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SUSTAINABLE ISSUE 01/16

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

SUSTAINABLE CAMPUSES

UNIVERSITY OF

CALGARY UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH

CANADIAN

SOLAR DELTRO GROUP BARBADOS LIGHT & POWER MONTSERRAT UTILITIES LIMITED

DELTA SUPPLY COMPANY

ALSO FEATURED THIS ISSUE

AASHE • CanSIA • CARILEC

S U S TA I N I N G T O M O R R O W. T O D AY


SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

SUSTAINING TOMORROW. TODAY www.sustainablebusinessmagazine.net


SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

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Sustainable Business Magazine is committed to promoting sustainable printing. This magazine is printed on Forest Stewardship Council certified material and manufactured using environmentally sustainable procedures. All lithographic printer inks used are vegetable-based.

SBM Media Ltd - Henderson Business Centre, 51 Ivy Road, Norwich, Norfolk, NR5 8BF, United Kingdom • T: +44 (0)1603 516519 Email: info@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net www.sustainablebusinessmagazine.net Editor: Fiona FitzGerald Assistant Editors: George Newell Senior Writer: Marcus Bonnano Contributors: John A. Gorman Andy Hehl Thomas Hodge Christopher Serrie Alysha D. Singh Meghan Fay Zahniser Commercial Manager: Kaye Kalu Web Administrator: Steve Phipps

CONTENTS ISSUE 01/16

Welcome to the latest issue of Sustainable Business Magazine Sustainable Business Magazine aims to spread awareness of the values of sustainability, as well as the brilliant ways in which organizations continue to meet challenges and champion corporate social responsibility. Our first issue of 2016 features the fourth installment of our ‘Solar Leadership’ series in partnership with CanSIA, which celebrates how CanSIA members are producing and delivering clean, reliable renewable energy. The series is prefaced by a foreword from CanSIA President and CEO John Gorman, and this installment features articles on Canadian Solar and the Deltro Group of Companies. Our ‘Sustainable Campuses’ series in partnership with AASHE celebrates how universities continue to develop and operate sustainably, as well as the role they’re taking in educating students and the wider public about sustainability. The series is prefaced by a foreword from AASHE’s Executive Director Meghan Fay Zahniser. For the latest installment we spoke to Joanne Perdue, Chief Sustainability Officer at the University of Calgary, and Maurice Nelischer, Director of Sustainability and Professor Emeritus at the University of Guelph. This issue also includes the third installment of our ‘Caribbean Energy’ series in partnership with CARILEC. The series showcases how CARILEC members are contributing to a more successful and sustainable Caribbean energy industry, and is prefaced by a foreword from CARILEC’s Interim Executive Director Thomas Hodge. For this installment we spoke to Peter Williams, Managing Director of Emera Caribbean, about Barbados Light & Power, and David Thomson, Managing Director of Montserrat Utilities Limited. Alongside our ‘Caribbean Energy’ series we feature an article on Delta Supply Company, in which General Manager Jonathan Swire explains how they are helping companies throughout Jamaica. Details of upcoming sustainability events can be found on our events calendar. This issues’ highlighted event is the 29th Annual IDEA Campus Energy Conference: “The Changing Landscape”. The conference took place between February 8th and February 12th 2016, and attracted over 840 registrants from colleges and universities, government agencies, and leading manufacturers and services providers. This issue’s three guest editorials have once again been provided by a selection of industry experts and feature an Environment Report from Andy Hehl, Kebony Manager at Pine River Group, an Energy Report from Alysha D. Singh, Marketing Communications Manager at ZincNyx Energy Solutions Limited, and a Technology Report from Christopher Serrie, CEO, Building Water & Energy Solutions Inc. We hope that you find this issue both interesting and inspiring. Thank you for reading. The Sustainable Business Magazine Team

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Environmental Report Kebony / Pine River Group

04

Technology Report Building Water & Energy Solutions Inc.

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Energy Report ZincNyx Energy Solutions Inc.

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Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA)

10

Canadian Solar Inc.

18

Deltro Group of Companies

24

The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE)

26

University of Calgary

32

University of Guelph

38

Caribbean Electric Utility Services Corporation (CARILEC)

40

Barbados Light & Power Company

46

Montserrat Utilities Limited (MUL)

50

Delta Supply Co. Ltd.

56

2016 IDEA Campus Energy Conference

60

Global Events

62

Advertisers Index

FRONT COVER IMAGE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY. COURTESY OF TOM ARBAN, ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY.

© SBM Media Ltd 2016. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form for any purpose, other than short sections for the purpose of review, without prior consent of the publisher.

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT HUNTERS POINT, NY.

ENVIRONMENTALREPORT

Written by Andy Hehl, Kebony Manager at Pine River Group.

Getting America up to Speed on Sustainable Architecture Contractors and architects are recognizing that green design is no longer just a trend; it is quickly becoming the norm across building sectors around the world. Despite this global movement and the growing number of green-conscious Americans, sustainability efforts in the U.S. remain behind other countries. While American architects are eager to incorporate eco-friendly products and practices into designs, product awareness remains the greatest road block. In a marketplace saturated with conventional materials, architects and contractors can struggle to find green materials that are both recognizable and available. 2 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

AWARENESS Though demand for sustainable products is growing, architects need to be made more aware of green options. Due to impatience and a lack of awareness, Americans are quick to turn to popular building products, especially in the residential and light commercial building sectors. For example, American consumers seeking new hardwood decking are more likely to explore tropical hardwoods than sustainable alternatives, because that has long been the choice product. However, most consumers are unaware that tropical hardwoods, like


Ipe, are not only produced in endangered rainforests, they also take 80 to 100 years to mature, leading to a long-term negative impact on the environment. In comparison, modified pine, such as Kebony, takes only 30 years to mature and three days to modify. While environmentally friendly and efficient to produce, green products take time to catch on and thrive in the U.S. To gain market share, they must gain exposure through industry publications, commercial projects, and architectural presentation. This exposure can help architects encourage early adoption and help brands gain a foothold in the industry. SUPPLY In addition to awareness, the U.S. has struggled with access to sustainable alternatives. To reduce time and cost, builders often seek local materials. Although a green building product may be their first choice, if regional limitations stand in the way, builders are forced by budget or time restrictions to seek closer alternatives. Traditional materials dominate the market and have long demonstrated their durability and performance. When green materials are not available locally, they lose the opportunity to gain industry exposure and establish proven performance records.

Though demand for sustainable products is growing, architects need to be made more aware of green options. Due to impatience and a lack of awareness, Americans are quick to turn to popular building products. Companies that have adopted green products early in the supply chain have recognized the added benefits, especially those that eliminate problem areas experienced with traditional materials. However, for more companies to become early adopters, green products must also compete economically. To do so, regional availability is a must. Investment in U.S.-based production facilities will improve efficiency and price. In order for global companies, including Norway-based Kebony, to build U.S. factories, they must first increase sales. Kebony, a sustainable alternative to tropical hardwoods, has found great success in its home country and neighboring European countries. Yet, like most green products, adoption in the American marketplace takes time. The goal to eventually open a North American factory is dependent on sales - an issue still rooted in market awareness. Though the U.S. has been slow to adopt sustainable building practices, there are still opportunities for green building products to gain momentum. However, to move forward, builders, suppliers and consumers must recognize that the responsibility lies with all parties to increase sustainability efforts. c About the Author Andy Hehl is the Kebony Manager at Pine River Group, the North American distributor of Kebony, a sustainable alternative to tropical hardwood. Kebony’s technology permanently modifies sustainable softwoods species so the resulting product performs to the level of a hardwood. Kebony is beautiful and long-lasting, having been used in several projects - from decking to marinas to cladding - around the world.

MARINA AT ST. JOSEPH, MI.

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TECHNOLOGY REPORT

TECHNOLOGYREPORT

Written by Christopher Serrie, CEO, Building Water & Energy Solutions Inc.

Strategic Water System Makes Building Owner’s Money Did you know, that water has a direct impact on a buildings energy and maintenance costs? Its quality affects everything in our lives; from the health of people and buildings, to mechanical systems, energy use, and operating budgets. Ignore it at your peril. What you don’t think about will cost you.

By the time water enters our buildings its quality has often deteriorated throughout the journey to the point that if left unconditioned it will destroy every single mechanical part it touches. 4 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

WATER ACTS LIKE A SOLVENT Water becomes what it touches. By the time water enters our buildings its quality has often deteriorated throughout the journey to the point that if left unconditioned it will destroy every single mechanical part it touches. Mixing and pressure reducing valves, boilers, tanks, anodes, cooling towers, booster pumps, pipes and heat exchangers are all affected by water quality. You won’t hear about our solutions from your mechanical contractor. Solutions are not in their best interest. Just look at the operating budget of a 10 year old building to see its impact on your own bottom line. EFFICIENCY INCREASE FOR OLD BOILERS You don’t have to replace old boilers to improve efficiency and energy performance. In hard water areas, domestic boilers/tanks are replaced every 8 plus years due to scale. The effects of scale begin in year 1 with a reduction in system efficiency. Certified technology is now available that can prevent/remove scale thereby increasing system efficiency and reducing your energy costs.


CHRISTOPHER SERRIE, CEO.

BIG SAVINGS Domestic boilers normally run above 150F to kill legionella. Mixing valves are used to bring the temperature down to 120F. Mixing valves fail frequently and can also reintroduce legionella back into the potable system. By using our certified technology on the cold water feed to boilers and tanks, bacteria is prevented from getting into the system so the temperature set point can be reduced to a level desired by all occupants. The result is no mixing valve issues to deal with, reduced boiler run time, improved efficiency, reduced down time, and reduced maintenance costs while you also received enhanced legionella protection. How much energy will your building save by being able to turn down your boiler thermostat by 20F to 50F?

NEXT STEPS Have a look at your annual operating budget. Now add in your future capital improvements. Are any costs going to go down? Would you like them to? c For more information please visit and contact: www.buildingwatersolutions.com

SCALE There is now performance certified anti-scale technology proven to prevent 99.6% of scale. That means higher boiler efficiency, extended equipment life cycles, and greater savings. No drains, chemicals, salt, electricity, or scheduled maintenance is required either. This technology provides bottom line benefits & savings. FINANCIAL IMPACT A third party engineer review of our system estimated (on a 3,000 MBTU 2 boiler DHWBS only requiring a 20F degree variation) that over $24,850/yr may be saved in maintenance and energy. That’s almost $500,000 in extra building value (5%cap) created for a system that costs less than $50k. It is clear that our strategic approach to water can result in significant annual savings and enhanced building value. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ENERGY REPORT ALYSHA D. SINGH, MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, ZINCNYX ENERGY SOLUTIONS, INC.

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Clean Energy for Our Future ENERGYREPORT

Written by Alysha D. Singh, Marketing Communications Manager, ZincNyx Energy Solutions, Inc.

Environmental sustainability has come to the forefront in the face of a rapidly evolving energy landscape. With growing concern over climate change, there is increasing interest in renewable energy. Measurable shifts towards alternative energy use are being made throughout the world, and these shifts are at the core of the evolution of the energy landscape. Presently, there is a race to develop the most efficient and cost-effective energy storage technology. Some might say that climate change has been the catalyst for this movement, as renewables lead the charge in new energy generation. Wind and solar are synonymous with clean energy, and while these energy sources are ideal, they cannot be successful contenders in the industry without storage. Energy storage stabilizes the intermittent and unpredictable nature of renewables. It is clear that energy storage is the solution to the limitations of renewable power; however the need for storage does not end there. Energy storage offers much needed relief to an over-stressed power grid. As renewable power is becoming more integrated with the grid, more stress is being placed on grid infrastructure. This impact can be seen in transmission and distribution, as well as stabilization. Consumption factors such as electric vehicle charging and micro-generation place additional demands on the grid. Climate change is a critical factor influencing the need for renewable energy generation, and now more than ever the need to lighten the load on the existing power grid is undeniable. Although energy

A fundamental feature of the ZincNyx system is safety; both in its operation and in its effect on the environment.

storage is the solution, one thing is certain: Not all energy storage technologies are equal. While some may boast efficiency, measures of safety, reliability, and environmental sustainability may not be met. ZincNyx Energy Solutions, Inc. has developed a cost-effective, regenerative energy storage technology that answers the need for an environmentally sustainable advanced battery. The system provides modular energy storage for a number of applications ranging from renewables firming, backup power, peak shifting, telecom facility backup, electric vehicle charging support, and diesel generator replacement or hybridization. A fundamental feature of the ZincNyx system is safety; both in its operation and in its effect on the environment. The ZincNyx energy storage system emits zero harmful chemicals or greenhouse gases. The ZincNyx energy storage system’s capacity to replace or hybridize diesel generators will have far-reaching effects on the environment and business. It will not only reduce pollutants released into the atmosphere by diesel generators, but it will also lower the costs associated with transporting fuel to remote locations where diesel generators are used. The regenerative aspect of ZincNyx’s technology will allow for significant cost savings in remote site applications. The potential of energy storage has yet to be fully realized. From harnessing the power of renewables and providing grid support as needed, to entering markets as a disruptive technology where the energy infrastructure is still being developed; energy storage continues to move forward. As the energy landscape progresses, it is important to consider future sustainability of both the grid and the environment. Storing power from renewables is key for a clean, sustainable environment, and with a system that is regenerative, non-polluting, and reliable, the goal for sustainability may truly be achieved. c For more information please visit www.zincnyx.com and follow them on Twitter: @ZincNyx.

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CANADIAN SOLAR INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION

“OUR GOAL IS TO BUILD A CANADIAN SOLAR ENERGY INDUSTRY WHICH IS STRONG, EFFICIENT, ETHICAL, AND PROFESSIONAL.”

SOLAR LEADERSHIP A foreword by John A. Gorman, President and CEO of the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA).

JOHN A. GORMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF CANSIA.

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On behalf of the members of the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA), I am pleased to offer this foreword to the “Solar Leadership” series in Sustainable Business Magazine. The Canadian solar industry is proud of the sector we have built, with nearly 2 GW installed by the end of 2014! As CanSIA members, the solar industry is poised to solidify solar electricity as a mainstream energy source and an integral part of Canada’s diversified electricity mix. The sun provides an inexhaustible supply of clean fuel to power our homes and our economy. Solar energy is posi-

tioned to play a key role in our transition to carbon-free lives and a carbon-free economy. Our goal is to build a Canadian solar energy industry which is strong, efficient, ethical, and professional, with capacity to provide innovative solar energy solutions and to play a major role in the global transition to a sustainable, clean-energy future. CanSIA members are companies involved with the delivery of solar energy products and services in Canada, or with the delivery of other products and services to Canada’s solar energy sector. CanSIA proudly represents manufacturers, installers, project developers, builders, architects,


engineers, consultants, and a variety of other companies and organizations who contribute directly to the growing number of solar projects in Canada. In Ontario, where the vast majority of Canada’s solar is installed, government support for solar has enabled rapidly declining costs for manufactured components. Capital costs for solar have declined by 65% over the last 6 years, to where solar + storage technology is getting cheaper than anyone ever imagined. The value of solar + storage is exactly what electricity systems of the future need (i.e. empowered consumers and a clean, cost effective solution that enhances the predictability, reliability, flexibility, and resilience of the electricity grid) with none of the unwelcome and costly social, health, and environmental externalities.

Innovations in solar + storage, with announcements like Elon Musk’s Powerwall energy storage system, designed to connect to a home solar installation, will revolutionize our energy system and make every home energy independent. The solar world has been anticipating this day, and is abuzz with the possibilities. Solar + storage is the key to making solar dispatchable as it circumvents the energy source’s main difficulty, that the energy it generates is only available when the sun is shining. Distributed generation like solar on rooftops can delay distribution system upgrades as demand on a circuit grows, because less power has to be shipped into the circuit. It also can reduce the need to build new transmission lines to carry power from distant grid-scale generation. Solar’s unique nature as a distributed

source of energy means that it can empower Canadians to reduce their carbon footprints not only with respect to their electricity use, but also by enabling carbon reductions in buildings, industry, and transportation. As we learn to adapt to a carbon-constrained future, growing load on the electricity system with plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), a new model of energy consumption is emerging. Getting that energy from renewable sources like solar is a primary objective. As we hope to demonstrate in this series, the solar industries sector recognizes the importance of clean fuels to Canadians. We encourage you to read more about CanSIA and the work of the solar industry at www.cansia.ca, or contact me with your questions or comments at jgorman@cansia.ca. c

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CANADIAN SOLAR CANADIAN SOLAR INC. WAS FOUNDED IN 2001 BY DR. SHAWN QU, CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, IN GUELPH, ONTARIO, CANADA.

THE FOREFRONT

OF SOLAR Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Dylan Marx, Head of International Operations at Canadian Solar, Inc., about what it takes to build the biggest solar power plants in Canada.

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CANADIAN SOLAR THUNDER BAY AIRPORT SOLAR FARM, LOCATED IN THE CITY OF THUNDER BAY, CONSISTS OF 36,660 CANADIAN SOLAR CS6P-P SOLAR MODULES AND HOLDS THE PROUD DISTINCTION OF BEING THE FIRST UTILITY-SCALE SOLAR INSTALLATION ON AIRPORT AUTHORITY LAND IN ONTARIO.

CANADIAN SOLAR IS ONE OF THE BIGGEST SOLAR COMPANIES IN THE WORLD.

Founded by Dr. Shawn Qu in 2001, and first listed on NASDAQ in 2006, Canadian Solar is one of the biggest solar companies in the world. The company employs more than 8,500 people across six continents, manufacturing PV modules, provid-

ing solar energy solutions, and working on utility-scale power projects. A big company means big numbers. “Through the end of 2015, we shipped over 13 gigawatts of solar panels including more than 4GW of shipments in 2015,” explains

Dylan Marx, Head of International Operations at Canadian Solar. “For reference, that’s enough to offset the equivalent of one million cars’ worth of CO2 emissions.” What’s more, our Energy Group has 10GW of projects in its development pipeline, of which 2.5GW are late-stage projects. “We acquired Recurrent Energy in 2015, which grew our pipeline significantly in the U.S.,” says Mr. Marx. “We also have significant project pipelines in Japan, China, Brazil, and the UK. Spread across the world we have regional teams who are responsible for developing and executing these projects.” AMBITIOUS PROJECTS In March 2015, the largest solar power plant in Canada, constructed by Canadian Solar, was brought online. The Grand Renewable Solar Project (GRS) boasts 445,000 Canadian Solar solar panels, has a generation capacity of 133MW, and produces enough clean, renewable energy to power 17,000 homes. It’s a huge achievement, and one which Canadian Solar repeated in September when it connected the Kingston

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www.metka-egn.com

26 MW in UK

13 MW in Scotland, under implementation with client Canadian Solar. The biggest solar project in Scotland yet

6 MW in Turkey

60 MW in Puerto Rico, under implementation

METKA EGN is a world-class EPC contractor for utility scale solar PV projects, with a customer portfolio including some of the leading investors in the PV sector. Our project reference includes EPC services for more than 400 MW of large scale solar projects, in UK, Puerto Rico, Chile, Turkey, Romania and Greece. METKA EGN is actively developing it’s presence expanding internationally from its base in the UK to rest of Europe, Latin America, USA, Middle East and North Africa. METKA EGN - 32 Hermes str., Islington, London N1 9JD United Kingdom • T. +44 20 8001 3341 • info@metka-egn.com

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CANADIAN SOLAR

Canadian Solar Installs Solar FlexRack At Earthlight Project

CONNECTED IN MARCH 2015, THE GRAND RENEWABLE SOLAR PROJECT IS ONE OF THE LARGEST UTILITY-SCALE SOLAR FARMS IN CANADA.

Canadian Solar’s 14 MW Earthlight Project, located in Georgina, Ontario, was installed with Solar FlexRack’s Series G3L-X world-class racking. Recognized for its exceptional ease and speed of installation, Solar FlexRack is an industry-leading solar racking and services organization selected by utility-scale solar developers and installers worldwide. Learn more about Solar FlexRack and our full-service tracker and racking solutions by visiting www.SolarFlexRack.com or calling 1.888.380.8138.

Solar Project (KSL). KSL superseded GRS to become the current largest solar power plant in Canada, with 464,000 Canadian Solar solar panels, and a 141MW capacity. “The projects were constructed for a consortium ownership managed by three parties: Samsung Renewables; Connor, Clark, and Lunn; and, in the case of the GRS Project, the Six Nations of the Grand River,” says Mr. Marx. “It’s an enormous amount of work to construct a project that’s over 100MW, and we worked closely with

CONNECTED IN SEPTEMBER 2015, THE KINGSTON SOLAR PROJECT SUPERSEDED THE GRAND RENEWABLE SOLAR PROJECT AS CANADA’S LARGEST SOLAR FARM.

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our construction partners, who were ABB, Bondfield, and H.B. White. Throughout construction of a project that size, you can expect to have between 500 and 1000 different types of professionals on the site. The soil conditions in Ontario can vary significantly; from very deep bedrock to loose sandy silt, even within the same site. Understanding the soil and then selecting technologies and methods which are suitable to the site conditions is one of the critical success factors in building projects

here in Ontario. We relied heavily on our partners to provide a broad range of expertise, as well as our own in-house engineering. We’re very proud that these projects were brought online on time, and delivered to the customers within budget.” ENVIRONMENTAL CONSCIOUSNESS For Canadian Solar, having a positive impact on the environment starts at the beginning of the process, in their manufacturing operations. “All our facilities are registered to the


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Ottawa Office Tel 613.836.2184 Fax 613.836.3742

Partners with Canadian Solar, specializing in environmental engineering, protection and monitoring during construction.

20 GW INSTALLED

www.mcintoshperry.com

GEMEC Ltd is an innovative company based in UK. Offers a great range of activities in fields of Design, Construction, installation and maintenance in projects of energy infrastructures. Explore Gemec’s potentiality in www.gemec-re.co.uk GEMEC LTD - 10 Wiverton Road - SE265HY - LONDON • t: 020 37420497 • email: info@gemec-re.co.uk

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CANADIAN SOLAR CANADIAN SOLAR HAS SEVERAL MANUFACTURING SITES IN CHINA, SUCH AS THIS FACILITY IN LUOYANG.

ISO 9001 quality management standard, as well as ISO 14001, which is an environmental management standard,” says Mr. Marx. “Our utility projects go through rigorous environmental analysis and studies to ensure there is no impact on any endangered species that might be present on site. During construction, we invest millions of dollars to

prevent potential impacts on the surrounding environment. We have sophisticated stormwater management facilities using the most advanced techniques to control erosion and ensure the site is properly stabilized during the construction phase. Then, as the project nears completion, we ensure that we replant native species of grass and trees.” In fact, Canadian Solar has established over 1,250 acres of habitat dedicated to the protection of native bird species. “We construct during periods where those species are known not to be breeding,” says Mr. Marx. “Prior to construction we establish a similar-sized plot of land and protect and maintain that land in a manner that’s conductive to each species, to compensate for land we’re disturbing.” Canadian Solar has also begun work on a program in collaboration with Eastern Ontario Model Forest to replant 89 acres of trees. WASTE NOT, WANT NOT Sustainability is deeply embedded in Canadian Solar’s company philosophy. On

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the manufacturing side, they have invested heavily in efficiency programs. “We have programs to reduce the amount of water that’s consumed, and to recycle the water that is used during the manufacturing process,” says Mr. Marx. “We’ve reduced process materials like silicone rubber and alcohol. We strive to reduce our usage and reliance on these materials as much as we can. Another focus is waste elimination. We try to ensure any variations in the product are identified and corrected as early as possible, which significantly reduces the potential to create unnecessary scrap. The good thing about these sorts of improvements is that there’s an economic benefit as well, so it’s a positive on many fronts.” INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION Canadian Solar’s work in Ontario is beginning to shift from construction and execution of projects to operations and maintenance. “We’ve essentially completed connecting all of our Ontario project portfolio,” says Mr. Marx “That consists


of thirty 10MW FIT projects, the two large Samsung projects, and three 10MW EPC projects. We’re optimistic about the next program in Ontario, which is the Large Renewable Procurement. In the long-term, we expect the province to continue to add renewables to the energy supply mix as generation is built to meet demand requirements under the Long-Term Energy Plan. We’re expecting anywhere between 1 to 2.5GW of additional PV to be added in Ontario by 2030.” Meanwhile, the company is looking further afield. Alberta, under its Climate Leadership Plan, intends to replace all its coal generation with renewables and natural gas by 2030. “They’re expecting 30% of their electricity will be from renewables by 2030, which will be primarily wind and solar,” explains Mr. Marx. “That’s a lofty ambition, which could result in an additional 2 to 3GW of solar in Alberta. Saskatchewan has announced a similar program, which could reach between 0.3 to 0.7GW by 2030. Outside Canada, we’ve established operations in 20 countries, which has led to the growth we’ve seen in our pipeline and our connected megawatts. We have 1GW expected to connect in the U.S. this year, 600MW of active projects in development in Japan, half a GW in China, and secured just under 400MW in Brazil.”

NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE In 2014 alone, Canadian Solar was granted 96 patents; the company now holds over 700 in total. They have three state-of-theart R&D facilities where over 250 full-time employees research product and process innovations. “Technology improvements are being driven on all fronts,” says Mr. Marx. “We’re working to improve performance modelling accuracy and reduce losses, finding lower-cost components

and standardizing designs and installation techniques. We’re also developing new technologies and methods for improving how we monitor and operate our plants. Solar energy currently still only accounts for less than 1% of global electricity generation, and by 2030 it could very well be ten times that number, so we’re certain solar energy is poised for continued growth year-on-year.” As the solar energy industry grows, Canadian Solar is sure to continue to be at its forefront. c

CANADIAN SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC (PV) MODULES UNDERGO STRICT AND RIGOROUS TESTING STANDARDS TO ENSURE THE HIGHEST QUALITY CONTROL ON THEIR PRODUCTS.

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DELTRO GROUP

COMPLETE SOLUTIONS David Del Mastro, founder and president of Deltro Group of Companies, explains how their innovative solar battery technology will change lives around the world.

Deltro Group of Companies was established by David Del Mastro as Deltro Electric in 1987, and entered the renewables market approximately four years ago. Having gained traction within its home market of Ontario, Canada, Deltro was frequently drafted to fix problems on grid-scale electrical systems including solar technology that, during its early years, suffered from a host of issues resulting from integration 18 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

difficulties. Deltro soon began working directly with contractors and developers, building systems for them. From there it was only a small leap to become a systems developer themselves. BATTERY POWERED At the heart of Deltro’s renewables portfolio is a battery storage system. The batteries are charged during off-peak hours, as well

as from the overbuild inherent in all solar panel arrays, and then discharged during peak hours, blackouts, or to mitigate spikes. Bi-directional inverters are used to redirect surplus energy into batteries rather than allowing it to clip. The most prominent demonstration of Deltro’s storage technology is about to get underway with IESO, Ontario’s electrical grid operator, when a 53 megawatt per


hour (MWH) system comes online in late 2016. As a province using a large - and growing - percentage of wind and solar power in its grid, the intermittent nature of generation is neutralized by the possibility of energy capture. “This is the largest battery storage system in the world,” says David Del Mastro, founder and President of Deltro Group of Companies. “We will work with Toronto Hydro to find properties where we can connect and then integrate the storage system into IESO’s transmission lines. The batteries will be charged when usage demand is low, then, as it rises and falls, we will discharge the batteries to smooth out the spikes that cause IESO and Toronto Hydro a lot of problems.” As the system designer, Deltro has chosen Greensmith Energy’s GEMS software platform for operation, as well as batteries manufactured by Leclanché. The GEMS platform offers response times as low as 16

milliseconds, turning the batteries into a spinning reserve available for any situation. After three years with IESO, Deltro will then begin operating the batteries directly with

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DELTRO GROUP

THE PHILANTHROPIC MOTIVATIONS BEHIND A NUMBER OF DELTRO’S DECISIONS PROVIDE A BREATH OF FRESH AIR IN AN INDUSTRY THAT CAN QUICKLY BECOME TRAPPED SOLELY WITHIN ECONOMICS.

Toronto Hydro. The system itself is situated just outside the city of Toronto. NEW WORLDS Battery storage technology also has applications beyond large-scale urban centers. Deltro has recognized the potential for this technology to bring benefits to impoverished communities and struggling governments across the world. At present, for example, Deltro GeneraSol is working with the government of Colombia to bring solar microgrids to villages and towns in the country. Communities that may not even have had electricity available previously, will receive an entire self-contained system of panels, batteries, 20 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


software, and transmission lines that do not require hooking up to the national grid system in order to provide electricity to their homes and businesses. “We firmly believe this is the new model for power generation throughout the entire world,” states Mr. Del Mastro. ISLAND SYSTEM The microgrids model will receive a major boost after it is brought to another part of the world currently undergoing major power generation changes: The Caribbean. Deltro has set up Deltro Caribbean to handle all construction projects in the region and the company’s task has been to set up a solar panel manufacturing facility in St. Michael,

Barbados. The $26 million dollar project will in fact be retrofitting an existing plant using equipment brought from Deltro’s own now-dismantled manufacturing warehouse in Phoenix, Arizona. “We were looking for a new home for the facility and undertook market analysis that highlighted how the U.S. market is already saturated,” Mr. Del Mastro explains. “There is, however, a need for local manufacturers somewhere in the Caribbean islands. Barbados was chosen for two reasons. First, they are a parliamentary democracy so laws there are very similar to our own, making it a very comfortable fit for us. Second, a suitable manufacturing plant was in place and the island already

had legislation for the sector so it was an easy transition. In the first year we will employ approximately 150 local people at the plant, before eventually growing to 500 employees.” The facility is expected to be fully operational sometime in Q1 of 2016.

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DELTRO GROUP

Apart from the plant itself, the project includes a solar farm that will generate power for the residents and businesses of Barbados. This 20MWH array offers full microgrid services, including battery storage, which will replace an annual diesel consumption of 12 million liters, reducing

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the country’s dependence on fossil fuels and reducing the cost of electricity for its citizens. Deltro has instituted a 100 year fixed-price proposal with the Barbadian government that will help money stay on the island and promote economic growth. The ultimate aim of this partnership is to


“IT IS IMPORTANT THAT WE CAN BRING A COMPLETE SOLUTION TO COMMUNITIES THAT NEED IT.”

stimulate moves towards a self-sustainable future not only for Barbados, but the rest of the Caribbean as well. CLEAN WATER, CLEAR FUTURE It would not have been possible for Deltro to grow from a traditional power contractor to a pioneering international renewables developer within just a few years, were it not for a committed and dedicated team. Mr. Del Mastro emphasizes the difficulty of design-

ing, developing, and constructing advanced technology such as solar storage microgrids, and the speed with which they are able to achieve such projects is testament to the skill of everyone involved. The philanthropic motivations behind a number of Deltro’s decisions provide a breath of fresh air in an industry that can quickly become trapped solely within economics. It is because of this foundation that Deltro’s vision for their own future should come as no surprise. Mr.

Del Mastro explains that they are branching beyond power generation and into other amenities: “We are working right now with a developer engineer on a water purification plant. It is important that we can bring a complete solution to communities that need it; providing clean water as well as power and communications. That will be our next big task and it should be ready for release in the second quarter of 2016 under the company name Deltro Hydro.” c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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AASHE

SUSTAINABLE EMORY UNIVERSITY.

CAMPUSES A foreword by Meghan Fay Zahniser, AASHE Executive Director

MEGHAN FAY ZAHNISER, AASHE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR.

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The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) is proud to support the “Sustainable Campuses” series that recognizes achievements of the higher education community and their efforts toward developing a thriving, equitable, and ecologically healthy world. AASHE empowers higher education faculty, administrators, staff, and students to be effective change agents and drivers of sustainability innovation. We enable members to translate information into action by offering essential resources and professional development to a diverse, engaged community of sustainability leaders. Additionally, we work with and for higher education to ensure that our world’s future leaders are motivated and equipped to solve sustainability challenges.

We support the higher education community through the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS), the AASHE Conference & Expo, Campus Sustainability Month, and the Green Gigawatt Partnership, as well as other professional development opportunities. STARS STARS was launched in 2010 as a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance. STARS was designed to provide a structure for understanding sustainability in all sectors of higher education, enable campus sustainability comparisons over time, incentivize institutions to boost future sustainability efforts and initiatives, as well


as provide an open platform for information sharing both nationally and internationally. With more than 550 ratings since the program’s inception, the importance of the rating system as a valuable tool for both seasoned campus sustainability leaders and institutions just beginning their sustainability endeavors is clear. AASHE 2016 CONFERENCE & EXPO Expected to draw over 2,300 participants, AASHE’s annual conference is the largest stage in North America for sharing effective models, policies, research, collaborations, and transformative actions which advance sustainability in higher education and beyond. Higher education institutions have been modeling sustainability solutions on their campuses for many years. With a theme of “Beyond the Campus,” the AASHE 2016 Conference & Expo will focus on a crucial next step: The dissemination and implementation of these solutions in communities throughout the world. Meeting the sustainability challenge will require collaboration across sectors and with stakeholders outside of academia. This year’s conference takes place Oct. 9-12 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Attendees can expect thought-provoking keynote speakers, hundreds of sessions to engage all higher education sustainability interests, and an Expo Hall with innovative products and services sure to inspire. CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY MONTH Held each October, Campus Sustainability Month is an international celebration of sustainability in higher education. During this month, colleges and universities have STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT CORTLAND.

organized events on campus and elsewhere to engage and inspire incoming students and other campus stakeholders to become sustainability change agents. These events include teach-ins, sustainability pledgedrives, zero energy concerts, waste audits, green sporting events, letter writing campaigns, service projects, and more. Campus Sustainability Month raises the visibility of sustainability and provides advocates with a platform to deepen campus engagement and address pressing environmental and social challenges. GREEN GIGAWATT PARTNERSHIP The Green Gigawatt Partnership (GGP), launched by AASHE last October, works to catalyze at least one gigawatt of new green power in higher education by 2020 by recognizing colleges and universities sourcing large-scale renewable energy and by helping more campuses do the same by using long-term, large-scale, power purchase agreements. The GGP supports green

power in higher education by providing in-person training workshops, instructional webinars, educational materials, recognition in written, electronic and in-person forums, networking opportunities with peers, project tracking, and no-cost assistance to assess large-scale renewables opportunities. These are only a few ways we inspire and catalyze higher education to lead the global sustainability transformation. We are proud of our nearly 1,000 members and look forward to welcoming all institutions and businesses who are motivated to make meaningful and lasting change towards campus sustainability. Visit AASHE.org to learn more about how you can help advance sustainability in higher education. c

Meghan Fay Zahniser AASHE Executive Director THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY.

UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY

INSTITUTIONAL SUSTAINABILITY

STRATEGY Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Joanne Perdue, Chief Sustainability Officer at the University of Calgary, about a major new strategy which will shape the future of sustainability at the university.

THE UCALGARYCARES PROGRAM ENABLES STUDENTS TO FURTHER THEIR UNDERSTANDING OF SUSTAINABILITY COMPLEXITIES, MAKE PERSONAL CONNECTIONS AND DEVELOP LEADERSHIP SKILLS THROUGH SERVICE LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES IN LOCAL AND GLOBAL COMMUNITIES.

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With its 50th anniversary coming up this year, you’d be forgiven for thinking the University of Calgary might be inclined to look backwards. The university’s alumni have been to the International Space Station (Dr. Robert Thirsk), occupied the Prime Minister’s Office (Stephen Harper), and invented the Java programming language (James Gosling). What’s more, in 2013, the university was rated Gold for sustainability under AASHE’s Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating System (STARS), and, as reported in Sustainable Business Magazine in 2014, it has achieved spectacular successes in waste diversion and greenhouse gas emissions reduction. Laurel-resting, however, is not an option for the University of Calgary. On February 24th, the university officially launched its new Institutional Sustainability Strategy, the successor to its 2010 Institutional Sustainability Plan. The strategy reaffirms the university’s commitment to sustainability.


A STORMWATER POND AND RAINGARDENS SURROUNDING THE TAYLOR FAMILY DIGITAL LIBRARY HELP TO REDUCE AND CLEANSE RUNOFF.

“The strategy joins three new interdependent frameworks,” explains Joanne Perdue, Chief Sustainability Officer at the university. “One addresses education and research; one community engagement; and one administration and operational excellence – each in the context of sustainability. These documents strengthen the institutional commitment to excellence and leadership in sustainability, and aim to more fully infuse sustainability into the campus experience.”

then underwent a very broad academic and administrative governance council deliberation process. For Ms. Perdue, this rigorous process was essential to the strategy’s success. “We intentionally undertook a longer, more deliberative approach which included broad participation from the campus community. This allowed us to expand the dialogue and the level of engagement, which ultimately led to a richer suite of concepts in our sustainability strategy. This process also

amplified campus engagement in sustainability which will support faster uptake as we implement the strategy.” LEARNING LAB Compared to the 2010 Institutional Sustainabilty Plan (ISP), the new strategy shifts to a more comprehensive approach, one that is both integrated and strategic. “The ISP particularly advanced our operational and administrative sustainability practices,” says

INCLUSIVE CONSULTATION The strategy began with an extensive consultation process, soliciting a broad array of perspectives from students, faculty, staff, and other key stakeholders. “We held over thirty multi-stakeholder workshops on campus,” says Ms. Perdue. “We also used an online platform for idea generation, somewhat like crowdsourcing.” These ideas were synthesized into drafts of the documents, which SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY STUDENTS WORKED WITH STAFF TO ENSURE FAIRTRADECERTIFIED PRODUCTS ARE OFFERED AT ALL FOOD SERVICE LOCATIONS UNDER UNIVERSITY CONTROL.

A VITAL FOCUS IS THE UNIVERSITY’S EFFORTS TO EMBED SUSTAINABILITY LEADERS ACROSS CAMPUS.

Ms. Perdue. “Our new strategy is a more holistic, and integrated practice model. One key idea is to establish our campus to be a vibrant learning laboratory for applied practice in sustainability; our students will have the opportunity to directly engage in projects that explore sustainability with direct linkages to our operational sustaina-

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bility goals. Campus as a learning laboratory is aimed at building the skills needed for sustainability leadership in all disciplines. We feel this reflects the kind of collaboration that’s needed for systemic change on campus, and in larger society. It’s important for universities to be recycling and energy efficient and so forth, but that’s just step

one. Ultimately, the biggest impact we’ll have in society will be a result of our core business – and that’s our graduates.” EDUCATION AND RESEARCH FOR SUSTAINABILITY The University of Calgary’s approach is deeply student-oriented, and consequently a large part of the Institutional Sustainability Strategy concerns sustainability in education and research. “We want to provide students with knowledge and tools to tackle very complex sustainability challenges,” says Ms. Perdue. “We offer several graduate-level degree specializations that are related to sustainability. One key new initiative is an undergraduate interdisciplinary sustainability studies certificate program which will be grounded in both theory and practice. We will provide a sustainability-focused curriculum paired with hands-on learning and research experiences. This will be available to undergraduate students in all disciplines as a compliment to their degree.”


OVER 30 WORKSHOPS AND DISCUSSION FORUMS WERE HELD TO HELP INFORM DEVELOPMENT OF THE INSTITUTIONAL SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGY.

THE AQUAPONICS CLUB IS ONE OF OVER 50 STUDENT CLUBS THAT HAVE SELF ORGANIZED AROUND SUSTAINABILITY AND A MEMBER OF THE SUSTAINABILITY CLUB ALLIANCE.

HASKAYNE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS STUDENTS ON A WILDERNESS RETREAT.

PRESIDENT ELIZABETH CANNON (LEFT) RECOGNIZES STUDENTS FOR THEIR LEADERSHIP AT THE ANNUAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS CELEBRATION.

A second emphasis is on integrating education and research. “We believe this will provide a differentiated experience for students who choose to come to the University of Calgary,” says Ms. Perdue. “They’re going to graduate not just with their degree and their sustainability certificate, but also with knowledge gained from experiential learning and interdisciplinary collaboration on real-world projects. These projects can be added to their résumé, and

will provide them with key skills to bring to their post-graduation endeavors. We aim to create an experiential environment where you take what you’re learning in the classroom and put it into practice, on campus and in the community.” The other academic focus is in engaging students, faculty, and the community around sustainability research partnerships. “As a research-intensive university we have a diverse research portfolio including sus-

THE SUSTAINABILITY RESOURCE CENTRE SERVES AS A CENTRAL GATHERING SPACE FOR LEARNING ABOUT AND GETTING INVOLVED IN SUSTAINABILITY.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY RESEARCH BEING CONDUCTED BY THE ARCTIC INSTITUTE OF NORTH AMERICA (AINA) ON THE KWADACHA GLACIER TO HELP ADVANCE KNOWLEDGE FOR A CHANGING NORTH.

STUDENT EMCEE LAUREN ARTHUR AND CHIEF SUSTAINABILITY OFFICER JOANNE PERDUE CELEBRATE THE LAUNCH OF THE INSTITUTIONAL SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGY ON FEB. 24 AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY.

tainability-focused research,” says Ms. Perdue. “Our new strategy provides a platform to strategically grow research partnerships for sustainability. We’re thinking about new ways to extend our expertise to address issues in rural and urban communities locally and around the globe.” COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT The University of Calgary’s approach to engagement encompasses both on-campus engagement and engagement with local and global communities. A common-

ality across their engagement approach is to assist students with developing six core competencies for sustainability leadership including: Anticipatory and long-term thinking; empathy and understanding of different worldviews and relationships; stakeholder engagement and collaboration; action-oriented leadership and change agency skills; critical thinking and decision-making in complex systems; and systems thinking. “Our new sustainability studies certificate and our co-curricular programs will be intentionally designed to

help students develop these competencies,” says Ms. Perdue. The competencies are aimed at helping students make good decisions when the answers aren’t black or white, or when they are faced with significant complexities or different world views. The university aims to provide learning environments, both on campus and in the community where students gain these skills. Another engagement goal is to connect research expertise to community partners, from governments to industry

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THE UNIVERSITY AIMS TO PROVIDE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS, BOTH ON CAMPUS AND IN THE COMMUNITY WHERE STUDENTS GAIN THESE SKILLS.

THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY GARDEN PROVIDES A COLLABORATIVE SPACE FOR LEARNING ABOUT URBAN AGRICULTURE AND FOOD JUSTICE ISSUES.

to indigenous groups. “Our approach to engagement aims to provide a differentiated and enriched learning experience for students, faculty, staff, and ultimately also for the larger communities that we’re partnering with,” says Ms. Perdue. ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATIONS The University of Calgary continues to pursue ambitious long-term goals, like becoming one of the most energy-efficient campuses in Canada, working towards carbon neutrality, and reducing waste to zero. “We’re maturing in our capacities,” says Ms. Perdue. “We’re working from more of a systems thinking model instead of one-off projects. We’re focusing our efforts strategically on leverage points in OVER 250 FACULTY MEMBERS ARE ENGAGED IN SUSTAINABILITYRELATED RESEARCH AND TEACHING. OVER 350 SUSTAINABILITY-RELATED COURSES ARE OFFERED.

our operational practices in order to attain effective scales of change, and we are collaborating with our vendors to achieve our aligned sustainability goals.” A vital focus of the university’s efforts is to grow sustainability leadership across campus. “The intent is to not be dependent on an Office of Sustainability, but to have expertise in the supply chain management team, in the building operations teams, in the food services team, and so on,” says Ms. Perdue. “We’re making good progress on this and pairing this with academic partnerships – for example, students are doing lifecycle assessment studies to help inform operational decisions. It’s all part of our emphasis on our campus as a learning lab.”

BIGGER CONVERSATION Ms. Perdue can trace the way conversation around sustainability has changed. “A much more integrative dialogue has emerged along with new forms of internal and external collaboration. We’re thinking more deeply about preparing students for leadership in sustainability, about our role as a public sector organization in advancing societal needs such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and about how we create a learning organization to further our approach to sustainability academically and in our operations. What I’m most excited about now is the conversation about how we’re going to implement the strategy, and who else needs to be part of the conversation as we move forward.” c

CO-GENERATION HAS REDUCED GHG EMISSIONS ACROSS ALL SITES BY 22%.

GLOBAL BRIGADES STUDENTS IN HONDURAS. UCALGARY’S INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY TARGETS TO CREATE OPPORTUNITIES FOR 50 PER CENT OF ALL STUDENTS TO HAVE AN INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE AS PART OF THEIR PROGRAM OF STUDIES.

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UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH

ROAR OF THE

GREEN GRYPHON Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Maurice Nelischer, Director of Sustainability and Professor Emeritus at the University of Guelph, about involving the whole campus community in sustainability. Images courtesy of the University of Guelph, MCW Engineers, and Maurice Nelischer.

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THE GREEN GRYPHON INITIATIVE, A $26 MILLION SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT WHICH INTENDS TO SAVE THE UNIVERSITY $2.5 MILLION A YEAR IN UTILITY COSTS.

A 30m x 30m thermal energy storage tank. A green bike shelter. A solar-powered building. Parking lots which are now parks. Savings on resource use across the board. It has been two years since Sustainable Business Magazine last spoke with Maurice Nelischer, Director of Sustainability at the University of Guelph, and one thing which hasn’t changed in that time is the university’s ambitious, big-picture approach to sustainability. What has changed is the scale and the visibility of the campus sustainability projects. “It’s about getting the word out there,” says Professor Nelischer. “It’s more than making the campus

sustainable; it’s getting the students to understand, learn from, and value the changes. A really big-umbrella view of sustainability has really taken hold now.” This means some big, attention-grabbing projects; but, most importantly, it means keeping the students involved. STUDENT-FUNDED Two years ago, Professor Nelischer told Sustainable Business Magazine about how University of Guelph students voted to tax themselves $10 per semester towards investments into energy and water conservation retrofit projects. The Student Energy

Retrofit Fund (SERF) brings in an impressive $460,000 a year from the students, which is matched in kind by the university. Now, this fund has led to the creation of the Green Gryphon Initiative, a $26 million sustainability project which intends to save the university $2.5 million a year in utility costs and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 4.7 million kg of CO2 a year. “It’s a really good example of students precipitating change,” says Professor Nelischer. “They committed this money, and as a result of that the university said: ‘Hey, this is a really good thing!’ Without the student support, none of this would have happened.” SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH 2014

Sustainable Campus Development @ UofG a visual representation of ambition, investment made, and results achieved to date

New, ambitious improvements as part of the GGI begin to be implemented

2008

SERF funding begins being used for campus improvements.

Dollars Invested

‘Business as Usual’ Projected GHG

Emissions Data

GHG Emissions in Tonnes/Year, per ft2

Water Usage

‘Business as Usual’ Projec

in m3 / Year, per ft2

2003 to 2008

Sustainability Results for the Period Prior to Student-Engagement in the Energy Projects

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEM Huge is the word. 30 meters tall, 30 meters wide, containing 22 million liters of water.

Data

2008 to 2013

2013/2014 & Beyond

With the introduction of the Student Energy Retrofit Fund and an Energy Conservation Working Group to manage the fund in 2008, the University of Guelph opened up the sustainable energy planning dialogue to the whole campus community.

In response to a more engaged stakeholder community on campus, the University of Guelph upped its ambition once again with the Green Gryphon Initiative in 2013-2014. The project’s $26+ Million budget was developed in order to meet the University’s ambitious new sustainable campus energy plan targets, which it is projected to do once the Green Gryphon Initiative is completed in 2020. Learn more at www.greengryphon.ca

Sustainability Results under the benefit of Collaborative Student Energy Retrofit Fund & Energy Conservation Working Group Initiatives

Through to 2013, this collaborative community of campus stakeholders enabled the University to make greater strides towards sustainable campus improvements through the dramatic influx on funding that the Student Energy Retrofit Fund generated. The result? A period of excellent energy and water savings coupled with a steady decrease in the campus’ Greenhouse Gas emissions despite ongoing campus expansion projects.

Previously, the SERF money went into energy retrofits, resulting in dramatic reductions in resource consumption. “It’s very effective stuff – lighting retrofits, air handling, et cetera – but things like that don’t have much visibility,” says Professor Nelischer. “Instead, this time, the students supported this huge new project.”

ted Water Comsumption

“It’s a giant tank of water,” says Professor Nelischer. “Or rather, it’s a kind of battery for thermal energy. You see, our biggest energy load – way higher than heating – is cooling in the summertime. To do that, we end up using all this electricity during the day, at the peak time.” Instead, the innovative new thermal energy storage system allows the university to cool water during the night, when electrical power is readily available and cheaper. Then, during the day, the already-cold water can be flushed through the university’s cooling plant. The

system, constructed by Toronto-based MCW Custom Energy Solutions, cost $15 million, and was partly funded by the province. “The local hydro and the provincial hydro people love it; they gave us some grants to do it,” says Professor Nelischer. “In terms of sustainability, it takes a broader view of the province as a whole. Now, we’re not being a load on the electrical grid, so the province doesn’t have to make new power stations.” What’s more, the system is expected to pay back the university’s investment through electricity savings

AERIAL VIEW OF NEW THERMAL ENERGY TANK.

VANCOUVER

EDMONTON

WINNIPEG

TORONTO

OTTAWA

SAINT JOHN

MONCTON

HALIFAX

CALGARY

WWW.MCW.COM 34 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


BIKE SHELTER.

in only five years. “It works very well for us financially,” says Professor Nelischer. THE POWER OF OWNERSHIP It is not only the students who are getting involved in sustainability at the University of Guelph. “We’re getting a lot of support from faculty and staff now,” says Professor Nelischer. “They’re donating money to sustainability action too.” Another new project funded by the students, staff, and alumni is an environmentally friendly bicycle shelter with space for 90 bikes. The shelter has a green roof planted with

drought-tolerant, low-maintenance plants, and it draws power for its lighting from the solar panels recently installed on the nearby Raithby House; another Green Gryphon Initiative investment. “The students love the bike shelter,” says Professor Nelischer. “It speaks to alternative methods of transit, and it’s very visible.” Staff also contributed to a new rainwater retention pond, and the fund is being used to develop a sculpture piece too. Indeed, one of Professor Nelischer’s strategies for embedding sustainability into the culture of the campus is to offer people a financial

SOLAR POWERED BUILDING.

stake. “It’s an amazing thing, the power of ownership,” says Professor Nelischer. “We listen to them, and make the place better, and that emboldens people to get on board, all the way up to administration.” CROSS-CAMPUS SUPPORT The breadth of support for sustainability at the university is striking. “Physical Resources (PR) has embraced sustainability values at all levels – from the Vice President to maintenance personnel,” says Mr. Nelischer. “The paradigm change we are seeing is dependant on a broad array

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UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH ABUNDANT CAR-SHARE FACILITIES - BY IAN WEIR.

“WE’RE BEING SUSTAINABLE, AND IT’S SAVING US A LOT OF MONEY, AND IT’S MAKING OUR BUSINESS – TEACHING – WAY, WAY BETTER.”

of PR personnel, notably Dan MacLachlan and Bob Carter, who make sure the projects are sound structurally and financially and make the case for the projects. They have chosen to embed me – the director of sustainability and a landscape architect – into every campus project. Recently, I was at a meeting about parking lots! It was about how to reduce runoff and how

to reduce salt contamination of the river through our storm sewer system” Then there’s the students. “We’re very student-focused, and the students are playing a really big role in this,” says Professor Nelischer. “The physical resources people have really recognized the importance of bringing the students on board in terms of helping make these decisions, and

so they’re involved in so many committees now – everything from the landscape advisory committee to the energy committee. We’re really proud of that, and we see it as an educational thing too!” PART OF THE CULTURE A result of sustainability’s integration into all levels of the University of Guelph is that

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WEEKLY ORGANIC MARKET SALE FOR STUDENTS.

it has become an omnipresent part of campus life. There’s the thermal energy tank, the bike shelter, the solar paneled-Raithby House. Then there’s the former parking lots which are now parks, the electric vehicle charging stations, the impromptu presentations in the main square on water and energy usage. The list goes on: Sustainability song contests, student-run campaigns, and then there’s the teaching. “I give grants to faculty members who have sustainability in their courses, be it a biology course or a math course,” says Professor Nelischer. “They come to me with a proposal where they say: ‘Okay, here I’m going to talk about sustainability but with a mathematical lens.’ And that’s what I want. I want

ONCE A PARKING LOT, NOW A GREEN SPACE AND BUS LOOP.

to insert sustainability into things that students don’t even think have anything to do with it. Because it’s everything!” As for the future of sustainability at the University of Guelph, Professor Nelischer is beginning the process of collaborating with faculty, students, and staff to create a campus sustainability master plan. However, Professor Nelischer doesn’t want to be too rigid in his approach to the future. “We try to approach it when we get to it; to seek opportunities when we see them. It might be: ‘Now oil is low’; or: ‘Now electricity is high’. We want to be responsive, adaptive, and flexible enough to move things where they should be; and when we see a problem, we’ll go after it.”

GOOD BUSINESS Of course, at the University of Guelph, it always comes back to the students. “Because, of course, they’re our core business,” says Professor Nelischer. “It’s not just about making the campus sustainable - it’s teaching students. The goal is, if we save $2 million a year on electricity, that money can then be put into the teaching mission rather than the operational mission of the campus. We can use it to make a study hall for the students. And that’s the big connection. It all comes down to the kind of stuff people have been saying for a long time: Sustainability is good business. Well, we’re being sustainable, and it’s saving us a lot of money, and it’s making our business – teaching – way, way better.”c

POP-UP EVENTS TO ENGAGE STUDENTS.

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CARIBBEAN ELECTRIC UTILITY SERVICES CORPORATION

CARILEC TEAM, CHAIRMAN AND EDF CEO.

THE CARIBBEAN ELECTRIC UTILITY SERVICES

CORPORATION (CARILEC) SUPPORTS THE CARIBBEAN

IN ITS THRUST TOWARD SUSTAINABLE ENERGY CARILEC EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MR. THOMAS HODGE.

A foreword to the ‘Caribbean Energy’ series by Thomas Hodge, Interim Executive Director of CARILEC. The Caribbean power sector is witnessing important changes in the energy landscape: Changes to the regulatory framework, high-penetration of renewable energy technologies, increased use of electric vehicles, and greater customer demands. Electric utilities are at varying stages of readiness, and have their own unique challenges for renewable energy adaptation, and future demands. CARILEC recognizes the benefits of the changes in the power sector and welcomes them.

CARILEC TECHNICAL TOUR AT BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION.

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BACKGROUND CARILEC was formed in 1989 (as part of an electric utilities modernization project funded by USAID) nearly 16 years after the oil crisis of 1973. The corporation’s main focus was on “modernization of electric utilities” – which at the time, was not particularly

focused on generation diversification or renewable energy production. By 2008, oil prices skyrocketed, and the levelized cost of electricity for wind power and solar PV continued to decline. Almost overnight, renewable energy had firmly asserted its position in the region’s energy landscape and things began to change rapidly. CARILEC’s role in the region’s thrust towards sustainable energy is to facilitate capacity building, communication, and cooperation among its electric utility members, associates, and other stakeholders. In the context of this task, CARILEC’s role is particularly important. CARILEC’S SERVICES CARILEC understands the importance of collaboration, shared learning, and networking in improving utility operations.


quakes, flooding, and volcanic eruptions. This service is especially important to strengthen energy security for all member utilities. Some of the activities undertaken by the secretariat under this programme include the deployment of engineers to undertake damage assessments and line crews to carry out transmission and distribution line restoration work.

With the introduction of IPPs, regulatory bodies, and consumer groups, forums are necessary to promote effective communication between stakeholders. In this regard, CARILEC organizes several utility symposiums and conferences for utility industry professionals and stakeholders. CARILEC understands the need to promote engagement and effective communication between utilities, governments, regulators, and other stakeholders. Since 2010 CARILEC has brought over 550 utility personnel and Caribbean regulators together in renewable energy and regulatory forums. Technological advances in the industry (such as AMI and Internet of Things)

have brought changes to the way power is served to consumers. Today’s customer also demands a higher quality of service, is digitally connected, and sensitive to the environment. In preparing Caribbean utilities for the new environment, CARILEC trains approximately seven hundred utility employees in about 35 courses each year. The courses cover diverse disciplines ranging from utility-specific technical courses to management training. CARILEC also offers technical certifications and web-based training. CARILEC’s Disaster Assistance Programme (CDAP) is one of the many benefits afforded to members of CARILEC and is a service which is opportune during times of major disasters such as hurricanes, earth-

THE PURSUIT OF PARTNERSHIPS CARILEC is aware of the importance of partnerships and the potential to influence change on a larger scale. As part of its strategic objectives, CARILEC fosters relationships with organizations that have mutual interests or shared visions including CARICOM, CDB, IDB, OAS, the Clinton Foundation, Carbon War Room, and Rocky Mountain Institute, among others. With varying perspectives and a diverse pool of strengths, CARILEC’s collaborative projects bring the best in experience, research, and financing to the region. THE FUTURE CARILEC will continue to play a constructive role in the transformation of the region’s electrical sector to a more robust, modern, and sustainable model. Although oil prices are low, the utilities know that history is capable of repeating itself. U.S. Vice President Joe Biden recently quipped, “There’s an old saying: The best time to fix a roof is when the sun is shining.” The sun is shining now, figuratively speaking. The time is now. c

BOUILLANTE GEOTHERMAL PLANT, GUADELOUPE.

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BARBADOS LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY

LET THERE BE LIGHT, WIND, AND DISTRIBUTED GENERATION Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Peter Williams, Managing Director of Emera (Caribbean) Incorporated, parent company of The Barbados Light & Power Company, about how the utility provider is making big changes on a small island. 40 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


The Barbados Light & Power Company Limited (BL&P) has been a key figure in the Caribbean island’s electricity generation and distribution for over a century. Formed in 1911 as the Barbados Electricity Supply Corporation, the company has always been investor-owned, and has remained at the leading edge of the Caribbean market with their operations and infrastructure. In the 1970s, for example, they were purchasing excess energy

produced by sugar factories and distributing it throughout the national grid, in the 1980s they cooperated with the Barbados government to test a small 200 kilowatt (kW) wind turbine, and in the late 1990s began exploring the possibilities of solar generation, becoming an early member of the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA), which was then called the Utility Photo Voltaic Group (UPVG). BL&P installed its first grid-tied solar PV system in February

2000 to gain first-hand knowledge of the technology and solar resource. The main factor behind this pursuit of alternative sources of power generation has been the country’s dependence on imported oil for its electricity production. Today, BL&P, which has a peak demand of around 155 megawatts (MW), uses four 12.5 MW and two 30 MW efficient slow speed diesel units - operating on Heavy Fuel Oil for the bulk of their generation. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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BARBADOS LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY

BL&P HAS A ‘BUY ALL, SELL ALL’ RENEWABLE ENERGY TARIFF RIDER WHEREBY CUSTOMERS CAN SELL ELECTRICITY BACK TO THE GRID.

A major concern of being reliant on fuel oil for electricity generation is the price volatility, which presents a major obstacle for the economic development and well-being of Barbados. By reducing their reliance on traditional imported fossil fuels, BL&P is seeking to stabilize and reduce prices for their customers. 42 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

PRAGMATIC OBJECTIVES Peter Williams sees the company’s pursuit of renewables as a pragmatic rather than ideological choice. “The objective is to stabilize and reduce energy prices. We are not looking to introduce renewables for their own sake, especially if the introduction results in price increases for our customers.

One example of this is that, following the experience with our first solar grid in February 2000 and the decline in the cost of this technology, we applied to our regulator, the Fair Trading Commission, in 2009 to allow our customers to install their own solar photovoltaic panels and connect these systems to the grid. This was approved about four


years ago and we now have a number of companies that have been installing small scale commercial and residential rooftop solar panels for BL&P customers. At the end of 2015, there was about 9 MW installed. BL&P has a ‘buy all, sell all’ renewable energy tariff rider whereby customers can sell electricity back to the grid.”

GRID LOCK A practical approach has informed the decisions made by BL&P on exactly what forms of renewable energy they want to introduce, how they wish to integrate them, and the regulatory work which needs to be done. The aim for the foreseeable future is to have a total of 20 MW

of distributed solar generation integrated with the grid, as well as a further 20 MW of grid scale solar. BL&P is well advanced with plans for a 10 MW solar farm in the north of the island and this is due to be commissioned by the middle of 2016. Solar provides BL&P with greater opportunities than wind due to the SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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BARBADOS LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY

difficulties of zoning challenges associated with the construction of wind turbines on a densely populated island. However, this has not prevented the company from looking into the viability of wind power. Building on its brief foray into wind energy during the 1980s, BL&P has returned to Lamberts, St. Lucy, site of the original turbine, in order to start a new wind project. Planning permission has been obtained and when completed the farm is expected to contain between ten and twelve turbines with a peak output of around 10 MW.

Further decentralizing power generation has become possible following recent changes to legislation which will allow Independent Power Producers (IPPs) to feed energy to the grid using other types of generation such as biomass and waste conversion. All of this comprises what Emera calls a ‘Fuel to Assets’ strategy: Moving infrastructure away from fossil fuels and spending money on assets that will strengthen the energy independence and sustainability not only of the Company, but of the country as a whole.

PART OF THE WHOLE “There is quite an active discussion here in Barbados about the road map for our country’s renewable energy thrust,” says Mr. Williams. “We are part of that initiative and very supportive. We want to transition the island away from oil, but at the same time ensure that the transition does not compromise either the proper functioning or reliability of the utility grid.” An important body in facilitating this discussion throughout the Caribbean has been the Caribbean Electric Utility Services

www.bwsc.com

BWSC recently carried out the replacement of 180 generator stator coils on G12 and signed another 5-year Technical Support Agreement with BLPC.

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44 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


BL&P CO. WILL MOVE AHEAD TO A BETTER FUTURE, ONE THAT WILL BRING BENEFITS TO THE WHOLE OF SOCIETY.

Corporation (CARILEC), an association of electric utilities across the Caribbean region. “CARILEC is an extremely strong component of the whole utility and energy business,” explains Mr. Williams. “CARILEC was formed out of a need to get utilities together for idea sharing, training, conferences, and sharing resources where possible. The association has been a great success. The conferences it hosts are very effective in helping companies in the region come together to understand how best to adapt to a changing market and changes in their business.” BENEFITS TO SOCIETY Today, BL&P is well regarded throughout the Caribbean as one of the most efficient

and well-rounded utilities in the region. By providing the electricity on which so many aspects of society rely, it has been a central pillar for the economic and social development of Barbados. However, the Company recognizes that their position depends, to a certain degree, on the wellbeing of everything else around them. When it looks to the future BL&P sees the development of a sustainability roadmap as crucial to the future of Barbados, but believes that this must be developed in conjunction with Government, industry, and key stakeholders within Barbadian society. Furthermore, it believe that such a road map needs to remain dynamic in order to respond to new developments that may arise from a young technological industry such as renewable energy.

“BL&P is working with all stakeholders here in Barbados, trying to engage and secure agreement on the key principles that will take us forward, to arrive at a roadmap that everyone can work with,” says Mr. Williams. “It has to be revisited as technology evolves and as new options arise, whether those are floating windfarms or the rapidly developing energy storage technologies. Our Company is part of helping that happen, but we believe we can’t succeed without our partners. Unless our partners succeed, we cannot succeed. That principle of making sure that whatever we do is in the best interests of all concerned continues to guide us. With this, BL&P will move ahead to a better future, one that will bring benefits to the whole of society.” c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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MONTSERRAT UTILITIES LIMITED

INDIGENOUS

ENERGY David Thomson, Managing Director of Montserrat Utilities Limited, speaks to Sustainable Business Magazine about growing from natural disaster to natural generation.

Montserrat Utilities Limited (MUL) is the sole provider of water and electricity to Montserrat, a British Overseas Territory located in the Caribbean. MUL formed in 2008 following the merger of two government entities: Montserrat Electricity Services Limited (Monlec) and Montserrat Water Authority (MWA), both of which continue operations under a parastatal umbrella. The restructuring of Montserrat’s utility services came about following two major blows to life on the island. In 1989, Hurricane Hugo swept through the Caribbean and devastated Montserrat, damaging most of the buildings and much of the infrastructure. Six years later in July 1995, the island’s 46 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Soufrière Hills volcanic eruptions started and the capital city of Plymouth was abandoned and destroyed in 1997, leaving half of the island uninhabitable. A move to redesign the utilities’ operational infrastructure began in 1998 and by 2005 had set out its principles for merger. In 2008, MUL was created as a private umbrella company that had 100% of its shares owned by the Montserrat Government. Today, rebuilding the island means providing water and electricity to 5000 residents and, given the high cost and lack of independence of oil, sustainable generation options have become the focal point for Montserrat’s future.


FROM THE OLD TO THE NEW At present Montserrat’s 2.1 megawatt (MW) peak demand is supplied from 4 high speed diesel generators, and its annual 150 million gallons of water demand is drawn from six mountain springs as well as an underground aquifer. The water department requires a stable electricity supply in order to keep their pumping machinery operational, while customers expect to have both water and electricity available for their residences or commercial properties. As the cost of oil has risen, so the cost of renewables has fallen. The Government is acting in a number of ways to try to reach 100% sustainable energy-driven status by 2020. The most significant of these efforts is focused on producing geothermal energy from the Soufrière Hills, an attempt to use the volcanic nature of the island to their advantage. “Geothermal exploration is already well underway,” says David Thomson, Managing Director at MUL. “Two production wells have been drilled with a third currently out to contract. MUL are in the final stages of assessing the optimum contractor for that

and we expect to start drilling in the coming weeks. We know that the two existing wells will provide enough energy for the short-to-medium term but a third will enable reinjection and that will sustain production into the long-term future.” Meanwhile, solar is being looked at as a bridging and support technology. “Geothermal energy production is about 2 to 3 years away from coming online so we are looking at solar technology to fill the gap between now and then,” explains Mr. Thomson. “A huge advantage of solar is it ties in very well with our daily use charts, with highest electricity usage occurring around midday and low usage at night. We are looking to install a total of 1MW of solar that will support geothermal generation once it begins.” MUL has taken to calling these new technologies “indigenous energy”, a grouping which they also consider to include wind power, although no plans to harness wind have yet been made. Due to their being a natural water source on the island, sustainable practice for Montserrat’s water utility takes the form of ensuring pipes are well maintained in order

to prevent leakage and wastage. Preventative maintenance on water pipes has been semi-neglected during the past few years because of other, more immediate issues, but MUL is now taking this problem seriously and has been granted funding in order to update their water distribution network. INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT Support comes from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development

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MONTSERRAT UTILITIES LIMITED

THE GOVERNMENT IS ACTING IN A NUMBER OF WAYS TO TRY TO REACH 100% SUSTAINABLE ENERGY-DRIVEN STATUS BY 2020.

(DFID), which is also involved in funding a new power station alongside the Caribbean Development Bank (CBD). International support is essential for Montserrat. “Our small population is one of the largest challenges facing the island,” explains Mr. Thomson. “It means there are no market efficiencies to make things cheaper or quicker, and no efficiencies of scale either. We must look to the U.S. or the UK in order to get the equipment required and much of our revenue is supported by the UK Government. We have been working very closely with DFID, as well as the CDB, so that we can build and expand our capabilities and get our geothermal generation up and running.” 48 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


“MUL have also been working with CARICOM, the Caribbean Community, and the European Union, to review energy policy and help us provide the right institutional support for further capital bids. The German Development Bank has provided assistance through a project known as Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technical Assistance (REETA) and we have used that to create a funding bid for our first solar power arrays.” FOSSIL FREE FUTURE With the help of foreign organizations at the back end, MUL have also been encouraging support at the front end of their operations by carrying out awareness campaigns about the use of electricity and water by residents on the island. Radio adverts are being aired and November saw the creation of an ‘energy week’ intended to focus popular consciousness onto the topic of sustainable energy practices. MUL is working with the Government of Montserrat to replace streetlights with LED bulbs and to introduce electric vehicles to the island, beginning with government vehicles.

The road that MUL and Montserrat will need to travel is long and challenging but one that all on the island are fully committed to. To be 100% sustainable by 2020 is a tall order, but one that Mr. Thomson feels confident can be achieved with the help of

international support. “I’d like to say thank you to all the people I am working with. It wouldn’t be possible to do this alone. MUL and our Government need and very much appreciate the help we are getting from all of these outside bodies.” c

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DELTA SUPPLY COMPANY LIMITED

DELTA SUPPLY HAS ESTABLISHED ITSELF AS A FAMILY BUSINESS WITH ONE EYE FOCUSED ON NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND THE OTHER PLACED FIRMLY ON IMPROVING ITS EXISTING CAPACITY.

PARTICIPANTS OF THE DELTA SUPPLY CHAINSAW COMPETITION LOOK ON IN AMAZEMENT WHILE VETERAN STIHL TECHNICIAN, BARBARA THOMPSON ASSEMBLES THE CHAINSAWS BAR AND CHAIN.

FROM BAUXITE TO

BROAD SIGHT Jonathan Swire, General Manager of Delta Supply Company Limited, speaks about how an unforgettable incident with a malfunctioning chainsaw led to big changes in his organization.

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CHAINSAW FABLE Delta Supply’s expansion of its portfolio began in the 1980s following a disappointing experience with a chainsaw for founder George. Jonathan Swire, Delta’s GM and son of George, elaborates. “In the late 80s, my father purchased a chainsaw to clear 600 acres of farm land. After 6 weeks, the chainsaw broke and he wasn’t able to get it repaired. Out of frustration, my father surveyed the market about their experiences and quickly realized one of the biggest concerns was the servicing of equipment. Our company subsequently reached out to and

partnered with the German chainsaw brand, Stihl, the first of many steps in providing products outside of our traditional offerings.” Following the global financial crisis in 2008, during which time the island’s bauxite and sugar industries stagnated, Delta accelerated its expansion into new areas including cleaning solutions, safety and material handling, and irrigation, while still maintaining its focus on its core businesses in construction, power and hand tools, welding and fabrication, and agriculture and landscaping. In light of the economic challenges it has faced, diversification has

FINALISTS IN THE DELTA SUPPLY CHAINSAW COMPETITION GO HEAD TO HEAD ON THEIR FINAL CUTS.

Founded by George Swire in 1972, Delta Supply Company Limited is an industrial equipment and product distributor based on the Caribbean island of Jamaica. Over the years, Delta Supply has established itself as a family business with one eye focused on new opportunities and the other placed firmly on improving its existing capacity. Initially focused on the bauxite and sugar industries, today the company’s name is synonymous with a multitude of sectors. They have two offices, one in Kingston and one in Ocho Rios.

JONATHAN SWIRE (2ND LEFT), GENERAL MANAGER OF DELTA SUPPLY CO AND THE JUDGES OF THE CHAINSAW COMPETITION, (L-R) SHELDON SCOTT, REID AND LENNOY PRENDERGAST, TAKE A PHOTO WITH THE WINNER LLEWELLYN RODNEY AND HIS BRAND NEW MS 660 CHAINSAW.

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DELTA SUPPLY COMPANY LIMITED

VENGSARKA GRANT, PRODUCT SPECIALIST – AGRICULTURE AND LANDSCAPING DEMONSTRATES THE CAPACITY OF THE ELIET SHREDDER.

proven to be an indispensable vehicle for the success enjoyed by the company today. CLOSE TO THE CUSTOMER Broadening Delta’s range of products and services has come about organically. Rather than forcing its own ideas onto the market, VENGSARKA GRANT, PRODUCT SPECIALIST – AGRICULTURE AND LANDSCAPING CONDUCTS A TRAINING SESSION WITH THE LANDSCAPERS AT THE GOVERNOR GENERAL’S RESIDENCE.

the organization’s development has been guided by the needs of its customers. Mr. Swire talks more about this approach and uses one of the company’s strongest sectors as an example: “We have a long-standing relationship with agriculture and landscaping as evidenced by our annual participation

in the Denbigh Agricultural, Industrial and Food Show. From our conversations with event attendees we realized there was a big interest in irrigation, which is why we added the Rainbird line.” For more than 40 years, ‘we service what we sell’ has been a guiding motto for the

A LANDSCAPER USES A STIHL BACKPACK BRUSHCUTTER TO CLEAR THIS SLOPE TERRAIN.

VENGSARKA GRANT, PRODUCT SPECIALIST – AGRICULTURE AND LANDSCAPING (LEFT) GOES THROUGH THE DETAILS OF THE WATER PUMP RANGE WITH A PATRON.

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MEMBERS OF THE JAMAICA CONSTABULARY FORCE USE THE MILWAUKEE PVC SHEAR TO CUT A PIECE OF PVC PIPE DURING THEIR VISIT TO THE DELTA SUPPLY BOOTH DURING DENBIGH 2015. DANIAN HYLTON, PRODUCT SPECIALIST – IRRIGATION AND PUMPS (RIGHT), LOOKS ON.

Proud supplier to Delta Supply Company Ltd www.milwaukeetool.com

company, guaranteeing clients after-sales service from specialized technicians and sales professionals on all products. Recognizing that malfunctioning equipment costs both time and money, Delta Supply is keen to assist its customers in maintaining a healthy work environment with minimal downtime. Furthermore, in a concerted effort to better serve its clientele base, a major warehouse reorganization project and update of the IT system has sought to improve operational efficiency and to transform inventory control into a much more streamlined process.

HELPING HANDS Alongside supplying and servicing clients, Delta has partnered with the Jamaica National Building Society to provide business owners the opportunity to invest in world class equipment, thereby enabling even the smallest producers in Jamaica to compete on the global market. “Although we work alongside large corporations, we have to remember these organizations are in turn served by contractors who commonly operate small businesses,” explains Mr. Swire. “These entrepreneurs are people from all walks of life with

varying education levels, and sometimes, they need assistance. They rely on us to lend a guiding hand with their investments, helping them to choose the right materials and providing them with access to the best training available.” SUPPORTING THE COMMUNITY Not one to stand on the sidelines, Delta is actively involved in the local business community through its membership in civic groups, such as the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce and the Incorporated Masterbuilders Association of Jamaica. The comTHE EXACT PIPE CUTTING MACHINE BEING USED TO MAKE PRECISE CUTS ON METAL PIPES.

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DELTA SUPPLY COMPANY LIMITED

FOR MANY IN JAMAICA, DELTA SUPPLY HAS BECOME A CENTRAL FIGURE IN THE COUNTRY’S INDUSTRIAL NETWORK.

KARCHER BOOTH INSIDE THE DELTA SUPPLY MAIN LOCATION IN KINGSTON.

pany recognizes that participating in these organizations will not only help to stay connected to the island’s commercial arena, but will also further develop Delta’s knowledge of and experience within the marketplace. For many in Jamaica, Delta Supply has become a central figure in the country’s industrial network. In addition to positioning itself as a market-leading supplier and distributor, the company also provides its staff with excellent training. Many of the island’s high school and college graduates apply to join Delta because of its reputation for 54 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

developing individual talent. “We have had a lot of team members who came here straight out of university because they saw our business as the place where their working career should ideally begin,” reveals Mr. Swire. “Working for Delta means you will have your eyes opened to industry, and gain a good understanding of what industry means in Jamaica. We have seen our employees go on to big things in other sectors such as construction and telecommunications, and in this way we have contributed to not just the commercial market but to the labor market

as well. Delta Supply is a sort of finishing school for many and we are very proud of that accomplishment.” THROUGH ANOTHER’S EYES Delta Supply is a unique company in that it holds both a prestigious position at the forefront of Jamaica’s supply and distribution industry, yet remains in touch with small business owners at the ground level. Mr. Swire ends on how his father’s chainsaw incident changed Delta forever. “Taking on the Stihl brand was a major advantage;


THE WACKER NEUSON CONSTRUCTION UNITS ARE DISPLAYED INSIDE THE SHOWROOM AT THE DELTA SUPPLY STORE.

A DEMONSTRATION IS CONDUCTED WITH THE KARCHER STEAM CLEANER WHILE OTHERS LOOK ON.

EWAN BROWN (LEFT), SERVICE TECHNICIAN SHOWS THE FUNCTIONALITIES OF THE KARCHER STEAM VACUUM TO ELDON WALKER OF MODERN MAINTENANCE SERVICES.

the entire experience continues to be a reminder that we should always try to see things from the customer’s perspective. Being in that position enabled us to realize there was a unique business opportunity in the market. It is an experience we constantly share with our staff to showcase how success can be reaped by simply looking through the customer’s eyes. I may not be able to predict what will happen in the future, but we do know that holding fast to our customer-centric approach will ensure everything works out.” c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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IDEA CAMPUS ENERGY CONFERENCE

29TH ANNUAL CAMPUS ENERGY CONFERENCE:

THE CHANGING

LANDSCAPE It’s been said that everything is bigger in Texas, and IDEA’s 29th Annual Campus Energy Conference — “The Changing Landscape”— certainly lived up to that expectation. Held at the JW Marriott Austin hotel on February 8-12, 2016, the event attracted over 840 registrants from colleges and universities, government agencies, and leading manufacturers and service providers based in 10 countries, 44 US states, and 4 Canadian provinces – establishing a new attendance record for an IDEA campus energy conference. Especially noteworthy was the largest-ever number of first-time attendees. An astounding 33 percent of the total were attending an IDEA conference for the first time — in absolute terms, 279 new faces: Up 150% over last year’s Annual Campus Energy Conference in Denver where 28 percent of registrants were first-timers. Clearly, the IDEA Campus Energy conference has gained a reputation for excellent content and high-quality people in attendance. Throughout the conference, there 56 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

was a buzz of enthusiasm in the air, with numerous attendees volunteering positive assessments of the best practice insights gained from the workshops, technical presentations, and panel discussions. The trade show was busy and active with plenty of networking, conversation, and connecting with representatives from the 102 companies hosting exhibits at the event. WORKSHOPS AND TECHNICAL PRESENTATIONS Three heavily-attended workshops kicked off the event on Monday and Tuesday, followed by opening panels and a multi-track series of rich technical presentations on Wednesday and Thursday. Friday featured guided technical tours of key portions of the University of Texas at Austin district energy system and of two Austin Energy systems. • The Thermal Distribution Workshop, held on Monday afternoon and all day Tuesday, was co-chaired by Patrick Davin of Veolia North America and Jim Riley of Texas A&M University, with 164 total attendees

— a record turnout for the 26th year of this high-interest event. The program bifurcated into steam distribution and hot and chilled water tracks, enabling conferees to focus on topics of key interest in each of these topic areas. Steam topics featured remote monitoring of distribution assets, various piping design issues, and advances in water hammer prediction and control. Hot water and chilled water workshop topics included advances in water treatment, high-pressure flushing technology, coil freezing prevention, corrosion control, and new piping materials. The workshop concluded on Tuesday afternoon with a joint session featuring FRP repair of concrete tunnels and manholes and tunnel communications systems and a round table discussion of issues covered and for future consideration. • The “Intelligent Data for a Smart, Resilient & Sustainable Campus” Workshop, chaired by IDEA’s Laxmi Rao, opened with a discussion panel consisting of Abbe Bjorklund, Dartmouth College; Joan Kowal, Emory University; Mark Petty, Vanderbilt


ROB THORNTON.

TIM GRIFFIN.

RYAN THOMPSON.

University, Juan Ontiveros, UT Austin; John Vucci, University of Maryland; and Les Williams, Texas A&M. Discussions focused on the leveraging of data describing efficiency, resiliency, O&M performance, and future building design by campus energy and water infrastructure managers, as well as other campus stakeholders including students and faculty, to encourage the strategic stewardship of available energy and water resources. Presentations followed on the energy-water nexus, handling of big data, the Internet of Things, and innovations such as on-site dashboards to make users aware of their consumption and to encourage them to conserve, and much more.

• “A Deeper Dive into EPA Clean Power Plan” Workshop, chaired by IDEA’s Rob Thornton, featured insightful presentations from Avi Zevin of Van Ness Feldman and Mark Spurr of FVB Energy, IDEA’s Legislative Director. The presentations included an overview of the Clean Power Plan and a detailed view of the CPP’s proposed Model Trading Rule and the implications of the CPP for campus district energy and the opportunities inherent in the Plan for CHP systems — and the likely state-by-state variations in rate-based and mass-based targets. Presentations were followed by a lively exchange of audience questions and responses from the speakers.

THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE IDEA Vice Chair Tim Griffin of RMF Engineering launched the formal portion of the Campus Energy Conference on Wednesday morning, cordially welcoming the attendees to IDEA as a pinch hitter for IDEA Chair Bruce Ander who was unable to attend. Ryan Thompson of the University of Texas at Austin served as Conference Program Technical Chair, and welcomed the gathering to Austin on behalf of host UT Austin and provided an overview of the technical conference program.             The traditional opening plenary panel discussion followed, focusing on the theme, “The Changing Campus Landscape”.

MODERATED BY IDEA PRESIDENT AND CEO ROB THORNTON, “THE CHANGING CAMPUS LANDSCAPE” PANELISTS WERE (L TO R) MARK KIRSCHENBAUM, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON; JOAN KOWAL, EMORY UNIVERSITY; ROBERT MANNING, HARVARD UNIVERSITY; THOMAS NYQUIST, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY; KENT REIFSTECK, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS; JUAN ONTIVEROS, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN; AND MARK ST. ONGE, UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA.

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IDEA CAMPUS ENERGY CONFERENCE

THE TRADE SHOW WAS WELL-ATTENDED.

Moderated by IDEA CEO Rob Thornton, panelists included Mark Kirschenbaum, University of Washington; Joan Kowal, Emory University; Robert Manning, Harvard University; Thomas Nyquist, Princeton University; Juan Ontiveros, University of Texas at Austin; Kent Reifsteck, University of Illinois; and Mark St. Onge, University of Arizona, who shared strategies and best practices in managing the many dimensions of change affecting their campuses. Highlights of the panel discussion included insightful responses by the panelists to the questions posed by Mr. Thornton, “How important is sustainability to your students, trustees, and administration? In other words, is having a low-carbon footprint more important than having a winning football team?” — which immediately generated universal smiles; and “What has been the most significant change on campus over the past five years?”

A packed agenda of 78 technical presentations and two symposia followed and continued through Thursday. IDEA member campuses shared innovations, new technology investments, and strategies for investing in clean energy. Most presentations featured discussions of best practices to generate economic as well as environmental rewards. Topics included detailed case studies in campus energy master planning, combined heat and power, optimization and expansion of district cooling systems, innovations in resiliency, efficiency and waste energy recovery, carbon footprint reduction, metering and controls, training and talent management, creative project finance, demand response, information management, microgrids, and more. As at all IDEA events, Continuing Education Units (CEUs) were available to all registrants.

TECHNICAL TOUR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, AUSTIN. ATTENDEES ARE DWARFED BY A HRSG. THE CAMPUS CAN ISLAND 100%, PROVIDING ALL OF ITS ELECTRICITY, HEATING AND COOLING DEMAND AT WILL.

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The IDEA Campus Forum met on Thursday after the conclusion of the technical presentations, providing an open meeting conversation for campus energy peers to discuss the ideas and lessons learned from previous days’ discussions and to provide suggested topics for consideration at next year’s Campus Energy Conference. STUDENT VIDEO CONTEST For the past five years, IDEA has held a video contest for student sustainability clubs at IDEA member institutions in an effort to start a dialogue around the importance of efficient and sustainable district energy systems. The University of Virginia was announced as the winner of the Fifth Annual Campus Energy System Video Contest during Wednesday’s networking luncheon. The University of Virginia winners were on hand to receive the award and gain valuable exposure to the district energy industry by

THE TECHNICAL TOUR OF AUSTIN ENERGY FACILITIES INCLUDED THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT COOLING PLANT #2 GUIDED BY SENIOR POWER SYSTEM ENGINEER MICHELE BRYANT (AT VERY CENTER OF PHOTO) AND THE MUELLER ENERGY CENTER CHP FACILITY.


attending the conference. Their winning submission can be viewed on the IDEA YouTube page: www.youtube.com/DistrictEnergy1. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING At a signing ceremony on Wednesday, IDEA and the U. S. Green Building Council (USGBC) Green Business Certification, Inc. (GBCI) management, formally signed a Memorandum of Understanding calling for further collaboration and cooperation to promote more sustainable, efficient, and resilient electricity and thermal grids through the Performance Excellence in Electricity Renewal (PEER) program. This agreement is evidence that the USGBC recognizes that good infrastructure and integration of clean energy efficiency is part of resiliency, and that there is a shift underway from just looking at the energy efficiency of single buildings to looking at entire communities, campuses, and cities. It reflects a growing trend among IDEA member campuses already operating and optimizing their electricity systems in conjunction with thermal energy utilization. The MOU gives a framework to the industry to work together and identify best practices as they relate to grid operation and optimization.

Administered by GBCI, the PEER program is a comprehensive framework for defining, assessing, and verifying the overall sustainable performance of electricity delivery system design and operations. The standards enable project teams to assess their current state, develop strategies for improvement, advance the business case, and verify the value of system changes. PEER is also the driving force behind the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) vision to transform power systems and the nation’s first comprehensive, data-driven approach to evaluating and improving power system performance. Under the leadership of Juan Ontiveros, Associate Vice President of Utilities and Energy Management at the University of Texas at Austin — the host of the 2016 Campus Energy Conference — the university became the first college campus in the world to attain Performance Excellence in Electricity Renewal (PEER) certification in 2014. The certification program measures and improves power system performance and electricity delivery systems. PEER certification is administered for USGBC by Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI), an independent credentialing entity.

According to GBCI in its report on the university’s certification process, achieving PEER certification demonstrated Mr. Ontiveros’ leadership in transforming the power industry. The report identified the campus as “a showcase example of sustainable electricity system design”, noting that “PEER certification validates UT Austin’s accomplishments, sets a benchmark for other campus facilities, and demonstrates UT Austin’s commitment to sustainable power systems and continuous improvement.” In recognition of many years of continued support and contribution to shared learning, IDEA presented a special gift to Juan Ontiveros to commemorate his many contributions to advancing the industry. c OUR SPONSORS IDEA gratefully acknowledges the generosity of the following IDEA member organizations whose sponsorships provided vital financial support for the 29th Annual Campus Energy Conference: PLATINUM SPONSOR Johnson Controls

GOLD SPONSORS Burns & McDonnell Carrier CB&I

Jacobs Solar Turbines Trane

SILVER SPONSORS Affiliated Engineers CHA Chem-Aqua Concord Engineering I.C. Thomasson Associates, Inc.

Optimum Energy Ramboll Siemens Stanley Consultants Thermo Systems U.S. Water

BRONZE SPONSORS Ameresco Quadax

SIGNING THE MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE INTERNATIONAL DISTRICT ENERGY ASSOCIATION AND GREEN BUSINESS CERTIFICATION, INC., IN FRONT ARE ROB THORNTON, PRESIDENT & CEO, IDEA (LEFT), AND DAVID WITEK, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE, OPERATIONS & ADMINISTRATION, USGBC. IN BACK ARE (L TO R) AUREL SELEZEANU, DUKE UNIVERSITY; JIM ADAMS, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN; KEN SMITH, DISTRICT ENERGY ST. PAUL; TIM GRIFFIN, RMF ENGINEERING; JAMIE STATTER, U.S. GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL; AND JOHN KELLY, USGBC.

IN RECOGNITION OF HIS MANY CONTRIBUTIONS TO ADVANCES IN DISTRICT ENERGY, IDEA PRESENTED JUAN ONTIVEROS WITH A SPECIAL RECOGNITION FOR GLOBAL LEADERSHIP. (L TO R: TIM GRIFFIN, DAVE WITEK, JUAN ONTIVEROS, ROB THORNTON).

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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GLOBAL EVENTS

MAR 2016 SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

2nd - 5th

GLOBE 2016: International Environmental Business Summit Vancouver, BC, Canada www.globeseries.com

GLOBE is about taking responsibility; forging new partnerships and thinking outside the box. It’s where leaders come to devise winning strategies to conserve precious resources, save money, and meet people that can help them be more profitable, and more efficient.

6th - 9th

EcoBio 2016: Challenges in Building a Sustainable Biobased Economy Rotterdam, Netherlands www.ecobioconference.com

Eco-Bio 2016 will highlight the latest research and innovation towards developing industrially viable, safe, and ecologically friendly biobased (renewable biological sources) solutions to build a sustainable society.

15th - 16th

The Sustainability Summit 2016 London, UK www.economist.com

The Sustainability Summit 2016 will look at how short-termism dominates the global mind-set, with the need to achieve growth in the present often overshadowing critical preparations for our future.

20th - 22nd

2016 International Corporate Citizenship Conference Atlanta, GA, USA

At the 2016 International Corporate Citizenship Conference, experts from around the world will share the innovative new programs, partnerships, and solutions that are driving positive change across the globe.

M A G A Z I N E

PROMOTE YOUR EVENT HERE If your organization has a trade show or event, please let us know and we will promote your event on our global events pages.

For more information please contact us at: info@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net

http://ccc.bc.edu/index.cfm?pageId=476

30th

GoGreen Seattle Seattle, WA, USA

www.seattle.gogreenconference.net

2016 International Conference on the Constructed Environment Tucson, AZ, USA

This interdisciplinary conference and its companion journal invite scholars to examine the human configurations and interactions among the constructed, social, and natural environments.

11th - 13th

Cleantech Forum Europe Lyon, France http://events.cleantech.com

Now in its 12th year, Cleantech Forum Europe continues to be the place to create connections, to connect the dots across multiple industrial sectors being disrupted by information, bio and clean technology innovations.

12th - 13th

Responsible Business Summit USA 2016 New York, NY, USA

The Ethical Corporation Responsible Business Summit USA 2016 will be an exclusive gathering of corporate leaders, NGOs, associations, and media with a tailor made agenda covering everything from incentivizing your supply chain, empowering the workforce, making the most of your CSR report, and integrating sustainability across all operations.

1st - 3rd

www.constructedenvironment.com

http://events.ethicalcorp.com/ rbs-usa/

22nd

Earth Day 2016

21st - 22nd

The Green California Summit 2016 Sacramento, CA, USA

http://www.green-technology.org/ gcsummit16/

60 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

The Green California Summit marks its tenth anniversary in 2016. The last decade has brought changes and challenges to sustainability efforts in the Golden State, but it has also been an era of steady progress.

GoGreen empowers business decision-makers with sustainability strategies, tools, and connections to create positive change within their organizations by facilitating environmental, economic, and social performance improvement.

APR 2016


LONDON, UK (MARCH 14-15) HOUSTON, TX (MARCH 24-25) TORONTO, CANADA (APRIL 14-15) NEW YORK, NY (MAY 23-24) ATHENS, GREECE (MAY 26-27)

Advanced Certified Sustainability (CSR) Practitioner Training

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to become the next certified CSR Practitioner! You might have missed the opportunity of receiving the globally recognized certification as a CSR Practitioner, but in the New Year how about receiving a certified training on sustainability and CSR issues? How about becoming the CSR champion within your organization? This challenging 2-day training offered by Centre for Sustainability and Excellence (CSE), aims to give you all the latest tools and resources required to implement or upscale existing sustainability initiatives taking place in your organization.

London, UK

Houston, TX

Toronto, Canada

New York, NY

Athens, Greece

March

March

April

May

May

14-15 24-25 14-15 23-24 26-27 For more information visit http://www.cse-net.org/article/127/upcoming-trainings or contact us at sustainability@cse-net.org SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ADVERTISERS INDEX B Black and Veatch Burmeister & Wain Scandinavian Contractor A/S (BWSC) C Centre for Sustainability and Excellence CIMA Canada Inc. E Eagle Restoration Inc.

62 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

P30 P44

P61 P15

P36

G GDM Lindex Limited GEMEC Limited M McIntosh Perry MCW Custom Energy Solutions Limited METKA-EGN Limited Milwaukee Tool

P49 P15

P15 P34 P13 P53

P Pivotal Projects Inc.

P30

R Remy Consulting Engineers Ltd.

P36

S SNC Lavalin Inc. Solar Flexrack Sungrow Canada Inc.

P30 P13 P15

W The Water Expo 2016

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SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

SUSTAINING TOMORROW. TODAY www.sustainablebusinessmagazine.net


Sustainable Business Magazine 01/16  

Sustainable Business Magazine Issue 01/16

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