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SUSTAINABLE ISSUE 05/15

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

IGPC

ETHANOL INC

CANADA

CLEAN FUELS

HYDRO ONE ALSO FEATURED THIS ISSUE

AASHE • CEA • CRFA

S U S TA I N I N G T O M O R R O W. T O D AY


SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

M A G A Z I N E

SUSTAINING TOMORROW. TODAY www.sustainablebusinessmagazine.net


SUSTAINABLE

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M A G A Z I N E

Sustainable Business Magazine is committed to promoting sustainable printing. This magazine is printed on Forest Stewardship Council certified material and manufactured using environmentally sustainable procedures. All lithographic printer inks used are vegetable-based.

SBM Media Ltd Norwich Enterprise Centre, 4B Guildhall Hill, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 1JH, United Kingdom • T: +44 (0)1603 516519 Email: info@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net www.sustainablebusinessmagazine.net Editor: Fiona FitzGerald Assistant Editor: Thomas Massey George Newell Profile Writers: Michael Anjos Marcus Bonnano Contributors: Steve DeBusk Joy Facos Andrea Kent Channa Perera Devin Redlich Kevin Smith Meghan Fay Zahniser Web Administrator: Steve Phipps

CONTENTS ISSUE 05/15

Welcome to the latest issue of Sustainable Business Magazine Sustainable Business Magazine aims to spread awareness of the values of sustainability, as well as the brilliant ways in which organizations continue to meet challenges and champion corporate social responsibility. This issue features the first installment of our ‘Canadian Bioeconomy’ series. The series is being run in partnership with the Canadian Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA) and will feature detailed profiles of CRFA members, showcasing how their efforts are contributing to a more environmentally and economically sustainable future. Each installment is prefaced by a foreword from Andrea Kent, President of the CRFA, and the first installment features articles on IGPC Ethanol, Gales Gas Bars, and Canada Clean Fuels. The installment also features an in-depth Q&A with Devin Redlich, one of the owners of Arcade Station. This issue also contains the second installment of our ‘Powering Sustainability’ series. The series is being run in partnership with the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) and celebrates the efforts being made by Canadian power companies to develop and operate sustainably. This installment is once again prefaced by a foreword from CEA Director of Sustainable Development Channa Perera, and includes detailed articles on Hydro One and Newfoundland Power. The latest installment of our AASHE ‘Sustainable Campuses’ series features the University of San Diego. The series is being run in partnership with AASHE (the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education) and celebrates the continuing efforts of North American universities to develop and operate sustainably, as well as the role they’re taking in educating students and the wider public about the importance of sustainability. The article on the University of San Diego is prefaced by a foreword from AASHE’s Executive Director Meghan Fay Zahniser. Details of upcoming sustainability events can be found on our events calendar. This issues’ highlighted event is the Canadian Solar Industries Association’s (CanSIA) fifth annual Solar Ontario Conference. The event was held between May 25th and May 27th 2015 and brought together 300 industry professionals and stakeholders for important discussions about the present and future of solar energy in Ontario. This issue’s three guest editorials have been provided by a selection of industry experts and feature an environmental report from Kevin Smith, National Boreal Program Manager for Ducks Unlimited Canada, a technology report from Steve DeBusk, Global Energy Solutions Manager for the window film division at Eastman Chemical Company, and an economic report from Joy Facos, Senior Sustainable Investing Research Analyst for Sentinel Investments. We hope that you find this issue both interesting and inspiring. Thank you for reading. The Sustainable Business Magazine Team

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Environmental Report Ducks Unlimited Canada

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Technology Report Window film division, Eastman Chemical Company.

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Economic Report Fossil Fuel Investing

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Canadian Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA)

10

IGPC Ethanol Inc.

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Gale’s Gas Bars Ltd.

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Canada Clean Fuels

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Q&A Devin Redlich Owner, Arcade Station

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Canadian Electricity Association (CEA)

30

Hydro One

38

Newfoundland Power

44

The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE)

46

University of San Diego

52

Solar Ontario 2015 Event Review

56

Global Events

58

Advertisers Index

FRONT COVER IMAGE ARIEL VIEW OF IGPC PLANT. IMAGE PROVIDED BY IGPC ETHANOL INC.

© SBM Media Ltd 2015. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form for any purpose, other than short sections for the purpose of review, without prior consent of the publisher.

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ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

ENVIRONMENTALREPORT

By Kevin Smith, National Boreal Program Manager, Ducks Unlimited Canada.

Taking the High Road in Canada’s Boreal Forest Its sheer size is hard to fathom. Earth’s largest intact forest stretches from the mountain ridges of the Yukon to the rocky shores of Newfoundland. Canada’s vast boreal forest supports 40 per cent of North America’s breeding ducks and contains 85 per cent of the country’s wetlands, making it one of Ducks Unlimited Canada’s (DUC) top conservation priorities. Superlatives of the boreal abound. It holds the largest area of freshwater on Earth, it stores higher densities of carbon than any other ecosystem, and it provides some of the last remaining intact habitat for species at risk such as woodland caribou. Development of the boreal has occurred mostly along its southern fringe but is expanding further north. Meanwhile, climate changes threatens to destabilize this vital region, which stores 20 years’ worth of global carbon dioxide emissions in its wetlands and soils. 2 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

DUC wants to ensure the boreal’s abundant natural resources are sustainably managed alongside a network of protected priority areas. This will conserve some of the continent’s most important waterfowl habitat, all while mitigating the release of greenhouse gases and strengthening the resiliency of this frontline region to adapt to climate change. We work with our partners to develop best management practices that help minimize the impact of development on the boreal. Our Enhanced Wetland Classification (EWC) system is the foundation of our sustainable development work. It allows land managers to map and understand the diverse network of wetlands in the boreal. Our work on road-building with the forest industry is a great example. When a road is built across a wetland, it may block the flow of water and the nutrients it carries. This can cause the wetland to dry


DUC wants to ensure the boreal’s abundant natural resources are sustainably managed alongside a network of protected priority areas. out downstream of the crossing site and flood on the upstream side. Not only does this damage the ecosystem, it’s a colossal headache for foresters whose roads wash out. When the Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc.® provided an opportunity for a funding grant, DUC and its forestry partners got together to learn how to build better roads. Their search would lead them to a low-tech solution. Foresters have long used corduroy roads to cross wet areas in northern Canada. By laying logs side-by-side (giving the appearance of corduroy fabric) they built paths over the muskeg. With the wetlands expertise of DUC biologists, the operational knowledge of forestry professionals, and solutions from forest engineers at FPInnovations, the humble corduroy road was reborn. Using DUC’s knowledge of boreal wetlands and understanding how the water will flow is the first crucial step. For example, water in bogs is stagnant. In swamps, it fluctuates. It’s a slow, lateral flow in fens. Crossing designs were developed to accommodate the different water flow regimes. In clearing area for the road it’s crucial to keep the root mat, stumps and all, intact. Geotextile fabric is put down to support the corduroy and culverts are placed where they’re needed among a thick layer of logs. Once it’s thick enough, more geotextile is used

to prevent dirt from plugging the corduroy or entering the water. Finally, a normal dirt road is built over the top. A suspended road, in essence, is the result. Water flows underneath so the wetland is not damaged and foresters can move overtop to drive the northern economy. When they are done with it, it could be removed easily. Once the successful field trials were completed, DUC and its partners created a guide to building resource roads in the boreal forest that don’t impact the area’s hydrology. With the savings this solution offers forestry companies, it’s quickly being put to work. Keeping these wetlands from drying up maintains critical breeding habitat for ducks and geese. It also prevents the immense amount of carbon they store from being released and fuelling global climate change. By working with resource-based companies to implement these kinds of practical solutions, DUC is helping make sure development in the boreal forest occurs sustainably. The goal is to combine this approach with the establishment of a network of large protected areas so the boreal forest continues to provide its many benefits to wildlife and people. c Project partners include the Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc®, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Louisiana Pacific Canada, Weyerhaeuser Canada, FPInnovations, and Spruce Products Ltd. For more information about our work in the boreal forest or to download the guide visit borealforest.ca.

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TECHNOLOGY REPORT HYATT REGENCY HOUSTON RECENTLY INSTALLED WINDOW FILM.

STEVE DEBUSK, GLOBAL ENERGY SOLUTIONS MANAGER FOR THE WINDOW FILM DIVISION OF THE EASTMAN CHEMICAL COMPANY.

TECHNOLOGYREPORT

By Steve DeBusk, Global Energy Solutions Manager, window film division at Eastman Chemical Company.

Window Film Solves Common Sustainability Challenges Energy-efficiency improvements are essential if you want to keep operating costs under control, but major building system upgrades can require time, money, and resources that aren’t always easy to come by. The good news? You can positively impact the energy use of several commercial building systems at once with one green investment: High-performance, low-e window film. The right window film not only reduces glare, year-round energy use, and operating costs, but also improves building system performance and prevents unnecessary upgrades or replacements. 4 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Discover how window film can help solve a few common problems encountered by facilities professionals on their sustainability journeys. PROBLEM: OUR WINDOWS AREN’T VERY EFFICIENT; THEY CAUSE INCREASED HEATING AND COOLING COSTS. Window Film Advantages: According to the U.S. Department of Energy, inefficient windows are to blame for 25% to 35% of wasted energy in commercial buildings. When facility owners and managers hear this, it’s not long before the topic of window replacement may


come up. But replacing windows requires upfront capital; it also requires careful planning so tenants and occupants aren’t inconvenienced during installation. To obtain a full return on your investment for new windows, it may take up to 30 years – and that’s for glass replacement only, based on RSMeans data. That can be a tough sell when most facilities professionals are looking for energy-efficiency projects that can offer a full payback in five years or less. The insulating power that high-performance, low-e window film can provide gives single-pane windows the same insulating performance as double-pane windows; it provides double-pane windows with the same insulating performance as triple-pane windows. This increases the R-value of your existing windows by up to 92%. If you’re considering new windows as an energy-efficiency project, it’s very likely that window film will provide the same results with considerably less upfront expense and a much faster return on investment. Window film energy savings may offer total electricity cost reductions of between 5% and 15% (depending on glass type, window-to-wall ratio, geographic location, and HVAC efficiency). In some cases, a commercial building may experience a 100% ROI in four years or less. PROBLEM: OUR LIGHTING ENERGY USE IS HIGHER THAN WE WOULD LIKE IT TO BE. Window Film Advantages: When sunlight isn’t controlled, blinds and shades are often used to reduce interior fading, keep tenants and occupants comfortable, and prevent glare. Blinds and shades can address these issues – but they also limit views and prevent natural daylight from entering the space, which may cause an increased need for interior artificial lighting. Despite the myth that window film makes indoor spaces darker and increases lighting usage, installing window film can actually help decrease lighting costs. A research team from the University of Padua in Italy recently studied the use of window film and its effect on lighting. MG Tower – a modern building with up-to-date HVAC systems and new windows – was struggling with occupants who were uncomfortable due to solar heat gain and glare from sunlight. The team discovered that window film addressed the glare and occupant comfort problems. It also offered a considerable increase in the amount of useful daylight available in the building because blinds weren’t used as often to control glare and solar heat gain. PROBLEM: HVAC SYSTEMS ARE RUNNING FREQUENTLY TO KEEP UP WITH HEATING AND COOLING LOADS. Window Film Advantages: Before investing in HVAC upgrades or retrofits to achieve energy savings, many energy consultants recommend reducing heating and cooling loads first. To do this, take a close look at your building and what’s impacting your HVAC system (insulation levels, the type of roof on your building, the type of lighting system, etc.). Then think about ways to reduce runtime, which will extend the life of your HVAC system. A smart way to start is by controlling solar heat gain and thermal heat loss through windows. Because solar heat gain is responsible for nearly one-third of a building’s total cooling costs (according to the U.S. Department of Energy), reducing solar heat gain will go a long way towards decreasing HVAC loads and your electricity bills. Low-e window film can also provide energy savings during cooler months. By helping to decrease the flow of radiant heat from the warmer side of a window to the cooler side, low-e window film can reduce heating loads and HVAC runtimes. When heat attempts

Despite the myth that window film makes indoor spaces darker and increases lighting usage, installing window film can actually help decrease lighting costs. to radiate to the outdoors, low-e film reflects the majority of it back into the building instead of absorbing it. And if you’re still not convinced, a recent study shows just how much of a difference window film can make in HVAC energy use. The Hyatt Regency Houston recently installed low-e window film in 48 of its guestrooms. To measure heating and cooling usage in these rooms, the hotel used an extensive metering system; the data was then compared to the heating and cooling use in 48 rooms without window film. The results, which were compiled by a third-party energy management consultant and verified by the local utility company, found that heating energy use decreased by 25% and cooling energy use decreased by 23% in rooms with low-e window film. HVAC runtime also significantly reduced, and prevented replacement of the HVAC system (which had been struggling to keep up with demand before installation of the window film). These results could be mirrored in almost any type of commercial building. PROBLEM: PLUG LOADS ARE INCREASING AS A RESULT OF FAN AND SPACE HEATER USAGE. Window Film Advantages: Thanks to solar heat gain, temperatures of surfaces near windows can reach up to 125 degrees For higher. If it’s uncontrolled, solar heat gain often equals discomfort for occupants and tenants located near windows. To counteract uncomfortable temperatures, fans and space heaters may be used (and sometimes at the same time). Task lights may also be used more frequently if natural light is blocked by closed blinds and curtains. This only adds to a building’s total plug load, but window film can help prevent increased plug load. After installation, tenants and occupants may not use fans and/or space heaters as often because window film can eliminate the majority of hot and cold spots. Improving building system performance is no small task, but the right solutions can help. Window film isn’t the only option to consider, but it’s one that may provide a high return on investment, prolong HVAC and lighting equipment lifecycles, provide extra insulating capacity to the building envelope, and decrease operating costs. Learn more about a cost-effective investment that reduces year-round energy use and keeps operating costs in check. c Steve DeBusk is global energy solutions manager for the window film division at Eastman Chemical Company. DeBusk has 30 years of experience in energy efficiency. He is a Certified Energy Manager, a Certified Measurement and Verification Professional, and a Certified Sustainable Development Professional. You can visit his blog at blog.vista-films.com or follow him on Twitter at @greenbldgs. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ECONOMIC REPORT JOY FACOS, SENIOR SUSTAINABLE INVESTING RESEARCH ANALYST, SENTINEL INVESTMENTS.

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Fossil Fuel Investing:

Many Roads Lead to Change ECONOMICREPORT

By Joy Facos, Senior Sustainable Investing Research Analyst, Sentinel Investments.

The global call to reduce greenhouse gas (“GHG”) emissions primarily from fossil fuels is becoming more urgent as the effects of climate change are being felt more acutely around the world. This call has led to the question of how or whether to invest in fossil fuel companies. The ensuing debate is important, yet too often set, as an “either/or” proposition – divestment or engagement. Each side has merits and it can be argued that both approaches can play a critical role in bringing about positive change. Change is essential if we are to limit global temperature increases to 2 C, which the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has stated is necessary to stave off “dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system.” First, a look at divestment: The question of whether to divest fossil fuel holdings has become a major issue sweeping college campuses and board rooms. The approach is modeled after the anti-apartheid movement which started on college campuses and called for divestment from companies doing business in South Africa. The movement was largely credited with helping end apartheid in South Africa. For fossil fuel investing, the issue is more complicated as the global economy is still carbon-based. Although one can divest holdings in fossil fuel companies, just one move down the supply chain of almost any company and one encounters fossil fuel use. In making informed investment decisions, investors should evaluate the efforts of companies across all sectors – not only fossil fuel – in

This call has led to the question of how or whether to invest in fossil fuel companies. The ensuing debate is important, yet too often set, as an “either/or” proposition – divestment or engagement.

their fight against climate change; from financial institutions’ lending practices, to manufacturers working to reduce energy consumption, to retailers turning to renewable energy sources. Another approach is effecting change through corporate engagement and proxy voting. As a company shareholder, investors have a seat at the table. This proxy season there are a number of shareholder resolutions for both fossil fuel companies and non-fossil fuel companies which deal with climate change-related issues, from calling for increased reporting and transparency to setting emission reduction targets. The good news is that some of these resolutions will be withdrawn before they come to a vote as companies proactively respond to shareholders to address these concerns. For those resolutions that do make it to the proxy ballot, shareholders will cast their votes. If they receive the support of even 10% of votes cast, company management will have received a message that will be difficult to ignore. That is the power of shareholder voice. The divestment approach is important having raised awareness and elevated the discussion to the national and international stage. Shareholder activism through corporate engagement and proxy voting also plays an important role in influencing corporate behavior. Both approaches lead to change and coupled with other change drivers, such as increased investment in renewable energy, setting a price for carbon, and coordinated government action on an international scale, we have a chance of limiting the detrimental effects of climate change. c This article contains the current opinions of the author but not necessarily those of Sentinel Investments. The author’s opinions are subject to change without notice. Sentinel distributes this article for informational purposes only. The information contained here is from sources believed, but not guaranteed, to be reliable. The comments should not be construed as a recommendation of individual holdings or market sectors, but as an illustration of broader themes. Sentinel Investments is the unifying brand name for Sentinel Financial Services Company, Sentinel Asset Management, Inc., and Sentinel Administrative Services, Inc. Sentinel Funds are distributed by Sentinel Financial Services Company, One National Life Drive, Montpelier, VT 05604, 800-282-FUND, www.sentinelinvestments.com. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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CANADIAN RENEWABLE FUELS ASSOCIATION GREENFIELD SPECIALTY ALCOHOLS’ ETHANOL FACILITY, CHATHAM, ONTARIO, CANADA CRFA MEMBER.

BUILDING CANADA’S

BIOECONOMY ANDREA KENT, PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN RENEWABLE FUELS ASSOCIATION (CRFA).

A foreword to the ‘Canadian Bioeconomy’ series by Andrea Kent, President of the Canadian Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA).

We’ve been building Canada’s renewable fuels industry for 30 years. What began as a group of determined corn farmers looking to find new revenue for their crops has turned into today’s Canadian Renewable Fuels Association. This has laid the foundation for a viable, domestic industry with 26 renewable fuels facilities across Canada producing 1.8 billion litres of ethanol and 400 million litres of biodiesel annually. It’s an industry that has created over $5 billion in economic activity and over 14,000 jobs since 2007 while reducing greenhouse gas emissions by over 4.2 megatonnes (equivalent to 1 million cars) every year. And while our accomplishments 8 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

are impressive, our potential is nowhere near exhausted. Climate change and environmental sustainability is one of the defining challenges of the 21st century and it’s especially tough because this isn’t just a scientific concern, activist cause, or industrial challenge. Climate change is a global problem that brings to light serious challenges and it is innovative companies, such as CRFA members, who are helping transform these challenges into opportunities. Biofuels are the cleanest and most sustainable source of fuel available and are an established part of Canada’s energy mix. Renewable fuels like ethanol and renewable


port the work of Canadian renewable fuels producers and innovators by investing in Canadian innovation, growing market access for renewable fuels, and fighting climate change while growing the economy. EXPANDING RENEWABLE FUELS REQUIREMENTS Mandated levels of renewable fuel content have succeeded in securing a market for a product that burns cleaner when compared to petroleum-based alternatives. The net result is that consumers receive the benefits of cleaner fuels, and Canada reduces its emissions. There are NO technical barriers to increasing the federal renewable diesel mandate to ensure a 5% inclusion by 2020. At the same time, expanding renewable diesel use to other markets — like marine, rail, mining, power engines, and oil sands expansion — would make significant emissions reductions in otherwise very carbon intensive industries.

diesel reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 99% compared to fossil fuels. Their use extends our petroleum supply while protecting our environment. Canada’s biofuels industry continues to grow, improve, and innovate. Today agricultural waste, residue, and even garbage can be used to make biofuel. In April 2014, we released our new vision and plan for biofuels and the bioeconomy in Canada. Our policy recommendations sup-

PROMOTING INNOVATION The priority we place on sustainability and innovation will ultimately determine our long-term economic prosperity. The growth of today’s Canadian bioeconomy is due in large part to renewable fuels technology, but success relies on expanding emerging technologies and successfully bringing them to market. Creating a comprehensive Bioeconomy Strategy – similar to the one which exists in the United States and the European Union — is needed to support innovative and potentially ground-breaking technology, accelerate

progress in research, and ultimately shape Canada’s overall energy future. BUILDING PATHWAYS INTO THE MARKETPLACE Renewable fuels diversify our fuel mix and extend our petroleum supply while delivering the environmental benefits many customers and governments want. There are over 3.5 million vehicles on Canada’s roads that can take up to 85% ethanol (E85). In the United States there are over 3,000 E85 pumps, as well as thousands of others that offer mid-level ethanol blends and 10-20% biodiesel directly to consumers. However, there are less than ten pumps that offer E85 to consumers and none that offer higher biodiesel blends at commercial sites in Canada. Governments should be encouraging existing pump turnover and new market entrants so that renewable fuels are available to Canadian consumers where they want them - at the fuel pump. A FAIR VALUE FOR GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS Over 40 countries worldwide either have or are in the process of putting a price on carbon. Be it a direct tax, a trading system, or a low-carbon fuel standard, putting a price on carbon and rewarding those who reduce the total amount of carbon is the solution. Biofuels are an efficient, low-cost pathway to realizing GHG reduction targets and are an essential part of any low-carbon strategy. Monetizing GHG benefits is an opportunity to provide financial returns and incentives for companies that practice and/ or adopt more sustainable practices and clean technologies. CRFA supports policies that maximize this opportunity and are working with jurisdictions on systems that recognize and encourage the economic value of renewable fuels products. FROM BIOFUELS TO BIOECONOMY CRFA members are already hard at work, creating more renewable fuels and sustainable products that stimulate the economy and help fight climate change. We are excited to work with Sustainable Business Magazine to profile some of our members and show how their businesses are helping shift the energy landscape in Canada. c

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IGPC ETHANOL INC

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CANADIAN CORN-UCOPIA

Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Jim Grey, CEO of IGPC Ethanol Inc., about how they’re building a successful enterprise in the growing bioeconomy industry.

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IGPC ETHANOL INC

IGPC ETHANOL HAS BECOME A LEADER IN CANADA’S ETHANOL PRODUCTION INDUSTRY.

Extraction of ethanol from corn has proven revolutionary for numerous sectors, not least for farmers growing the corn. From modest beginnings in 2002, a group of Canadian corn producers recognized the possibilities of pushing their crop even further; all they would need is capital investment for a new refinery. Thirteen years later, IGPC Ethanol Inc. has become a leader in Canada's ethanol production industry through a steady process of refining efficiency, strengthening personnel, and innovative technology. "IGPC Ethanol Inc. began conceptually in 2002 when a group of farmers were literally sitting around a kitchen table looking to take advantage of government 12 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

programs that were in place at the time," explains CEO Jim Grey. "The possibility arose of building a renewable fuels facility that would add value to their existing corn crop. For the next five years, the group who formed the co-operative, Integrated Grain Processors Co-operative Inc., went about raising equity and putting technology, construction, and other agreements in place. A facility was built in Aylmer, Ontario, and started production in the fall of 2007. The total cost of the project was $135 million; $58 million of which was equity, the rest being government support and debt. “Being structured as a co-operative means the majority of our shareholders come from the farming community, thus offering


producers the best returns." IGPC Ethanol Inc. is a division of Integrated Grain Processors Co-operative Inc., one of the largest co-operatives in Ontario and currently has approximately 750 shareholders. Built to process 40 million gallons of ethanol per year, the IGPC Ethanol Inc. plant has in fact generated more than that every year since 2007, making it a facility running beyond capacity. The facility is not halting there, however, as IGPC Ethanol Inc. recently invested in ICM’s Fiber Separation Technology™ (FST) that will bring even greater processing power into the company's hands. This new technology will allow the facility’s capacity to increase by 20%. Coupled with this is the doorway this technology opens to other new technologies that will help diversify revenue streams while adding greater value to the existing product. IGPC Ethanol Inc. is receiving $3.7 million in government funding towards the $10 million total cost of the project through the AgriInnovation Program under the Growing Forward 2 (GF2) policy framework. SUPPLY AND DEMAND At the heart of IGPC Ethanol’s success is the huge demand for ethanol in fuel. Throughout Canada there is a federally mandated 5% ethanol volume in every litre of gasoline, while some jurisdictions such as the Greater Toronto Area in Ontario blend up to 10%. The impact of this is a 62% reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the total lifecycle of the gasoline, from the tractor in the field planting corn to the car driving down the highway. Results like this make IGPC Ethanol’s business not only lucrative but environmentally essential as well. Over its 7 years of operation, the ethanol

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Imagine focusing on your business instead of your computer network.

Virtualization • IT Management • Software Development • Support Phone: 519.489.0343 • Woodstock, Ontario, Canada • ArmitageTech.com

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IGPC ETHANOL INC

KAREN VECCHIO, PROVINCIAL CONSERVATIVE CANDIDATE FOR ELGIN-MIDDLESEX-LONDON. MPP JEFF YUREK, ELGIN-MIDDLESEX-LONDON. JIM GREY, CEO OF IGPC ETHANOL INC. MP GERRY RITZ, MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE AND AGRI-FOOD CANADA. ADRIAN OP’T HOOG, CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD, INTEGRATED GRAIN PROCESSORS CO-OPERATIVE INC. GREG CURRIE, MAYOR, TOWN OF AYLMER.

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produced by IGPC has reduced GHG emissions by the equivalent of 210,000 vehicles. This fundamental success could not be delivered without a strong baseline within the company, and one of Mr. Grey's proudest achievements with IGPC Ethanol Inc. is the creation from scratch of a strong, innovative, business-minded team. "We've taken a group of very raw individuals from the street and built an operations and business team that I would stack up against anybody else in the business,” says Mr. Grey. “When we started the facility we didn't have the luxury of experienced personnel so there was a very steep learning curve, but once that was in place, we were able to begin improving efficiencies within the technology of the plant itself." The new Fiber Separation Technology™ is not the only improvement IGPC Etha-


nol Inc. is excited about. "Corn is a huge component of our cost so any fraction of a percentage of yield improvement that can be made through better practices will have a direct impact on the bottom line," explains Mr. Grey. “Other improvements such as our co-generation project will allow us to produce our own electricity making us less reliant on Ontario Hydro, while reducing our energy costs.“ NEW POSSIBILITIES With the new FST technology, there is the prospect of creating a bioeconomy, a term used by Mr. Grey when referring to other products that come out of the starch conversion platform that ethanol production belongs to. Having become experts in one part of this platform, IGPC Ethanol Inc. is now able to look at other products of starch

conversion such as organic acids, food ingredients, and even other types of fuel that the platform offers. At present there is an in-house investigation into the potential for creating food-grade Omega3 oils. With the opening up of these possibilities, IGPC Ethanol Inc. continues to build value for its corn suppliers and its shareholders. It’s not just the various links in the supply chain that have benefitted. Southwestern Ontario has been hit hard in recent years due to the 2008 financial crisis and its impact on Canada’s auto sector, as well as the demise of the Ontario Tobacco industry several years ago. The presence of IGPC Ethanol Inc. in Aylmer, Ontario, has been a boon for the region's economy. By remaining local, employing locally, and utilizing local services, the company has played a small but notable part in

ensuring the community benefits from its operations. FUTURE HARVEST Looking forward, there is nothing but possibilities in IGPC Ethanol’s future. From being electrically self-sufficient to increasing its capacity, the fledgling company is just beginning its story. "We have a very active business development team in the company now and they have a very long laundry list of potential opportunities that we are looking at in the bioeconomy space," says Mr. Grey. "Everything from human and animal food products to industrial chemicals may be possible with little more than investment in new technology. Our strategy is very aggressive and we will continue pursuing it as actively as we possibly can." c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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GALE’S GAS BARS

GALE’S GAS BARS LTD. HAS MADE A COMMITMENT TO ENSURING A GREENER AND MORE SUSTAINABLE FUTURE.

JESSICA (GALE) FRIESEN. PHOTO CREDIT: BRANDON GRAY.

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COLLIER-RD: GALES LOCATION.

BOB GALE, JESSICA (GALE) FRIESEN.

GALES CITY-DELIVERY TRUCK.

GALE’S GAS GOES

GREENER

Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Jessica Friesen, CEO of Gale’s Gas Bars Ltd., about the considerable efforts they’ve made to promote renewable fuels and sustainability throughout the Niagara region. By Thomas Massey.

In 1967 Bob Gale Sr. made a practical investment in a property to maintain the trucks he used for his then job as a home heating oil agent. The site, which had an attached Sunoco gas station, was converted into the first site of Gale’s Gas Bars and has become the busiest corner in the Niagara region. Jessica Friesen, current CEO and the third generation of the Gale family involved with Gale’s Gas Bars, tells us of the pride she takes in her work and the impact that work has on the surrounding Niagara community. “We’re very community involved and try to give back to the community as much as we possibly can,” says Ms. Friesen. “The fact that we’ve developed into a third generation business while helping the population of Niagara is a huge accomplishment that we are all particularly proud of.” GOING GREEN Gale’s Gas Bars Ltd. has made a commitment to ensuring a greener and more sustainable future for Canada by becoming a member of the Canadian Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA). The CRFA, a non-profit organization, have taken responsibility for providing Canadians with clean burning ethanol-based fuels and biodiesel, both of which are efficient, renewable, and can help combat climate change and pollution levels. In accordance with CRFA principles, Gale’s Gas Bars has made the switch to E30 fuels at one of their sites, a fantastic example of their commitment to the

Canadian Sustainability cause. E30 fuels are an ethanol-based fuel blend composed of 30% ethanol, with the remaining 70% made up of gasoline or other hydrocarbons. The particular significance of the switch for Gale’s Gas Bars was the fact that they were the first company in Canada with a site that offered E30 to the growing market of flexible-fuel vehicle owners. “We didn’t think it was a big deal when we started with E30,” says Ms. Friesen. “All we knew was that it was something new and that as we have our own terminals here, which we use to blend our own fuels, we had the ability to do it. We had no idea we were going to be the first location in Canada that offered E30. It was because of this that we received the Fuelling Change Award from the CRFA.” The Fuelling Change Award was presented to Gales Gas Bars, as well as Arcade Station and Porter Airlines, at the CRFA’s 1st Annual Canadian Bioeconomy Conference in December 2014. The award recognized their efforts to promote the use of renewable fuels.

gas and more ethanol,” says Ms. Friesen. “The ethanol we use is corn based so it is much more readily available and therefore the price of ethanol is much cheaper and the fuel itself is cheaper. So not only is it better for the environment, but it’s better for your wallet too. It’s also better for your car as it helps it stay cleaner internally than either gasoline or diesel.” LEGACY The Gale family has enjoyed a long and happy relationship with the local Niagara community. Since starting almost 50 years ago, Gales Gas Bars has been able to expand their business throughout the region. The work they’ve done has not only put them on the map as the first Canadian provider of E30 fuel, but has also ensured that they are seen as a positive contributor to the Niagara region, and Canada as a whole. c

THE BENEFITS As well as providing customers with the opportunity to operate and maintain a flexible-fuel vehicle, Gale’s Gas Bars have always done their utmost to help educate the public about the personal and environmental benefits of using ethanol-based fuels. “Well first and foremost, it is more environmentally friendly, you’re using less SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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CANADA CLEAN FUELS

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THE FUTURE OF

BIODIESEL Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Giovanni Angelucci, Vice President at Canada Clean Fuels, about promoting green energy and the future of biofuels. Written by Michael Anjos.

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CANADA CLEAN FUELS gas emissions. It goes way beyond Carbon Dioxide and helps with a whole host of other emissions. Some of the other benefits could include improved lubricity which would lead to increased engine and fuel injector longevity.” The most notable drawback is cost. In many countries biodiesel remains considerably more expensive than its fossil fuel based counterparts, something which was made worse by the recent drop in oil prices. On average biodiesel is currently priced at around 150% of the price of fossil fuel-based diesel, making it less attractive for potential customers. “Everyone is very green conscious,” explains Mr. Angelucci, “but everyone is also conscious of their margins. It’s tough to get somebody to pay 5 or 10 percent more for a biodiesel blend when their profit margins are only 5 or 10 percent or less.” Canada Clean Fuels is aware that switching to biodiesel may currently be difficult financially, which is why the company goes to great lengths to reduce the effect biodiesel prices may have on the customer and help ease the transition to cleaner and more sustainable fuel. One of the ways they are encouraging customers to use biodiesel is by lowering some of their own margins, and as a result, taking some of the hit from Canada Clean Fuels has been providing clean, renewable fuel to their many customers for the last 13 years. Canada Clean Fuels was one of the first companies to bring biodiesel into the Canadian market, having been doing so since successfully piloting a project in 2002 with Toronto Hydro, the largest municipal electricity distribution company in Canada. Today Canada Clean Fuels is one of the largest distributors of biodiesel in Ontario. THE COST OF CLEAN ENERGY Giovanni Angelucci, Vice President of Canada Clean Fuels, hopes to use the company’s success in Ontario to promote a greener alternative to the country’s mainstream fuel source. “Biofuels will not quickly replace fossil fuels, but the two can work together over time,” says Mr. Angelucci. “The benefits of biodiesel make it a good alternative environmentally and in terms of fuel quality. Using biodiesel also requires no upfront investment or changes to infrastructure. Granted, it needs to be handled, blended and distributed properly by people that know what they are doing, but companies like ours that have gone through those growing pains exist. The obvious advantage of biodiesel is that it reduces greenhouse 22 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE


the increased cost. This way the company shares the burden and the customer isn’t left to bear the brunt of the price difference. GOING THE EXTRA MILE In an effort to invigorate and incentivize the growth of the biofuels industry, the Canadian government has issued several mandates over the years which have aimed to establish a minimum percentage of biofuels which must be blended into conventional fossil fuels used in transportation. Ontario is remarkably advanced when it comes to promoting and facilitating sustainable changes to industry practices. It therefore comes as no surprise that as well as introducing a cap and trade to try to cap emissions, the Ontario government has put forward its own mandate to use a higher blend of biodiesel and ethanol than required by federal mandate. “We’ve kind of been working with that mindset,” says Mr. Angelucci. “That being said, because of

those [mandates] they have a very stringent building policy; Toronto’s building policy is 25% above the minimum, and with our own head office we went 25% above that.” Canada Clean Fuels regularly goes above and beyond what is required in pursuit of more environmentally friendly business practices. This dedication to greener business extends to how they develop their office space: “We put in

lights that draw the least amount of energy, we put in a skylight and a whole forest of bamboo trees within the building, we used geothermal energy, and we reinforced the roof so we could have solar panels,” says Mr. Angelucci. “We’re trying to do every little bit that we can, the more you do the more it reduces your carbon footprint as a whole, we even have a white roof to reflect any solar energy which doesn’t hit the pan-

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CANADA CLEAN FUELS

IN 2013 THEY WERE AWARDED THE FUELING CHANGE AWARD BY THE CANADIAN RENEWABLE FUELS ASSOCIATION.

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els.” Furthermore the insulation that was installed within the building has a very high R-value (thermal resistance) which means it effectively traps heat in the winter and keeps it out in the summer. This ensures that they use as little energy on heating and air conditioning as possible. THE FUTURE Canada Clean Fuels has achieved recognition in the industry for its efforts to provide cleaner and greener fuel to its customers. In 2013 they were awarded the Fueling Change Award by the Canadian Renewable Fuels Association for their achievements in promoting the use of renewable fuels. “We continue to do everything we can and we’re

going to try to do more,” says Mr. Angelucci. “The biggest goal is to try and bring the cost of biodiesel in line on an economic front to make the pitch easier for our sales guys. Regardless we try to be efficient in our routes, efficient in our blendings, and efficient in our purchases to keep the cost as low as possible. We split the difference with the customer; we get a little bit, they get a little bit, and in the end we get more biodiesel on the market. It’s still a very niche product but I think over time, especially because it can be manufactured, I don’t see why it can’t grow. The right technological advance or invention and all of a sudden you may be able to produce biodiesel cheaper than you can dig it out of the ground.” c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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Q&A DEVIN REDLICH

Devin Redlich

Owner, Arcade Station

DEVIN REDLICH, OWNER OF ARCADE STATION, AND BUSINESS PARTNER AMIR NAZARY.

Can you tell us about the history of Arcade Station? The station itself has been around for 50+ years and has been operated under a number of different brands, both independent and chains. Myself and three partners entered into a lease with the property owner last summer to open Arcade Station with the intention of positioning our business as the only retail E85 distributor in Western 26 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Canada. We also sell the same fuels as any other gas station (Regular, Premium, and Diesel) but our unique value is in the E85. The desire to make E85 available locally was driven by the personal need of one of the partners in the business. He’s a very active participant in the local high-performance automotive community. He and many of his fellow enthusiasts were driving across the border


to Seattle to buy E85 as their high-performance tuning requires the higher octane characteristics of E85 relative to readily available petroleum. His desire to make E85 available locally was the catalyst for the formation of the business. What are the advantages of E85 Ethanol fuel? At a high level, there are two value propositions to E85. The first value is to the high performance automotive tuning community. For those who are passionate about automotive tuning, one of the hurdles to extracting maximum performance from a vehicle is the quality of the fuel. It’s very easy to run up against the limitations of even premium fuel for someone who is trying to aggressively tune their car. E85 has performance characteristics that make it the equivalent of a 100 octane petroleum fuel while at the same time burning at a much lower temperature. E85 provides these characteristics at a cost much lower than racing fuel, making it an attractive option for the high performance community. The second value proposition is sustainability. Ethanol is a renewable resource and can be derived from a number of different base components based on what is readily available regionally. In North America, most ethanol is currently derived from corn. Deriving ethanol from corn is actually a win-win for the producer since the by-product of the ethanol extraction process is animal feed, which is what the bulk of corn produced in North America is used for anyway. In other parts of the world, ethanol is derived from sugar cane and other crops that are better suited to grow in the local geography. Looking to the future, there is research into bacterial processes that can convert carbon dioxide to ethanol. Science will continue to find ways to create ethanol, while the only way to make more petroleum is more holes in the ground. It’s worth noting that you can’t just put E85 into any vehicle. The vehicle needs to be specifically designed to support this alternative fuel, either from the manufacturer or via aftermarket modification. It probably goes without saying that big Oil doesn’t care much for the idea of supporting alternative fuels, but regardless there are millions of cars on the road today that support E85 and whose drivers could be exercising their option to utilize an alternative, renewable, ecologically friendly fuel source if only the fuel were available at the pump. Arcade Station makes that option available to drivers in Metro Vancouver. How are the Canadian Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA) helping to promote the use of biofuels? The CRFA has been actively involved in helping Arcade Station get our message out since we first launched last summer. Their media contacts and network have been very valuable in helping us with the missionary work we need to do to spread the word about the existence of this alternative fuel and its benefits. Arcade has landed a number of newspaper, magazine, and television spots as a result of the CRFA’s efforts to promote the retail availability of a more environmentally friendly alternative to gasoline. How did you feel about receiving the Fueling Change Award at the first annual Canadian Bioeconomy Conference? We were all very pleasantly surprised to be one of the recipients of the Fueling Change award. Many industry awards are given out based on who lobbies the hardest but this came as a complete surprise to us and has a sense of legitimacy to it since we won based

on the work we’re doing, not based on how hard we campaigned for recognition. How are you trying to make Arcade Station a valuable part of the West Vancouver Community? We’ve actually dedicated a lot of time and resources to becoming an embedded part of our neighborhood. Primarily, we’ve committed to delivering a consistent, predictable business which was something that was lacking in that neighborhood over recent history and which we’re working hard to deliver. We’re open 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., 7 days a week. Our station is entirely full-serve and our station attendants are tasked with being friendly and engaging. Over our year in existence we’ve held several community BBQs where we’ve invited the locals to join us for a smokie and a soda. The fact that we continue to sell regular, premium, and Diesel in addition to E85 is also entirely to service the local market. In fact, Arcade Station is the only station in the entire District of West Vancouver that sells diesel which is something that we consistently receive positive feedback on. Of course our business model is based on making E85 a success and to do so we need to reach out beyond the borders of West Vancouver, however we’ll always ensure that we’re a good neighbor in our community. What achievements are you especially proud of? The fact that we sell E85 at all is a remarkable achievement. There are no E85 wholesale suppliers in Western Canada so we have to source our ethanol from the U.S., then string together a supply chain of our own making to ultimately get the fuel into peoples’ cars. The station’s 50+ year old infrastructure needed a number of upgrades to ensure that it is compatible with high-ethanol fuels and that work was neither cheap nor easy, however we were able to go from nothing to becoming the only retail distributor of E85 in Canada west of Ontario in just a few months and that’s something we take a lot of pride in. What are your plans for the future? Our biggest challenge right now is that our location isn’t ideal for serving all of Metro Vancouver with E85 so primarily we’re interested in expanding our geographic reach though partnerships with complementary businesses. We already have a barrel shipping program for providing E85 to enthusiasts in other parts of British Columbia and Alberta and we’d like to work on making retail E85 available beyond West Vancouver. We’re under no delusion that we’re going to be the second coming of Rockefeller, but we feel like there’s unmet market demand for E85 in and around Metro Vancouver and we want to be the firm to fill that need. c SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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CEA MANITOBA HYDRO’S KETTLE GENERATING STATION, BUILT ON THE LOWER NELSON RIVER, IS THE SECOND LARGEST HYDROELECTRIC GENERATING STATION IN THE PROVINCE. PHOTO CREDIT: MANITOBA HYDRO.

POWERING SUSTAINABILITY

A foreword by Channa Perera, Director, Sustainable Development, at the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) On behalf of the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA), I am pleased to write this foreword to the ‘Powering Sustainability’ series for Sustainable Business Magazine. CEA and its member utilities have a long-standing history of leadership on sustainability. In 1997, the Association and its members launched the Environmental Commitment and Responsibility (ECR) Program to reduce the adverse environmental 28 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

impacts of our operations and be more efficient in the use of natural resources. This commitment was further strengthened in 2009 when the association launched a more dynamic Sustainable ElectricityTM Program covering the three pillars of sustainable development (environmental, social, and economic). Already, CEA members are improving their overall sustainability performance. Air


SASKPOWER IS LEADING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST POST-COMBUSTION CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (CCS) PROJECT—THE FIRST IN THE WORLD TO FULLY INTEGRATE CCS TECHNOLOGY WITH COMMERCIAL SCALE COAL-FIRED GENERATION. PHOTO CREDIT: SASKPOWER.

emissions are at an all-time low, engagement levels with employees, local communities, stakeholders, and Aboriginal Peoples have significantly improved, and investments to renew and modernize infrastructure are also on the rise. The utility success stories (initiatives) presented in this ‘Powering Sustainability’ series will help further illustrate how the sector is integrating sustainability into its activities. I hope you read these

stories with interest and share your thoughts with us so that we can continue to improve our performance. As a sector, we recognize that sustainability is a journey and we still have a long way to go. We want to work with you to make this journey a success. Let’s partner for a sustainable future. Read more at www.SustainableElectricity.ca and share your thoughts with me at perera@electricity.ca c

NOVA SCOTIA POWER IS MOVING AHEAD WITH A NUMBER OF RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS. PHOTO CREDIT: NOVA SCOTIA POWER.

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HYDRO ONE

FIRST NATIONS, MÉTIS AND INUIT EMPLOYEES ARE AN IMPORTANT PART OF HYDRO ONE’S WORKFORCE AND THE COMPANY HAS DEDICATED POLICIES AND RESOURCES FOCUSED ON EMPLOYMENT OUTREACH.

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POWER TO THE MASSES Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Richard Pringle, Manager of Corporate Responsibility and Community Investment at Hydro One, about being a Sustainable Electricity Company™.

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HYDRO ONE JIM BURPEE, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE CANADIAN ELECTRICITY ASSOCIATION PRESENTS CARMINE MARCELLO, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF HYDRO ONE, WITH THE SUSTAINABLE ELECTRICITY COMPANY CERTIFICATE.

As a company responsible for 97% of electricity transmission and whose distribution system spans approximately 75% of the province in Ontario, Canada, it is no surprise that Hydro One is recognized as a leader in the sector. Wholly owned by the Province of Ontario and directly or indirectly responsible for nearly every residential, commercial, and industrial client in the province, Hydro One has developed a caring and

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forward-looking attitude. This is made clear, for example, by two recent developments that Richard Pringle, Manager of Corporate Responsibility and Community Investment, shares with Sustainable Business Magazine. “Our work on the Bruce to Milton Biodiversity Project, and a commercial partnership model with the Saugeen Ojibway Nations (SON), are both groundbreaking approaches to our type of business,” says Mr. Pringle.

“They are consistent with our values and our goal of becoming the leading utility provider in Canada. They really define our way of doing business as very different to other companies.” WINNING ENDEAVORS During January 2015, Hydro One was designated a Sustainable Electricity Company (SEC) by the Canadian Electricity Associ-


THE HYDRO ONE AIRSTAIR IS UNIQUE TOOL USED FOR DROPPING LINE MAINTAINERS ONTO TRANSMISSION STRUCTURES WITH A HELICOPTER. SAFETY BY DESIGN IS THE FUNDAMENTAL GUIDING PRINCIPAL USED BY HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT SE STAFF WHEN DESIGNING, EVALUATING AND IMPLEMENTING NEW EQUIPMENT, PROCEDURES AND TRAINING AT HYDRO ONE.

A HYDRO ONE TRANSMISSION TOWER NEAR EAST GARAFRAXA ON THE BRUCE-TO-MILTON TRANSMISSION LINE.

HYDRO ONE’S FLEET HAS WELCOMED MORE HYBRID AND SMALLER GHG FOOTPRINT VEHICLES TO THE FLEET, ENCOURAGING EMPLOYEES TO THINK ABOUT THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE JOB.

ation (CEA) in recognition of excellence across three core areas: Managing environmental impact, delivering social and societal benefit, and achieving strong economic performance. They are only the fourth company to have received the SEC certification since the program was established in 2009. The certification demonstrates their position as a leader and has formally recognized for the first time a culture of sustainability

that has been embedded in Hydro One for many years. This trailblazing spirit, however, is no better demonstrated than in their work on reinforcing the Bruce to Milton Transmission Line. The connection between Bruce Nuclear Generating Station and Hydro One’s switching station in Milton, located 40 km west of Downtown Toronto within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), required

upgrading due to increased input from renewable resources along its 112 mile length. Initiated in 2007 and completed in 2013, Hydro One twinned the 500 kilovolt line in order to double its capacity and ultimately make it capable of up to 3000 megawatts of transmission. As a company with focus on sustainability and community relations, Hydro One could not undertake such a major project without facing

ZERO MAINTENANCE AND IT SAVES ENERGY TOO? A world leader in LED technology, Dialight invented LED tower lighting over 15 years ago. In addition to providing an expected 15-20 year maintenance-free life, Dialight LED tower lighting uses 95% less energy than incandescent systems. So in addition to being environmentally friendly, there are some very good business reasons for upgrading your tower lighting today. Dialight and RVA are proud suppliers of LED tower lighting to Hydro One. 5240 Finch Ave. E., Unit 10, Toronto ON M1S 5A3 Tel: 416-292-7878 Fax: 416-352-7558 www.rvalightingandmasts.com

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HYDRO ONE

“THE BASIC PRINCIPLE IS TO AVOID NET LOSS BUT OUR AIM IS AN EXPANSION OF BIODIVERSITY.”

HYDRO ONE WORKERS NEAR BAIE FINE IN KILLARNEY PROVINCIAL PARK IN ONTARIO.

a multitude of considerations. Two of the most important were the transmission line’s impact on biodiversity and its presence within SON territory. A NEW WAY FORWARD In order to tackle the issues surrounding biodiversity impact, Hydro One used a familiar model in a brand new way. “Rather

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than soliciting feedback from stakeholders, we actively engaged them,” explains Mr. Pringle. “There are a lot of stakeholders and land owners that we needed to co-operate with including local conservation authorities, the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, and Municipal Planning Departments, and of course, we also included the First Nations, the SON and Métis peoples.

What we did first was bring them all to the table and explain that we aimed to develop a brand new methodology that will respect and value the habitats lost, through clearing of the right of way, before further determining the value on what those habitat losses might look like. Looking to build on that, we said that we wanted a methodology that would actually enhance biodiversity along the path of the line. The basic principle is to avoid net loss but our aim is an expansion of biodiversity.” “We asked all groups involved to submit proposals that would meet our guidelines and evaluated each one against criteria that had been developed. The strongest proposals were selected and funded. Approaching the issue in this way created a very collaborative atmosphere that allowed us to work directly with the First Nations communities, organizations, and stakehold-


HYDRO ONE AND THE GRAND RIVER CONSERVATION AUTHORITY PARTNERED ON TWO ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROJECTS TO ENHANCE IMPORTANT WILDLIFE HABITAT AT THE LUTHER MARSH MANAGEMENT AREA AS PART OF HYDRO ONE’S BRUCE TO MILTON BIODIVERSITY INITIATIVE.

ers involved to create a plan that respected sustainability and biodiversity. It wasn’t just an open house for people to shout ideas at us; we sat down with them and took what they had to say seriously. As a result we had one of the fastest ever environmental assessment approvals for a project of this size. Furthermore we completed it with a lower cost than previous habitat restoration programs of a similar size.” In parallel to this process came a groundbreaking agreement with SON that has, in many ways, a far broader impact than the Hydro One biodiversity project. The widespread presence of First Nations across Canada means development projects often run through First Nations territories and typically this requires companies to negotiate for rights of way. Hydro One sought to engage SON with a fresh outlook in order to create an amicable agreement

THE LIMEHOUSE CONSERVATION AREA NEAR GEORGETOWN, ONTARIO, WAS IDENTIFIED AS A PRIORITY SITE FOR HYDRO ONE’S BRUCE-TO-MILTON BIODIVERSITY INITIATIVE. FUNDING PROVIDED EDUCATION TO LOCAL VOLUNTEERS AND STUDENTS AND ENGAGED THEM IN REMOVING INVASIVE SPECIES LIKE GARLIC MUSTARD AND NON-NATIVE HONEYSUCKLES.

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HYDRO ONE

EMPLOYEES ARE ABLE TO PARTICIPATE IN ONGOING DISCUSSIONS ON HOW THE COMPANY CAN IMPROVE.

A HYDRO ONE EMPLOYEE WEARING THE APPRENTICE’S SIGNATURE GREEN HARDHAT. SKILLED TRADES MAKE UP A LARGE PORTION OF HYDRO ONE’S WORKFORCE AND THE COMPANY OFFERS A RIGOROUS APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM THAT INCLUDES WORKING ALONGSIDE EXPERIENCED HYDRO ONE EMPLOYEES.

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HYDRO ONE WORKERS ON A TRANSMISSION TOWER.

that would benefit both parties and thus went into long-term negotiations with SON to achieve this. What came out at the end was a model that had never before been attempted: A new company, B2M Limited Partnership, was created in a commercial partnership agreement. B2M Limited Partnership has two shareholders, SON with 34% and Hydro One with a 66% controlling share. With this, Hydro One proves it is interested in sharing the benefits of its success with the SON while the First Nation communities show there are new ways of engaging with utility companies.

ONE OF 4,000 SEEDLINGS PLANTED AS PART OF THE BRUCE-TO-MILTON BIODIVERSITY INITIATIVE AT A FORMER QUARRY ON THE NIAGARA ESCARPMENT ON APRIL 30, 2013. MORE THAN 300 LOCAL RESIDENTS VOLUNTEERED FOR THE PLANTING, MAKING IT A TRUE COMMUNITY EVENT.

BEHIND THE SCENES It is no surprise that Hydro One has been awarded SEC designation. What has been accomplished on the Bruce to Milton Transmission Line project is just one case study representing the deeply-rooted sustainability and social responsibility practices which have taken hold in the transmission and distribution company. Present in the company, for example, is a biodiversity advisory committee tasked with improving operational practices. It engages employees from the various lines of business within Hydro One that can affect, or be affected by, biodiversity issues.

LEARNING FOR THE FUTURE Having already set impressive standards, Hydro One is not about to relax. For example, it is currently in the process of completing its second LEED-approved facility. “We will also take part in GTA West, a project to expand the capacity in Toronto’s fastest growing region. On all of these future developments we want to implement the best practices learned on the Bruce to Milton development and ensure we are once again doing the best we can, in terms of corporate social responsibility and sustainability, for all of Ontario.” c

HYDRO ONE’S ELECTRICAL SAFETY EDUCATION PROGRAM.

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NEWFOUNDLAND POWER

COMMUNITY Sustainable Business Magazine speaks to Jason Dalton, Environmental Management Representative (EMR) for Newfoundland Power, about how their work is benefiting the environment and communities in Newfoundland and Labrador. Written by Thomas Massey.

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PCB BUSHING REPLACEMENTS.

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NEWFOUNDLAND POWER NEWFOUNDLAND POWER LINECREW USING CLICKMOBILE.

For over 125 years, Newfoundland Power has generated and distributed power safely and reliably to the island portion of Newfoundland and Labrador. In addition to working hard to deliver a high standard of customer service, they have also placed an increased emphasis on trying to contribute to a more sustainable Canada. The Company is committed to promoting environmental awareness and stewardship, supporting energy efficiency programs and being prepared in case of environmental emergencies. Newfoundland Power purchases most of the power they sell from Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro, a Crown Corporation who specialize in producing hydroelectric power. “We are very fortunate to have access to a clean and renewable resource such as hydroelectric power. Newfoundland Power operates 23 small hydro and 5 standby gas 40 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

turbine and diesel generating plants,” explains Jason Dalton, Environmental Management Representative. “Our electrical system has over 11,000 km of transmission and distribution lines and 130 substations delivering power through a network that includes over 50,000 units of oil-filled electrical equipment. With all of this equipment there are inevitably accidental oil spills and oil releases which typically are the main contributor to our operations impacting the environment. As a result we have proactive inspection and equipment replacement programs in place and we are ready to act promptly to contain and clean up oil spills when they occur”. COMMITMENT TO THE ENVIRONMENT As well as being prepared in case of an emergency, Mr. Dalton explains some

GARY SMITH, PRESIDENT & CEO.


OSPREY NEST PLATFORM CONSTRUCTION.

SUSTAINABLE ELECTRICITY IS OUR RESPONSE TO THE CHALLENGE OF CREATING A SUSTAINABLE TOMORROW.

of the things Newfoundland Power are doing to lessen the utility’s impacts on the environment. “We have completed projects that increase our hydroelectric production such as installing more efficient equipment, creating additional storage, and reducing water spillage. We have an ongoing program of replacing mild steel constructed poletop transformers with stainless steel units that significantly reduce the risk of oil spills caused by rust due to our corrosive salt water environment. We also have programs focusing on corporate waste reduction and recycling and recently implemented technology to improve the efficiency of job scheduling and truck dispatch that reduced our overall vehicle fleet fuel consumption. In terms of minimizing negative operational impacts on the environment, these are some of the

things we have been doing as a Company to meet our environmental commitments.” Newfoundland Power are emphasizing their commitment to help make the electrical energy industry more sustainable and environmentally friendly through their involvement with the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA). The CEA defines itself as “the voice of the electricity industry” and targets six key areas where its member companies should strive to improve: Infrastructure, energy efficiency, technology, regulation, environment, and security. To help companies become more sustainable the CEA launched the Sustainable Electricity Program. “Newfoundland Power has been a member of CEA for the last forty years, and has participated in the Sustainable Electricity Program, formerly the Environmental Commitment Program,

since 2001,” says Mr. Dalton. “Sustainable electricity is our response to the challenge of creating a sustainable tomorrow and proves we are committed to the environmental and socio-economic practices and principles of sustainable development.” COMMUNITY AWARENESS Newfoundland Power educates customers about how they can have a positive impact on the local environment. “One of the things we feel is very important at Newfoundland Power is partnering with communities and supporting projects that preserve and protect the environment.” says Mr. Dalton. “We are committed to supporting projects that will enhance green spaces in local communities and that create awareness of the importance of preserving our environment for future generations.” A part of this comSUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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NEWFOUNDLAND POWER NEWFOUNDLAND POWER LINECREW, TREE TRIMMING.

AT NEWFOUNDLAND POWER WE UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE OF PROTECTING THE ENVIRONMENT FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.

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PENSTOCK REPLACEMENT.

munity pledge is the Newfoundland Power Environmental Commitment Program, which was developed in November of 1997. The program aims to enhance environmental awareness through the actions and support of Newfoundland Power employees. Their job is to contact schools, government organizations, and environmental organizations to identify opportunities to promote awareness of environmental issues and foster environmental stewardship. As a result of this networking we have established an annual celebration we call EnviroFest. EnviroFest is a public awareness campaign, held during National Environment Week that encourages local environmentally friendly organizations, interest groups, and partners to collaborate and partner in activities that raise awareness of the importance of envi-

ronmental and sustainability issues. “EnviroFest is the cornerstone of our environmental commitment program,” says Mr. Dalton. “It is an annual celebration that provides fun, hands-on support for initiatives that encourage positive environmental action.” MAKING A DIFFERENCE Newfoundland Power is committed to making sure their business operations and community projects benefit the citizens of the province. They are ensuring their facilities and equipment are safe and reliable, they are using renewable energy sources, they are promoting energy efficiency, they are reducing waste production, they are prepared in case of emergencies, and through their Environmental Commitment Program and events such as EnviroFest they are rais-

ing awareness about environmental issues. Through their operations and initiatives, Newfoundland Power are contributing to a more sustainable Canadian energy industry. "At Newfoundland Power we understand the importance of protecting the environment for future generations,” explains Mr. Dalton. “Through our environmental programs and our promotion of energy efficiency with our customers, we are helping to protect the environment and operate our business in a responsible and sustainable manner. We are committed to the environmental and socio-economic practices and principles of sustainable development. We are achieving this thanks to the commitment and efforts of our employees and customers, and our understanding of the need for a greener tomorrow.” c

GARY MURRAY, VP OF ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS AT ENVIROFEST.

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AASHE SFSU-CHANT LEADER MICHAEL ZAMBRANO GETS READY TO KICK THINGS OFF.

RAIN GARDENS AROUND THE UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON CAMPUS ARE DESIGNED TO COLLECT, RETAIN AND SLOWER ABSORB WATER RUNOFF FROM SURROUNDING SURFACES OR ACT AS A NATURAL FILTER SO WATER IS CLEAN BY THE TIME IT ENTERS A STORM SEWER.

SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY TO END COAL INVESTMENTS: THE SFSU FOUNDATION HAS AGREED TO NOT INVEST IN COMPANIES “WITH SIGNIFICANT PRODUCTION OR USE OF COAL AND TAR SANDS.” THE FOUNDATION WILL ALSO SEEK TO LIMIT INVESTMENTS IN FOSSIL FUEL COMPANIES.

SUSTAINABLE

CAMPUSES A foreword by Meghan Fay Zahniser, AASHE Executive Director

MEGHAN FAY ZAHNISER, AASHE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR.

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The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) supports and encourages the advancement of sustainability at higher education institutions through programs such as the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS), professional development offerings, and an annual conference & expo. STARS is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance. This comprehensive assessment tool helps institutions understand exactly how they are performing, as well as identifying areas for improvement related to sustainability in academics, operations, and administrative efforts on campus. With more than 650 institutions registered for STARS, it has transformed the way campuses track and monitor their sustainability progress. We have institu-

tions that participate in STARS annually and are able to see their improvements through an increased score. Institutions, both national and international, work toward a Bronze, Silver, Gold, or Platinum rating, or they may opt to be recognized as a STARS Reporter where they only report data without receiving a rating. In addition, given that transparency is critical to sustainability reporting, all STARS data is made available to the public which easily enables our members to share information and best practices. Professional development opportunities also boost sustainability efforts and are one of the top member offerings and benefits. Members can access webinars for free and receive discounts for workshops, STARS, and conference registrations. Members also have access to the Resource Center. The online Resource Center is a comprehensive


BABSON UNIVERSITY.

DELTA COLLEGE LIVING WALL.

source of information on sustainability in higher education. It provides administrators, faculty, operations staff, students, and other campus stakeholders with the tools, information, and guidance they need to lead a sustainability transformation on their campus. We are also looking forward to welcoming AASHE members and others in the campus sustainability community to the AASHE 2015 Conference & Expo, themed Transforming Sustainability Education, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on Oct. 25-28. The annual conference allows everyone the opportunity to share and exchange ideas on the expansion of

sustainability efforts, as well as providing a platform for feedback. Attendees also have an opportunity to hear from internationally recognized sustainability leaders such as last year’s featured keynote speaker Annie Leonard, Greenpeace Executive Director and creator of “The Story of Stuff Project”. Founded in 2005, AASHE celebrates its tenth year throughout 2015, and remains committed to inspiring and catalyzing higher education to lead the global sustainability transformation through the aforementioned efforts and many other exciting celebratory initiatives planned throughout the year. See the AASHE website for information on these

initiatives including live tweet sessions and a video campaign kicking off at the conference in Minneapolis! I’m excited to build on past successes from my six years at AASHE. It is vital that we remain focused on providing support and additional resources to empower higher education institutions to be the foundation for a thriving, equitable, and ecologically healthy world. Sustainable Business Magazine’s continued support highlighting sustainable campuses is pivotal to furthering the campus sustainability community and AASHE’s vision, and we are thrilled to continue the partnership, especially throughout this monumental year for AASHE. c VIRGINIA TECH.

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CHICAGO STUDENTS TEACH DIVERSITY WITH GARDENS.

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY.

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UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO IMMACULATA.

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GOOD CITIZENS Sustainable Business Magazine talks to Michael Catanzaro, Director of Sustainability at the University of San Diego, about how they’re finding new and innovative ways to tackle environmental issues and taking on ambitious sustainability projects. By Thomas Massey.

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UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

A RECYCLING REVOLUTION IS HAPPENING ON THE CAMPUS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO.

Beginning his role as Director of Sustainability at the University of San Diego (USD), Michael Catanzaro contributed to a drastic overhaul of utilities. Retrocommissioning buildings can be challenging, but the upgrades to water and electrical systems were vital to USD reducing its bills and improving energy efficiency. Upgrades to electrical systems, as well as more efficient bathroom fixtures and fittings, and the installation of a smart wireless sprinkler system, represent a significant investment in more efficient equipment which has subsequently produced savings of approximately one million dollars per year. “In 2010, we made an 48 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

$8.5 million investment in energy efficiency projects that yielded a 20% reduction in our energy usage,” explains Mr. Catanzaro. “In terms of electric, we achieved a KW

reduction of 6 million KW hours annually. We also managed to reduce our water usage by 26 million gallons, which represents a 24% reduction of our total water consumption. That was just as I started as Director of Sustainability, so straight away we had embarked upon projects that produced a massive payback, which was terrific.” As well as concerted efforts to upgrade and retrofit existing buildings, the University of San Diego has set LEED Silver as the minimum standard for all new construction projects. Mr. Catanzaro explains how he’s taking pride in one of the most recent building projects, and how the efficiency of the


EWASTE PICKUP.

NEW CHALLENGES A recycling revolution is happening on the campus of the University of San Diego. Mr. Catanzaro likes to call recycling “the most tangible form of sustainability,” as it is arguably the most easily performed and it is very noticeable when recycling options are unavailable. The recycling program aims to turn USD into a Zero Waste campus, and while

significant progress has been made, there are still several potential problems. “There are so many issues with zero waste that are a challenge,” says Mr. Catanzaro. “We’ve done the assessment and we’re currently at about 60% diversion, which is great. One of the bigger challenges we will have to face however is shifting the culture; trying to get people to think about what they are bring-

STUDENTS TABLING.

building will produce financial rewards as well as energy and utility savings. “The newest building project, the Beyster Institute of Nursing Research, is actually being built right now,” says Mr. Catanzaro. “What we did with that building was we worked with the local utility on a program called Savings by Design. We worked with them from the start to design the most efficient building we could. By doing this we maximized our rebates and incentives to really ensure we were building to the highest possible standard. I’m very proud of that project as it represents a shift in thinking in terms of making sustainability a real priority.”

GREEN OFFICE CERTIFICATION.

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UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO EWASTE PICKUP.

ing on to campus. The University is working with its suppliers to reduce the amount of styrofoam and packaging on products coming in, but the biggest hurdle will undoubtedly be the final 15%. We will have to work hard to educate students about what they bring onto campus. We obviously can’t control what they buy, so education will play a large part there.” The University of San Diego is making strides towards becoming a Zero Waste campus using recycling of traditional materials such as paper, plastic, and metals. However, they are also extending their SOLAR PANELS.

50 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

efforts to less-conventional alternative materials. USD recently received attention from the national press for their innovative Electronics Recycling Center (ERC). The ERC program was an AASHE case study award winner and was the first place to provide six day a week collection for e-waste in San Diego. “Prior to the opening of the ERC there was a place that was open once a week for old electronics, or once a month the city landfill would provide collection drives for e- waste,” explains Mr. Catanzaro. “There was definitely a community need, and the worst thing that can happen is that


“IT IS SO IMPORTANT TO EMPHASIZE THE FACT THAT WE THINK IT IS CRITICAL FOR STUDENTS TO COME OUT OF UNIVERSITY WITH SOME ENVIRONMENTAL LITERACY.”

DORM ENERGY READING.

this stuff ends up in landfills. People ended up throwing it away as there wasn’t an easy solution. We wanted to make it easy for people to do the right thing.” Since beginning four years ago, the ERC program has continued to become more and more successful. The first year earned $17,000, the second year $78,000, and last year it collected $185,000. This money is used in different ways throughout the campus and the local community. 70% is used to bolster Mr. Catanzaro’s budget for sustainability projects, 20% goes towards funding student scholarships on campus, while the final 10% is donated to local community projects. “It is very rewarding to know that we are taking something that is actually an environmental liability and turning it into a philanthropic opportunity for people,” says Mr. Catanzaro. “In a way, it actually counts as a donation to the university because we can take that equipment and monetize it in any number of

ways. For instance, if we sell it by the pound to be recycled, there are a lot of precious metals in electronics such as gold, silver, and platinum. Did you know that it is seventeen times more effective to mine electronic waste for gold than it is to mine gold ore?” THE BIG PICTURE The primary focus of the University of San Diego remains providing a top quality education for their students. However sustainability is playing an increasingly important role in this education as students get actively involved with programs and initiatives which are available on campus. In the near future students will also be able to engage with new sustainability related curriculum revisions. Mr. Catanzaro explains how these changes will be important for students at USD and for the future of sustainability efforts. “It is so important to emphasize the fact that we think it is critical for students to

come out of university with some environmental literacy; some understanding of the impacts of things such as global warming. Students need to understand why sustainability makes good business sense; that thinking about the impact of ones actions is good business practice and being a good citizen. This is truly central to who we are.” c EWASTE WAREHOUSE.

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SOLAR ONTARIO 2015

SOLAR ONTARIO 2015 Between May 25th and May 27th 2015, the Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) held the fifth annual Solar Ontario conference. The event brought together 300 industry professionals and stakeholders for important discussions about the present and future of solar energy in Ontario.

People from Canada, the US, Europe, and China gathered at Niagara Falls to discuss public feedback about the industry, a brand new Cap-and-Trade scheme, and the future opportunities which will be created by an expanding sector. As in previous years the emphasis was on bringing together experts in their field in order to build better communication through shared knowledge and topics of discussion; unlike previous years Solar Ontario 2015 was able to offer an 52 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

expanded program in a purely conference format, enabling attendees to delve deeper into topics and issues currently affecting the North American solar energy industry. TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANTAGES The conference was opened by speeches from Jim Diodati, Mayor of Niagara Falls, Bob Waddell, General Manager of Centrosolar Canada and Chair of the CanSIA Board of Directors, and John Gorman,

CanSIA’s President and CEO. The speeches focused largely on new possibilities which have been created by the sector’s recent growth. “The costs of solar are rapidly declining,” said Mr. Gorman, “heralding a new era in clean energy production.” This message was bolstered by JoAnne Butler, Vice President of Market and Resource Development at the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO), when she revealed the sizeable impact solar is making on the


innovation and development of renewable technologies. Over the past year, rapid deployment experience has enabled the sector in Ontario to dramatically decrease capital costs while improved efficiency has helped meet the province’s energy demands. Ms. Butler also explained how storage ability will play an important role in the future: One graph highlighted the substantial increased network demand during a day of rain and fog compared to a day of sunny weather. The possibility of micro-grids which serve very localized neighborhoods, complete with multiple renewable sources and on-site storage, suggests a radically different relationship between consumers and energy in the future. POPULAR APPEAL There is public support for such a future, as revealed by David Herle, Principal Partner of The Gandalf Group, in his presentation

entitled “Ontarians’ Views on Solar Energy, Technology and Policies”. Using data gathered from 837 residents of Ontario who were selected to represent a cross section of the province’s population, The Gandalf Group found job creation and economic well-being were the top priorities throughout the province along with long-term sustainability and a manageable cost of living. More than 58% of people surveyed strongly favored increased use of solar technologies to generate electricity, more than for any other fuel source. More than 8 out of 10 Ontarians agree that there need to be more Government policies to encourage the production of solar energy within Ontario. “Eighty three percent of Ontarians want government policy to ensure electricity regulations that allow more companies to utilize solar power,” said Mr. Herle. “Seventy-seven per cent believe the government should invest in more solar

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SOLAR ONTARIO 2015

power electricity generation and technologies that enable solar power. Additionally 78% of Ontarians agreed that Ontario needs to be a leader in the development of clean energy such as solar in North America.” Two in every three Ontarians support a Cap-and-Trade regulation system, which would help reach these goals. GOVERNMENTAL BACKING In April, just days prior to the May polling, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne announced a Cap-and-Trade system for carbon emissions in the province that would regulate damaging environmental output through financial mechanisms, and 54 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

thus give the market freedom to decide its own methods of pollution reduction. This program was discussed in greater depth at Solar Ontario 2015 by Paula McGarrigle, Managing Director of Solas Energy Consulting, whose presentation outlined how Capand-Trade benefits solar energy producers by enabling them to take advantage of their minimal carbon emissions production. The revenues generated by trading these allowances could be directed to solar and solar enabling technologies. The linking of Ontario’s market to existing markets in the Western Climate Initiative will begin to build a global platform for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Reinforcing Ontario’s commitment to supporting the solar industry, the Deputy Minister for Energy, Serge Imbrogno, outlined a number of new developments currently underway in the province. “Currently we have 1550 megawatts (MW) of solar energy online and another 825 MW contracted and under development; altogether that would be enough to power 300,000 homes,” stated Mr. Imbrogno. “The province remains committed to the Long Term Energy Plan, or LTEP, that we released in 2013. Ontario has set a target of 20,000 MW of renewable generation online by 2025, representing about half of Ontario’s installed capacity. We have made


great progress over the past six years. Your industry and the province have worked together to create thousands of jobs in Ontario. We have created opportunities for home owners, land owners, cooperatives, municipalities, and aboriginal communities, and we have taken the largest climate change initiative in North America by eliminating coal-fired generation. To ensure continued success, providing stability and predictability to Ontario’s solar sector remains a priority.” Mr. Imbrogno went on to outline three major projects: A Large Renewable Procurement (LRP) that targets 140 MW, a Feed-in-Tariff (FIT4) program targeting just over 240 Mw, and a microFIT which continues to target 50 MW. In-depth analyses of existing renewable energy networks in Hawaii, Arizona, and California will

be undertaken as well as lengthy consultations with Ontarian stakeholders to ensure the province achieves the best system available. With his presentation, Mr. Imbrogno painted a picture of a thoughtful and rapidly evolving energy market for the Canadian province’s short and long-term future. SUNLIT FUTURE Solar Ontario 2015 reaffirmed the importance of solar energy by showing that the sector has not only governmental backing but popular support as well. It represented an opportunity for participants, most of whom play notable roles within the industry, to recognize their achievements, as well as those of the community as a whole. The work of CanSIA in facilitating this growth was on display at their Game

Changer Awards Gala, held on March 26th 2015, which recognized the notable achievements of individuals and organizations and helped show the world the progress being made by the Canadian solar industry. The Canadian solar energy industry can look forward to two further CanSIA events over the coming year. Between October 7th and 9th there is Solar West, a series of conferences focusing on issues specifically affecting the western provinces of Canada, while Solar Canada will be held on December 7th and 8th at the Metropolitan Toronto Convention Centre and will bring together the entire country. Judging by the success of Solar Ontario 2015, CanSIA and their upcoming events will be a key part of a bright future. c

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GLOBAL EVENTS

AUG 2015 SUSTAINABLE

B U S I N E S S

2nd - 5th

International Conference on Environmental Indicators (ICEI) 2015 Windsor, ON, Canada

The theme of the conference is “Measuring, Monitoring, and Management of Water Quality”. The participants for this conference series include environmental researchers, educators, students, environmental managers, environmental industry representatives and policy makers.

Optics + Photonics for Sustainable Energy 2015 San Diego, CA, USA

Gain access to a focused program of 200+ technical presentations and courses on photovoltaics, thin film solar technology, concentrators, reliability, solar hydrogen, next generation cell technology, and manufacturing systems.

www1.uwindsor.ca/icei2015/

9th - 13th

http://spie.org/sustainable-energy

22nd -28th

World Water Week 2015 Stockholm, Sweden www.worldwaterweek.org

World Water Week is organised by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and takes place in Stockholm, Sweden. It has been the annual focal point for discussions on the globe’s water issues since 1991.

25th - 27th

International Conference on Sustainable Energy Technologies Nottingham, UK

SET 2015 is a multi–disciplinary, peer-reviewed international conference on sustainable energy sources and technologies that provides a forum for the exchange of the latest technical information, the dissemination of high-quality research results, the presentation of new developments in the area, and the debate and shaping of future directions and priorities for sustainable development.

Sustainable Brands 2015 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

The flair and culture of Rio de Janeiro continues to inspire brand, sustainability, and design leaders, and their innovation leads towards a flourishing future.

M A G A Z I N E

PROMOTE YOUR EVENT HERE If your organization has a trade show or event, please let us know and we will promote your event on our global events pages.

For more information please contact us at: info@sustainablebusinessmagazine.net

www.set2015.orgevent/forum/

25th - 27th

www.sustainablebrands.com/events

XIV World Forestry Congress Durban, South Africa

Forests are essential to life on our planet. They are essential for to mitigating and adapting to climate change, for ensuring adequate supply of fresh water, for enhancing biodiversity, and for providing sustainable incomes and livelihoods, including food security.

14th - 16th

ICCE2015: International Conference & Exhibition on Clean Energy Ottawa, ON, Canada http://icce2015.iaemm.com/

The ICCE2015 organizing committee warmly invite you to attend the ICCE 2015 conference. ICCE 2015 takes place in Ottawa, Canada. Nestled on the banks of the majestic Ottawa, Rideau, and Gatineau Rivers, Ottawa is one of the most beautiful G8 capitals in the world.

21st - 23rd

Wind Operator Congress North America Chicago, IL, USA http://atnd.it/28012-0

The Wind Operator Congress unites leading owner operators, OEM’s, and service providers in the pursuit of strategies, models, tools, and practices to deliver operational excellence across North America’s ever-growing wind power operations.

29th - 30th

ATAG 2015 Global Sustainable Aviation Summit Geneva, Switzerland www.envirosummit.aero

The summit will enable an exchange of views in preparation for two key events: The UNFCCC Conference of the Parties climate talks in December 2015, and the 39th ICAO Assembly in 2016, where governments will hopefully agree on global market-based measures for aviation.

7th - 11th

http://www.fao.org/forestry/wfc/en/

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SEPT

2015


WASHINGTON DC, USA (SEPTEMBER 24-25) ATLANTA, GEORGIA, USA (NOVEMBER 16-17)

Be the next Certified Sustainability (CSR) Practitioner CSOs, Sustainability & CSR Directors from Global Fortune 500 companies and other leading organizations such as NASA, Coca-Cola, United Airlines, Walmart, Pfizer, Thomson Reuters, Unilever, Timberland, Microsoft and Heineken Group, have become recognized through our Leading Certification Program in New York, Washington DC, Atlanta, Houston, Toronto, Tokyo, London, & Dubai.

Certified Sustainability Practitioner Training (Advanced), approved by IEMA

Washington DC September 24-25

Early bird discounts apply!

Book your place for Washington DC (by Aug. 24) to get 10% OFF Key modules discussed: • Sustainability and Integrated Reporting Based on GRI & IIRC Guidelines • Current Global and Local Legislation for Sustainability & GHG Emissions • Sustainability (CSR) Strategy and Related Global Standards & Guidelines (UN Global Compact, GRI G4, CDP, SROI) • Communicate your Report and Gain Credibility • The importance of Sustainability in Supply Chain and Carbon Footprint Reduction

Upon successful completion, professionals gain a CSR-P Certification and CSR-P Seal. For more information visit http://www.cse-net.org/article/127/upcoming-trainings or contact us at sustainability@cse-net.org SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ADVERTISERS INDEX A Armitage Technology Group Inc.

D Davis Fuels

P14

B Brenntag P14

E Eco-Energy Fueling Solutions

P14

C Centre for Sustainability and Excellence P57 CIBC Mellon Back Cover CIPG P14

F Furst Mcness Company

P15

I ICM Inc.

P15

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P15

R Rassaun Steel RVA Lighting & Masts Inc. T The Water Expo Tripp-Vogt-Trottier Ltd.

P15 P33

Inside Back P15


Sustainable Business Magazine  

Issue 05/15

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