energy-using buildings you can build. We’re working on what we call the hospitals of the future. They’re better for the patients, as IT improves and you reduce paperwork, and you can do a lot of waste heat recovery – we’ve man-

aged to make exhaust air heat recovery work better in these buildings.” Recently, MMM’s work using energy modelling for the Surrey Memorial Hospital Acute Care Tower allowed the building to achieve LEED Gold certification. The building used durable natural materials and stateof-the-art energy efficient technologies, but was nonetheless completed on schedule, allowing the hospital to quickly gain 151 extra beds.

in energy savings, and many provinces provide incentive programs where they pay out money when you achieve certain levels of performance. There’s also been recent ramping up of legislation on minimum building energy performance. Modelling allows you to optimize design choices to achieve these types of targets.” Energy modelling ultimately meant that the design for Waterpark Place could incorporate inventive design features to maximize energy efficiency: High-efficiency condensing boilers, heat reclaim on all ventilation units, deep lake water cooling, and a dedicated outdoor air system. It also incorporates simple, common-sense solutions too, like providing 380 bike stalls to encourage greener commuting. The building is now on track to be the first new speculative office tower in Toronto to be certified LEED Platinum. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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RSAI1118_SmallSustainableBizMagAd-HiRes.pdf MMM GROUP

1

2015-10-27

10:12 AM

Appreciative of our collaborative sustainable efforts, we salute MMM Group Limited with best wishes for future success!

Proud Design Partner

Passionate About Sustainability

North America's Most Livable Office

| MMM Group Limited, Kitchener WILLIAM J. KROHN

GREEN OFFICES MMM doesn’t just factor sustainability into its projects for clients. In its own premises and corporate culture, energy efficiency and environmental friendliness are essential. As green building consultants, MMM has been in a perfect position to lead the way when it comes to buildings with high energy performance and a low ecological footprint. MMM’s offices in Kitchener, Ottawa, Thornhill, and Toronto are all LEED-certified. “Our Kitchener office,” says Mr. Kemp, with

justifiable pride, “is among the lowest energy-consuming buildings in North America by utility bills. We get 69 kWh/m2 in a cold climate!” This compares to the Canadian office average of 333 kWh/m2. This extraordinary level of energy efficiency is achieved by deliberate siting of the building, a high-performance building envelope, maximizing daylight, and a narrow (12m across) building footprint and a low ambient capable air source heat pump system. Toilets and urinals reuse collected rainwater, occupancy sen-

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sors control lighting, heating/cooling, and ventilation, and the roof holds a 5.5 kW solar PV system. It’s good for employees too; the Center for the Built Environment deemed MMM’s Kitchener office the Most Livable Office in North America. In addition to envelope-pushing sustainable design, MMM is a Gold Pledging Partner of the Sustainable Waterloo project, for which it has committed to zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2018, including commuting and business travel. “We’re

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48 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


trying to get people to use the Train, and we’ve purchased a hybrid car people can use in lieu of their personal car for business travel,” explains Mr. Kemp. “We also use lots of teleconferencing as we’re trying to use modern systems rather than flying all over the place.” Every summer, MMM holds the Commuter Olympics, rewarding employees who keep their commuting-related carbon emissions to a minimum. MMM also uses in-house software to carefully study commuter habits, allowing the group to identify successes and areas for improvement. Mr. Kemp is realistic but optimistic about the challenges they face when trying to promote sustainable behavior. “Buildings are easy; people are tough. I pay attention to what kind of incentives we can find that actually moves the needle on how people behave.” OFFERING SOLUTIONS MMM has always been on the cutting-edge of sustainable design. “25 years ago, we pioneered and wrote the first software programs that evaluate window performance in a computer,” Mr. Kemp explains. “That’s now North America-wide. We’ve been doing rainwater cisterns for 20 years, which is also becoming more common now. We were the first to install independent heat recovery in the context of a high-rise residential: Almost 20 years ago we designed a building that gave suites their own ventilation system, and I’d guess 30-40% of high-rises in the Toronto area are doing this now. We’ve had an influence in the wider context of building design in southern Ontario, and more broadly in Canada.”

IT IS MMM’S WILLINGNESS TO RECONCILE DIVERSE DISCIPLINES THAT ALLOWS IT TO CONTINUE LEADING THE WAY IN INNOVATIVE, SUSTAINABLE DESIGN.

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MMM isn’t content to rest on its laurels however. “We’re still looking at getting into even higher performances,” says Mr. Kemp. “How do you make ultra-low energy buildings what I would call net-zero-ready buildings? How do you make that much more commonplace?” For Mr. Kemp, one part of this is creating common metrics. “Everyone’s used to talking about the R-value of walls and the U-value of windows, but if I’m the mechanical engineer sizing the heating equipment, I care about the total wall performance. It’s the same for cooling: You care not only about how much sun comes in the window, but also how big the window is. Mechanical engineers and architects still aren’t using the same framework of building performance.” It is MMM’s willingness to reconcile diverse disciplines that allows it to continue leading the way in innovative, sustainable design. c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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TERRAGON ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES INC

WASTED Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Peter Tsantrizos, President of Terragon Environmental Technologies Inc., about how they are eliminating waste through the development of compact, clean, user-friendly technologies.

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Terragon Environmental Technologies Inc. is a technology development company based in Montreal, Canada, with a focus on waste treatment technologies and a cutting edge philosophy. They are seeking to completely change the way waste is viewed, and as Sustainable Business Magazine finds out, they are already making great headway. “We have all been trained to think of waste as something unpleasant that we need to send away as quickly as possible,” explains Peter Tsantrizos, President of Terragon Environmental Technologies. “Terragon is trying to say no, there are important uses for waste. There is no need to get rid of it.” This is why Dr. Tsantrizos is keen to emphasize Terragon is not in the waste management business. Instead their goal is to eliminate the concept of waste altogether through the development of small scale technologies for the onsite conversion of waste into resources. With a

background in technology development, waste management, and engineering, Dr. Tsantrizos established Terragon in 2004 to be an organization that would transform the way the existing waste management industry operated. Terragon possesses three technologies in its portfolio: Micro Auto Gasification System (MAGS), for solid waste; Wastewater Electrochemical

Treatment Technology (WETT), for liquid waste; and System for Total Environmental Protection (STEP), a platform for integrating MAGS and WETT. THE GENERATION GAME MAGS is a revolutionary technology, the first appliance to generate domestically viable levels of energy using only

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TERRAGON ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES INC

SINCE ITS FOUNDATION IN 2004, TERRAGON HAS BEEN ON A MISSION TO CHANGE THE WAY THE GENERAL PUBLIC RELATES TO WASTE PRODUCTS.

combustible waste as fuel. It contains a 55 gallon drum that is loaded up with carbon-based waste, without need for pre-treatment, and the appliance converts waste into a synthesis gas that is then burned for energy. MAGS is a highly efficient converter, able to convert 1 kilogram (kg) of waste into 2 kilowatt hours (kWh) of thermal energy. MAGS is designed for use on site, within any type of environment or location, meaning its user-friendliness has 52 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

been a high priority during development. “It can be used by anyone able to operate a washing machine,” says Dr. Tsantrizos. “It is very different from anything else on the market because it was developed for use not by waste processors but by the waste generator, locally and on-site. User-operability was one of two main focuses, the other being safety - both environmentally and for the user. In order for it to be useful within an industrial or residential environment, all emissions


have been cleansed so that there are no bad smells or discharges.� Aside from its abilities for treating all combustible municipal solid waste, MAGS offers specific advantages for industries producing special or hazardous waste that requires specialized treatment services. By allowing companies to safely treat these waste streams at the source, MAGS can help reduce the risks involved in transporting the waste and at the same time offer them energy for their operations. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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TERRAGON ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES INC

WATER Having made strides in the tackling of solid waste, Terragon has also turned its attention to liquid waste with WETT, which as in the case for MAGS, was developed with the support of Sustainable Development Technology Canada, the Canadian Department of Defence, and the U.S. Navy. WETT is the size of a small refrigerator and uses electrochemical processes to convert used water into useful water. Terragon’s approach is based on creating a hierarchy

of three categories for water: potable, utility, and irrigation. WETT creates utility water out of grey water, or irrigation water out of black water, thereby closing the water cycle. A small amount of potable water input results in a small amount of irrigation water output, such as into the garden, with the majority remaining within WETT’s water loop. Ultimately this will provide between 70% to 90% savings in water. “We are currently in the testing phase with our first product, which is designed

to treat water contaminated with oil such as water from washing tanks,” explains Dr. Tsantrizos. “It has been in development for 6 years and we are quite far through the field evaluation now with that product and expect to have it commercially ready by 2016. WETT is designed to eliminate the basic concept of water management as it exists today. The way we use water today - brushing teeth with the same water used to flush our toilet, or showering with the same water used for flowers in the garden - is highly illogical and our technology will change that. It will essentially eliminate the need for sewers and septic tanks.” INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGIES MAGS and WETT are complementary technologies that Terragon believes can work to create a “zero-waste habitat”. STEP is the company’s project to integrate the two technologies. Using MAGS results in a small amount of water byproduct; using WETT results in a small amount of organic sludge byproduct. STEP enables MAGS to use WETT’s byproduct and vice versa to create an environment where waste is completely eliminated.

54 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


STEP is not yet a reality but Terragon is working diligently to realize it as a commercial product. Discussing its development, Dr. Tsantrizos explains how MAGS and WETT technologies are beginning to converge. “Right now both appliances are not on the exact same scale. MAGS has reached the point of being able to utilize waste for up to 500 people, while WETT is designed for 5 to 30 people. We are trying to scale up WETT and scale down MAGS so that we can have a solution for sites ranging from 5 and 500 people, meaning we will have a product useable by everyone from domestic households to industrial facilities.” REDEFINING OUR UNDERSTANDING Since its foundation in 2004, Terragon has been on a mission to change the way the general public relates to waste products. MAGS and WETT are making clear progress towards creating the zero-waste habitat envisioned by Dr. Tsantrizos and his company, a pursuit driven by understanding that there is a fundamental error in the way that existing waste management protocols function. “All of us have been trained by 100 years of garbage trucks and sewer systems to think of waste as something bad,” says Dr. Tsantrizos. “The big problem is that we use only a part of what we buy, of what

we consume, and the rest goes into some sort of invisible treatment process where people just take it away and we don’t have to care about it. We are trying to change that at the source where people view everything as useful. If we get the message across and deliver the enabling technologies then I believe people will change. For me, that would be an accomplishment worth capping my career with.” c

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NEWLEEF 2015

THE CONFERENCE HAS EXPANDED FROM ONE DAY OF LINEAR SESSIONS IN ITS FIRST YEAR, TO TWO DAYS OF MULTIPLE STREAMS OF PRESENTATIONS.

NEWLEEF 2015

NEWFOUNDLAND AND

LABRADOR’S GREEN ECONOMY CONFERENCE On October 8-9, 2015, the Newfoundland and Labrador Environmental Industry Association (NEIA) held Newleef – the province’s premier green economy conference. Written by Kieran Hanley. 56 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

“Newleef brings industry, small business, academia, and government together to discuss the growth and diversification of the province’s economy through the protection of, mitigation of effects to, or enhancement of the natural environment,” says Ted Lomond, NEIA’s Executive Director. The conference attracts environmental professionals, business owners and entrepreneurs, policy analysts, academia and researchers, and organizations with sustainability objectives. “NEIA’s members are active in all areas of Newfoundland and Labrador’s economy, from green building, to waste management, to forestry, to oil and gas,” says Mr. Lomond. “What binds them is their belief that economic development and environ-


TED LOMOND, NEIA’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR.

standing in this province of the relationship between economy and environment.” The range of presentations at Newleef 2015 was broad, with sessions exploring business opportunities; the latest in local research; intra-sector innovation possibilities; the navigation of environmental issues with a focus on solutions; and the products, services, and activities of organizations operating in the province. Sessions were grouped according to themes of importance to the local sector, including food and agriculture, resource development, cor-

porate sustainability, industry development, new technologies, and green building. INNOVATION One of the main attractions at Newleef 2015 was the Innovation Session, an event which highlighted exciting new research in the province and connected local businesses with university and college staff. “Innovation is a key consideration when we talk about diversifying Newfoundland and Labrador’s economy,” says Mr. Lomond. “Innovation in product, process,

mental health are not mutually exclusive values. Newleef is the one event in the province which brings these like-minded individuals and organizations together.” STEADY GROWTH In just four years, since the first iteration of Newleef in 2012, attendance at the event has grown by over 100%. The conference has expanded from one day of linear sessions in its first year, to two days of multiple streams of presentations and as many as three concurrent activities for attendees. “Newleef continues to grow in size and scope,” says Mr. Lomond. “This is an indication of the growing interest and underSUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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NEWLEEF 2015 STEPHEN KENT, DEPUTY PREMIER OF NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR.

OUR INNOVATION SESSION HELPS CREATE THE NETWORKS, RELATIONSHIPS, AND CULTURES.

service, or business model contributes to the long-term international competitiveness of our firms, but it is not something that happens naturally. Our Innovation Session helps create the networks, relationships, and cultures that are necessary in order to give our firms the chance to innovate.” Innovation does not happen in isolation, and is lagging in Newfoundland and Labrador. The Conference Board of Canada recently gave the province a ‘D’ grade in innovation performance, ranking it 22nd among 26 ranked jurisdictions. “Innovation is not only an important factor in improving productivity, economic growth, and job creation. It is also essential from an environmental perspective,” explains Mr. Lomond. “Living in communities that are often isolated, remote, and natural resource dependent can pose environmental challenges. New and creative ideas are required in this province to develop 58 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

the unique solutions we need to avoid or mitigate the environmental effects of our business activities.” The Innovation Session featured over 40 rapid-fire presentations, drawing environmental sector researchers across a range of disciplines including engineering, marine systems, geography, biology, business, chemistry, geosciences, environmental studies, environmental policy, food sciences, technology programs, etc. The event gave firms an opportunity to discover local research expertise with an aim to solving existing product and service challenges or generate new business ideas and initiatives. “This was the fourth Innovation Session we have organized,” says Mr. Lomond. “In each of the previous years, our event has resulted in collaborations between industry and academia – collaborations that have been supported by funding agencies.” Particularly engaged in the sessions were the

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). CLIMATE CHANGE IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR Newleef 2015 also featured an exclusive and timely session focusing on tackling climate change within the province, and how it might consider moving forward in pricing carbon emissions. “85 percent of Canadians are now living in a province where carbon is being priced,” says Mr. Lomond, referring to program implementations in Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec . “It is time that Newfoundland and Labrador had an open discussion on when we will do our part for the environment, how we will address our rising greenhouse gas emissions, and how we will help capitalize on the business opportunities this creates.”


Encouraging that discussion at Newleef was Chris Ragan, Chair of Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission and the event’s keynote speaker. “Chris leads a group of experts who take a practical and economic-centric approach to policy development,” says Mr. Lomond, noting the approach could be appealing to Newfoundland and Labrador’s decision mak-

ers. Ragan’s presentation built a strong case for the province to join the country’s major economies in pricing carbon emissions, and was a highlight for many of the attendees. The province’s Minister Responsible for the Office of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency added a local context to the conversation, outlining specific factors Newfoundland and Labrador needs to consider when assessing pricing options. The climate change session also featured an expert assessment on the needs and challenges the province faces in adapting to its shifting climate. “Newleef presented the most comprehensive public discussion on climate change and carbon emissions pricing that our province has seen,” says Mr. Lomond. “It provided an excellent base from which industry and environmental stakeholders can choose how to proceed. We look forward to being part of that discussion and that decision.” FORTUITOUS TIMING The discussions held at Newleef 2015 were timely. The event preceded a provincial election by just over one month. Each pro-

vincial political party had the opportunity to address attendees and outline their visions for Newfoundland and Labrador’s green economy, while guests had the opportunity to meet and share ideas and concerns. “On behalf of our membership, we engage the province’s leaders on a regular basis both face-to-face and in writing to indicate the needs of the sector,” says Mr. Lomond. “Newleef is a chance for these leaders to demonstrate their commitment to the industry and to discuss issues directly with stakeholders.” Mr. Lomond says NEIA’s members were pleased with Newleef 2015. “Newleef is the best opportunity in the province for the discussion of issues of common economic and environmental interest,” he explains. “Planning has already begun for next year’s event”. c NEIA is a not-for-profit association of businesses that promotes the growth and development of the green economy in Newfoundland and Labrador. More information on NEIA and Newleef can be found at www.neia.org.

NEIA CHAIR DEIDRE PUDDISTER FROM PENNECON LTD. AND DWIGHT BALL, LEADER OF THE OFFICIAL OPPOSITION (LIBERAL PARTY OF NL).

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GLOBAL EVENTS

DEC

2015

7th - 8th

6th Annual Sustainable Innovation Forum 2015 Stade de France, Saint-Denis, France www.cop21paris.org

The Sustainable Innovation Forum is the largest business focused event held during the annual Conference of the Parties. Building on year-round work from Climate Action and the UN Environment Programme, the 2 day Forum will convene cross-sector participants from business, government, finance, UN, NGO, and civil society to create an unparalleled opportunity to bolster business innovation and bring scale to the emerging green economy.

7th - 8th

SOLAR CANADA 2015 Toronto, ON, Canada

Provincial governments and consumers are focusing more on renewable energy in an effort to lower greenhouse gases and utilize more affordable sources of energy. This has created a tremendous opportunity for companies to expand their market presence in Canada. Solar Canada Conference & Exposition 2015 will provide an excellent platform to connect with industry professionals and enter this growing market.

www.solarcanadaconference.ca

SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

PROMOTE YOUR EVENT HERE If your organization has a trade show or event, please let us know and we will promote your event on our global events pages.

11th -13th

Green Festival 2015 Portland, OR, USA www.greenfestivals.org

The Green Festival will be held at Oregon Convention Center, the first convention center in the nation to receive the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED-EB (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Existing Buildings) certification.

14th - 16th

World Congress on Sustainable Technologies London, UK www.wcst.org

The congress covers a wide spectrum of topics that relate to sustainability, which includes technical and non-technical research areas. It also encourages sharing new knowledge about sustainable technologies and environmental impacts.

For more information please contact us at: info@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net

15th - 23rd

Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week 2016 Abu Dhabi, UAE

Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week (ADSW) is the ground-breaking global forum that unites thought leaders, policy makers, and investors to address the challenges of renewable energy and sustainable development. An Abu Dhabi government initiative, ADSW is the largest gathering on sustainability in the Middle East and a significant forum for stimulating international dialogue and action.

Sustainable Foods Summit San Francisco, CA, USA

Food ingredients, marketing developments, and sustainable packaging are focal themes of the North American edition of the Sustainable Foods Summit. How are new technologies creating novel sustainable ingredients? How can food & beverage firms reduce their packaging impacts? What is the outlook for the organic and eco-labeled food market? What developments are occurring in freefrom labels? Such questions will be addressed in the summit.

The 36th Annual EcoFarm Conference Pacific Grove, CA, USA

Regenerating our lands and water. The EcoFarm Conference is more than a conference, it’s a gathering for inspiration, renewal, and celebration brought to you by the Ecological Farming Association.

www.abudhabisustainabilityweek.com

20th - 22th

www.sustainablefoodssummit.com

20th - 23rd

www.eco-farm.org/conference

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JAN 2016


DUBAI, UAE (FEBRUARY 17-18) HOUSTON, TX (FEBRUARY 25-26) LONDON, UK (MARCH 10-11) TORONTO, CANADA (APRIL 14-15) NEW YORK, NY (JUNE 16-17)

Advanced Certified Sustainability (CSR) Practitioner Training

More exciting destinations for 2016 You might have missed the opportunity of receiving the globally recognized certification as a CSR Practitioner, but in the New Year how about receiving a certified training on sustainability and CSR issues? How about becoming the CSR champion within your organization? This challenging 2-day training offered by Centre for Sustainability and Excellence (CSE), aims to give you all the latest tools and resources required to implement or upscale existing sustainability initiatives taking place in your organization.

Dubai, UAE

Houston, TX

London, UK

Toronto, Canada

New York, NY

February

February

March

April

June

17-18

25-26 10-11 14-15 16-17

For more information visit http://www.cse-net.org/article/127/upcoming-trainings or contact us at sustainability@cse-net.org SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ADVERTISERS INDEX A Alston Associates Inc. Aqua Timber Inc.

P30 P48

C Caribbean Power Solutions Ltd P14 Centre for Sustainability and Excellence P61 Ceramic (Trinidad) Limited P15 CIBC Mellon Back Cover Cosma Solar P30 D Deltro Group Desjardins Landscaping Inc.

P27 P29

E Electrical Industries Group

P14

62 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

G GE

P14

N Nova Lighting Ltd

P15

I Indocom Limited

P15

P Pelican Woodcliff Inc.

P46

K KA Factor Group Inc.

P29

R Robertson Simmons Architects Inc.

P48

L Lucy Electric

P15

S Skyhigh Canada Inc.

P29

T Tulloch Engineering

P29

W William J. Krohn Architect

P48

M Mia Green Expo & Conference Murphy Contracting Co. Ltd.

Inside Back P31


Green Mia 8 th Edition

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February 9, 10 & 11, 2016 Miami Airport Convention Center

Meet Major Suppliers - Get Best Deals - Increase Professional Value Obtain Educational Credits - Connect with Innovation - Scout Representations Uncover Business Opportunities - Network Locally, Regionally & Globally (40 countries under one roof) Accredited sessions at special rates for Architects, Engineers, Interior Designers & LEED Pros.

Green Mia

Green Building | SOLAR | CleanTech | Energy Saving

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in East USA, Latin America & The Caribbean

To Attend: Register NOW & SAVE at www.MiaGreen.com

To Exhibit / Sponsor call (305) 412-0000 or mail@MiaGreen.com

Ask for current specials


Social Finance: Enabling Positive Change Through Investments Responsible investing is part of a transformative change to recognize the importance of sustainable business practices while creating value for investors. Social finance tools and strategies such as screening for environmental, social and governance factors can help plan sponsors, endowments and other institutional investors as they pursue positive change and financial returns.

To learn more: cibcmellon.com /csr @cibcmellon Š2015. A BNY Mellon and CIBC Joint Venture Company. CIBC Mellon is a licensed user of the CIBC trade-mark and certain BNY Mellon trade-marks, is the corporate brand of CIBC Mellon Trust Company and CIBC Mellon Global Securities Services Company and may be used as a generic term to reference either or both companies. This is not an offer to provide any product or service even if reference is made to the product or service. Some products or services are available only through BNY Mellon.

Sustainable Business Magazine  

Issue 07/15

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