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SUSTAINABLE ISSUE 02/15

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

SUSTAINABLE CAMPUSES

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON POWERING SUSTAINABILITY

TORONTO

HYDRO MR RICHARD DAMECOUR

President & CEO of FVB Energy Inc.

ALSO FEATURED THIS ISSUE

AASHE • AACC • CEA

S U S TA I N I N G T O M O R R O W. T O D AY


SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

Sustainable Business Magazine is committed to promoting sustainable printing. This magazine is printed on Forest Stewardship Council certified material and manufactured using environmentally sustainable procedures. All lithographic printer inks used are vegetable-based.

SBM Media Ltd Norwich Enterprise Centre, 4B Guildhall Hill, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 1JH, United Kingdom • T: +44 (0)1603 516519 Email: info@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net www.sustainablebusinessmagazine.net Editor: Fiona FitzGerald Assistant Editor: Thomas Massey Profile Writers: George Harris Jack Griggs-Smith Contributors: Brad Bradford Jan Burton Robert Craig Richard Damecour Simon Davis Andrea L. Dono Amrita Lall Atwal Channa Perera Taryn Wilkinson Meghan Fay Zahniser Web Administrator: Steve Phipps

CONTENTS ISSUE 02/15

Welcome to the latest issue of Sustainable Business Magazine Sustainable Business Magazine aims to spread awareness of the values of sustainability, as well as the brilliant ways in which organizations continue to meet challenges and champion corporate social responsibility. This issue contains the first installment of our ‘Powering Sustainability’ series. The series is being run in partnership with the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) and celebrates the efforts being made by Canadian power companies to develop and operate sustainably. Each installment will be prefaced by a foreword from CEA Director of Sustainable Development Channa Perera. The first installment includes detailed features on Toronto Hydro Corporation, Saskatoon Light & Power, and the Northwest Territories Power Corporation. The latest installment of our AASHE ‘Sustainable Campuses’ series features the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Oregon, and Niagara College. The series is being run in partnership with AASHE (the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education) and celebrates the continuing efforts of North American universities to develop and operate sustainably, as well as the role they’re taking in educating students and the wider public about the importance of sustainability. The series is prefaced by a foreword from AASHE’s Executive Director Meghan Fay Zahniser. Continuing our focus on higher education, Andrea Dono, Program Coordinator at the American Association of Community Colleges, explains how community colleges can play a key role in building resilient and sustainable cities. As always, details of upcoming events can be found on our events calendar. This month’s highlighted event is the International District Energy Association’s (IDEA) 28th Annual Campus Energy Conference. The theme of the conference was “Clean Energy for the Next Generation” and it included comprehensive workshops, engaging plenary discussions, and a full agenda of informative technical presentations on how university and college campuses can use district energy to become more efficient and sustainable. A Q&A with Richard Damecour, President and CEO of FVB Energy Inc., highlights how district energy systems can promote sustainability. Following on from our last issue’s focus on mining, Parris Lyew-Ayee, Executive Director of the Jamaica Bauxite Institute, explains how sustainable mining is being promoted in Jamaica. This issue’s three guest editorials are once again provided by a selection of industry experts. An environmental report on Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage has been provided by ICO2N’s Managing Director Robert Craig, and CCS Analyst Amrita Lall Atwal. Simon Davis, CEO of Falcon Waterfree Technologies, also provides a technology report, while Jan Burton, Co-Founder of Rhino Cubed, provides an economic report. We hope that you find this issue both interesting and inspiring. Thank you for reading. The Sustainable Business Magazine Team

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Environmental Report ICO2N

04

Technology Report Falcon Waterfree Technologies

06

Economic Report Rhino Cubed

08

Canadian Electricity Association (CEA)

10

Toronto Hydro Corporation

18

Saskatoon Light & Power

24

Northwest Territories Power Corporation (NTPC)

30

Q&A Richard Damecour FVB Energy Inc.

32

Jamaica Bauxite Institute

36

The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE)

38

University of Pennsylvania

46

University of Oregon

54

Niagara College

58

American Association of Community Colleges (AACC)

62

IDEA Campus Conference 2015 Event Review

68

Global Events

70

Advertisers Index

FRONT COVER IMAGE

KRISHNA P. SINGH CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY. IMAGE PROVIDED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA. PHOTO CREDIT: ESTO

© SBM Media Ltd 2015. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form for any purpose, other than short sections for the purpose of review, without prior consent of the publisher.

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ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT THE CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE PROCESS FIGURE 1 *NOT TO SCALE

ENVIRONMENTALREPORT

By Robert Craig, Managing Director at ICO2N and Amrita Lall Atwal, CCS Analyst.

Carbon Capture Utilization & Storage - The Fundamentals Increasing global attention on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and human induced climate change is a major focus area in the energy sector. In Canada CO2 is the main greenhouse gas emitted into the atmosphere, accounting for 79% of total GHGs. In terms of Canadian emissions of CO2, the combustion of petroleum products accounted for 89% of total CO2 emissions in 2011. Proactive action has been taken in the Canadian energy sector to greatly reduce CO2 emissions. 2 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

For nine years, the Integrated CO2 Network (ICO2N) has been researching CO2 mitigation through carbon capture and storage and more recently through carbon capture utilization and storage. ICO2N is a consortium of nine Alberta energy companies: Suncor, Shell, BP, Canadian Natural Resources, Syncrude, Total, Husky, ConocoPhillips, and Statoil. Since its launch in 2005 the consortium members have supported ICO2N’s vision to create a future for carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) solutions,


ROBERT CRAIG, MANAGING DIRECTOR AT ICO2N

AMRITA LALL ATWAL, CCS ANALYST

In Canada CO2 is the main greenhouse gas emitted into the atmosphere, accounting for 79% of total GHGs.

and ensure companies and governments have accurate information on the technologies, costs, and viabilities of CO2 capture utilization, transportation, and storage. WHAT IS CARBON CAPTURE UTILIZATION AND STORAGE? CCUS starts with capturing CO2 from large industrial sources before it is emitted into the atmosphere. This can be done with a variety of technologies, some proven, and others in development. Generally the CO2 also needs to be compressed, again using conventional proven technologies. Carbon storage refers to transfer of the CO2 emissions via pipeline to a deep geological formation for permanent storage underground (see figure 1). CO2 has also been used since the mid 1980’s for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). EOR is the process by which CO2 is injected into producing oil fields to increase the recoverable oil and once the project is complete the CO2 can remain permanently stored in the depleted reservoir. EOR has supported the business case for several permanent sequestration operations in Canada (Weyburn-Midale, Boundary Dam and the Alberta Carbon Trunk Line). Utilization refers to the use of these captured CO2 emissions as a feedstock for the production of new valuable commodities. A recent uplift in research is finding that CO2 can be utilized to create exciting commodities such as building materials, polymers, fuels, and food products (see figure 2). Mantra Energy, Carbon Cure and Pond Bio Fuels are just a few Canadian companies who are work-

ing towards advancing CO2 utilization. Due to the high cost of CO2 capture and direct storage, the concept of utilization has received great interest in the past several years as a way to lower the cost of greenhouse gas reductions by creating these valuable products. SUSTAINABLE ENERGY DEVELOPMENT CCUS is a viable carbon mitigation tool as it can be deployed at many large industrial emission sources of CO2 such as cement, steel, electricity, oil and gas production, and chemical industries. A reduction in emissions can allow the use of fossil fuels resources while transitioning to a low emission economy. Alberta is a Canadian province with particular interest in CCUS technologies. The Alberta government has invested over a billion dollars which has helped projects such as the Enhance Energy and North West Upgrader, and the Shell Scotford Upgrader (Shell Quest) move forward. According to Alberta’s 2008 Energy Strategy CCUS is an important component of the Energy Strategy accounting for 70% of emission intensity reductions by 2050. ICO2N research shows widespread adoption of CCUS technologies has been challenged by substantial costs for early stage deployment of the technology. Costs for capturing CO2 can vary depending on the technology used and source of emissions, but ranges from $80-$250 per tonne. As mentioned above CO2 utilization may play a part in offsetting CCUS costs as will a higher carbon price and further technological advancements. c For more information on CCUS in Canada, visit www.ICO2N.com

PAVING THE WAY — A SELECTION OF TODAY’S CARBON CAPTURE AND UTILIZATION PATHWAYS FIGURE 2

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TECHNOLOGY REPORT

WATERFREE TECHNOLOGIES

TECHNOLOGYREPORT

By Mr Simon Davis, CEO of Falcon Waterfree Technologies.

Water Is Life Americans flush an estimated 5.7 billion gallons (21.58 billion liters) of clean drinking water down the drain every day. 4 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Water is a necessity that flows through every part of our day, every day of our life. We depend on water for everything from basic survival to generating the energy that lights our homes and fuels our businesses. Therefore it is very important that we take water conservation seriously and start to innovate new ways to make what limited resources we do have last. Without these steps forward the world as we currently know it will not be the same for future generations. The current drought in the Western United States has brought water scarcity issues to the forefront of national media attention, but historically the American Southwest has suffered from several


mega-droughts, lasting for decades and in some cases, even centuries. The problem isn’t really the drought itself or even the geological history of the West, but rather our perception of water. Although we have little control over where our water comes from, it is inevitable that water costs will rise in the future. Water rates vary regionally, but data has shown a steady rise in rates over the last decade. Increasing populations coupled with drought related water scarcity is inevitably going to result in the continuation of steep water price hikes and those managing commercial buildings are going to be burdened. MAKING A DIFFERENCE One major area where there is an opportunity to save water is in the restroom. Americans flush an estimated 5.7 billion gallons (21.58 billion liters) of clean drinking water down the drain every day while countries all over the world face terrible water shortages. Issues like this drive Falcon Waterfree Technologies to commit to environmental sustainability in our products and company practices. Falcon Waterfree Technologies, through partner Sloan Valve Company, offers restroom solutions that are focused on water conservation and prevent unnecessary water usage. As a Los

Angeles based company, Falcon is no stranger to the pressures of drought and is taking great strides to support local municipalities who will pay for building owners to retrofit their restrooms to conserve water. Since Falcon started 15 years ago, we have put hundreds of thousands of urinals in operation and led the way for restroom sustainability. Along the way our products have saved an estimated 20 billion gallons or more of water, with each additional installed Falcon Waterfree urinal saving up to another 40,000 gallons of water or more every year. Our users also save daily operational energy while cutting harmful greenhouse gas emissions associated with water transport and waste treatment. By supporting these products you are also supporting an innovative future and a better tomorrow. We invite you to join our fight. Falcon Waterfree Technologies continually strives to be the world’s best-in-class innovator of water-conserving, commercial restrooms solutions. By switching to water-saving devices businesses can help ensure actual savings occur without ongoing effort beyond the initial installation. Set it, forget it, and save. c For more information please visit : www.FalconWaterfree.com or www.SloanValve.com SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ECONOMIC REPORT

ECONOMICREPORT

By Jan Burton Co-Founder, Rhino Cubed.

Sustainable Living The U.S. has the largest average single-family sized home of any nation, but homes in other developing countries are growing too.

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Americans like to go big. In 2013, the average size of an American home was 2,600 square feet, compared to 983 square feet in 1950. The U.S. has the largest average single-family sized home of any nation, but homes in other developing countries are growing too. Along with the building materials required to construct these larger homes, demand for utilities to run them is predictably higher. Water, electricity, gas, and fuel oil usage all increases according to home size. Despite many people’s interest in smaller homes, the home building industry, city and county planning departments, and the surrounding industries are all geared up for large homes. It is difficult to find a small home that is built sustainably and with artistic appeal.


JAN BURTON CO-FOUNDER, RHINO CUBED

Enter Rhino Cubed and its container homes, blending art and sustainability. The structures are built from re-purposed shipping containers, up-cycling a product that would otherwise become the planet’s waste. Made of Corten steel, a shipping container is virtually indestructible; wind proof, waterproof, and rodent proof. Sam Austin, chief architect and designer, says “a shipping container is the perfect building envelope and can truly be an heirloom product due to its long lifespan and low maintenance.” These homes are small: Anywhere from 160 square feet up to 800 square feet, depending on the plan. Size is the biggest factor in the sustainability quotient. A small home uses fewer building materials and requires fewer resources to run it over time. These units can be purchased in an “on-grid” or “off-grid” configuration. On-grid would mean being hooked up to city water and sewer services, electricity, and having normal appliances. “Offgrid” options include solar-powered appliances, composting toilet, self-contained water tanks, and various energy-efficient heating and cooking appliances. Small doesn’t have to mean ugly however. Design is the key component bringing each of these little units to life. Steel window bucks strengthen both the integral design and artistic interest.

Designer wooden timbers and a cedar trellis add warmth. A 4-foot metal Rhino horn juts up from one end, holding a flag of choice. The inside is insulated with closed-cell foam insulation, providing R59 on the roof and R22 on the walls; exceeding the most stringent American requirements for wind, heat, and cold. The inside is also finished with hickory floors, paneling, and options for a kitchen, bathroom, and appliances. These tiny structures are perfect for a mountain cabin, hunting lodge, or even a backyard studio. Larger plans are available for fulltime living. So who is open to this type of living? It turns out, many people. Millenials are known to be less interested in “stuff” and large houses to store it all in. Baby boomers learned a lot about their own values and financial ability to live large in the last recession, and many of them are looking to downsize. Many studies point to greater happiness from buying experiences rather than “things.” A smaller house enables one to live in the outdoors, enjoy experiences, and feel great about the environmental impact. c Jan Burton co-founded Rhino Cubed, which makes tiny homes out of shipping containers. For more information, www.rhinocubed.com SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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CEA MANITOBA HYDRO’S KETTLE GENERATING STATION, BUILT ON THE LOWER NELSON RIVER, IS THE SECOND LARGEST HYDROELECTRIC GENERATING STATION IN THE PROVINCE. PHOTO CREDIT: MANITOBA HYDRO

POWERING SUSTAINABILITY A foreword by Channa Perera, Director, Sustainable Development, at the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) On behalf of the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA), I am pleased to write this foreword to the ‘Powering Sustainability’ series for Sustainable Business Magazine. CEA and its member utilities have a long-standing history of leadership on sustainability. In 1997, the Association and its members launched the Environmental Commitment and Responsibility (ECR) Program to reduce the adverse 8 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

environmental impacts of our operations and be more efficient in the use of natural resources. This commitment was further strengthened in 2009 when the association launched a more dynamic Sustainable ElectricityTM Program covering the three pillars of sustainable development (environmental, social, and economic). Already, CEA members are improving their overall sustainability performance. Air


SASKPOWER IS LEADING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST POST-COMBUSTION CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (CCS) PROJECT—THE FIRST IN THE WORLD TO FULLY INTEGRATE CCS TECHNOLOGY WITH COMMERCIAL SCALE COAL-FIRED GENERATION. PHOTO CREDIT: SASKPOWER

emissions are at an all-time low, engagement levels with employees, local communities, stakeholders, and Aboriginal Peoples have significantly improved, and investments to renew and modernize infrastructure are also on the rise. The utility success stories (initiatives) presented in this ‘Powering Sustainability’ series will help further illustrate how the sector is integrating sustainability into its activities. I hope you read

these stories with interest and share your thoughts with us so that we can continue to improve our performance. As a sector, we recognize that sustainability is a journey and we still have a long way to go. We want to work with you to make this journey a success. Let’s partner for a sustainable future. Read more at www.SustainableElectricity.ca and share your thoughts with me at perera@electricity.ca c

NOVA SCOTIA POWER IS MOVING AHEAD WITH A NUMBER OF RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS. PHOTO CREDIT: NOVA SCOTIA POWER

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TORONTO HYDRO

LIGHTING TORONTO David Johnston is Director of the Environment, Health and Safety at Toronto Hydro, an electricity distribution corporation based in Ontario, Canada. In this interview he discusses the ways in which a successfully managed business is also an environmentally conscious business.

Toronto Hydro has served the city of Toronto for more than a century, and each decade brings fresh challenges and new approaches to the electrical distribution industry. Today the company has approximately 736,000 customers; a number that accounts for 18% of the electricity used in the province. It holds the accolade of being Canada’s largest municipal electricity company. As a distribution rather than generation company, Toronto Hydro is responsible for maintain10 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

ing much of the public electricity delivery infrastructure in the city; its roles are predominantly focussed on providing reliable distribution, ensuring staff and public safety, and increasing efficiency where possible. To this end, it has worked to implement the ISO 14001 environmental standard, OHSAS 18001 occupational health and safety standard, and the ISO 26000 social responsibility guidelines. In June 2014, the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) designated Toronto

Hydro a Sustainable Electricity Company, in recognition of its long-standing commitment to corporate responsibility. Adhering to these standards was a prerequisite for receiving the CEA designation. “A few years ago we had already taken on the initiative to have Toronto Hydro certified to both ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001 as part of an integrated environmental, health and safety management system,” says David Johnston, Director of the Environment, Health and


Safety. “Earlier this year we started going through the ISO 26000 requirements line by line to identify what we were doing that already conformed. We discovered and were able to demonstrate that Toronto Hydro was already meeting 99% of the requirements. The gaps were mainly centred around establishing materiality through stakeholder engagements as well as addressing the lack of a banned products list; a document that formally states we will not purchase or use

certain products. We put everything together and delivered it to the CEA; the CEA carried out a third party audit and verified our claims then awarded us the Sustainable Electricity Company designation.” APPROACHING SUSTAINABILITY Since gaining the CEA’s seal, Toronto Hydro has further enhanced its sustainability focus, with executive sponsorship and quarterly steering committee meetings. A committee

gathers at the beginning of the year to draw up and implement a sustainability plan for the year ahead, then meets quarterly to review progress and targets. As a consequence, Toronto Hydro has an intelligent and proactive approach to company-wide sustainability. Toronto Hydro has many programs of differing scales, which underline this focus. For instance, Toronto Hydro has implemented a capability for mobile centres that can be set up much closer to SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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TORONTO HYDRO

TORONTO HYDRO CREATED SUSTAINABLE PROCUREMENT PRINCIPLES, A GOVERNANCE DOCUMENT TO GUIDE THE DAILY OPERATIONS OF ITS PROCUREMENT TEAM.

(L-R) ALINA RACOVICEANU, DAVE JOHNSTON, KEES-JAN HOMSMA, SHEIKH NAHYAAN, DUNCAN KERR, ELIAS LYBEROGIANNIS, JODI ENGEL

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COPELAND

work sites. This has reduced the distance trucks need to travel, and therefore reduced vehicle emissions. Satellite sites are present across Toronto where trucks can be parked and equipment stored. An additional bonus of this capability is the reduction of road exposure for the crews, thus further facilitating safety for both staff and the general public. To further reduce its environmental footprint, Toronto Hydro created Sustainable Procurement Principles - a governance document to guide the daily operations of its procurement team. As well as ensuring that its own procurement is done with sustainability in mind, a Vendor Management program means the company monitors the sustainable procurement principles of its suppliers. These are just some of the ways in which the company is trying to ensure that it is as environmentally friendly as possible. “We are also in the midst of a fairly large capital program,” David explains. “About 30% of our equipment is beyond its useful life. Though the equipment has served us well for the past 30 to 40 years, we are at a point now where those assets need to be rebuilt in order to maintain an acceptable level

of service. The added benefit is that today’s equipment is safer and much more efficient. For example, certain parts of the city feature distribution lines operating at 4 kV voltage, a result of having not been updated since first being built. We are planning to gradually replace those with higher voltage cables that will help improve efficiency and lower line losses, subject to receiving the necessary approvals.” In an effort to further improve facilities at Toronto Hydro, the company is in the process of undertaking a number of consolidation and renovation projects across the city as part of its Operating Centre Consolidation Program. To ensure the standardization of these renovation efforts, Toronto Hydro developed a dedicated Facilities Renovation Standard. This standard details the specific products to be purchased during renovations, such as environmentally preferred products like recyclable carpet, dimmable LED lighting where possible, and low/no-VOC paints. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Working with the local community is an important part of Toronto Hydro’s sustaina-

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UNDER ONE HAT - ONE RESPONSIBILITY • OVERHEAD • UNDERGROUND • SUBSTATION

www.riggsdistler.com Contact: 27 Cardico Drive, Gormley ON, L0H 1G0 • Office: (905) 888-6677 • Fax: (905) 888-6718

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TORONTO HYDRO ICE STORM

bility plan. This is exemplified by initiatives such as its awareness campaigns, as well as the introduction of a suite of web-based tools that enable Toronto Hydro customers to monitor and control their electricity consumption, such as the Time-of-Use Portal. “I believe this has been a huge contributor to energy conservation,” says David. The company also offers a helping hand to people on low incomes by replacing at no cost the inefficient incandescent porch bulbs with

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modern energy efficient compact florescent bulbs as part of its Brighter Nights™ campaign to provide greater street lighting at night and, therefore, greater neighbourhood safety. An annual public safety campaign also provides safety tips to various audiences, including children and seniors. Communications channels include public service announcements, school notices, customer newsletters, media events and interviews, and social media campaigns.

December 2013 saw Toronto struck by a major ice storm that brought down trees, disrupted power lines, and blocked major roads. More than 300,000 of Toronto Hydro’s customers lost power during the peak of the storm. David explains how this led to one of the company’s proudest moments in recent years. “The most outstanding accomplishment is that there were no serious injuries throughout the event. You have to consider that virtually


WE WANT TO ENSURE EVERYBODY IN THE COMPANY UNDERSTANDS WHAT SUSTAINABILITY ENTAILS; NOT JUST RECYCLING BUT GREATER INTEGRITY IN OUR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REPORTING.

everything was covered in ice while our teams were working. Trees and wires were coming down around them, yet we were still able to complete our work without sustaining serious injuries to either staff or the public. This was due to a lot of the preparation and training that has resulted from our pursuit of high standards, as well as dedication from all the staff during the emergency. A report prepared by an independent panel that assessed Toronto Hydro’s handling of this major weather event has found that our response was

generally in line with industry best practices. As with most areas, the report noted some areas for improvement, and we have since developed an action plan to address all of the recommendations, having made progress on a number of them to date.” DRAWING UP PLANS Through its sustainability initiatives, Toronto Hydro is looking at the future with an eye on improving its already impressive environmental health and safety credentials. “We want to ensure everybody

in the company understands what sustainability entails; not just recycling but greater integrity in our Corporate Social Responsibility reporting, for example. To do this we will have very active stakeholder engagement to help us define what is material in order to guide our future vision. Most organizations struggle to achieve sustainability commitments, but Toronto Hydro leaders have embraced the Sustainable planning process that will help us effectively integrate strategy with reporting requirements.” c

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SASKATOON LIGHT & POWER

POWERING SASKATOON Sustainable Business Magazine talks to Kevin Hudson, Manager of Metering & Sustainable Electricity at Saskatoon Light & Power, about how they’re promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency in a growing city. By Thomas Massey. 18 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


increasingly important for the residents of Saskatoon and the wider area of Saskatchewan. “Saskatchewan residents use more energy and produce more Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions per capita than any other area in Canada,” explains Mr. Hudson. “That’s why renewable energy is such a focus for us. Electricity counts for 22% of our GHG emissions in the province, so we really have a lot of work to do in that area.” SUPPLYING LOCAL RENEWABLE ENERGY Saskatoon Light & Power, and the city of Saskatoon as a whole, have committed to countering the threat of inefficient energy sources and subsequent GHG emissions.

As well as becoming members of Partners for Climate Protection, a network of over 240 Canadian municipalities dedicated to reducing GHG emissions and taking action on climate change, Mr. Hudson explains that the city has mapped out a detailed strategy for tackling energy issues. “A few years ago, through consultation with the community, the city developed a strategic plan known as our Energy & Greenhouse Gas Management Plan. One of the focuses of that plan is to achieve a diverse and environmentally sustainable electrical system using local, renewable resources. We have many renewable projects in the works that are key to that plan. We have set a target for Saskatoon to reduce its corporate Greenhouse Gas

LANDFILL GAS ENGINE GENERATOR

The city of Saskatoon, located within the Canadian province of Saskatchewan, recently saw its population surpass a quarter of a million people. While this may seem relatively small by global standards, it represents a significant recent increase for a city that is already the most highly populated in Saskatchewan. “We’re one of the fastest growing cities in Canada,” explains Kevin Hudson, Manager of Metering & Sustainable Electricity at Saskatoon Light & Power. “Our population is expected to double over the next thirty to forty years, so we have some challenges to face as far as meeting that growth, and doing it in a sustainable way.” If the current rate of growth continues, the need for locally produced renewable energy will become SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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SASKATOON LIGHT & POWER LANDFILL GAS COLLECTION FACILITY

emissions by 30% from the year 2006 by the year 2020. We aim to achieve that through energy efficiency programs and our clean energy program.” The clean energy program plays a key role in helping Saskatoon achieve its sustainability aims. “We currently have a number of green energy projects either underway or in the development process,”

says Mr. Hudson. “When completed, we hope that these projects will account for approximately 10% of our energy requirements. The first one came online this past spring. Our landfill gas power generation facility accounts for about 1% of our energy usage. It’s generating around 1.6 MW, meaning we are producing 13 GW hours annually.” If the success of the Landfill Gas GREEN ENERGY PARK SITE OVERVIEW

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Power Generation Facility can be matched by other Saskatoon Light & Power projects currently under consideration, then having local renewable energy sources contribute 10% to Saskatoon’s energy is certainly achievable. Projects under consideration include solar power projects, hydroelectricity projects, and energy efficient heat recovery systems.


WE HAVE SET A TARGET FOR SASKATOON TO REDUCE ITS CORPORATE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS BY 30% FROM THE YEAR 2006 BY THE YEAR 2020.

LANDFILL GAS WELL DRILLING

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SASKATOON LIGHT & POWER LANDFILL GAS POWER GENERATION FACILITY

OUR LANDFILL GAS POWER GENERATION FACILITY ACCOUNTS FOR ABOUT 1% OF OUR ENERGY USAGE.

BACK TO SCHOOL The Landfill Gas Generation Facility is part of a larger project know as the Saskatoon Green Energy Park. The Green Energy Park will house many of the new renewable energy projects that Saskatoon Light & Power hope will help reach the 10% renewable electricity target. As well as producing renewable energy, Mr. Hudson hopes that the park will help educate the LANDFILL GAS POWER GENERATION FACILITY

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people of Saskatoon. “A large part of the Green Energy Park is to showcase the local renewable energy available in Saskatoon. We will ensure that every single one of the projects will be economically viable on it’s own. The location itself is perfect as well. We get around a million vehicles a month driving past, so it is a very visible spot to showcase these technologies.” As part of their efforts to promote renewable

energy and energy efficiency, Mr. Hudson explains that Saskatoon Light & Power is also engaging with local schools. “At Saskatoon Light & Power we offer a school tour program where 20 – 35 classes come through each year. The main focus of that school tour is to teach the students how to use electricity safely and efficiently, and how it can remain sustainable.” The tour effectively grabs the attention of students


3D INTERACTIVE SMART METERING DISPLAY

with a 3D interactive smart metering display, which focuses on safety, energy efficiency, and energy efficient lighting. It also demonstrates how it is possible generate your own electricity at home. A CITY IN SAFE HANDS With the city of Saskatoon set to expand significantly during the early part of this

century, measures must be taken to ensure that electricity can be provided effectively, efficiently, and sustainably. Saskatoon Light & Power are working hard to provide renewable, locally sourced energy while promoting energy efficiency throughout the city. Their commitment to sustainability is helping to guarantee a successful and sustainable future. c

RENDERINGS OF PROPOSED HYDROELECTRIC FACILITY & WHITEWATER PARK

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NORTHWEST TERRITORIES POWER CORPORATION

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COMMUNITY Sustainable Business Magazine talks to the Northwest Territories Power Corporation’s Director of Health, Safety and Environment, Eddie Smith, as well as Environmental Analyst, Joshua Clark, about how they’re contributing to a more efficient and sustainable Canada. Written by Thomas Massey.

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NORTHWEST TERRITORIES POWER CORPORATION INUVIK LNG PLANT

NTPC IS DEDICATED TO PROVIDING A RELIABLE, CLEAN, EFFICIENT, AND WHERE POSSIBLE RENEWABLE, SERVICE TO THEIR COMMUNITIES.

INUVIK BUCKET TRUCK

The Northwest Territories Power Corporation (NTPC) is tasked with what may, on paper, seem an almost impossible task. NTPC serves 27 communities in the Northwest Territories of Canada. The communities total only around 43,000 people, but are spread over an area of 1.3 million km2. Providing reliable electricity to customers who are spread over such a large area can be extremely difficult, especially considering the annual extreme weather conditions experienced in Northern Canada, however NTPC is dedicated to providing safe, reliable, efficient, and where possible renewable, service to their communities. INNOVATION The Northwest Territories Power Corporation (NTPC) continues to look for ways to affordably utilize the renewable energy

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sources available in Canada. Projects such as the Fort Simpson Solar Array, the Colville Lake Solar Project, and the Inuvik LNG Project, provide safe, clean, reliable, and renewable energy for some of Canada’s northernmost communities. NTPC Environmental Analyst Joshua Clark explains the scale and impressive output of the Fort Simpson Solar array. “In 2012, we installed


258 solar panels with a peak capacity of 60.6 kW. In 2013 we expanded that by adding another 178 panels, so we are up to 436 panels in the array. The extra panels added 43.6 kW of capacity, bringing the site total to a peak output of 104 kW. That amount of energy can power up to 15% of Fort Simpson’s community requirements.” As well as an impressive output, Mr. Clark explains that the project has also significantly contributed to NTPC’s efforts

to be more sustainable. “The production of this energy has resulted in us displacing or reducing 210 tons of carbon dioxide equivalents.” NTPC is hoping for the same kind of success with their other projects. A solar project currently under development at Colville Lake hopes to provide 25-30% of the community’s energy requirements through solar power. As well as solar power, NTPC is making progress regarding the use of alternative

fuels. The town of Inuvik previously used two power plants. One was powered by natural gas, while the other backup plant was powered by diesel; an arrangement that lasted 13 years from 1999 to 2012. When the gas well at Ikhil in the Mackenzie Delta ran dry however, the town’s power was generated entirely by diesel, at a cost to the environment. NTPC soon provided a solution. As of February 2014, the gas generators have been running on Liquefied

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NORTHWEST TERRITORIES POWER CORPORATION COLVILLE LAKE SOLAR PV PANELS

Natural Gas (LNG), which is imported from Southern Canada. LNG is not only 10-15% cheaper to purchase than diesel, but may also reduce greenhouse gas emissions, something which would make it more economically and environmentally sustainable. An added bonus with LNG is that in the event of a spill the non-toxic gas simply evaporates into the air, leaving behind no residues or chemicals. “At the beginning of this year we finished construction of an energy storage facility up in Inuvik, so there are now two 68,000 liter storage tanks,” explains Mr. Clark. “At the moment, power generation is still running on a mixture of both LNG and diesel but we are hoping to soon be 60% reliant on LNG.”

ENERGY EFFICIENT COMMUNITIES The Northwest Territories Power Corporation is helping educate customers about energy efficiency and how they can save energy and money. “To promote energy efficiency externally, we have launched a new campaign called PowerWise,” says Mr. Clark. “The PowerWiseNWT.com website provides tips regarding energy usage and ways that our customers can save energy and money. We do a lot of promotion, such as posters and press releases, regarding energy efficiency and renewable energy projects.” The PowerWise website is just one of the many ways in which NTPC is helping their customers manage their power usage. Tools on the website include energy saving

Green Sun Rising Green Sun Rising from Windsor Ontario completed the largest roof-top solar system in 2014 in the NWT, in Hay River. NTPC selected Green Sun Rising for the 81 kW solar PV system in 2015 for Colville Lake, the largest solar system for NWT in 2015. The Colville Lake solar system will be integrated with the new power plant with battery storage, by NTPC. BULL MOOSE AT SNARE

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tips for various household appliances, as well as an energy calculator to help customers add up the cost of their energy usage per room. These tools are designed to help customers make smart decisions which can help them save energy and money. The Northwest Territories Power Corporation is not just leaving it to their customers when it comes to being proactive about energy efficiency. NTPC is currently retrofitting street lights throughout communities where diesel is used to generate electricity. They are aiming to achieve a 100% retrofit of high-pressure sodium (HPS) street lights to LED lighting, reducing energy consumption in all diesel communities. “We have had a lot of success with the LED street lights,”


says Mr. Clark. “We have done full changeouts in eight communities, replacing all high pressure sodium street lights with LEDs and will continue with this replacement program in other diesel communities, as they require replacing or as part of a full community retrofit. Right now about 800 of our 2,000 HPS, or 40%, of all our street light fixtures have been converted to LEDs. Our goal is to convert 100% as funding is available.” RISING TO THE CHALLENGE The Northwest Territories Power Corporation is meeting the challenge of providing energy to some of the northernmost communities in Canada and they continue to look at innovative northern solutions. In

addition to the solar array in Fort Simpson and Colville Lake and the LNG project in Inuvik, they are researching biomass and wind as potential northern projects. As well, the care they show for their customers and communities is part of their efforts to provide exceptional customer service throughout the Territories. It is often in the places where it is hardest to provide reliable energy, such as in the Canadian Arctic, that electricity is most important. With average January temperatures in the Territories of around -25 degrees Celsius having reliable electricity is essential. “What our business takes a lot of pride in is being a member of the community in the Northwest Territories,” explains NTPC’s Director of Health, Safety and

Environment, Eddie Smith. “There are very few people in the Northwest Territories and we know the people in every community. It is a small community but as a large power company we like to be involved. We make a lot of donations, provide sponsorship, and our employees are present and involved in every community too. They play sports there and they are involved in different action groups. It’s community and it’s family; there is a face to our business. We all take pride in being reliable, providing good value, and being environmentally responsible and sustainable, as well as working safely. This is especially because our employees are northerners; a large part of our workforce grew up here.” c

SNARE HYDRO

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Q&A RICHARD DAMECOUR

Richard Damecour President & CEO FVB Energy Inc.

Can you tell us a little about the history of FVB Energy? FVB Energy Inc. was founded in Sweden and for more than 40 years has helped clients develop, operate, and grow energy systems in both the private and non-profit sectors. With offices in Canada, the U.S., and Sweden, FVB offers the perspective of an experienced global partner, plus the insight to customize energy solutions for local conditions and needs. We have worked in every Canadian province and territory, most U.S. states, and more than 30 countries globally. In North America, FVB has helped develop nearly 80 percent of the new district energy systems built since 1990. Our extensive international experience helps us quickly identify business, technical, and environmental issues that need to be considered from the outset. With a focus on the business implications of engineering decisions, FVB designs for the bottom line.

embargoes of the early 1970’s showed Europe how important it was to develop thermal grids in order to become less reliant on imported oil and become more sustainable. Recently Russia has threatened to cut off the supply of natural gas to the Ukraine. How will people in the Ukraine heat their homes and provide domestic hot water if this happens? Well, fortunately the Ukraine has a large number of District Energy Systems serving their urban communities. While these systems currently use a large amount of Natural Gas it is much easier to add a local energy source to a single thermal grid than it is to retrofit a 100,000 homes and businesses. The one thing we are certain of is that the energy landscape is unpredictable. Who remembers all the discussion about “Peak Oil” 10 years ago? Who would have predicted the historic low cost of oil we see today? The strength of District Energy Systems is that they are very flexible in utilizing whatever energy source makes the most sense.

How do District Energy Systems promote sustainability? I like to refer to District Energy Systems as Thermal Grids. These Thermal Grids allow communities to take advantage of local and renewable thermal technologies (i.e. Biomass, Solar, and Waste Heat). For a community, the ability to utilize local energy sources and be less reliant on imported energy sources is key to being sustainable. The oil

How do you help communities develop District Energy Systems? FVB is not just an Engineering design firm, we actually spend a significant amount of our efforts helping communities develop the business side of District Energy Systems. This starts from looking at what potential a particular community has to develop a District Energy System; can a business case be developed to support it? We look at

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What does sustainability mean to FVB Energy? We fundamentally believe that if a community does not have a Thermal Grid they cannot be considered to be sustainable. In North America 55% of the total energy consumed in communities is utilized to heat, cool, and provide domestic hot water to its citizens. So without a Thermal Grid a community’s ability to address the majority of its energy use is impractical. Thermal Grids allow communities to utilize local and renewable energy sources to provide their heating, cooling, and domestic hot water requirements in a sustainable way. Again the three pillars approach (economic, energy, and environmental) comes into play. All three must be met in order to be considered sustainable.

projects from a three pillar approach; economic, energy, and environmental. All our projects must benefit the local community in all three pillars. Once we come up with a workable concept we then develop a strategy for the community to convince the targeted customers (existing and planned) to agree to connect. The key to a District Energy system is Customers and the long term secure revenue stream they can deliver in order to be able to finance the capital for the project. In order to secure this revenue stream, long term (20 year) Thermal Service Agreements must be developed, negotiated, and agreed to. It’s only after all this work that we get to design and construct the system. Can you tell us about projects you are currently involved in? FVB is involved in a number of District Energy and Combined Heat and Power projects across North America. We continue to help communities develop Thermal Grids for their Greenfield developments and retrofit existing buildings to enable them to connect to District Energy Systems, which allow them to be more sustainable in the future. Two of the biggest trends in the industry that we have had a leadership role in are converting “legacy” steam systems to low temperature hot water and introducing Biomass as an energy source.

What achievements are you especially proud of? FVB is most proud of Markham District Energy (MDE). We were able to develop the original concept back in 1998, negotiate the thermal service agreements with the anchor customers, and get the initial phases up and running. Fifteen years after initial operation (2000) we are proud to say that there are now four plants connected to the system serving over 10 million square feet of buildings. MDE is a good example of how important thermal networks are to communities as they have been able to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of the buildings on their system by 50% through the use of combined heat and power and hot water storage. The next step for MDE is to incorporate Biomass, which will further reduce their GHG footprint. FVB is also proud of Southeast False Creek (SEFC). The City of Vancouver wanted an innovative approach to provide heating to the Athlete’s Village. FVB developed a concept which was the first of its kind in North America. The system captures waste heat from untreated urban wastewater and uses large heat pumps to boost the thermal energy in the wastewater to provide heating for the district energy system. This system produces 65% less greenhouse gas emissions than conventional energy sources would. The next step for SEFC is to incorporate Biomass, which will further reduce their GHG footprint. What exciting plans do you have for the future? Thermal Grids are all about transitioning to locally supplied, environmentally friendly thermal sources. Most of the initial District Energy Systems that we help develop use fossil fuels as an energy source. Now these systems are looking to transition to waste heat from industrial sources, solar thermal, and biomass. The benefit of having seen the District Energy industry in Europe transition over the last 40 plus years (through FVB Sweden) is that we already have a good idea how the North American District Energy Industry will transition in the future. We have also seen what concepts have been developed in Europe, which ones worked, and how to best apply them to the North American Market. c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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JAMAICA BAUXITE INSTITUTE

JAMAICAN BAUXITE Sustainable Business Magazine talks to Parris Lyew-Ayee, Executive Director of the Jamaica Bauxite Institute. Written by Jack Griggs-Smith.

The existence of Bauxite in Jamaica was first reported in the 1860s when the presence of large quantities of red earth, terra rossa, was discovered. In 1942 an extensive study revealed that these alumina and iron rich deposits, known as bauxite, were widespread throughout Jamaica. Early trials, however, had environmental impacts and as operations continued they impinged upon local communities. The industry was not only facing environmental

issues, but also social ones. Despite these early teething problems, mining operations continued and in 1976 the Jamaica Bauxite Institute (JBI) was formed with the aim of overseeing the bauxite and alumina industry. Its key objectives were to centralize and coordinate the activities of several government agencies in the bauxite sector, and to establish plans for the regulation of the industry to meet local and international standards. In April 1994, a Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the JBI and the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA), delegating responsibility for the environmental management of the bauxite/alumina industry, and the mitigation of impacts on the environment, to the JBI. ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES There are many environmental issues associated with the bauxite industry. These

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include water and air contamination, as well as waste disposal. Disposing of red mud, the waste product generated during the production of aluminum, can be particularly difficult because its alkalinity makes it environmentally hazardous. Finding ways to dispose of red mud safely and effectively remains an important issue for the bauxite mining industry. “Bauxite is a major source of revenue for the country,” explains Parris Lyew-Ayee, Executive Director of the JBI. “Unlike in many other countries, the bauxite is distributed over about two thirds of the country, all within close proximity of communities. This creates strong competition for land and poses the dilemma of how the bauxite can be mined and extracted without causing problems for the local communities, especially when much of the bauxite operations take place in areas where up to 70% of the population is below the poverty line.”


Even before the existence of environmental agencies and regulations, the JBI recognized that for the bauxite and alumina operations to operate in harmony with the rest of the country, they would have to adhere to good international standards regarding noise pollution, air pollution, and especially water pollution. “We recognized very early, before environmental issues became fashionable, that certain precautions

needed to be put in place to protect the health and safety of local communities.” The JBI works in collaboration with other agencies and is proactive in ensuring that the Jamaican bauxite industry has minimal or no adverse impact upon the environment. This has been achieved by ensuring compliance with local standards and regulations through a regular and effective monitoring programme, and by conduct-

ing regular reviews on the environmental performance of the industry and instituting the necessary corrective actions. This has encouraged research and development aimed at identifying new technologies for minimizing waste and creating a cleaner, more efficient production process, while fostering and maintaining a harmonious relationship with local communities. Mr. Lyew-Ayee explains that the industry has implemented new environmentally friendly mud disposal techniques. “One thing that is very important for us is the disposal of red mud. We recognized how disastrous it was in the early mining operations, and the core of what we do at the JBI is to be pro-active in the prevention of future dangers.” The new techniques involve dry and thick mud stacking; a process in which thin layers of mud are spread on sloping beds to drain and evaporate to a high solid content. They are designed to maintain zero discharge from the plant to the environment. HIGH STANDARDS The JBI, in collaboration with relevant government agencies, conducts regular site visits and performs environmental reviews of each company. At these reviews, performance data is evaluated and the sites

FINDING WAYS TO DISPOSE OF RED MUD SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY REMAINS AN IMPORTANT ISSUE FOR THE BAUXITE MINING INDUSTRY.

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JAMAICA BAUXITE INSTITUTE

are inspected by monitoring programs to guarantee that standards are met. These programs ensure that not only is sodium concentration in the water closely monitored at various points around all the alumina facilities, but also that the pH, hardness, alkalinity, sulphate, nitrate, conductivity, chloride, and total dissolved solids are taken into consideration. Around each alumina facility several monitoring points including domestic water and monitor wells are sampled monthly and surface water bodies are analyzed, in some cases on a weekly basis. In addition to routine water quality monitoring, special hydrogeological studies were done to define the extent of any sodium contamination of ground water resources, and as a result it has been confirmed that

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domestic water supply is not being affected by bauxite and alumina operations. Ambient concentrations of atmospheric gaseous emissions from the stacks at the alumina plants are also monitored on a regular basis. These include sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, ozone, and carbon monoxide. Ambient levels of these gases are determined by continuous samplers, which are placed within communities surrounding the respective alumina plants. These samplers are placed in areas found within the predominant wind direction as well as the opposite upwind direction. To date, the respective NEPA standards for these gases have not been exceeded. The JBI also conducts reviews of waste management; monitoring environmental spills and incidents, and creating

action plans to identify and address areas of concern. Outside of these reviews regular site visits and spot checks are also made to all the various facilities including bauxite mining areas, alumina plants, and ports. As well as implementing these monitoring programs, the JBI actively participates in monthly meetings held with various community councils at the respective locations. These meetings help provide education and agricultural skills training. “We formed community councils, made up of representatives from the companies and from members of parliament, in order to allow them to voice their concerns about the operations,� explains Mr. Lyew-Ayee. “We want to make sure that there is peace between the communities and the companies, and over


the last seventeen years we have largely succeeded in helping the local communities to help themselves. Since we started more than 500,000 people have benefited from these programs. We have something like 300 projects in the 150 communities we work in.” A POSITIVE LEGACY It is very important to the JBI that land can be used to the benefit of local communities once mining operations have finished. Rehabilitation of land is achieved through reclamation, this refers to the activities

necessary to reshape and re-soil the mined out pit according to government guidelines which have been developed with industry input to ensure acceptable restoration standards. Reclamation is achieved almost entirely by planting the reclaimed areas with pasture grasses, followed by inspection and certification to ensure that the land is suitable for commercial agriculture or can be made available to tenant farmers. This allows crops to flourish and thereby sustains further industry. “The bauxite development program is something I am extremely proud

of,” says Mr. Lyew-Ayee. “Before it started we had weekly, if not daily, demonstrations and we knew that at its heart it was a social problem not an environmental problem. In the past there were companies telling us to dump our red mud at sea, but this was something I was against. The red mud is a resource for the future. Our red mud has 60% iron and contains many valuable minerals, and last year we were successful in extracting these elements. This means that waste material that was once lost can now be used a resource for the future.” c

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AASHE SFSU-CHANT LEADER MICHAEL ZAMBRANO GETS READY TO KICK THINGS OFF

RAIN GARDENS AROUND THE UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON CAMPUS ARE DESIGNED TO COLLECT, RETAIN AND SLOWER ABSORB WATER RUNOFF FROM SURROUNDING SURFACES OR ACT AS A NATURAL FILTER SO WATER IS CLEAN BY THE TIME IT ENTERS A STORM SEWER.

SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY TO END COAL INVESTMENTS: THE SFSU FOUNDATION HAS AGREED TO NOT INVEST IN COMPANIES “WITH SIGNIFICANT PRODUCTION OR USE OF COAL AND TAR SANDS.” THE FOUNDATION WILL ALSO SEEK TO LIMIT INVESTMENTS IN FOSSIL FUEL COMPANIES.

SUSTAINABLE

CAMPUSES A foreword by Meghan Fay Zahniser, AASHE Executive Director

MEGHAN FAY ZAHNISER, AASHE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) supports and encourages the advancement of sustainability at higher education institutions through programs such as the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS), professional development offerings, and an annual conference & expo. STARS is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance. This comprehensive assessment tool helps institutions understand exactly how they are performing, as well as identifying areas for improvement related to sustainability in academics, operations, and administrative efforts on campus. With more than 650 institutions registered for STARS, it has transformed the way campuses track and monitor their sustainability progress. We have institu-

tions that participate in STARS annually and are able to see their improvements through an increased score. Institutions, both national and international, work toward a Bronze, Silver, Gold, or Platinum rating, or they may opt to be recognized as a STARS Reporter where they only report data without receiving a rating. In addition, given that transparency is critical to sustainability reporting, all STARS data is made available to the public which easily enables our members to share information and best practices. Professional development opportunities also boost sustainability efforts and are one of the top member offerings and benefits. Members can access webinars for free and receive discounts for workshops, STARS, and conference registrations. Members also have access to the Resource Center. The online Resource Center is a comprehensive


BABSON UNIVERSITY

DELTA COLLEGE LIVING WALL

source of information on sustainability in higher education. It provides administrators, faculty, operations staff, students, and other campus stakeholders with the tools, information, and guidance they need to lead a sustainability transformation on their campus. We are also looking forward to welcoming AASHE members and others in the campus sustainability community to the AASHE 2015 Conference & Expo, themed Transforming Sustainability Education, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on Oct. 25-28. The annual conference allows everyone the opportunity to share and exchange ideas on the expansion of

sustainability efforts, as well as providing a platform for feedback. Attendees also have an opportunity to hear from internationally recognized sustainability leaders such as last year’s featured keynote speaker Annie Leonard, Greenpeace Executive Director and creator of “The Story of Stuff Project”. Founded in 2005, AASHE celebrates its tenth year throughout 2015, and remains committed to inspiring and catalyzing higher education to lead the global sustainability transformation through the aforementioned efforts and many other exciting celebratory initiatives planned throughout the year. See the AASHE website for information on these

initiatives including live tweet sessions and a video campaign kicking off at the conference in Minneapolis! I’m excited to build on past successes from my six years at AASHE. It is vital that we remain focused on providing support and additional resources to empower higher education institutions to be the foundation for a thriving, equitable, and ecologically healthy world. Sustainable Business Magazine’s continued support highlighting sustainable campuses is pivotal to furthering the campus sustainability community and AASHE’s vision, and we are thrilled to continue the partnership, especially throughout this monumental year for AASHE. c VIRGINIA TECH

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CHICAGO STUDENTS TEACH DIVERSITY WITH GARDENS

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

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UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA PHOTO CREDIT ESTO

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LESSONS IN LEADERSHIP David Hollenberg, University Architect at the University of Pennsylvania, talks to Sustainable Business Magazine about how environmental considerations have shaped the infrastructure of the university, while Sustainability Associate Julian Goresko outlines initiatives and campaigns which have encouraged students, staff, and faculty to participate in green activities.

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UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

PENN HAS FOR MANY YEARS ENSURED THAT LONG-TERM SUSTAINABILITY UNDERPINS THEIR ARCHITECTURE.

VIEW TOWARD NEW COLLEGE HOUSE ENTRANCE FROM WOODLAND WALK PHOTO CREDIT BOHLIN CYWINSKI JACKSON

The University of Pennsylvania (Penn) is a private, prestigious Ivy League research university located in Philadelphia, USA. It is considered one of the world’s leading research institutions and has, throughout its history, been at the helm of groundbreaking discoveries in the fields of both science and humanities. In recent years, recognizing the rapidly growing importance of the environment across all aspects of life, the university under the leadership of Penn President Amy Gutmann has made strides towards becoming a leader in environmental sustainability. 40 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

CENTURY BOND In the spring of 2013, Penn undertook a major financial investment that would radically change the path of its future development by selling its Century Bond. This enabled the university to raise $300 million whilst deferring repayment of the principal for 100 years - hence the name. Enough money was immediately carved out to ensure, through compound interest, repayment of principal in a century. Two-thirds of the remainder was assigned the explicit mission of funding infrastructural projects where deferred maintenance and energy conservation con-

verged and the last third was given to strategic priorities. “What this has enabled us to do for the first time is think holistically about comprehensive renovation of buildings that, in the past, due to limited funding, we had to deal with in a piecemeal fashion,” says University Architect David Hollenberg. “The first completed project undertaken with this approach is Chem ‘73, a laboratory building that we came to realize after a series of studies was one of our biggest energy hogs. The Century Bond enabled us to completely renovate the HVAC system: changing it from constant to variable air volume,


CHEM 73 PENN FACILITIES & REAL ESTATE SERVICES

installing occupancy sensors, giving it fume hoods that shut down when not being used, and many other alterations. Within the first couple of months of completion energy usage had dropped by approximately twothirds. We are not ready to say this is the final outcome but the results have certainly been outstanding. Furthermore the users have reported a change in the environment with better air and lighting quality and quieter workspaces. Building on this, we are now conducting a series of presentations to explain to users what has changed and how

they can help maintain the energy benefits this project has created.� Penn is very proud of the renovations to Chem ‘73 and what it represents for the larger Century Bond investment picture. They might be the first university in the country to have used their Century Bond for the explicit purpose of providing a holistic, environmentally-focused regeneration across campus and they have received a lot of attention from fellow institutions for doing so. It is important to note, however, that the ethos of sustainability has not grown

CHILLER PLANT EXISTING VIEW FROM GROUND LEVEL PENN FACILITIES & REAL ESTATE SERVICES

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UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

ARCH EXTERIOR PHOTO CREDIT TOM CRANE

out of the money provided by the Century Bond. Penn has for many years ensured that long-term sustainability underpins their architecture. This can be seen, for example, in the university’s Krishna P. Singh Centre for Nanotechnology, a state of the art research and development building that had an energy criterion established during its design to ensure that it would operate

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as efficiently as possible. Mr. Hollenberg says that this is an example of Penn’s commitment to its greening project; “we didn’t make exceptions for buildings we know have extraordinary energy use.” Over the last six years Penn has developed an institution-specific, rigorously applied policy statement regarding the construction and renovation of buildings across

campus. This document regards LEED Silver as the benchmark for all new buildings and major renovations. To date, all projects have exceeded this bare minimum, a straightforward achievement given the much more stringent engineering requirements internal to Penn that have been implemented by Mr. Hollenberg and his colleagues. LEED has nevertheless provided an excellent

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ARCH RESTORED WOOD PANELING PHOTO CREDIT TOM CRANE


ARCH EXTERIOR PHOTO CREDIT TOM CRANE

ARCH AUDITORIUM. PHOTO CREDIT TOM CRANE

point of public engagement for the university, as well as the benefit of validation of its efforts by a neutral third party, the U.S. Green Building Council. PLAN OF ACTION In 2009, a Climate Action Plan was developed by Penn as a blueprint for the integration of sustainability throughout not only its infrastructure but across its operational, academic, and social activities

as well. Under the guidance of the Green Campus Partnership, the action plan began formulating in 2007 and brought together key stakeholders from students, staff, and faculty. Launching two years later, the plan created subcommittees representing different university departments, sustainability leaders within those committees, as well as a full-time Sustainability Director in order to promote pan-campus support for future development. In October 2014, Climate

Action Plan 2.0 was launched, with newly increased goals and greater involvement by new stakeholders. The Green Campus Partnership has played a key role in rooting the Climate Action Plan into the daily life of students, staff, and faculty at Penn. “We have three full-time employees and a consultant that we work with very closely, but otherwise we work with dozens of faculty, staff, and volunteers to bring forward the goals of

NEURAL BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES AERIAL VIEW FROM SOUTH PHOTO CREDIT SMITHGROUP

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UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

PENN IS IN AN OVERWHELMINGLY STRONG POSITION TO MOVE FORWARD AS A LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY.

CHARACTERIZATION SUITE LAB ON LOWER LEVEL PHOTO CREDIT ESTO

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RICHARDS EXTERIOR VIEW PENN FACILITIES & REAL ESTATE SERVICES

the Climate Action Plan,” says Sustainability Associate Julian Goresko. “For each goal articulated in the action plan we have subcommittees on the Environmental Sustainability Advisory Committee (ESAC), comprised of staff and faculty co-chairs and members from related university departments. All of our committees have diverse priorities spanning the topics of academics, utilities and operations, physical environment, waste minimization and recycling, transportation, and outreach and engagement. One important program that has grown in recent years is entitled Integrating Sustainability Across the Curriculum (ISAC), where summer research interns work with professors to develop new aspects of their respective courses that integrate sustainability into the curriculum. Rather than professors asking their schools for the funding, our office funds the interns during the eight-week summer; this is also a good opportunity for students at the university, many of whom are eager to deepen their experience of a subject throughout the break.” The Climate Action Plan also has repercussions beyond the limits of the campus. For many years Penn has purchased steam from the local public utility, most of it is generated at the nearby Veolia cogeneration plant. As part of the current contract, Veolia agreed to replace two old, inefficient boilers. Not only would these new boilers improve system wide reliability and efficiency,

but they would use a much cleaner burning fuel. The result was a 25% reduction in carbon emissions for all steam users in the City of Philadelphia.  For Penn, that translated to an annual reduction in carbon emissions of about 15,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent – a testament to what can be achieved through the co-operation and collaboration of several different parties. NO COMPLACENCY With an updated version of the Climate Action Plan at its fingertips, and with the options made possible by the Century Bond, Penn is in an overwhelmingly strong position to move forward as a leader in environmental sustainability. “Not only do we have a great opportunity to implement conservation measures when it comes to energy and utility usage, but we are also meeting students at an important time in their lives before they have families and become homeowners,” says Mr. Goresko. “As large anchor institutions, universities play an important role in being leaders in the field.” “There is a culture here that didn’t exist six or seven years ago,” explains Mr. Hollenberg. “It’s an incredible outpouring. There is no way of pinpointing one single individual achievement but the changes across campus and beyond have been significant. The Climate Action Plan is our blueprint for the future and shows that we are not resting on our laurels.” c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON’S MAIN CAMPUS IN EUGENE, OR

A SUSTAINABLE Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Steve Mital, Sustainability Director at the University of Oregon. Written by Jack Griggs-Smith.

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON THE NEWLY REMODELED STUDENT RECREATION CENTER

STUDENTS GATHER NEAR HEART OF CAMPUS

OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

AUTZEN STADIUM

If education is the path to environmental sustainability then the University of Oregon is paving the way. Its proactive and innovative approach to engage in change, through greening buildings and infrastructure, research, and co-curricular activities, is leading the way for others to follow. Driving these initiatives is the Office of Sustainability, established in 2007 with the aim of helping to set goals, monitor progress, make policy recommen-

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dations, and to support student, faculty, and staff initiatives. In 2011 the Office of Sustainability helped develop the Oregon Model for Sustainable Development to create a framework to address its environmental concerns, both in existing buildings and in new developments. The Oregon Model for Sustainable Development places a cap on the energy use of campus buildings, improves water efficiency, and promotes sustained energy conservation habits throughout the institution. “The university could grow by as much as 20% over the next decade,” explains Sustainability Director Steve Mital. “All future development will adhere to the model.” The model states that any new construction has to be LEED Gold Certified or better, and each building has to get all the available energy points. “It draws a line in the sand; no additional energy consumption despite planned growth” says Mr. Mital. “All new buildings have to


“ALL NEW BUILDINGS HAVE TO BE WORLD CLASS IN THEIR ENERGY EFFICIENCY, AND EVERYTHING WE’VE BUILT SINCE SIGNING THE POLICY HAS MET THOSE STANDARDS.”

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON FORD ALUMNI CENTER AT NIGHT

THE NEWLY REMODELED STUDENT RECREATION CENTER

be world class in their energy efficiency, and everything we’ve built since signing the policy has met those standards.” DEVELOPMENT AND REDEVELOPMENT The renovation of the Recreation Centre is just one example of what is being done at the University of Oregon. It has all the features one would expect from a modern

environmentally conscious building, including roof-top solar panels, daylight harvesting, and radiant heat flooring, but it even uses its exercise machines to generate some on-site energy. “In terms of actual production per person, it is minimal,” says Mr. Mital. “This is not so much about renewables, but a chance for students to get a feel for the watt-hour, a very important but not well understood metric.” One of the real creative leaps at the

FORD ALUMNI CENTER

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Recreation Centre development resides under the new SRC Lobby. What was previously Leighton Pool, now serves as a cistern which will gather rainwater from the roof to flush all the toilets in the building and perform irrigation on the exterior of the facility. Mr. Mital explains that as well as new developments such as the Recreation Center, Lewis Integrative Science building, and the Ford Alumni Center, the University


of Oregon in an attempt to bring twenty-first century standards of efficiency to twentieth century buildings, has also created a revolving loan fund to make money available for efficiency upgrades to existing buildings. “Our analysis shows that these efficiency improvements can provide 100% of the energy needed by all the new buildings expected to come online this decade.” LEWIS INTEGRATIVE SCIENCE BUILDING

RECYCLE, REUSE, AND REDUCE Attempts to make the University of Oregon more sustainable go beyond construction. Mr. Mital explains that within the thriving culture of conservation is a well-established recycling scheme, started by students as a grass-roots effort back in 1991. “They were recycling before recycling was cool.” Not only are there thousands of recycling LEWIS INTEGRATIVE SCIENCE BUILDING

drop-sites on campus, but the Campus Zero Waste Program, which has been supported by student fees, currently recycles over 50% of disposed waste on campus. As well as the usual paper, plastic, bottles, and cans, they also recycle things such as bubble-wrap, Styrofoam, batteries, CDs, DVDs, electronics, and food waste. The university’s Campus Zero-Waste Program MEMORIAL QUAD

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UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

THE OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY IS EVEN PROMOTING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND THE USE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES FURTHER AFIELD.

OUTDOOR PROGRAM BARN ROOFTOP

is a national leader in college zero-waste efforts, explains Mr. Mital. “It really is focused on all three Rs; not just recycle, but reduce and reuse as well.” PROMOTING AN ALL INCLUSIVE APPROACH A culture of sustainability is apparent across all levels of the university. “It’s really important that we have champions horizontally and vertically throughout the whole institution,” explains Mr. Mital. Initiatives go well beyond the Office of

Sustainability. Students have their very own Student Sustainability Coalition and Bike Loan program, while a Green Office program helps support and ultimately reward staff and faculty for environmentally friendly practices. The Office of Sustainability is even promoting energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy sources on its satellite campuses. Working with the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology in Coos County, they have installed their first wind turbine. The turbine, the first of its kind in

Coos County, will provide all the energy needed by the soon-to-open Charleston Marine Science Centre, “We wanted to provide an example on the windy Oregon Coast,” says Mr. Mital. “We hope that others will follow.” The efforts of the University of Oregon, and specifically the Office of Sustainability, are supported and promoted by AASHE (the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education). With hundreds of universities across North America now taking steps to make their WIND TURBINE AT OREGON INSTITUTE OF MARINE BIOLOGY

OUTDOOR PROGRAM BARN

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campuses more sustainable, AASHE has helped create a collaborative and competitive environment which generates ideas and results, allows institutions to network, and ultimately speeds up innovation. “It allows us to replicate others, and others to replicate us,” Mr. Mital explains. “AASHE is the straw that stirs the drink.” INTO THE FUTURE The University of Oregon has much to be proud of. As well as The Oregon Model, the wind turbine, the recycling proMEMORIAL QUAD

gram, and the Recreation Centre with its swimming pool cistern, the University of Oregon has launched the Oregon Leadership in Sustainability program, a one year graduate level academic program. “I feel really proud of what we’ve done, but we’re always pushing the envelope,” says Mr. Mital. The university president recently signed the Comprehensive Environmental Policy, which lays the foundation for specific work plans, timetables, and goals to address an even wider range of environmental impacts. “For the first time

we’re pulling together all the different environmental concerns and being more explicit about where we intend to go, and what resources we need to get there.” The University of Oregon is keen to share its blueprint with the world and the Office of Sustainability even hopes to win an international grant competition which would help launch Campus Sustainability programs in India. “It would be the first of its kind in Indian Higher Ed,” explains Mr. Mital. “We want to be globally engaged and this is a really exciting opportunity.” c

HARVESTING TOMATOES DURING SUMMER SUSTAINABILITY TRIP

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NIAGARA COLLEGE

WHAT’S HAPPENING AT NIAGARA IS A GREEN SHIFT, WHERE THE LESSONS FROM THE ENVIRONMENTAL CLASSROOMS ARE SEEPING INTO ALL PROGRAM AREAS AS WELL AS THE SCHOOL’S OPERATIONS.

NIAGARA COLLEGE

EMERGING AS A GREEN LEADER Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to President Dan Patterson and Sustainability Coordinator Taryn Wilkinson about how Niagara College is promoting sustainability. 54 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


Ontario’s Niagara College is quietly emerging as a green leader within its community and among post-secondary institutions. Niagara College has a well-respected School of Environment and Horticulture, where students benefit from applied education and the unique living laboratory that surrounds them. What’s happening at Niagara is a green shift, where the lessons from the environmental classrooms are seeping into all program areas as well as the school’s operations. Niagara College has made environmental sustainability a key strategic priority. The result is a horizontally and vertically integrated culture of sustainability that goes beyond operations to create living laboratories for student, employee, and community learning.

“As educators, we provide outstanding applied education in environmental studies and renewable technologies, and our graduates are making significant contributions in this sector,” says Niagara College president Dan Patterson. “Sustainability has become an important part of our long-term strategic plan, inside the classroom and out.” With an enrolment of more than 10,000 full-time students, Niagara College operates from specialized campuses located in the heart of the Niagara region. The Welland Campus is home to programs in media, applied health, community services and safety, and technology – including a Renewable Energies Technician program. Nestled in the shadows of the Niagara Escarpment, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve, the Niagara-on-the-Lake Campus is home to

the School of Environment and Horticulture, tourism and business programs, and the College’s Canadian Food and Wine Institute, which includes 40 acres of teaching vineyards, gardens, hop yards, and more. In 2011, the College set five sustainability targets for the next five years: Cut paper consumption by half, achieve a 65 percent diversion rate for waste (achieved in 2012), achieve a 10 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, and achieve a five percent reduction in water use. In 2012, the College banned the sale of bottled water while installing several hydration stations throughout its campuses. “This initiative was significant in terms of building a culture of sustainability at Niagara College,” says Taryn Wilkinson, Niagara College’s Sustainability Coordinator and a SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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NIAGARA COLLEGE

graduate of NC’s Environmental Management and Assessment (Graduate Certificate) program. “The bottled water initiative has the obvious benefit of reducing waste from plastic bottles but, more importantly, it supports the notion that clean drinking water is a right, not a privilege.” Part of the College’s green shift includes embracing green technologies and

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innovative energy conservation initiatives at its campus facilities. The Welland Campus features solar panels and a geothermal heat pump, as well as a small demonstration-size wind turbine, which also provides the Renewable Energies Technician and environmental students with the opportunity to use the campus as a living lab within the classroom. Two

on-campus facilities, the Rankin Technology Centre in Welland and the unique Wine Visitor + Education Centre in Niagara-on-the-Lake, have earned Carbonzero Certification as carbon neutral buildings. Students from the College’s Environmental Management and Assessment (Graduate Certificate) program gain valuable real-world experience working with a local


company, Walker Industries, to conduct annual greenhouse gas inventories for these buildings. Niagara College has also entered into strategic partnerships that promote sustainability in the community and beyond. The College is a member of the Niagara Sustainability Initiative (NSI), a not-for-profit organization that is focused on improving

environmental and economic performance by engaging the community to reduce carbon emissions, enhance sustainability, and improve economic performance. Niagara College is also a member of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) and participated in the Sustainability Tracking & Rating System (STARS) in October 2013, achieving a Bronze rating. "Niagara College has demonstrated its commitment to environmental education and awareness for students, employees, and visitors by actively implementing a variety of unique projects,” says Katrina Kroeze, NSI’s executive director. “The cross-functional and cross-disciplinary relationships Niagara College has developed over the past few years provide endless creativity to drive sustainability in a number of ways including student life, operational efforts, and campus culture." These efforts are earning recognition locally and internationally. In 2014 alone, Niagara College was awarded the

Energy Manager Excellence Award from the Ontario Power Authority, Outstanding Post-Secondary Institution from the Canadian Network for Environmental Education and Communication (EECOM), was listed as one of the Top Environmental Organizations in Canada by Environmental Careers Organization (ECO) Canada, and was awarded the Green Business Award by the Niagara Region. The future at Niagara College looks green as well. A new Sustainability Strategic Plan is under development in collaboration with students, staff, and community stakeholders, and will include goals, targets, and new initiatives. “We’re making important strides and we continue to broaden the scope of sustainability,” says Ms. Wilkinson. “It’s an exciting era of change at Niagara College.” c For more information about Niagara College, visit niagaracollege.ca. To learn more about the College’s sustainability initiatives, visit niagaracollege.ca/sustainability. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES

GATEWAY TECHNICAL COLLEGE IS THE COMMUNITY’S BROADBAND NETWORK ANCHOR, ENSURING INTEROPERABILITY OF POLICE, FIRE, AND SCHOOL COMMUNICATIONS DURING A CRISIS. PHOTO CREDIT: GREG LEBRICK

BUILDING RESILIENT CITIES WITH COMMUNITY COLLEGES By Andrea L. Dono, Program Coordinator at the American Association of Community Colleges’ SEED Center. A strong community is resilient. Climate change and its impacts, like mega-droughts, super storms, and extreme temperatures, are forcing communities to rethink preparedness and emergency responses of yesterday. Today, a truly resilient community has integrated strategies that address public health, food security, transportation infrastructure, water supply, clean energy, and so much more. No single entity can achieve this alone. Public-private partnerships are key to this comprehensive approach, and an untapped resource, our 58 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

nation’s community colleges, are primed to play a major role. The United States has 1,123 two-year institutions that enroll almost half of the nation’s undergraduates (12.4 million people). Approximately 90 percent of Americans live within 30 miles of a community college. Charged with bettering the areas they serve, these colleges should be central to designing and carrying out a coherent and sustainable local response to climate threats, says a new report released by the American Association of Community

Colleges’ Sustainability Education and Economic Development Center and the Center on Wisconsin Strategy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. They can do this as a workforce developer, a community organizer, and stakeholder convener. EDUCATIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE SUPPORTS PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE Hundreds of cities and states are developing climate resiliency plans, but few are involving their local technical and com-


GATEWAY TECHNICAL COLLEGE STUDENTS LEARN REAL-LIFE SKILLS THROUGH HANDS-ON TRAINING. PHOTO CREDIT: GREG LEBRICK

munity colleges. According to A Guide to Climate Resiliency & the Community College, this is a missed opportunity. Most of these plans, for example, call for the rebuilding of infrastructure, more sophisticated land use planning, and networked emergency response systems, but say little about where to find the necessary skilled workforce and who will do the training. City and county workers, engineers, planners, construction managers, and others will need to think differently. How will they factor in changes in temperature and wind patterns when designing a bridge, for example? And, how will the design impact greenhouse gas emissions? Both new and incumbent workers must factor climate change effects into their jobs and training in the necessary skills PHOTO CREDIT: GREG LEBRICK

can be provided most effectively at community colleges. Community colleges offer a wide variety of degree programs and certificates that teach the skills required by employers so students can immediately enter the workforce, advance their careers with additional skills or credentials, or continue their path to higher education. Edmonds Community College in Lynnwood, Washington, has developed certificate programs that lead directly to jobs in energy management and energy efficiency technology or can be combined for associate degrees. With associate degrees in hand, students can transfer to Central Washington University, and apply their course work towards a business degree. Imagine: A region like Northwest Washington will now have a

CULINARY STUDENT TEACHES PRESCHOOL CHILDREN ABOUT GROWING PLANTS FOR FOOD. HCC DALE MABRY CAMPUS, TAMPA, FL. PHOTO CREDIT: CHRIS STICKNEY

HYDROPONIC PLANTS, TAKEN ON DAY OF FIRST HARVESTING. HCC SOUTHSHORE CAMPUS IN RUSKIN, FL. PHOTO CREDIT: HCC STAFF

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AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES

BY WORKING TOGETHER, LOCAL GOVERNMENT, THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY, AND EDUCATORS CAN IDENTIFY THE JOBS AND SKILLS THAT ARE NEEDED REGIONALLY.

pipeline of skilled technicians who are educated in business, energy, and sustainability concepts, and prepared to solve regional resiliency issues. One example of where cutting-edge curriculum development meets resiliency is at Hillsborough Community College (HCC) in Florida. Following the oil spill in the nearby Gulf of Mexico in 2010, the college

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approached the Port Authority to discuss preparedness and emergency response. HCC walked away with the idea of integrating more extensive hazardous material training into its health and public service training programs. An oil recycling company at the Port Authority expressed a need for a cleaner process and is now working with HCC on a chemical engineering technician program. Additional conversations with other area employers continue to spark the development of new programs, internships, and local jobs. A true convener, HCC brought together Tampa’s municipal leaders, regional planners, and transit authorities to discuss resiliency and workforce development. The college makes the connections and ties industry need with economic development. Rather than launch job-specific programs, it trains a resilient workforce by infusing disaster preparedness and planning across its curriculum.

By working together, local government, the business community, and educators can identify the jobs and skills that are needed regionally and fill those gaps with training at community colleges. This type of collaboration leads to an updated educational infrastructure that helps local workers qualify for local jobs related to addressing climate impacts and responding to disasters. CENTER OF THE COMMUNITY One of the challenges that communities face in building resilient places is capturing public support. It is difficult to explain climate change and its consequences in a way that resonates with residents and compels them to take action. Community colleges, however, are well-positioned to play the role of “community educator.” These institutions are connected with community groups, civic organizations, and area employers. They can be powerful allies


GATEWAY TECHNICAL COLLEGE’S HERO CENTER IS A FIRE MEDIC AND EMS INDUSTRY HUB. PHOTO CREDIT: GREG LEBRICK

SUBJECT: HORTICULTURE INSTRUCTOR SPEAKING TO STUDENTS. HCC PLANT CITY CAMPUS, PLANT CITY, FL. PHOTO CREDIT: PEDRO CASTILLANO

FIELD TRIP BY HCC INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA STUDIES DEPARTMENT, VIEWING SEA WEED AND SEA GRASS SAMPLES FROM TAMPA BAY. COCKROACH BAY, AQUATIC RESERVE, NEAR RUSKIN, FL. PHOTO CREDIT: PEDRO CASTILLANO

in fostering inclusive conversations with a broad group of stakeholders who can offer different perspectives and resources. Community colleges can be a neutral space for convenings and an unbiased facilitator of these conversations. Partnering on civic engagement, outreach, and education can ensure a more inclusive process that leads to more widespread buy-in. An illustration of this is the Resilient and Sustainable Cities Symposium held by the Peralta Community College District in 2014 at Laney College in Oakland, California. The college convened representatives from local government and community groups to discuss food security, fire, climate action, and other topics. It was able to showcase Bay Area successes and partnerships and created a space for open dialog that would lead to new ones. Equity, too, plays an important role in resiliency. The report points out that low-in-

come neighborhoods are often the hardest hit by environmental and economic impacts and will shoulder a disproportionate share of anticipated climate-driven price spikes. The report states: “A society becomes resilient through improvements in median income, education, health, wealth, and equal opportunity to participate in and benefit from the activity that produces them. If opportunity then is a primary adaptive strategy, community colleges are clearly positioned to play a leading role.” Finally, community colleges are aligning their own campus adaptation and hazard mitigation planning (which they are already required to do) with local and regional efforts. Integrating campus expertise and resources with those of the city or county results in more coordinated response and recovery efforts and greater community benefit. In Southeastern Wisconsin, Gateway Technical College serves as the

anchor for the area’s broadband network, allowing for interoperability of police, fire, and schools’ communications in times of crisis. In addition, Gateway’s EMS and fire medic students learn this collaborative approach and its crisis intervention teams are networked with local services. ENGAGE YOUR COMMUNITY COLLEGE Two-year colleges are poised to facilitate skills attainment as well as community conversations. As cities, states, and regional governments are building resilient communities and trying to weather the effects of climate changes, their local community college should be engaged to help figure out the details. Learn more about working with community colleges on resiliency by downloading A Guide to Climate Resiliency & the Community College at theseedcenter.org/climateresiliencyguide. c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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IDEA CAMPUS ENERGY CONFERENCE OPENING PLENARY PANEL.

CLEAN ENERGY FOR THE NEXT GENERATION: IDEA 28TH ANNUAL CAMPUS ENERGY CONFERENCE Written by Brad Bradford Communities across North America are recognizing that district energy is fundamental to achieving large scale energy savings and emissions reductions. From recovering industrial surplus heat, to tapping renewable sources of cooling, to harvesting indigenous fuel resources, utilities are joining forces with cities to bridge multiple pathways to successful district energy implementation. University and college campuses are already doing their part. Many college campuses have deployed district energy, 62 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

CHP, and microgrid technologies for decades, some for even a century or more. As such, campuses are uniquely positioned to demonstrate the economic and environmental advantages of district energy and to deploy new technologies that stimulate economic activity and innovation, while acting as major stakeholders in decisions around land-use planning, energy supply and distribution, and transportation. All of these decisions help drive the green economy transformation.

IDEA’s 28th Annual Campus Energy Conference, with a theme of “Clean Energy for the Next Generation”, brought together more than 670 delegates from colleges and universities, government agencies, and leading manufacturers and service providers from 44 different states across the USA, as well as delegates from Canada, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. The conference, held between the 10th and 13th of February 2015 in Denver, Colorado, included comprehensive workshops, engaging ple-


EXHIBIT HALL.

nary discussions with campus and industry leaders, and a full agenda of informative technical presentations. IDEA Chair Ken Smith of Ever-Green Energy offered opening remarks speaking to the important role of campuses as innovation incubators in a changing utility landscape. The 90 exhibit Trade Show was lively and well attended, and an off-site networking dinner event at the historic Mile High Station treated participants to an evening of

culture and rich ‘pop baroque’ music. Conference host University of Colorado Boulder warmly welcomed IDEA Campus Conference participants to the Denver area, and provided guided tours of university systems at the conclusion of the event. THERMAL DISTRIBUTION WORKSHOP The 25th Thermal Distribution Workshop focused on the safe and reliable distribution of thermal energy through underground

OPENING PLENARY PANORAMA.

TRADE SHOW PANORAMA.

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IDEA CAMPUS ENERGY CONFERENCE DISTRIBUTION WORKSHOP. JIM RILEY & PAT DAVIN.

COMMUNITIES ACROSS NORTH AMERICA ARE RECOGNIZING THAT DISTRICT ENERGY IS FUNDAMENTAL TO ACHIEVING LARGE SCALE ENERGY SAVINGS AND EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS.

piping networks to customer buildings in campuses and city networks. Separate workshop segments addressed the specific considerations and nuances for steam, hot water, and chilled water. Patrick Davin, Veolia North America, and Jim Riley, Texas A&M University, chaired the workshop, delivering a forum for peer to peer learning and collegial exchange for about 160 attendees. Rich Boscarino from Consolidated Edison Operations, along with Patrick Davin from Veolia North America, provided an overview of IDEA’s Mutual Assistance for District Energy (MADE) Program. MADE is a voluntary system for sharing trained personnel resources and emergency equipment among IDEA Member Organizations in the event of disasters and unplanned outages. Timely recovery from these and other unanticipated system emergencies may sometimes require outside assistance 64 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

from contractors or emergency crews to effect repairs in a timely manner. MADE is a collaborative program to facilitate these efforts among IDEA member systems. The Thermal Distribution Workshop allowed IDEA members to share proven in practice insights critical to systems engineering and operations management. Other areas of focus included selection

of distribution piping materials, manhole cover corrosion and vault maintenance, metering, and effective safety programs. MICROGRIDS AND ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS WORKSHOP As more cities, communities, and campuses seek greater resiliency and reliability, microgrids and local electricity generation


JEFFREY PACKARD ASKS A QUESTION.

continue to emerge as a practical solution. Ted Borer, Princeton University, and Bob Manning, Harvard University, chaired the 5th edition of the Microgrids & Electrical Distribution Systems Workshop. Participants were provided with technical discussion covering the rules and regulations influencing microgrid deployment, performance measurements and metrics, integrated data sharing, and collaborative system design. The workshop was well attended, with more than 80 campus energy system managers, utility and sustainability directors, project and technology developers, operations staff, and other energy professionals engaging in the day long discussion. TECHNICAL PROGRAM The main component of the Campus Energy Conference had over 110 different presenters and panelists across three tracks of

high-quality presentations and moderated discussions. Visit http://www.districtenergy. org/proceedings-28th-annual-campus-energy-conference/ for the Online Proceedings. Campus and industry representatives shared success stories and lessons learned from ongoing efforts to improve efficiency and demonstrate resiliency. Case studies provided the foundation for much of the learning and knowledge exchange that took place in sessions. Justin Callihan, University of Virginia, and Joe Witchger, HGA Architects & Engineers, provided an overview of the mechanical plant innovation at the University of Virginia. Alan Daeke, North Carolina State University, and Michael Dempsey, Burns & McDonnell, shared lessons from North Carolina State University about comprehensive electric distribution master planning. Participants heard about the business case for the

University of Alaska Fairbanks’ new CHP plant from Mike Ruckhaus and Chilkoot Ward. The University of Iowa’s Ben Anderson along with Ben Niedergeses, Stanley Consultants, outlined key considerations for designing desuperheater options for low pressure steam systems. Additional topics included drying solutions for flooded steam pipes, improving chiller plant performance, dual fuel technology for CHP, and demand side management strategies for campus labs. At the conclusion of the conference, the campus forum provided an opportunity to coalesce all of the ideas and lessons learned from previous days’ discussions. University and college energy professionals engaged in a thoughtful discussion relevant to their leadership and challenges and shared their thoughts around content curation for future IDEA events. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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IDEA CAMPUS ENERGY CONFERENCE

WEDNESDAY PLENARY. ROB THORNTON, BRIAN BIROSAK, SCOTT CLARK, TOM NYQUIST, JUAN ONTIVEROS, MEGHAN RIESTERER AND KEN SMITH.

CAMPUS THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: CLEAN ENERGY FOR THE NEXT GENERATION Wednesday’s plenary panel discussion, moderated by IDEA President Rob Thornton, explored the next decade of growth for campus energy utilities, and developing

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partnerships for institutional leadership within the broader community. North American universities and colleges are leaders when it comes to clean energy development and deployment of efficient technologies. In fact, while utilities and developers wrestle with regulatory

restrictions around microgrid development and connection, our campus institutions have quietly been developing and generating clean, efficient energy for decades. Opportunities are now emerging for strategic partnerships between campuses and their communities to accelerate the deployment of resilient microgrids and other sustainable energy technologies. Less than a decade ago, it was sufficient to complete a high-level Utilities Master Plan to align with planned campus expansion. In cities, energy master planning was generally an exercise for investor-owned or municipal utilities. Today, campuses and cities are committing to steep carbon reductions, the deployment of more sustainable technologies, and placing an increased emphasis on resilient infrastructure, requiring a comprehensive and coordinated approach to utility master planning. Panelists discussed the implications, drivers for change, and their recent successes. Training, succession planning and system modernization were also important topics. The take-away was real-world insights from some of North America’s most progressive campus energy providers, with feedback directly applicable for other campus utility operations across the country.


Panel participants included Bryan Birosak, University of Colorado Boulder; Scott Clark, Burns & McDonnell; Tom Nyquist, Princeton University; Juan Ontiveros, The University of Texas at Austin; Meghan Riesterer, Oberlin College; and Ken Smith, Ever-Green Energy. The theme of town and gown partnerships was infused throughout the rest of the program track presentations, with important discussions focusing on master planning and system renewal, microgrid and CHP deployment, system optimization, and making the business case for sustainable investment. TECHNICAL TOURS Conference attendees concluded their IDEA Campus Conference experience by taking part in one of three technical tours: The University of Colorado Boulder. Conference host University of Colorado Boulder opened the doors on their West District Energy Plant, giving attendees a chance to see their recently renovated cooling plant and repowered cogeneration facility. Participants also toured the newly

constructed East District Energy Plant providing conventional heating and cooling for the campus. The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center. Attendees toured the Central Utility Plant (CUP) that provides steam and chilled water to 6.2 million square feet of leading medical research, clinical, and educational space, serving both the university and two hospitals. The CUP was constructed in 2002, and has installed conventional boilers and chillers for campus heating and cooling. Plant capacity consists of six 125 PSI boilers with a total output of 360,000 lbs/hr steam flow and 17,400 tons of cooling capacity through nine electrical centrifugal chillers. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Attendees were granted access to two sites at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s campus in Golden, Colorado. The tour provided a rare inside look at the Energy Systems Integration Facility, which provides transformative

capabilities to advance the US’ energy system into a cleaner, more intelligent infrastructure. Participants also toured the Renewable Fuel Heating Plant that provides heat to critical research buildings on NREL’s South Table Mountain Campus. c The 28th Annual Campus Energy Conference was generously supported by: Platinum Sponsors – Burns & McDonnell and Johnson Controls; Gold Sponsors – Jacobs, Solar Turbines, and Trane; Silver Sponsors – Affiliated Engineers, Carrier, CHA, Chem-Aqua, ICETEC Thermo Systems, and Van Ness Feldman; Bronze Sponsors – Stanley Consultants. TECHNICAL TOUR: ANSCHUTZ MEDICAL CENTER.

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GLOBAL EVENTS

APRIL

11th - 14th

2015

Greater & Greener 2015 San Francisco, CA, USA www.greatergreener.org

More than 1,000 global park leaders, city planning and design professionals, and urban park advocates convene in San Francisco to discover the power of parks in creating healthy, resilient, and sustainable cities.

15th - 17th

GreenTech 2015 Seventh Annual IEEE Green Technologies Conference New Orleans, LA, USA www.ieeegreentech.org

GreenTech 2015 was conceived to address one of the most pressing challenges of our time: Securing green and clean energy sources for the 21st century to protect the environment and help build a more resilient power grid.

SUSTAINABLE

20th - 22th

The 8th annual International Biomass Conference & Expo Minneapolis, MN, USA www.biomassconference.com

The 8th annual International Biomass Conference & Expo will take place in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This dynamic event unites industry professionals from all sectors of the world’s interconnected biomass utilization industries — biobased power, thermal energy, fuels, and chemicals.

24th

Recycling Energy Forum Expo & Education Miami, Florida, USA

This business expo and educational conference brings together business professionals and educational institutions to share innovations in smart and clean products and solutions to improve quality of life while reducing negative impacts on the world.

14th Annual Sustainability Summit The Conference Board New York, NY, USA

This forum hears perspectives and strategies from major corporate and financial leaders on how to successfully instill sustainability and circular economy thinking into all aspects of global management systems.

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

PROMOTE YOUR EVENT HERE If your organization has a trade show or event, please let us know and we will promote your event on our global events pages.

For more information please contact us at: info@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net

www.recyclingenergyforum.com

29th - 30th

www.conference-board.org

4th - 7th

2015 Alternative Clean Transportation “ACT” Expo Dallas, TX, USA www.actexpo.com

North America’s Largest Clean Fleet Show. All weight classes and alternative fuel types are represented — electric, hybrid, hydrogen, natural gas, propane autogas, and renewable fuels — providing a one-stop shop for fleets to learn how to reduce costs and emissions.

14th - 15th

Canadian Hydropower Association’s 2015 Forum on Hydropower Ottawa, ON, Canada www.hydroforum.ca

Learn about how the hydropower industry is fostering aboriginal relationships and delivering environmental improvements while addressing the need for skilled labour. Discover how hydro developers are communicating the industry’s challenges and successes within our ever changing world.

19th - 20th

Low Carbon Energy Investor Forum 2015 San Francisco, CA, USA

Join leading global investors, fund managers, and energy industry executives to discuss the current and future investment opportunities available in the asset classes of infrastructure, private equity, and venture capital as they relate to cleaner energy.

Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council 2015 Summit Seattle, WA, USA

SPLC’s annual Summit provides an opportunity to learn best practices, share knowledge, build valuable relationships, and influence the development of SPLC’s programs for guiding and benchmarking leadership in institutional sustainable purchasing.

www.lowcarbonenergyinvestor.com/ event/forum/

25th - 26th

www.sustainablepurchasing.org

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MAY 2015


ABU DHABI, UAE (MARCH. 23-24) TORONTO, CANADA (APRIL. 23-24)

The Centre for Sustainability and Excellence (CSE) has hosted its Advanced Certified Sustainability trainings in 25 countries, 5 continents, and trained 5,000 professionals from non-for-profit, governmental, and Fortune500 organizations. Topics discussed include: • Current Global and Local Legislation for CSR and GHG emissions • Strategy and Related Global Standards & Guidelines (UN Global Compact, GRI G4, CDP, SROI) • The importance of Sustainability in Supply Chain and Carbon Footprint reduction • External Assurance and how to communicate and gain credibility in your report and many more trending topics.

Are you in Canada?

Are you in the MENA region?

Join us in Abu Dhabi, March 23-24 Image Source: www.abudhabitriclub.com

Join us in Toronto, April 23-24 Image Source: www.wallconvert.com

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to become the next certified CSR Practitioner! For more information visit http://www.cse-net.org/article/127/upcoming-trainings or contact us at sustainability@cse-net.org

Victoria Karkouli, Marketing Coordinator • T: 3122146464 • 70 W Madison Str.,Suite 1400, Chicago, IL 60602, USA

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ADVERTISERS INDEX B Black & McDonald

P16

C Carillion P17 Centre for Sustainability and Excellence P69 Chartwells Inside Front CIBC Mellon Back Cover Composite Power Group Inc. P15

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G General Cable Company Govan Brown Green Sun Rising Guelph Utility Pole Company Ltd L Leer Weinzapfel Associates P Powerline Plus Ltd

P14 P12 P27 P15

P41

P13

R Riggs Distler Inc. Canada Renew Merchandise

P15 P50

S Saft Batteries

P27

T The Water Expo Trans Power Utility Contractors Inc.

Inside Back P15


Sustainable Business Magazine  

Issue 02/15

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