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AFRICA

www.ProudlyAfrican.info

Volume 5 • 2013

OHADA: Celebrating 20 Years In 2013 AFCCA: Connects Intra-African Construction BOTSWANA: Beyond Vision 2016 AFRICA WANTS: TRADE not AID

PROMOTING ECONOMIC GROWTH AND SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH LEADERSHIP, DIPLOMACY AND TRADE


PUBLISHER’S ForEwOrd Diplomat Africa is a platform of success stories emanating from the African continent in Foreign Policy, Diplomacy and Relations, Trade and Investment, Intra-African Relations, Travel and Tourism, Technology and Communications and Growth and Development. It has become a voice advocating good governance and inter-trade relations within Africa. We are proud of the role we are playing and the interest in Africa we are generating on the international stage. Reaching a global audience in the digital age essentially means a competent digital platform is necessary. Our encyclopaedia of online publications at www.GVPedia.com or www.ProudlyAfrican.info has proved to be more than competent and is an easy-to-access resource. The Proudly African concept is a unifying initiative which promotes countries and companies who are actively participating and seeking Inter-African activities. We are firmly in an era of Africanism which aims to promote and drive African pride and inter-trade with one another. Our four featured countries for this issue of Diplomat Africa are Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon, and Botswana. Having just won the African Cup of Nations hosted in South Africa, Nigerian positivity is at an all-time high. Nigeria is well on its way to super-power status – exemplified in the recent publication of Best of Nigeria. Ghana is entering an exciting time as a new wealth of oil is set to launch the country into economic heights. Cameroon’s immense wealth of resources are being firmly set into a promising Vision plan. Botswana continues to defy the odds as its growth is heightened by the implementation of its Vision. In this issue, we are also excited to share some organisations making waves on the continent with massive strides towards Intra-African interaction – Organisation for the Harmonisation of Business Law in Africa (OHADA) and African Federation of Construction Contractors’ Associations (AFCCA). Diplomat Africa shares all developments of Intra-African growth as they unravel and we are happy to showcase the people, companies, and countries behind this growth.

Thapelo Letsholo Publisher

Proudly African

Boosting inter-trade & cultural relations across the continent

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LETTING • SALES • RESEARCH • CONSULTING • DEVELOPMENT • FACILITY MANAGEMENT 65 Queen Street, Off Herbert Macaulay Road, Yaba, Lagos. Ropp House, Plot 1771 Adetokunbo Ademola Cresent, Wuse II, Abuja. Tel: +234-1-818-5985, 818-5985 M: +234-809-591-3398, +234-809-664-2933, +234-809-664-2932 Email: info@properteamltd.net

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Contact Details GVPedia Publishing (Pty) Ltd PO Box 26382 Gaborone, Botswana Plot 119 Unit 2G Gaborone International Finance Park Tel: +267 395 1363 (Gaborone) +27 11 705 2097 (Johannesburg) Email General: info@gvpedia.com Email Editor: rebecca@gvpedia.com www.ProudlyAfrican.info www.GVPedia.com

International Group Publisher: Sven Boermeester Ultimately we look forward to showcasing and connecting all the successful governments, companies and individuals that are spearheading Africa’s incredible growth. GVPedia Communications: Managing Director Gia Bischofberger

THE TEAM Publisher: Editor: Project Manager: Production: Creative Direction: Printer: Digital Manager: Public Relations: Sales Team: Contributor:

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Thapelo Letsholo Rebecca Eb Gia Bischofberger GVPedia Communications iMedi8 Creative Creda Communications Liam Dobell RedPepper PR & Communication Consultancy (Botswana) Yvonne Sinclair (South Africa), Lesego Goitsemang; Peo Mokgosi; Refilwe Tlamelo; Balepeng Montwedi (Botswana) Chedza Mogae

Proudly African

Boosting inter-trade & cultural relations across the continent

www.ProudlyAfrican.info

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in “Diplomat Africa”. Neither “Diplomat Africa”, Red Pepper PR & Communication Consultancy nor GVPedia Communications cc assume any responsibility for errors or omissions. The editor reserves the right to amend and alter copy and visual material as deemed necessary. All rights reserved: No part of this publication shall be reproduced, copied, transmitted, adapted or modified in any form or by any means. This publication shall not be stored in whole or in part in any retrieval system.


In This Issue

FUTURE VISIONS 12

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8 Botswana – Still Defying The Odds 12 Future Visions Nigeria 16 Future Visions Ghana 20 Future Visions Cameroon

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In This Issue CHAPTER 1: FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

CHAPTER 2: TRADE AND INVESTMENT

CHAPTER 3: INTRA-AFRICA

26 Botswana Presidents – Personalities Spearheading Progress 28 Ghanaian President H.E. John Dramani Mahama sworn in 30 Portrait of a Diplomat – Mrs Tuelonyana Oliphant 32 Administration of Justice The High Court of Botswana

36 OHADA Celebrating 20 years in 2013 38 OHADA Member States’ Profiles 42 Ghana and Nigeria among world’s fastest growing economies in 2012/2013 44 Botswana Life 46 Commemorating 30 years of the Debswana Jwaneng Mine 48 Morupule Coal Mine (MCM)

52 Proudly African Boosting Trade, Development and Cultural Relations Across Africa 54 Africa wants TRADE not AID 56 AFCCA Connects Intra-African Construction

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CHAPTER 4: TRAVEL AND TOURISM

CHAPTER 5: TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS

CHAPTER 6: GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

60 Southern Africa to host 2013 UNWTO General Meeting 62 Tourism in Nigeria 64 2013 Promises to be a significant year for tourism in RETOSA Member States 66 Freedom Air Charter Services 68 Lansmore Masa Square Botswana beguiling the world

72 MTN launches skyward in Africa 74 How we made it in Africa 76 PAMRO conference promotes development through research

80 Cameroon Agriculture and Forest Resources 82 Farm Solutions for Africa 84 Botswana – Beyond Vision 2016 86 Botswana Development Corporation Limited (BDC) 88 Botswana Education Hub 90 Lenmed Health Bokamoso Private Hospital

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Botswana – Still Defying The Odds In 1966 Botswana was the second poorest country in the world with a GDP per capita of about US$70. The country inherited 6km of tarred roads, three secondary schools and six university graduates from Britain. The adversities faced by independent Botswana included minimal investment by colonial authorities during the protectorate period, encirclement by hostile minority-ruled racist states, a proclivity to drought, agricultural pests and animal diseases. Its developmental prospects at the time were considered poor to non-existent. Now 47 years later, Botswana is part of an elite club of the world’s preeminent economic performers. By the turn of the century, Botswana’s economic situation had changed dramatically and in 34 years had graduated from low income status into the ranks of middle-income, with an average annual growth rate of about 9% from 1966 to 1999. Botswana’s development was fuelled by the discovery of large diamond reserves. Economic growth was supported by prudent macroeconomic and fiscal management; further enhanced by international financial and technical assistance and a cautious foreign policy. Botswana had beaten the odds and continued its upward trajectory in the 21st century, despite the numerous tests and trials that confront its continued sustainable economic and environmentallyfriendly development. Botswana’s business model goes international Botswana is synonymous with diamonds – brilliant, bold and glittering quality gems that dazzle, much like Botswana’s economy. Since the early 1980s, the country has been the world’s largest producer of diamonds by value. Successive governments have wisely and prudently invested diamond revenues into all aspects of economic, social and political development. The returns have been continuous increases and improvements in: GDP; per capita income; employment rates; foreign exchange reserves; levels of poverty; educational enrolment; literacy rates; access to health 8

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His Excellency Lt. Gen. Seretse Khama Ian Khama facilities; potable water and electricity; indices of human development; and ratings on transparency, governance and credit-worthiness. The success of the ‘Botswana Incorporated’ business model has been confirmed by international development agencies, allowing Botswana to move away from simple and straightforward mining and extraction of minerals into more complex areas such as diamond beneficiation – imperative cutting and polishing processes in diamond value chain conducted in-country to maximise local economic contribution. Botswana’s move into diamond beneficiation is about diamond processing as well as other opportunities that diamond beneficiation brings – namely increased prospects for tourism, property development, security, hotels, restaurants, and taxes. While government is committed to economic diversification away from diamonds, this does not preclude the mineral sector. As Botswana’s President Lieutenant General Seretse Khama Ian Khama said when speaking to “Voices of Botswana” interviewers, Botswana can and will “achieve more engines of growth and more diversification within the mineral sector itself… because diamonds are finite… and when we see the revenues we get from diamonds declining… we have identified other minerals which are going to step in and take over and take us beyond.” The government is constantly rethinking and reformulating its business strategy, including aiding and assisting other developing nations to realise maximum gains from mining activities by sharing industry best practice. Botswana, in the spirit of South-South cooperation, has pledged to assist the Republic of Liberia in rebuilding its diamond sector. In the private sector, Botswana’s brands have gone panAfrican on the back of their local experience and success. Indigenous micro-lender Letshego Holdings, established in 1988 to give ordinary citizens access to finance through the provision of consumer lending facilities, has evolved from Diplomat Africa

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Amantle Montsho in southern Africa, comprising 53 stores in Botswana and 16 stores in South Africa with more to come. The group employs over 4200 people in Botswana and 1200 people in South Africa – on average 60 to 70 individuals per store with 98 percentile share of employment by Batswana. Botswana breaks records and sets best practices In 2009, the CIA World Fact Book reported that Botswana’s economy was one of the fastest-growing in world history with a per capita GDP (ppp) of about US$14,000, experiencing a growth rate comparable to (and exceeding) those of the Asian tigers.

being merely a consumer lending entity to being a bona fide financial services company. Over the years it has introduced a broad range of innovative products and services including legal insurance, funeral insurance and personal development loans. Letshego Uganda was launched in 2005 and is a subsidiary of Letshego Holdings Ltd. Botswana – a Botswana Stock Exchange listed company. Letshego now operates in 11 countries and over the course of the last 14 years, has developed into one of the most recognisable brands in Botswana as well as in Africa. Choppies Enterprises Limited is the market-leading mass grocery retailer in Botswana and retails fast moving consumer goods, household goods, fruit and vegetables, meat products, as well as dry, fresh and baked goods through its stores in Botswana and South Africa. The origins of Choppies emanate from Westside Supermarket in Lobatse – a small general dealer owned by local businessman Farouk Ismail. Choppies listed on the BSE on 26 January 2012. Today the group operates 69 retail outlets 10

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Previous personal bests accomplished by Botswana include Mpule Kwelagobe’s crowning as Miss Universe in Trinidad and Tobago in May 1999. It was significant as Miss Universe is the most publicised and anticipated beauty pageant in the world – won by a young woman from a country in Africa with a population of less than two million. Amantle Montsho is Botswana’s foremost female sprinter whose speciality is the 400m dash. She represented Botswana at the 2004, 2008 and 2012 London Summer Olympics, reaching the final in the latter. She also competed at the World Championships in Athletics and the International Amateur Athletics Federation (IAAF) World Indoor Championships – currently the World Champion in the 400m, winning with a personal best of 49.56 in South Korea. She is two-time African Championships gold medallist over 400m, winning titles in 400m at the 2007 All-Africa Games, 2010 IAAF Continental Cup and 2010 Commonwealth Games. Her Commonwealth win made her Botswana’s first ever gold medallist there. In 2012, Botswana athlete Nijel Amos, aged 18, became champion at the 2012 World Junior Championships in Athletics, finishing with a new championship record of 1:43.79. In the 2012 London Summer Olympics, Amos won silver in the men’s 800m – the first Olympic medal for Botswana. His time of 1:41.73 established a new World Junior Record behind the new World Record set by David


FUTURE VISIONS

Rudisha and is tied with Sebastian Coe for third fastest individual ever. Following the first reported case of HIV in Botswana in 1985, the country’s response was mainly focused on blood screening to eliminate the risk of transmission through blood transfusion. In 1997, it became clear that the epidemic represented a clear and present danger to national development. In response, government went on the offensive by becoming significantly more proactive in combating the epidemic. A programme was introduced in 1999 for the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT). In August 2000, the Gates Foundation, along with the Harvard AIDS Initiative and Merck and Bristol-Myers Squibb pharmaceuticals started an HIV/AIDS treatment program, working with the Botswana government. Antiretrovirals were dispensed at government expense. The Ministry of Education introduced a new HIV/AIDS educational technology for schools. The Ministry of Health led and supported a distribution programme of free prophylactics and instituted free testing and screening, with the promotion of circumcision as prevention. These have resulted in significant measurable decreases in prevalence rates, with government’s national response to HIV/AIDS viewed as an example of international best practice by international aid agencies and organisations such as PEPFAR. Botswana has gained necessary experience required to confront any medical emergency. Botswana’s continued search for development solutions Botswana is unique – incorporating history, customs and traditions into solutions for its sustainable economic development. From its colonial master Britain, it took the Westminster parliamentary system, marrying Tswana traditional practices of governance with the Westminster model. The Tswana ‘kgotla’ or traditional assembly was made a part of government structures and room was made for traditional leadership, through the creation of a House of Chiefs. This recognises the merits of the past,

leading to projects such as the School of Medicine at the University of Botswana. This endeavour was derived from acknowledgment of the lack of adequate trained healthcare professionals – inspired by an appreciation of traditional basket weaving. Tswana talent to weave exquisite and intricate patterned creations, a skill requiring manual dexterity as well as attention to detail, translates into a modern day asset – the creation and construction of a locally bred, contemporary assemblage of medical practitioners and surgeons. While most economists cite Botswana’s small population and land-locked status as economic impediments, Botswana’s President Lieutenant General Seretse Khama Ian Khama begs to differ, citing this as an advantage. On record with “Voices of Botswana” he stated that “Even though we don’t have direct access to ports, we don’t have a coast… we are right in the middle of the Southern African region… we are conveniently placed, well placed in terms of all the countries around us… we are constantly developing our transport network… we have recently upgraded our major airports, we pride ourselves on our road network, which we are constantly upgrading…we are looking at two exciting railway projects to the west coast through Namibia and the east coast through Mozambique as well as IT connectivity through submarine cables of the east and west coasts… those are all things that bring it all together…”. Botswana’s government continues to find new creative solutions to complex modern development; seeking solutions and partners for economic prosperity. It seeks constructive collaboration with the international community and other African countries, seen by sharing expertise of establishing public institutions with the newly independent Republic Of South Sudan. Botswana’s story of achievement was written because its leadership and people dared to aspire to greatness against all odds. This attitude still serves as the backbone of its development efforts. This dedication to the pursuit of greater fortune continues to ensure Botswana’s success story. Diplomat Africa

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Future Visions Nigeria Nigeria is a fascinating country with so much to offer. There is no denying that the image of the country has been tarnished, but as the next economic superpower of Africa, there is much to praise. It is the dominant force of West African economics, politics and culture – with influential music and literature which enjoys a world-wide reach. As such a large and diverse land, there are many sides to Nigeria which are often cast aside by popular opinion in place of the more sensationalist negative reviews. Like the persistence and determination of its people, Nigeria is a country that is hard to shake off – as it leaves an indelible imprint in one’s heart. It is a challenging destination for travellers, but if the necessary rigmarole is followed, it will prove itself to be one of the most worthwhile visits. As the most populous city in the most populous country in Africa, Lagos is one of the most vibrant cities on the continent. The port city of Calabar is a great stopover for travellers on their way to Cameroon. Ancient kingdoms across southern Nigeria maintain their customs reflected in their sculptures to venerate ancient gods. Nigeria is also home to one of the world’s pioneering primate conservation organisations. Ancient Saharan trade routes still show themselves in the Muslim trade cities of the dusty northern regions stretching out towards the desert. Kano is West Africa’s oldest city while Yankari National Park is the best in the country. Nigeria is a country of extreme juxtapositions. Immense wealth meets immense poverty on a daily basis, and coupled with varying religion, lays the foundation of ancient civil tension between differing communities. There are a small number of areas which are still problematic but the majority of the country’s people are warm and hospitable. Nigeria is Africa in its most raw form. Nigeria’s vibrant contrasts include varying cultures, rich history, cascading waterfalls, electrifying heritage festivals 12

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and scintillating dances, equatorial forests, beautiful clean beaches, exotic landscapes, towering rocks, rolling hills, ancient caves and hospitable people. The experience includes diverse wildlife: lions and cheetahs, chimpanzees and gorillas, giraffes and crocodiles, hippopotamus and antelopes, and birds roving liberally in numerous game reserves. Predicted to become a new world superpower and set to overtake South Africa’s economy by the year 2020 to Republic of Nigeria Capital:

Abuja

Largest City:

Lagos

Location:

Western Africa, bordering the Gulf of Guinea, between Benin and Cameroon

Area:

923,768 km2 (1.4% water)

Population:

155,215,573, density 164.8/km2 (2010 estimate)

Language:

English

Independence:

From the United Kingdom Unification of Southern and Northern Nigeria: 1914 Declared and recognised: 1 October 1960 Republic declared: 1 October 1963

Government:

Presidential Federal Republic President: Goodluck Jonathan Vice President: Namadi Sambo

Currency:

Naira or NGN

GDP (PPP):

$377.949-billion total and $2,422 per capita (2010)

GDP (nominal):

$216.803-billion total and $1,389 per capita (2010)

Time Zone:

GMT +1

Dialling Code:

+234

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become the largest economy in Africa, Nigeria is oil rich and business savvy. However, the government has recently been looking to diversify the economy by expanding on the vast tourist resources and thus attempt to lessen the gap between the rich and the poor. Whatever the case, the fact is that great things are expected for the country, and although tensions are still sizzling, a higher level of excitement seems to be rising to the fore. Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa, the seventh most populous country in the world, and the most populous country in the world in which the majority of the population is black. It is listed among the “Next Eleven� economies, and is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations. The economy of Nigeria is one of the fastest growing in the world, with the International Monetary Fund projecting immense growth. Economy A market-based economy in Nigeria has been making progress even through the hampering of instability. The oil-rich nation began following economic reforms in 2008 which are beginning to bear fruit. The former military administrations continuously failed to implement diversification and remained heavily reliant on the oil sector. The oil industry generates large capital and creates 95% of foreign exchange earnings and 80% of budgetary revenues. After years of political instability, corruption and violence, things began to turn around for Nigeria after an IMF stand-by agreement was signed in August 2000 which saw Nigeria receiving a debt-restructuring deal from the Paris Club and $1-billion credit from the IMF. Although Nigeria pulled out of its IMF program in April 2002 due to ineligibility, Abuja won a debt-relief deal in November 2005 which reversed debt of $18-billion in return for $12-billion in payments. In line with the IMF, Nigerian government began to express political willingness to reform the economy in 2008. This has included modernising the banking system, curbing inflation, and resolving regional disputes over oil wealth distribution. Between 2007 and 2010, GDP rose greatly as a result of increase in oil exports and prices. Economic 14

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reforms are set to continue under President Jonathan’s pledge and emphasised improvement in infrastructure. In August 2010 Jonathan unveiled a power sector blueprint including privatisation of state-run electricity generation and distribution facilities. A stronger partnership between public and private sectors is being developed for roads along with measures by the Central Bank to strengthen the financial sector after being hurt by global crises. Trade and Investment Nigeria faces problems of an infrastructure that had been left in decay from past regimes as well as poor regulation. However, positive attributes include carefully targeted investment and expansion as a regional and international market player. Apart from the energy sector, profitable markets include specialised telecommunication providers as Nigeria has one of the fastest growing telecommunications markets in the world. The infrastructure expansion has seen the arrival of space-based communications including a space satellite monitored at the Nigerian National Space Research and Development Agency Headquarters in Abuja. The Nigerian financial services sector is highly developed and includes both local and international banks, asset management companies, brokerage houses, insurance companies and brokers, private equity funds and investment banks. Nigerians believe that foreign investment is vital to fulfil the vast potential and would therefore welcome any company looking for long-term investment. Mining As a result of the focus on oil, the solid minerals industry in Nigeria has remained vastly untapped and underdeveloped. Investment in the sector is being actively promoted so that a favourable environment can be created. This is evident in the efforts of the Kwara State government for example. Government proposes that interested investors partner with local miners who already hold a mining license. Currently mineral mining in Nigeria only provides 0.3% of the GDP. As a result of the underdeveloped domestic mining industry, Nigeria imports minerals such as salt


FUTURE VISIONS

and iron ore which could in fact be produced in the country. Government holds rights to ownership of mineral resources and grants the exploration, mining and selling to organisations. Agriculture Agriculture provides employment for 70% of the Nigerian population and is a major part of the economy contributing 43.64% to GDP in Q3 2011. It is being adapted by commercialisation at all enterprise levels. In 1990, over 90% of Nigerian land was discovered to be arable but only 42% of this was cultivated, with the majority under the bush fallow system to generate fertile soil. Nearly 22% of arable land was classified as permanent pasture with the potential to support crops. Forests and woodlands cover over 24% of arable land in Nigeria, and most of this land is considered to have agricultural potential, although Nigeria has one of the highest rates of deforestation in the world and would have to tread carefully in line with agricultural policies to curb that. Outside of oil, cocoa is the biggest foreign exchange earner with a potential for over 300,000 tonnes of cocoa beans per year. It is however held back by lack of scale and urbanisation. Rubber comes in at second in non-oil foreign exchange earnings. Energy Nigeria has about 35 billion barrels of oil reserves which makes it the 10th highest in the world. It is the 9th highest in gas reserves with about five trillion cubic metres. Based in Lagos, Oando is Nigeria’s largest oil company and is also Nigeria’s largest non-government owned company in the energy industry. It is listed on the Nigerian and Johannesburg Stock Exchange. Oil and gas contributors include Nigerian National Petroleum Company, Chevron Corporation, CNOOC, CNPC, Conoco, ENI, Exxon Mobil Corporation, GEPetrol, Petrobras, Shell, Statoil and Total. By 2025,Nigeria aims to achieve 7% renewable energy. Nigeria is a member of the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries.

National Pride Along with South Africa, Nigeria is considered a superpower in the African continent, creating a general sense of pride among Nigerians. With the largest population in Africa and holding enormous quantities of natural resources, Nigeria is the sixth largest oil-producing nation with a well-educated and industrious society. A popular Nigerian expression is “When Nigeria sneezes, the rest of the African nations catch cold.” A popular slang word is “Naija” which refers to the new era of Nigerian cultural pride and unity. Source: Best of Nigeria vol.1 Diplomat Africa

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Future Visions Ghana Ghana is known as an English speaking ‘island’ in the ocean of francophone Africa, with Burkina Faso in the north, Togo in the east, and Cote d’Ivore in the west. The Atlantic Ocean lies in the south. Ghana has 10 Administrative Regions with 170 Districts. District Assemblies are the Political Authorities and there are 230 Electoral Constituencies. Before Independence on 6 March 1957, Ghana was called the Gold Coast. The earliest Europeans to arrive were the Portuguese in the 15th Century. On their arrival, they found so much gold between the River Ankobra and the Volta, that they subsequently named it “da Mina”, meaning The Mine. In 1482, the first castle was built in the Gold Coast by the Portuguese at Elmina. A well-known Ghanaian legend refers to Tetteh Quarshie, who was a young blacksmith in the late nineteenth century and left Accra to work on an island now part of Equatorial Guinea. On his return home, he smuggled a few cocoa pods with him. The pods didn’t grow well in Accra, so he travelled away from the coast and tried again. This time, they flourished, and so began Ghana’s long and lucrative history with cocoa. The country is the second largest producer of cocoa in the world, while West Africa with its cocoa-friendly climate produces some 75% of the world’s cocoa. His actions single-handedly rescued his country’s stagnant economy and altered its destiny, forcing Ghana to modernise and pushing it into the next level of development. This is relevant now because Ghana is on the brink of a similar century-defining, economy-revolutionising development: Ghana has found a new gold – black gold. The full-scale production of significant off-shore oil reserves is about to take off. How Ghana handles its new oil money will likely determine the course of its next century, just like 16

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Republic of Ghana Capital:

Accra

Location:

A sub-Saharan, West African country on the Gulf of Guinea

Area:

239,460 km2

Population:

24 million (2010)

Language:

English

Independence:

March 1957

Government:

Unitary state, Presidential system, Constitutional republic

Currency:

Ghanaian cedi

GDP:

US$26.2-billion

Time Zone:

UTC+0

Dialling Code:

+233

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cocoa determined – at least in part – the last century. With relative internal peace, Ghana’s constitution is its democratic anchor. Since the 1990s, elections have been characterised by peaceful transitions of power. There are numerous Ghanaian ethnic groups who have managed to coexist without much tension – a rarity in Africa. Once the December 2012 elections were concluded with President John Dramani Mahama being sworn-in on 7 January 2013, attention focused onto what his policy plans for his four-year term would be. Developing the oil and gas sector is to be high on the agenda, but so too may be developments in the mining sector – an on-going debate. Vision 2020 In 1995, Ghana’s NDC administration launched the Vision 2020 document that was put together by the National Development Planning Commission (NDPC) as Ghana’s blueprint for sustainable socio-economic development. Vision 2020 was presented to parliament by thenPresident Jerry John Rawlings, recognising that the country’s resources could only be used efficiently through integrating Science and Technology programmes so as to achieve rapid economic growth in line with the protection of the environment. It also highlighted the need to decentralise Ghana’s public administration system to the district level so that they could take responsibility for their development programmes and resources in line with the Vision 2020 programme. The Vision 2020 document envisaged the use of science and technology to rapidly address Ghana’s development to improve the quality of life for all, which is the country’s current priority in development. When the NPP took over the reins of government, it created a priority Vision 2010 programme, which aimed at increasing food production and processing as well as job creation. On paper, Vision 2020 appeared to be vital for the success of Vision 2010. This has highlighted a common belief that Governments past and present have aimed for first-world status for Ghana, but have disagreed on the

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targets and policy framework for achieving that feat. Whilst the NDC touted vision 2020 as targets towards reaching a middle income status, the NPP insisted Ghana could attain that feat in 2015. Science and Technology The scientific and technological training of young Ghanaians is acknowledged as being vital to economic growth and stature. Universities, various Institutes in the Ghana Academy of Sciences, the University College of Science Education in Cape Coast, the newly established Medical School and the proposed University College of Agriculture, will help in providing this training. There have been numerous Science exhibitions held in academies and universities, which received enthusiastic responses from the people of Ghana. The projected National Science Museum is soon to be completed and will permanently provide this for the people of Ghana. This major project will help further public interest in science by conveying the impact of science on everyday life, in an understandable way. A key feature of Vision 2020 was to consolidate the gains so far secured over the past decade and to lay strong foundations for accelerated growth in the coming decades. Ghana still has millions in the lowest income brackets and has to work extra hard to meet number one of the eight strategic Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), that of reducing poverty by the year 2015. When John Atta Mills assumed the presidency, he came out with his ‘Better Ghana’ agenda. These elements included a vibrant economy, ability of the Ghanaian to afford three square meals a day, and security of lives and property. Medium-term Strategic Development Plan A medium-term strategic development plan is currently being worked out by the government to translate the vision of President John Dramani Mahama into programmes and projects to propel the country’s socio-economic transformation.


FUTURE VISIONS

The three-year plan will span until 2016 and is being handled jointly by the government’s policy team and the national Development Planning Commission (NDPC). President Mahama addressed members of the diplomatic corps at the Peduase Presidential Lodge on 1 February 2013 and enumerated Ghana’s economic and democratic gains, affirmed the country’s commitment to strengthen relations with its allies, and reiterated Ghana’s resolve to fighting terrorism, cyber fraud and money laundering. The State of the Nation Address would further capture the plan and the budget will be presented in line with this progressive vision. International peace and security President Mahama has affirmed the government’s commitment to multilateralism and the use of peaceful means to resolve disputes within the international community. Ghana will work to ensure durable peace and security in all ECOWAS member states, including Mali, as a prerequisite for sustainable economic development in the sub-region. Ghana’s candidate for the post of the next DirectorGeneral of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) is Mr Alan Kyerematen, whom Mahama is pinning high hopes on. Ghanaians have been lauded for the peaceful, fair and transparent conduct of the Presidential and Parliamentary elections on 7 December 2012 and Ghana is also making progress on the economic front as a result of prudent government policies. There is a resolve for all countries to deepen ties with Ghana for the benefit of their people. Successes of these development visions depend on Ghana’s ability to process its vast resources into valueadded tradable goods, using the combination of human capital and technology, which would ensure maximum benefits for all. Mahama’s call is an answer to a dire need for a new development policy which embraces structural transformation of the economy; priority of investment

in quality education and human capital development; pursuit of agro and industrial technology acquisition and application; and modernisation and mechanisation of agricultural production. Ghana has needed a competent visionary and all eyes are on Mahama to deliver. The country’s focus now seems to be more aligned with formulating long-term development policies as opposed to single focus of short-term poverty reduction programs. Ghana has achieved a recent high annual GDP growth rate of more than 10%, but now needs to focus on restructuring the country’s economy to move away from an agrarian based economy. As a resource laden country, rapid economic progress will be possible if this socio-economic development dilemma is addressed; exploring other development policy options, that could possibly lead to the structural transformation of Ghana’s economy to improve quality of life and standard of living. Source: www.ghana.gov.gh Diplomat Africa

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Future Visions Cameroon The government of Cameroon describes the country as “Africa in miniature” – alluding to its diversity in climate, culture, and geography. It is a resource-laden country with one of the most promising futures in Central Africa. It’s long-term Vision for 2035 outlines a road map for the country’s economic take-off to propel it into emerging economy status. By 2035, the country hopes to be an industrialised nation. Cameroon of yesterday The earliest inhabitants of Cameroon were believed to be the Baka Pygmies who still inhabit the forests in the south and east. Early Europeans made their way to Cameroon for coastal trade and slaves, with the north at the epicentre of the Muslim slave trade network. Christian mission presence arrived in the late 19th century – still evident in Cameroonian life today. France set up Cameroon as an autonomous state in 1957. In 1959, a fully autonomous government of Cameroon was formed under Ahmadou Ahidjo. Cameroon became an independent republic on 1 January 1960. Ahmadou Ahidjo was replaced in 1982 by the Prime Minister, Paul Biya – still the current President. Cameroon of today Cameroon has enjoyed relative stability, allowing the development of agriculture, roads, railways, and the petroleum industry. Cameroon is an excellent business environment for investors. The government has cleverly been revamping laws in the last decade to attract and protect investors. This market-driven economy is regulated by government who have prioritised private initiatives for regional cooperation and integration. 20

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FUTURE VISIONS

Cameroon also was a founding member of the African Union, the Economic Community of Central African States and the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa. Having Nigeria as a neighbour almost certainly helps propel it towards its economic visions – linking it to a potential 250-million strong consumer market. The notion of a free trade agreement at continental level within five years is strongly backed in Cameroon. Cameroon is growing as a vital economic hub in the region. The creation of the Anti-Corruption National Commission, the Financial Investigation National Agency, the Cameroon Business Forum and the Regulation and Competitiveness Council illustrates government’s drive to entice investment. The Investment Promotion Agency has cut the red tape for ease of entrance for investors into Cameroon. The boundless opportunities are now being promoted and showcased on the global stage.

Republic of Cameroon Capital:

Yaoundé

Location:

Western Africa, bordering the Bight of Biafra, between Equatorial Guinea and Nigeria

Area:

Total Area: 475,400 km² (including 6,000 km² of water)

Population:

15,085,000

Language:

French and English

Independence:

January 1960

Government:

Republic, Multiparty presidential regime

Currency:

The Central African CFA franc

GDP:

US$42.55-billion (2009 est.)

Time Zone:

UTC+1

Dialling Code:

+237

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FUTURE VISIONS

Diverse economy Cameroon is one of the best-endowed primary commodity economies in sub-Saharan Africa as a result of its oil and agriculture resources. The government has embarked on numerous IMF and World Bank programs to encourage business investment, increase efficiency in agriculture, improve trade, and recapitalise the nation’s banks. The IMF requests further reforms such as increased budget transparency, privatisation, and poverty reduction programs. Good agricultural conditions have led it to become one of the breadbaskets of Central Africa. Resources also lie in a wealth of petroleum, bauxite, iron ore and hydropower. Up until now, Cameroon’s challenge has been in manufacture to ensure final products stay home. As a result, the country has had to rely heavily on imports – even with vast exports going out. This is what Vision 2035 is hoping to tackle. With the expansion of oil, timber, and coffee exports, the economy has continued to improve. However, environmental degradation remains a concern.

Vision 2035 is Cameroon’s bold vision for long-term development. The process aims to position the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper under review in the long term. Oil Cameroon has been an official oil producer since 1977, when the Kol field was drilled. The state undertook a number of incentives in the 1990s to boost national oil production and liberalise the sector. This saw the further distribution of exploration permits and attracted foreign investors. Oil investments from the 1980s are now out of date and Cameroon is currently looking for high foreign capital flow to increase capacities. In 2000 the World Bank agreed to provide more than US$200-million to build a US$3.7-billion pipeline connecting the oil fields in neighbouring Chad with the Cameroon coast. In 2006 Nigeria turned over the disputed oil-rich Bakassi peninsula to Cameroon. 22

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Cameroon of tomorrow Cameroon’s Vision for the next 20 years is to create an emerging, democratic and united country in diversity. The Vision hinges on the results of past studies, identification of the population’s needs, aspirations and political ambitions. The Vision is a synchronisation of the aspirations and hopes of all Cameroonians. Conceptualised in 2005, the overall objective of the vision is to make Cameroon an emerging country in the allocated 25 to 30 years – the period required to move from one generation to another. The vision also has medium-term objectives, including: poverty alleviation; middle income status; becoming newly industrialised; and consolidating democracy and national unity while respecting the country’s diversity. At the macro-economic level, the vision highlights the need to accelerate growth by stepping up forest, agropastoral and fishing activities and ensuring an industrial technological advancement with emphasis on the processing of local commodities. For this goal to be achieved, the vision advocates the increase of investments as a growth engine.


FUTURE VISIONS

Challenges to face with Vision 2035 The first challenge is to consolidate democracy and enhance national unity, as Cameroon is an ethnic and linguistic melting pot. Economic growth and employment constitute another challenge. The third challenge is sociodemographic. Urban and regional development is the fourth challenge. The last challenge is governance – meaning efficient and effective use of the country’s potential as well as human, material and financial resources for its development. Cameroon needs to overcome this challenge to be well integrated into the global economy. At the social and demographic level, the objectives are to make the people the main actors of their development through a bold policy on creating decent jobs. In the rural sector, agricultural revolution is envisaged, allowing for an increase in productivity with the intensification of activities and the change of agricultural holdings scales. In the industrial sector, the Vision intends to retain industrial development as the country’s development engine. The objectives of the Vision at this level are to create a competitive manufacturing sector that can generate resources, sustain growth, employment, exports, and ensure integration into the global economy. Industrial development will depend on the development of infrastructure, reduction of factor costs and promotion of new funding methods. Three implementation phases: 1. Setting milestones for strong growth thanks to increased investments in infrastructure and rapid modernisation of production. The process should go along with an improvement of the business climate and governance, as well as a renewed determination to factor in employment in the growth process. 2. Government will look for ways and means to maintain growth at high levels, to achieve Millennium Development Goals no matter how late and to ensure that the population is entirely mobilised in the fight against climate change effects. 3. Coincide with the time when Cameroon becomes an

emerging country, open to the outward world and relying on its production and export pattern that is essentially based on industries. Phases underpinned by: • an ambitious industrialisation strategy, • a strategy of national integration and the advancement of democracy, • a private-sector promotion strategy, • a good governance and management strategy with blueprint for a resource allocation strategy, • a strategy for sub-regional, regional and international integration, • a strategy for partnership and development assistance, • and a development funding strategy. The vision is a response to real aspirations of Cameroonians over a given period long enough to foresee structural adjustments. The vision can be achieved by overcoming four major challenges: economic growth which is stagnating, increased population growth, rapid urbanisation and poor governance. This requires mastering obstacles with a collective effort. www.camerounenmarche.com www.cameroontourist.com www.mintour.gov.cm

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Chapter 1: FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Botswana Presidents – Personalities Spearheading Progress

His Excellency Lieutenant General Seretse Khama Ian Khama, Current President of Botswana The economic, social and political progress made by Botswana in the 47 years since independence, is the stuff of legends. While Botswana’s leadership is quick to point out that development has been a collective effort, some room must be made to 26

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Sir Ketumile Masire

Festus Mogae

credit those individuals who have led and spearheaded growth and advancement. In one of his first international television interviews, granted to CNN’s ‘African Voices’ broadcast, current President Lieutenant General Seretse Khama Ian Khama stated that, “We have always understood that the role and the responsibility of a government is to run the affairs of the country in the best interest of its citizens… it’s not about the leader or the leadership” – a sentiment that has been passed down from one president to the next and from preceding to subsequent generations. Botswana’s first President Sir Seretse Khama was born into the Bamangwato royal house in what was then the British Protectorate of Bechuanaland. Unlike the vast majority of his countrymen, he was able to pursue an education, graduating from Fort Hare University in 1944 then proceeding to Balliol College, Oxford for a year before joining the Inner

Temple in London in 1946 to study and become a barrister. In 1947 he met Ruth Williams, an English clerk at Lloyd’s of London, marrying her after a year-long courtship. Their interracial marriage was the subject of controversy and the apartheid government of South Africa and his tribal elders demanded the marriage be annulled. As Bechuanaland was then a British protectorate, the South African government exerted substantial pressure on Britain to have him removed; resulting in the Khamas being exiled from Bechuanaland in 1951. His return to Botswana in 1956 was as a private citizen and in 1961 he founded the Bechuanaland Democratic Party, the precursor to today’s Botswana Democratic Party (BDP). In 1966 when Botswana gained independence, he became the nation’s first president and between that time and the time of his death in 1980 he oversaw a Botswana that had the fastest growing economy


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Sir Seretse Khama in the world. Those who knew him well credit his legal training and trials and tribulations at the hands of his tribal elders, Bechuanaland’s British authorities, Britain’s labour government and South Africa’s apartheid regime, as the driving force behind his dedication to building a Botswana based on non-racial and legal principles – where none were discriminated against on the basis of race or class and all stood equal under the law. His passion in this regard translated itself into a Botswana characterised by equal opportunities for all. Sir Ketumile Masire is an awe-inspiring figure. Son of a minor headman, he grew up in a community where male commoners such as himself were expected to become low-paid migrant labourers in the mines of South Africa. From an early age, Masire set himself apart and graduated top of his class at Kanye village school; going on to receive a full scholarship at the Tiger Kloof Institute in South Africa. After graduating from Tiger Kloof in 1950 he was instrumental in founding the Kgosi Seepapitso II Secondary School – the first institution of its kind in the Bangwaketse tribal area. In 1957, he earned a Mater Farmers Certificate and distinguished himself as one of Bechuanaland’s leading agriculturalists. He joined politics shortly after and helped found the BDP, serving as its first secretary general. In 1966 he became Botswana’s first Vice-President and held a number of significant portfolios, such as Minister of Finance (from 1966) and Minister of Development Planning (from 1967) which were formally merged in 1971. He was a principal architect of Botswana’s steady economic and infrastructural growth between 1966 and 1980, when he ascended to the Presidency after the death of Seretse Khama. As president, he was well-known for his support of and emphasis on development backed by regional and international organisations. His fervency for education and

farming were deeply personal and profoundly defined his presidency. He is the founding father of the generation of technocrats that designed and led Botswana’s early development. His support of local farmers was in a large part the reason for the success of Botswana’s beef farming industry. Like his predecessor and mentor Sir Ketumile Masire, Festus Mogae came from humble beginnings. It was educational attainment that was his path out of poverty. Mogae studied economics in the United Kingdom, first at University College, Oxford followed by a stint at the University of Sussex from which he graduated with a Master’s degree. Mogae joined politics and the BDP in 1988 when Masire made him Minister of Finance and Development Planning. He latterly became Vice-President in 1992 – a position he held until Masire’s retirement in 1998 when he ascended to the Presidency. Mogae is part of a generation of indigenous technocrats, who under Masire led and directed Botswana’s economic development. Like Masire, Mogae believed that Botswana’s advancement had to be headed by those with the requisite skills and knowledge. It was under his guardianship that Botswana’s foreign reserves burgeoned. Mogae is also responsible for instituting the multifarious HIV/AIDS programmes that reined in Botswana’s HIV/AIDS prevalence rate. In an address to the United Nations General Assembly he stated, “We are threatened with extinction. People are dying in chillingly high numbers. It is a crisis of the first magnitude.” He sounded an international call to arms that galvanised organisations such as Harvard Medical School, Baylor Pharmaceuticals and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to come to the aid and assistance of the Botswana government’s battle against HIV/AIDS. Current President His Excellency Lieutenant General Seretse Khama Ian Khama is a retired army officer and the son of Botswana’s first President Sir Seretse Khama. He is also paramount Chief of the Bamangwato tribe; his roots are royal. He joined politics in 1998 when he became Member of Parliament for Serowe North and Mogae’s VicePresident. He held no actual ministerial portfolio during his Vice-Presidential tenure, but instead oversaw various public sector reforms. He ascended to the Presidency in 2008 after Mogae had served his two legally mandated terms. A pilot and career soldier, Khama is best known for his emphasis on discipline and delivery in the public sector. He is also a renowned conservationist who has spearheaded programmes and projects for the protection of endangered wildlife and habitats. Khama’s Presidency has also been characterised by the numerous philanthropic activities he has undertaken for and on behalf of the poor. Botswana’s presidents are an exceptional group, each with their own passions and proclivities in terms of the national agenda. Perhaps most significant and responsible for the seemingly effortless levels of continuity from one president to the next, from one administration to the one following, is the fact that each man mentored his successor and that in those years, close bonds formed between them. While none of them would take sole credit for Botswana’s outstanding achievements, it can and has to be said, that elements of each man’s personality has left its mark on the nation – that they are the personalities who have spearheaded progress. Diplomat Africa

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FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Ghanaian President H.E. John Dramani Mahama sworn in Although seen as a test for Ghana’s young democracy, Mills’ death seemed to unite Ghanaians in their shared grief. Mills began his four-year tenure in January 2009 and was months away from running for re-election when he succumbed to his struggle with throat cancer. Mills was a leader who was much loved and respected – a Ghanaian icon. Mahama assumed the role of Head of State, Head of Government and Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of Ghana from the time of the passing of the late President. He was sworn into office on the same day by the Chief Justice. The peaceful transition seemed to allay fears in a nation of past divisions. Ghana’s restoration seems to be confirmed as it soars to one of the continent’s strongest and most economically robust countries. Mahama’s legitimacy in his role is in no doubt, after a convincing win at the December polls which received the stamp of approval from international observers. His first address was to a sea of supporters and other dignitaries – including South African President Jacob Zuma and Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan. The presence of two former Ghanaian presidents also appeared to back this confidence.

On 7 January 2013, John Dramani Mahama was sworn in again at Independence Square in Accra as President of Ghana. Although newly elected, Mahama was in fact incumbent after he had taken over from the late John Atta Mills in July 2012, after Mills passed away suddenly in office. His new election into office gives him more movement in the position as he was democratically chosen by the population. 28

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His inauguration speech highlighted that although Ghana still has some way to go, the potential is readily there. Mahama’s speech focused more on Ghana’s Future Visions rather than foreign policy. His vision is to create jobs, build infrastructure, invest in agriculture and find sustainable solutions to power, water and sanitation issues. Part of the success of any country’s Vision, is the contribution to change from each individual in the population. Mahama was sure to highlight the significance of all Ghanaians. Mahama’s election is particularly significant to Ghana’s future. Just as the lucrative production of cocoa defined the last century for Ghana as the second largest producer in the world, new production of off-shore oil reserves is set to define the next century – with Mahama as the first president in Ghana’s new oil era. Mahama’s actions and how he


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

handles this new economic revolution through a flow of oil money into Ghana, will define the extent of the country’s growth and development. In conclusion, Mahama reiterated this by saying, “This is our country. This is our moment; Ghana’s time, once again, for greatness”. Biography President Mahama was born in Damongo on 29 November 1958. He attended Ghana Secondary School in Tamale where he obtained his Ordinary and Advanced level GCE Certificates. He then attended the University of Ghana, Legon where he received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in History in 1981. He completed his Post Graduate Studies in Communication in 1986. He then obtained a Post Graduate Diploma in Social Psychology from the Institute of Social Sciences in Moscow. Mahama is an avid reader, author and historian. Over the course of his career he has written for several newspapers and other publications, and recently published his first book, a memoir entitled “My First Coup D’etat and other true stories from the lost decades of Africa”. President Mahama has a keen interest in Technology and Agriculture, being a farmer himself. He works to encourage more young people to see farming as a viable business and not a subsistence activity. This has translated into his passion to see the Savanna Accelerated Development Authority (SADA) create new opportunities for people living in the Savanna areas of the country. President Mahama has been married for over twenty years to Lordina. They have eight children. Early Career In 1991, he become the Information, Culture and Research Officer at the Embassy of Japan in Accra. He moved on to become the International Relations, Sponsorship, Communication and Grants Manager at the Ghana Office of PLAN International, an International Development Charity that has committed itself to alleviating child poverty and improving the lives of Children all over the world. Political Life The President contested to serve as a Member of Parliament for the Bole-Bamboi Constituency in 1996, and won on the ticket of the NDC. He was re-elected to Parliament two more times in the year 2000, and 2004 prior to becoming the Vice-Presidential Candidate for the Party in 2008. Mahama has committed himself to fulfilling the vision of creating a Better Ghana by focusing on Jobs, Stability, and Development.

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FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Portrait of a Diplomat – Mrs Tuelonyana Oliphant

Giving a speech on Botswana Day Celebration 2012. In Botswana there exists a legion of a different kind consisting of female foreign envoys – and Mrs Tuelonyana Oliphant stands in the forefront of this prominent group. Currently serving as Botswana High Commissioner in the Zambian capital of Lusaka, this career diplomat has spent the last 28 years representing Botswana in various capacities – local, regional and international. 30

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Her interest in political and diplomatic matters and in the realm of governance can be traced as far back as her student days – a teenager in high school who witnessed development unfolding in Botswana. By the time Tuelonyana enrolled as an undergraduate in 1974, she’d decided the best way for her to contribute to Botswana’s advancement would be through the study and pursuit of

a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Public Administration and Political Science. She took this further when she graduated from Pennsylvania State University in the United States with a Masters in Public Administration in 1981. Tuelonyana Oliphant initially joined the public service in 1977 as an administrator in the Ministry of Mineral


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

With UN Representatives in Zambia Ms Wignaraja and His Excellency Mr Storella American Ambassador to Zambia. Resources and Water Affairs (today’s Ministry of Minerals, Energy and Water Affairs) – arguably the country’s most important agency in that it oversees the management, supervision and regulation of the country’s mining sector; the engine that has driven Botswana’s stunning levels of economic growth. Eight years later, she’d risen through the Ministry’s ranks and held the substantive post of Principal Administration Officer. If you ask her past and present colleagues to describe her, terms such as ‘highly competent’, ‘effective’, ‘knowledgeable’ and ‘personable’ crop up fairly persistently. An image begins to emerge of a woman who is passionate about her country, her career and the responsibilities she has been given. It made sense that such an individual should be transferred to Botswana’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation (MOFAIC), where her fervour translated itself into representing the people and President of Botswana to the best of her substantial abilities. Her initial posting was to Botswana’s Mission in the American capital of Washington D.C. as Counsellor. Since then her posts have included: Counsellor and Deputy Permanent Representative to Botswana’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations; Botswana’s first High Commissioner to the Republic of

Namibia; Ambassador to Angola on non-residential basis; Botswana’s High Commissioner to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; accredited Ambassador to the Republic of Ireland, Former Yugoslavia and the Czech and Slovak Republics; Deputy Permanent Secretary for Political Affairs in the Office of President – latterly promoted to the substantive post of Permanent Secretary in the same role; and alongside her current position, she is accredited Ambassador to Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as well as Dean of the Diplomatic Corps, the Dean of the Africa Group and the Dean of Commonwealth High Commissioners. She is formidable as a foreign envoy, a working woman, a wife and a mother – and she juggles all her various roles and responsibilities with grace and the dignity required of a diplomat; evidently with great joy. A woman who has achieved this much would seemingly have no spare-time, no intervals in which to pursue further study, other interests and pastimes. While she readily admits that her life is full, she has found that with time and practice, she has been able to bring balance to her existence by putting aside time for moments necessary for continued personal growth. Over the years, Mrs Oliphant has continued her education and training

Attending an official event in Zambia.

On official duty with the Minister of Trade Makgethu Malesu. in the areas of conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peace building, foreign policy-making processes, as well as the management of civilian/ military relations. She considers this training as further assets in the arsenal of resources that one needs as an African diplomat. When asked if all her leisure time pursuits are as serious, she smiles and assures us that her existence is well-rounded and that she is surrounded by family and friends. When opportunity allows, she takes a breath and reads an autobiography, listens to music and takes walks in the bush. Hers is a full life and looking at it explains why this particular diplomat brings such vigour and vitality to Botswana’s Foreign Service. Diplomat Africa

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FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Administration of Justice The High Court of Botswana arrangement was terminated in 1955 following the establishment of the Court of Appeal for the three High Commission Territories. The High Commission Territories continued to share resources and personnel, such as the Chief Justice and Judges until the Independence of Botswana. At Independence, there were very few modern structures in the country and one of them was Lobatse High Court, which also served as the Headquarters of the Judiciary. The construction of this new court, which has stood the test of time, started in 1955 and was completed in 1957.

Recalling the history of a country can never be complete without mentioning the judicial branch of government. The health of a country is determined and measured by its performance and the efficiency of its organs. The Botswana judiciary, unlike the two other arms of government, was the least developed until the mid-1990s. Meaningful development only started after the commencement of the localisation programme. Prior to that there were associated and uncoordinated developments of court infrastructure. The High Court was established as a superior court of record with, unlimited original jurisdiction to hear and determine any criminal and civil cases 32

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under any law. This therefore means that the doors of the High Court are open for cases of all types – from family matters to criminal matters. The development of the courts of Botswana can be tracked as far back as 1891. The administration Proclamation of 10 June 1891 empowered the High Commissioner to establish a High Court in the Protectorate. It was not until 1 January 1938 that the High Court for the Protectorate was established as a superior court of record. At that time, appeals from the High Court went directly to the Privy Council as there was no Court of Appeal in any of the three High Commission Territories. This

Up until 1992, Judges of the High Court were expatriates and were appointed on short-term contracts of two to three years. However this has since changed and today the High Court bench is fully localised. The localisation of the High Court started in 1992, when two citizen judges were appointed to the bench. The late Hon. Justice Moleleki Didwell Mokama was appointed the first citizen Chief Justice of Botswana. At the same time, Justice Julian Mukwesu Nganunu was appointed as a Judge of the High Court. This marked a change in the history of the Judiciary of Botswana, in that for the first time the Judiciary came under the control of citizens. Hon. Justice Maruping Dibotelo is the current Chief Justice of Botswana and was appointed in February 2010. Prior


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

to that, acting litigant judges were appointed. In 1992 Mr Lethebe Maine was appointed Acting Judge for a short period. The development of the country has been in step with the expansion of judicial needs and services. The High Court bench has been growing in response to the workload in the courts. Economic growth has resulted in increased litigation and impatience by litigants in the turnaround time of cases. For that reason, the establishment of judges had also increased to the current 24. The Administration of Justice is guided by its strategy whose vision, mission and values are: • Vision: Access to Justice for all by 2016. This means that all enjoy fair and equal access to justice within the jurisdiction of the courts. • Mission: To uphold human rights, democracy and

the rule of law in accordance with the constitution of Botswana. As an arm of Government they administer the law to uphold the rights of all people in the country and ensure that there is observance of the rule of law. • Values: In working towards its mission and vision, the Administration of Justice will be guided by the following values: • Integrity • Professionalism • Transparency • Quality Service with Courtesy • Empowerment of their team • Personal Responsibility • Teamwork Key Results Area/Strategic Theme • Dispute Resolution (in a just, peaceful and timely manner) • Accountable and Responsible Judiciary The recent relocation of the High Court from Lobatse to the capital city Gaborone was intended to take justice to the people; as it is the Court’s aspiration to promote access to justice and make the courts as user friendly as possible. Gaborone High Court Private Bag 00220 Gaborone Tel: + 267 3718000 Fax: +267 3915119 Toll free Number: 0800 600 922 Website: www.justice.gov.bw Diplomat Africa

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Chapter 2: TRADE AND INVESTMENT


TRADE AND INVESTMENT

OHADA Celebrating 20 years in 2013

OHADA is a system of business laws and implementing institutions adopted in a Treaty by seventeen West and Central African nations. OHADA is the French acronym for “Organisation pour l’Harmonisation en Afrique du Droit des Affaires”, which translates into English as “Organisation for the Harmonisation of Business Law in Africa”. It was created on 17 October 1993 in Port Louis, Mauritius. Initially, fourteen African countries signed the treaty, with two countries (Comoros and Guinea) subsequently adhering to the treaty and a third (the 36

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Democratic Republic of Congo) due to adhere shortly. The Treaty is open to all states, whether or not members of the Organisation of African Unity. As a West and Central African initiative to harmonise business laws and implement institutions, OHADA aims to find alternative solutions to the lack of economic growth in subSaharan Africa – a region which has challenged and puzzled development economists for several decades. The stated purpose of the initiative is to facilitate and encourage both domestic and foreign investment in the member states, and seeing as how most of the participating countries are former French colonies, they draw chiefly on a modernised French legal model to achieve their goals. The laws promulgated by OHADA are exclusively businessrelated. The OHADA treaty has created a supranational court to ensure uniformity and consistent legal interpretations across the member countries; and the French influence in court proceedings is apparent. The legal and judicial system of OHADA is a success story of legal integration. OHADA is a full service international legal personality which pursues working integration law between member countries. The working languages are French, English, Spanish and Portuguese. Objectives Its objective is the facilitation of trade and investment, ensuring legal certainty and judicial business


TRADE AND INVESTMENT

Member States • Benin • Burkina Faso • Cameroon • Central African Republic • Chad • Comoros • Republic of the Congo • Côte d’Ivoire • Equatorial Guinea • Gabon • Guinea • Guinea-Bissau • Mali • Niger • Senegal • Togo • Democratic Republic of Congo

activities. OHADA law is used to propel economic development and create a wide integrated market to make Africa a “development pole”. To achieve this objective, OHADA has an institutional system structured around bodies that are the Conference of Heads of State and Government, the Council of Ministers (political bodies) and the Permanent Secretariat – which is the executive to assist the Council of Ministers and coordinates preparation and monitoring of the procedure for the adoption of the Uniform Acts. Two other specialised bodies complement the institutional system – the Common Court of Justice and Arbitration of OHADA (CCJA) and the Regional School of Magistracy (ERSUMA). CCJA is the only successful experienced transferring judicial sovereignty in the world. ERSUMA aims to train professionals of OHADA in skills of economic development. It is also a centre for research in business law. The Revision of the Treaty on the Alignment of Business Law in Africa was adopted on 17 October 2008 in Quebec, Canada. The member states reaffirmed their determination to make further progress towards African unity

and their willingness to strengthen legal and judicial space of the Organisation for the Harmonisation of Business Law in Africa (OHADA). This ensured confidence in contributing to making Africa a pole for development; reaffirming the determination to make the harmonisation of business law a tool for continuous strengthening of the rule of law and legal and economic integration. The Revision determined to create all conditions necessary to consolidate the achievements of OHADA and to amplify and promote them. Twenty years The 20th Anniversary of OHADA will be marked in Burkina Faso in 2013. This anniversary is an opportunity to review and evaluate 20 years of OHADA. The Anniversary is planned in a draft program including a summit of the Heads of State of the 17 member states of OHADA, the meeting of the Council of Ministers and the organisation of several events for the business community and the general public. www.ohada.com www.ohada.org Diplomat Africa

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TRADE AND INVESTMENT

OHADA Member States’ Profiles Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso is a landlocked country in west Africa around 274,200km² in size with a population of 15.75 million. Its capital is Ouagadougou. Formerly called the Republic of Upper Volta, the country was renamed “Burkina Faso” on 4 August 1984 by thenPresident Thomas Sankara. “Burkina Faso” is understood as “Land of upright people” or “Land of honest people”. The Mossi Kingdoms became a French protectorate in 1896. After gaining independence from France in 1960, the country underwent many governmental changes, arriving at its current semi-presidential republic.

Cameroon

Benin

The Republic of Benin, formerly Dahomey, is in west Africa. A majority of the population live on its small southern coastline on the Bight of Benin. The capital of Benin is Porto-Novo, but the seat of government is in Cotonou, the country’s largest city. Benin covers an area of approximately 110,000km² with a population of approximately 9.05 million. Benin is a tropical, sub-Saharan nation, highly dependent on agriculture, with substantial employment and income arising from subsistence farming. The official language of Benin is French.

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The Republic of Cameroon is in west-central Africa. Cameroon’s coastline lies on the Bight of Bonny, part of the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean. Known for its geological and cultural diversity, natural features include beaches, deserts, mountains, rainforests, and savannahs. The highest point is Mount Cameroon in the southwest, and the largest cities are Douala, Yaoundé and Garoua. The country is well known for its music and successful national football team. French and English are the official languages. Cameroon enjoys relatively high political and social stability, permitting development of agriculture, roads, railways, and large petroleum and timber industries.

Central African Republic

The Central African Republic is a landlocked country in central Africa. The CAR covers a land area of about 620,000km²


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with an estimated population of 4.4 million. Bangui is the country’s capital. Two thirds of the country lies in the basins of the Ubangi River, which flows into the Congo River; while the rest lies in the Chari River basin, which flows into Lake Chad. The first multi-party democratic elections were held in 1993. Its potential lies in significant mineral resources (uranium, crude oil, gold, diamonds, lumber, and hydropower).

Chad

The Republic of Chad is a landlocked country in central Africa. Chad comprises of a desert zone, an arid Sahelian belt and a more fertile Sudanese savannah zone. Lake Chad is the second largest wetland in Africa. Chad’s highest peak is the Emi Koussi in the Sahara, and N’Djamena, (formerly Fort-Lamy), the capital, is the largest city. Arabic and French are the official languages. Since 2003, crude oil has become the country’s primary source of export earnings, superseding the traditional cotton industry.

Comoros

The Union of the Comoros is a sovereign archipelago island nation in the Indian Ocean, located at the northern end of the Mozambique Channel. Its capital is Moroni on Grande Comore. At 1,862km², excluding the contested island of Mayotte, the Comoros is the third-smallest African nation. The population is estimated at 798,000. A nation formed of many civilizations; it is noted for its diverse culture and history. Comoros has three official languages – Comorian, Arabic and French. The country consists of four major islands in the volcanic Comoros archipelago: Grande Comore; Mohéli; Anjouan; and Mayotte.

Republic of the Congo

The Republic of the Congo, also Congo-Brazzaville, is located in central Africa. The dominant Bantu-speaking tribes built trade links leading into the Congo River basin. Congo-Brazzaville was formerly part of the French colony of Equatorial Africa. Upon independence in 1960, French Congo became the Republic of the Congo. The People’s Republic of the Congo was a Marxist-Leninist single-party state from 1970 to 1991. Multiparty elections have been held since 1992, although a democratically elected government was ousted in the 1997 Republic of the Congo Civil War.

Ivory Coast

The Republic of Côte d’Ivoire is in west Africa. It has an area of 322,462km² and estimated population of 20,617,068. In 1893, it became a French colony and won independence on 7 August 1960. Its capital is Yamoussoukro and the biggest city is the port city of Abidjan. The country was a west African economic powerhouse with coffee and cocoa from 1960 to 1980. An economic crisis in the 1980s led to a period of political and social turmoil. The economy is largely market-based and relies heavily on agriculture. The official language is French.

Equatorial Guinea The Republic of Equatorial Guinea is located in middle Africa. With an area of 28,000km², it is one of Africa’s smallest countries. The country’s

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capital, Malabo, is on Bioko Island. Apart from the Spanish cities of Ceuta and Melilla on the Moroccan coast, it is the only territory in mainland Africa with Spanish as the official language. Equatorial Guinea has become one of sub-Sahara’s largest oil producers. With a population of 650,702, it is the richest country per capita in Africa and its GDP per capita ranks 64th in the world.

Gabon

The Gabonese Republic is a sovereign state on the west coast of central Africa. Located on the equator, Gabon has an area of nearly 270,000km² and its population is estimated at 1.5 million people. Its capital and largest city is Libreville. It’s independence from France was on 17 August 1960. In the early 1990s, Gabon introduced a democratic multi-party system. Low population density, abundant petroleum, and foreign investment have helped make Gabon one of sub-Saharan Africa’s most prosperous countries, with the highest HDI and the third highest GDP per capita (PPP) in the region.

Guinea

The Republic of Guinea is in west Africa. Formerly known as French Guinea, it is today sometimes called Guinea-Conakry or Guinea to distinguish it from its neighbour Guinea-Bissau and the Republic of Equatorial Guinea. It has a population of 10,057,975 and an area of 246,000km². Conakry is Guinea’s capital, largest city, and economic centre. French is the official language of Guinea. Guinea’s economy is largely dependent on agriculture and mineral production. It is the world’s second largest producer of bauxite, and has rich deposits of diamonds and gold.

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Guinea-Bissau

The Republic of GuineaBissau is in west Africa. It covers 36,125km² with an estimated population of 1,600,000. It became the Portuguese colony of Portuguese Guinea in the 19th century. Upon independence in 1973, recognised in 1974, the name of its capital, Bissau, was added to the country’s name to prevent confusion with the bordering Republic of Guinea. Guinea-Bissau has a history of political instability since gaining independence and no elected president has successfully served a full fiveyear term. Only 14% of the population speaks the official language, Portuguese.

Mali

The Republic of Mali is a landlocked country in west Africa. Its size is just over 1,240,000km² with a population of 14.5 million. Its capital is Bamako. The country’s economic structure centres on agriculture and fishing. Some of Mali’s prominent natural resources include gold, being the third largest producer of gold in the African continent, and salt. Part of French Sudan, the Sudanese Republic declared itself the independent Republic of Mali after 1960. After a long period of one-party rule, a 1991 coup led to a new constitution and the establishment of Mali as a democratic, multi-party state.

Niger

The Republic of Niger is a landlocked country in western Africa, named after the Niger River. Niger covers a land area of almost


TRADE AND INVESTMENT

1,270,000km² – the largest nation in west Africa, with over 80% covered by the Sahara desert. The population is just above 15,000,000. The capital city is Niamey. Niger is a developing country. Much of the non-desert portions of the country are threatened by drought. The economy is concentrated around subsistence and some export agriculture clustered in the more fertile south, and the export of raw materials, especially uranium ore.

Senegal

The Republic of Senegal is in west Africa. It owes its name to the Sénégal River that borders it to the east and north. Senegal is externally bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Senegal covers a land area of almost 197,000km² and has an estimated population of about 13 million. The climate is tropical. Dakar is the capital city of Senegal. During the 17th and 18th centuries, numerous trading posts, belonging to various colonial empires, were established along the coast. Senegal became independent from France in 1960.

Togo

The Togolese Republic is in west Africa. It extends south to the Gulf of Guinea, where the capital Lomé is located. Togo covers an area of approximately 57,000km² with a population of approximately 6.7 million. Togo is a tropical, sub-Saharan nation, highly dependent on agriculture, with a climate that provides good growing seasons. The official language is French. From the 16th century to the 18th century, the coastal region was a major slave trading centre, earning the surrounding region the name “The Slave Coast”. Togo gained its independence from France in 1960.

Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo, also DR Congo, Congo-Kinshasa or the DRC, is located in central Africa. It is the 2nd largest country in Africa by area and the 11th largest in the world. With a population of over 71 million, the DRC is the 19th most populous nation in the world. The country has access to the ocean through a 40km stretch of Atlantic coastline at Muanda and the roughly 9km wide mouth of the Congo River which opens into the Gulf of Guinea. The Second Congo War, beginning in 1998, devastated the country and is referred to as the “African world war”.

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Ghana and Nigeria among world’s fastest growing economies in 2012/2013

The West African nations of Ghana and Nigeria were expected to be among the world’s fastest growing economies in 2012, according to an emailed research note by Charles Robertson, global chief economist at Renaissance Capital. By Claude Harding Robertson’s data comprises consensus forecasts and the latest estimates of gross domestic product (GDP) growth figures.

2011

In 2011, Ghana was the fastest growing economy from a total of 43 markets included in Renaissance’s graphs. This growth was largely off the back of Ghana’s new oil industry. Nigeria had the 6th highest GDP growth, ahead of India. 42

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In 2012, Ghana was again expected to show the strongest GDP growth, with Nigeria in 4th position.

2012

However, in 2013 Ghana’s growth will slow down, while Nigeria is likely to remain in 4th position. “Finally Ghana shifts out of overdrive and gives Asia a chance to shine a little – though personally I doubt China will be growing at 9% in 2013. Around 7% to 8% looks more realistic, if only due to base effects,” notes Robertson. In 2013, South Africa, the continent’s largest economy, is likely to grow faster than Australia. “It might be a good time for the South Africans who emigrated to Australia to sell up their inflated property prices, sell the overvalued AUD and move back to South Africa,” says Robertson.

2013

“A lot of the emerging Europe, Middle East and Africa economies we cover are doing an awful lot better than most give them credit for. Helped by Nigeria, Kazakhstan and Ghana, they take two to three places in the top 5 in 2011-13. South Africa consistently beats developed market commodity exporters,” says Robertson. Diplomat Africa

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Botswana Life Insurance Limited The leading life insurance company in Botswana with a market share of over 80%.

Mission, vision and goals With nearly 40 years in Botswana’s life insurance market, Botswana Life commands extensive experience in the business, backed by the fact that it is the only home-grown life insurer in the country. BLIL, as it is also known, provides life insurance, investment and retirement products for retail and corporate clients. The company’s mission is to offer quality client-centric financial solutions and services to grow and protect the wealth of all stakeholders. According to the Chief Executive Officer, Catherine Lesetedi-Letegele, the medium to long-term goal of the company is to retain its leadership position in the market. This is especially important, given the proliferation of competition in the market. The CEO further explains that the company’s current strategy is very much focused on maintaining this leadership position while finding new ways into untapped segments. Botswana Life is proud to be part of a country that is advancing in almost all facets, technologically, economically and socially. Legislative changes are on the increase; the CEO admits that most of the acts that are being introduced are meant to improve competitiveness of the country and business, governance and general ease of doing business. “Modernisation of legislation is critical to business continuity, customer protection, attraction of foreign 44

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investors and a vibrant economy all at the same time,” she says. Investment into Botswana Botswana Life has, through structured bonds, invested over P1.5-billion in businesses in Botswana, making a significant contribution to the diversification strategy and job creation. The CEO adds that Botswana Life invests about 70% of all assets in the local economy and will continue to have this bias in support of the local economy and creation of jobs in the country. This is done voluntarily as legislation allows companies like Botswana Life to invest anywhere in the world, but they have seen the need to invest locally and add value to all stakeholders and the economy as a whole. The company’s contribution to the economy also extends to job creation and tax payments. Over the years, Botswana Life has also been instrumental in the development of the property market in Botswana, investing on its own or as part of a consortium, in a number of prominent residential and commercial properties in Gaborone such as Tapologo Estates, the SADC headquarters, Airport Junction and Lansmore Hotel. This undoubtedly facilitates development in the country, making Botswana an attractive investment destination for foreign investors.Lesetedi-Letegele asserts that Botswana Life will continue to look for other opportunities to enhance its contribution to the growth of the country’s economy. On the social front, the company’s life cover, investment and retirement planning products are designed to grow the wealth of individuals and provide them with financial security. On an annual basis, Botswana Life pays well over half a billion Pula in claims and benefits to policy holders, bearing testimony to the company’s mission statement. “We would like to see Batswana financially better off because of the products and services that we offer. We’re part of a BSE-listed company, Botswana Insurance Holdings Limited, which many Batswana have invested in. This is another way in which we facilitate wealth creation for Batswana,” adds Lesetedi-Letegele.

Putting the Customer First Botswana Life is currently on a buoyant three-year strategic journey that will ensure that the company is positioned to be the global benchmark insurer by 2014. In living up to its mission of being a truly clientcentric financial services provider, in 2012, the company launched a client service strategy themed “Here to Serve”, which aims to create a service environment characterised by excellence and high levels of customer satisfaction. The company strongly believes in impeccable service quality, as demonstrated by two of their core values; Service Excellence and Botho. This commitment to serving the needs of the market is also manifest in the product development process that the company follows. Botswana Life continuously revamps its products in order to make them relevant for current market demands. This is made possible by the company’s pool of experienced insurance, sales and actuarial professionals who possess not only technical skills but knowledge and needs of the market. It is through this innate knowledge that Botswana Life continues to respond positively to clients’ needs.

Giving Back Botswana Life makes a 1% contribution of profit after tax to the BIHL Trust, which is the corporate social responsibility vehicle of the BIHL Group. Since the establishment of the Trust, Botswana Life has contributed well over P10-million. These funds go towards empowering local communities by targeting projects that benefit the disadvantaged members of the community and help to alleviate poverty. Botswana as Africa’s Labour Market Botswana Life’s CEO believes that Botswana has great potential to provide a lucrative labour market for Africa and the world. This is based on the fact that some Batswana have been educated in the best institutions in the world, making them an asset anywhere. This has the advantage of exposing Batswana and Botswana to the world. “International exposure brings with it new thinking, new ideas and facilitates progressiveness,” she says.

www.botswanalife.co.bw Diplomat Africa

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Commemorating 30 years of the Debswana Jwaneng Mine Celebrations marking the 30-years anniversary of the Debswana Jwaneng Mine may have concluded at the end of 2012, however the collection of achievements generated over those three decades, have ensured lasting inspiration for the company to drive forward in the beautiful nation of Botswana. At the core of Debswana Jwaneng Mine is a commitment to sustainable partnership in diamond mining. Mining diamonds safely, cost effectively and responsibly remains a priority. Keeping a measure on the highest global mining standards helps deliver superior value – and this is, and has always been, at the heart of Debswana’s business strategy. Jwaneng Mine aims to ensure that its activities contribute significantly to the development and prosperity of Botswana and the community of Jwaneng and its surrounding areas. The occasion on Friday 7 December 2012 was memorably marked not only by the Chairman of the Debswana Board Mr Eric Molale as well as The General Manager of Jwaneng Mine Balisi Bonyongo and De Beers Executive Director, Strategy and Corporate, Bruce Cleaver, but also by His Excellency Lt. Gen. Seretse Khama Ian Khama. The President made mention of Jwaneng Mine’s numerous accomplishments and the positive role it has played on the nation of Botswana and sustainable economic growth. Its most notable accomplishment is its title as the 46

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richest diamond mine in the world by value. Jwaneng Mine’s contribution helped put Botswana among the world’s most significant players in diamond production. Lt. Gen Seretse Khama Ian Khama described Jwaneng as the jewel in Debswana’s diamond crown. Upon the opening of the Jwaneng Diamond Mine in 1982, Botswana was catapulted to the top tier of global diamond producers. The President went on to credit Debswana’s and Jwaneng Mine’s diamonds as the catalysers for Botswana’s middleincome status. The beneficiaries of these diamond revenues were in world-class physical and social infrastructure – roads, water, electricity, telecommunications, health, schools and human capital development. Debswana Diamond Company’s socio-economic development contribution has been made through its Corporate Social Investment programme which offers financial support to community development, health, sports development, education, small business development, arts and culture

development and environmental conservation. Debswana provides healthcare to communities around its mining areas through its two state-of-the-art COHSASA accredited hospitals in Jwaneng and Orapa – both of which service over 100,000 public patients annually. Jwaneng Mine has an impressive safety record. Its responsible and safe mining of diamonds has been possible through a number of safety initiatives, such as Jwaneng Premier SHE League (JPSL) and the Near-Hit Reporting Programme. Jwaneng Mine is home to the Aquarium – the only facility of its kind in the world. The ‘Aquarium’ is a unique packaging of matured technologies to achieve automation of diamond sorting. It houses a FISH (Fully Integrated Sort House) and a CARP (Completely Automated Recovery Plant). The President commended Debswana for having embarked on “High Performance Organisation (HPO)”, sharing the common goal of Vision 2016 to chart new ways of ensuring future survival, relevance and

prosperity. Grand efforts have been made towards cost containment, revenue improvement, improvements in organisational capability and ensuring long-term sustainability – a quest to reach global socio-economic development levels. As part of this, the CUT 8 project will deliver 100 million carats over a seven-year period to 2024. The project was launched in December 2010 and, at a cost of P24-billion, Cut 8 remains significant as it guarantees continued revenues which benefit all Batswana. This extension of the life of Jwaneng Mine has already created thousands of jobs for the local community with beneficial skills transfer. Chairman of The Debswana Board, Mr Eric Molale, hailed the commemoration as one of the proudest and most significant milestones in Botswana as it serves as a reminder to the world of the diamonds in Botswana making the country an outstanding and unique success story. Molale noted with appreciation the contribution from the men and women of the mine. To achieve diversification, they recognised the need to participate in other stages of the diamond pipeline – cutting, polishing, trading and eventually manufacturing of jewellery. Jwaneng’s expansion is in line with diversification aims to further catapult Botswana as a diamond hub into the future. The development of a diamond centre in Botswana will directly contribute to this. ABOUT DEBSWANA DIAMOND COMPANY • Debswana is a successful publicprivate partnership which has been in existence for 43 years. It is a 50/50 partnership between the Government of Botswana and De Beers. • Over 30% of government revenues are generated from Debswana diamond revenues. • Revenues from diamonds have been used to develop Botswana over the past 43 years. • The company operates four diamond mines and one coal mine. The diamond mines are Orapa, Letlhakane, Damtshaa and Jwaneng, and the coal mine is Morupule Coal Mine. Diplomat Africa

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Morupule Coal Mine (MCM)

Mission We mine coal and deliver energy for the benefit of our stakeholders in a sustainable manner.

First Production MCM started production in 1973 as an Anglo American Corporation subsidiary with the main objective being to supply coal to the then Bamangwato Concessions Limited mine (now BCL) and BPC power plant situated in Selebi Phikwe. In 2000 Debswana acquired MCM as its 100% owned subsidiary and it has since grown both in stature and production to be a dominant influence in the coal mining sector in the country and region.

Core Values • Safety • Passion • Caring • Excellence • Working Together • Growth

The Coalfield and Reserves MCM is situated above the Kgaswe coalfield, which is endowed with good-quality coal contained within four main seams. It is estimated that MCM has reserves of approximately 2.91 billion tonnes within the number

Location Morupule Coal Mine (MCM) is located 14km west of Palapye in the Eastern parts of Botswana along the A14 main road. Vision To be a leading coal energy business.

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01 and 02 seams and total inferred inventory coal resources are estimated to be 12 billion tonnes for all seams within the total mining lease area. The deepest, number 01 seam, is the thickest and most consistently developed and is also currently the only seam being mined. Safety, Health and the Environment MCM values the safety of its employees and for this reason, safety has been positioned as the number one core value. Numerous management and employee safety related programs have been implemented to promote zero harm. The latter together with initiatives aimed at positive behavioural change have resulted in the Mine achieving


TRADE AND INVESTMENT

low injury frequency rates. In addition, MCM is ISO 14001 certified and is curently seeking its OHSAS 18001 certification. The Expansion Phase The main customer for MCM’s thermal coal is the adjacent Botswana Power Corporation (BPC); with supply historically going to the existing 150MW Morupule ”A” Power Station. In 2008, South Africa advised Botswana of its intention to gradually terminate export of power to Botswana and other neighbouring states. This has resulted in BPC constructing a new 600MW power station. MCM rose to this national challenge for power supply and executed its own MCM Phase I expansion project that resulted in a threefold increase in installed capacity to 3.4mtpa. The scope of the project covered infrastructural as well as capacity

upgrades leading to the main ventilation system being upgraded to 600m3/s, the introduction of two new continuous miner sections, an entirely new surface screening and crushing plant and associated auxiliary engineering and support infrastructure and services. MCM has successfully completed this expansion project and is poised to meet the Nation’s demand for power through the supply of coal to BPC. Washed Coal In 2007, MCM commissioned a coal washing plant and subsequently now supplies washed coal in addition to thermal coal. The Grade “A” washed coal is sold both locally and into the SADC region where it is consumed by other coal fired power stations, various industrial users and is also an alternative to coking coal in metallurgical processes; due to its low sulphur and phosphorous content.

Exports into regional markets continue to grow and this gives rise to economic growth, employment opportunities and benefits fo the surrounding community in which MCM operates. The Future Ahead Since the successful completion of its Phase 1 expansion, MCM continues to explore its vast reserves and is currently undertaking further exploratory and investigative work (Phase II expansion) with the objective of establishing an open pit mine in the northern boundary of its mining lease area to meet the additional regional and overseas markets’ demand for coal.

Tel: +267 492 0667 Fax: +267 492 0643 www.mcm.co.bw Diplomat Africa

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Honing your competitive edge African Trader is an independent journal focusing on business conditions and opportunities in Africa. Published five times yearly, African Trader is essential reading for anyone involved in trade development in Africa.

opportunities throughout the continent. Regular features focus on new projects and products in all sectors, especially agriculture, transport and logistics, commerce, industry, tourism and technology. The in-depth focus on countries in Inside Africa provides the most up to date regional information, essential for informed decision making. Distribution Channels Its carefully targeted distribution strategy makes African Trader a powerful promotional medium, offering advertisers the opportunity to reach decision-makers throughout Africa and the rest of the world.

African Trader is an authoritative journal, featuring contributions from subject specialists, policy-makers, government and business representatives. As a result, it: • Provides a comprehensive overview of business conditions and developments in Africa; • Promotes marketing, trade and business opportunities in Africa; • Encourages Foreign Direct Investment into Africa by providing investors with accurate, relevant information; • Highlights import and export opportunities for African and international entrepreneurs; • Creates networking opportunities for all SMMEs; and • Profiles companies, products and services across Africa. Content Appearing in each issue are informed articles on a wide range of issues, highlighting developments and

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• First and business class airline lounges; • First and business class African and International airlines; • Exhibitions and Conferences; • African Government Departments and NGOs; • Professional Bodies and Institutes throughout Africa; • Foreign Chambers and Embassies; • African universities and libraries; • African Trader’s database – 1000s of companies across all industries in Africa. Target Audience • Business people, investors and top government officials flying first and business class across Africa; • African and International leaders and decision makers operating across all sectors and regions of the continent; • Aid and development organisations; • Funding institutions and investors; • Decision makers in government. THOMSON PUBLICATIONS Postal: Postnet Suite 77 Private Bag X10015 – Code 2125 Contact: Dean Thomson Cell: +27 83 649 6466 E-mail: dean@thomsonpub.com subs@africantrader.co www.africantrader.co


Chapter 3: INTRA-AFRICA


INTRA-AFRICA

Proudly African

Proudly African

Boosting inter-trade & cultural relations across the continent

www.ProudlyAfrican.info

Boosting Trade, Development and Cultural Relations Across Africa

Thapelo Letsholo, Global Village Africa Proudly African is an initiative of Global Village Africa which is a marketing and business platform geared towards showcasing and harmonising Africa’s development, trade and cultural diversity to a global audience. 52

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This is where the BEST OF AFRICA in business, government and non-profit organisations unite, promoting their vision and best practice in order to find the right customers, partnerships and joint ventures – in order to grow alongside the continent’s indisputable economic potential.

The initiative has an unstoppable magnetic presence with its ever growing country and sectoral window already in over 20 African states. We invite all leaders in business and government across Africa to showcase and integrate their visions and activities so as to promote inter-Africa trade, investment and technology transfer from around the globe. We also invite all Africa’s media, trade exhibitions, conferences and business chambers to use the platform to gain mutually beneficial exposure. Fully unlocking Africa’s promise requires greater continentwide economic integration and inter-trade; such as in Europe, where integration has enabled the continent to become the world’s single biggest market. Integration and inter-trade is not only urgent, but also indispensable to unlock economies of scale and propel Africa’s competitiveness in the global economy, thus aligning the continent with the global flows of trade and finance as an equal partner. Africa’s massive economic potential still lies largely untapped – but not for much longer. The world is coming and so is the dream of a more united Africa. We need to make sure we maximise on the growth for the benefit of all of Africa and its people.

www.ProudlyAfrican.info


INTRA-AFRICA

Proudly African

Boosting inter-trade & cultural relations across the continent

www.ProudlyAfrican.info

Africa wants TRADE not AID Launching a Trade for Development Gateway for Africa

Economic Freedom Africa is by far the world’s wealthiest continent in terms of natural resources - and Trade for Development (T4D) strongly opposes exploitation of the people of Africa; instead advocating the utilisation of the continent’s resources and skills for the benefit of the continent’s people. T4D aims to reach out to the unseen and marginalised people of Africa; to develop and empower them with the skills and tools to participate meaningfully and benefit from the unprecedented economic, social and industrial growth on the continent. T4D advocates active participation on development and manufacturing levels. Fair Trade and Investment Capital Trade Africa (CTA) and the Africa Vision Foundation (AVF),in 54

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Marshin Consortium Engineers prepared to transfer technology and skills for Assembly in Africa. collaboration with Proudly African, have launched the Trade for Development (T4D) programme based in South Africa which facilitates training and skills development in the manufacturing, construction, agri-food and hospitality industries with job creation as a primary and desired outcome. There are multiple programmes under development that all follow the same methodology, whereby a portion of the trade and investment revenues in each venture are allocated to skills and SME development. These are some of the programmes we are working on: • Manufacturing and Assembly in Africa

T4D is planning the development of various factories and warehouses, as well as the import of knocked-down parts and components for assembly and distribution in Africa. The factories and warehouses will act as incubation centres and facilities for training and skills development. • T4D Skills and Technology Transfer Participating international companies will transfer technology and skills to Africa where T4D establishes African manufacturing and assembly plants, creating Foreign Direct Investment as well as Skills Development and Transfer through the T4D LifeCycle Academy. • Hospitality Industry Procurement T4D has successfully negotiated with several hotel and hospitality groups to convert normal supply and procurement activities into additional social responsibility activities by contributing part of the trading profits to the T4D’s entrepreneurship, skills and SME Development programmes. • Hospitality Industry Training T4D will train people within the hospitality industry where we will offer training through various partners such as POPUP (The People Upliftment Programme) in hospitality-related courses, so that graduates can be absorbed by the hospitality industry once they have completed training.


INTRA-AFRICA

Annual Ambassadors Business Network Forum Emperors Palace. • African Coffee Belt - Connexion Coffee www.ctafrica.com Burundi, which is one of the coffee belt countries, has the lowest GDP of any country in the world. There are roughly 800,000 small holder coffee farmers with an average income of a mere $130 per annum($0.35 Cents per day) T4D has been in negotiations with the various coffee stakeholders in Burundi and other coffee-belt countries in Africa to change these circumstances by offering coffee farmers a premium price for the quality coffee they grow. T4D aims to reduce poverty, generate opportunity, and transfer sustainable life skills and environmental and agricultural education through providing support to participating African Coffee Belt Countries. Who is CAPITAL TRADE AFRICA? www.ctafrica.com CTA is a large network of wellconnected, hard-working consultants across Africa with a shared passion to promote economic and social development on this diverse and vibrant continent; and they share their extensive experience with their clients globally. They have in-depth knowledge and experience with solid, sustainable, credible and transparent relationships throughout Africa. Who is Africa Vision Foundation? AVF is a non-profit foundation with a solid track record of connecting needs and resources for the upliftment and development of people from a human-needs perspective; as well

as creating wealth for people on the African Continent through Connection Commodities (PTY) Ltd. Its Founder and President, Hennie Hanekom, has been involved in upliftment projects in Africa for more than 20 years. Who is Proudly African? www.ProudlyAfrican.info Proudly African is an initiative of Global Village Africa - which is a marketing and business platform geared towards showcasing and harmonising Africa’s development, trade and cultural diversity to a global audience. This is where the BEST OF AFRICA in business, government and non-profit organisations unite, promoting their vision and best practice in order to find the right customers, partnerships and joint ventures. Some of the negotiations currently underway are for the import and assembly of knocked-down high quality vehicles, motorcycles, and generators with specific applications for African conditions and uses. Marshin Consortium under the leadership of Mr Marshin Dong from China is leading this initiative and has over 20years’ experience in the industry whilst distributing products worldwide. Marshin Consortium in collaboration with various global component manufacturers such as Lister Petter (UK), Yanmar (Japan), Cummins and OilMate (USA) have developed products for the African Market that is Strong, Powerful, Affordable, Reliable and Economical. For the Hospitality Industry T4D will

Design Brief: Strong, Powerful, Affordable, Reliable and Economical.

Beaumont and Brown – UK. supply products from world renowned linen manufacturer Beaumont and Brown (UK) and amongst others, local companies such as Khayelitsha Cookies. An agreement with RESOLOO has been signed to provide Sanitation Solutions connected to T4D upliftment programs in communities on the African Continent. We are continually adding new innovative programmes and products from Africa and around the world. For more information on how to participate contact: Hennie Hanekom, President Africa Vision Foundation hennie@africavision.org.za Dirk Kotze – CEO Capital Trade Africa dirk@ctafrica.com Mr Theo Poggenpoel Head of Africa Relations theo@ctafrica.com www.Trade4Development.com

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INTRA-AFRICA

AFCCA Connects Intra-African Construction Master Builders South Africa (MBSA) hosted high-level members of the African Federation of Construction Contractors’ Associations (AFCCA) from various African countries in Johannesburg on 29 January 2013.

Minister T W Nxesi

Itumeleng Dlamini, Executive Director, Master Builders South Africa

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MBSA is the leading national federation of registered employer associations representing construction and building contractors in the formal sector in South Africa. This Executive Bureau Committee (Exco) meeting was a privilege for MBSA and South Africa to host, as it allowed an opportunity to further open the gates of construction with other African countries and encouraged discussion on industry strengths as well as gaps for exchange and partnership. Esteemed guests of Ms Itumeleng Dlamini, Executive Director of Master Builders South Africa, included Mrs Eunice Forbes, Former President of Master Builders South Africa, Engineer Abdel-Aziz Hassan, AFCCA First Advisor, as well as Minister T W Nxesi MP, South African Minister of the Department of Public Works. Also in attendance was the President of the MBSA, Danie Hattingh, as well as AFCCA members from Egypt, Morocco, Malawi, Sudan, Burundi, and Ghana.

Minister T W Nxesi was invited to present the Keynote Address at the Welcome Function for the Exco, held at the Country Club Johannesburg, Woodmead on Tuesday 29 January 2013. The Minister called for the regulation of construction policy in the public sector and alluded to the fact that hosting AFCCA members was a significant milestone for the construction industry of South Africa as it had potential to create a step further in the development of international trading in the building sector. This includes trading across borders within the African continent to enhance delivery capabilities across Africa. MBSA is an acknowledged leader representing South Africa in the formal sector. AFCCA is acknowledged on the African continent as it represents construction contractors in 30 different countries. The Minister alluded to the similarities between AFCCA’s principles and that of the Public Sector of South Africa. The aims of AFCCA resonated with the Minister’s view of South Africa’s own thinking to build ties with an established group of contractors in each country in Africa. This can be aided through the establishment of networks, databases, and consortiums. The strengthening of such, through pioneers like MBSA and AFCCA, will have a far-reaching effect. The core of African growth is infrastructure development – through the public sector and the private sector. MBSA’s initiative of hosting the AFCCA Exco meeting contributes to


INTRA-AFRICA

From left – Back row = Toufik Cherradi (Morocco), Reda Laraichi (Morocco), Eng. Hassan Abdel-Aziz Hassan (AFCCA First Advisor Egypt), Newton Kambala (Malawi), Ing. Sabbas Pantaleon (Burundi), El Walid Mustafa Mohamed (Sudan). Front row (from left) = Martins Kwasi Nnuro (Ghana), Abdelhaq Laraichi (Morocco), Ambassador Ibrahim El-Cheoumi (AFCCA Secretary General, Egypt), Eunice Forbes (South Africa). the development of inter-Africa trading opportunities. This is pertinent as a result of the numerous infrastructure development projects currently underway all over the continent – the fastest growing region in the world. The construction industry is therefore central to Africa’s growth. As the Department of Public Works is responsible for the policy and regulation of the construction sector, Minister Nxesi went on to divulge areas of the 2012 Infrastructure Development Plan for South Africa. The Plan includes 18 Strategic Infrastructure Projects (SIPs), which not only relate to within South Africa – but also extend beyond the borders. SIP 17 is to be unlocked in the coming months and years and outlines “Regional integration for African cooperation and development”. The aim of SIP 17 will be for South Africa to develop linkages with the rest of Africa through energy, road, mining, water, port, rail, and air links. Many areas in the construction sector require cooperation within the region as there is so much to be learnt from each country. Government is aware it needs to be receptive to the needs of AFCCA and the role it’s playing in this cooperation. This will result in the creation of an enabling environment for development in Africa. There is a call for strong regional economic and social ties within the private and public sectors. Only

through cooperation and collaboration throughout Africa, can growth and development in the continent be achieved to its potential. A current example of this is the North-South Corridor Project – the flagship of the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa and the Presidential Infrastructure Champions Initiative, which South Africa is honoured to champion. To move away from reliance on the West, Africa must determine its own agenda and growth path. This is possible through initiatives such as AFCCA. Cooperation within the private sector is essential to this. This is directly in line with the 2013 AU Summit whose theme is “Pan Africanism and African Renaissance”. Central to this will be deliberations on mechanisms to increase and promote intra-African trade. These efforts advocate for the streamlining and aligning of the much demanded built environment in Africa. The hope is that by minimising red tape, access to the utilisation of skills throughout the continent will be created. AFCCA promotes sound practices and good governance in the built environment and also champions high standards of training and development in the interest of the public for sustainable maintenance. MBSA is a proud representative of South Africa on this platform.

Mrs Eunice Forbes

Eng. Hassan Abdel-Aziz Hassan, AFCCA First Advisor

El Walid Mustafa Mohamed (Sudan) left and Sabbas Pantaleon (Burundi) right at the AFCCA Executive Bureau meeting Diplomat Africa

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Stunning Surroundings THAT SAY IT ALL

Just a lazy step from the Indian Ocean, 7 km from the airport and close to the bustling city, Southern Sun Maputo offers the business and leisure traveller great value in an unbeatable location. Exceptional staff, spectacular cuisine and impeccable all-round hospitality, it’s no wonder it’s Maputo's favourite stay.

The recognition you deserve

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tsogosun.com


Chapter 4: TRAVEL AND TOURISM


TRAVEL AND TOURISM

Southern Africa to host 2013 UNWTO General Meeting

Southern African neighbours Zimbabwe and Zambia have been jointly awarded the privilege of hosting the 20th session of the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) General Assembly in August 2013. This grand event will be hosted in the resort area of the Victoria Falls, a World Heritage site shared between the two countries. The General Assembly is the supreme organ of the UNWTO Organisation. Its ordinary sessions, held every two years, are attended by delegates of the Full and Associate Members, as well as representatives from the Business Council. It is the most important meeting of senior tourism officials and high-level representatives of the private sector from all over the world. The planned UNWTO General Assembly will give the region an unparalleled opportunity to refine its investment and trade, as the world’s gaze is fixed on it, before, during, and after the event. The current global economic meltdown, led by the recession characterising the industrialised 60

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TRAVEL AND TOURISM

west, combined with the massive natural resources still to be exploited on the African continent, present southern Africa’s almost unlimited opportunities to attract investment, increase trade and attract immigration. Tourism offers the most readily available and most appropriate tool to grow national economies in the shortest possible time and lends itself to combating poverty and unemployment in the region. The upcoming UNWTO meeting is not only a great honour for southern Africa, speaking volumes about its limitless potential, but it is also a great opportunity to reposition the region as a major attraction on the world map. Receiving this honour to host is not only greatly encouraging for Zimbabwe and Zambia, but also for the region as a whole. UNWTO The World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) is the United Nations agency responsible for the promotion of responsible, sustainable and universally accessible tourism. As the leading international organisation in the field of tourism, UNWTO promotes tourism as a driver of economic growth, inclusive development and environmental sustainability and offers leadership and support to the sector in advancing knowledge and tourism policies worldwide. UNWTO encourages the implementation of the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism, to maximise tourism’s socioeconomic contribution while minimising its possible negative impacts, and is committed to promoting tourism as an instrument in achieving the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), geared towards reducing poverty and fostering sustainable development. UNWTO generates market knowledge, promotes competitive and sustainable tourism policies and instruments, fosters tourism education and training, and works to make tourism an effective tool for development through technical assistance projects in over 100 countries around the world. UNWTO’s membership includes 155 countries, six Associate Members and over 400 Affiliate Members representing the private sector, educational institutions, tourism associations and local tourism authorities. www2.unwto.org Diplomat Africa

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Tourism in Nigeria

Tourism is high in the government agenda in Nigeria as they seek to diversify the economy from a singleproduct economy in a move away from oil. A master plan has been mapped out to develop the sector which is starting to see huge growth. The vast natural and cultural heritage of Nigeria has much to offer but has been hampered under years of upheaval and lack of funding. Tourism will be receiving attention equal to that given to the oil and gas industry, as a matter of priority. The hope is that Nigeria will follow in the footsteps of countries like Ghana and South Africa and spend money on developing 62

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the sector and then hand it over to the private sector. Tourism is vital for Nigeria’s economic advancement and the current administration understands this. Funding and investment would go a long way towards modernising the required infrastructure facilities which are affected by underdevelopment in some parts of the country. The impediments to tourism have been actively tackled by the new administration since assuming office. Nigeria’s variety and vast potential in tourist attractions include large rivers, beautiful coastline beaches, unique wildlife, natural tropical

forests, magnificent waterfalls, rapidly growing cities, climatic conditions conducive to holidaying, traditional cultural heritage, monuments and arts and crafts. The untapped tourist attractions are boundless and are currently enjoyed by outsiders in search of exotic adventures and new challenging experiences. Reforms are set to enhance professionalism in marketing and promotion of tourism on an international and local stage. This of course goes hand-in-hand with working on the country’s tarnished image. There is a renaissance of West African tourism underway with


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Nigeria and Ghana agreeing to be the nucleus. The aim is to promote the region as a multi-destination tourist centre, involving tours in the sub-region. This was agreed upon in discussions held between the Director General of the National Tourism Development Corporation of Nigeria, Otunba Ausegun Runsewe, and the Ghana Tourist Board. It was agreed that West Africa can offer so much to the world tourism market and a collective effort under the ECOWAS banner is needed to promote and market the region.  The tourism investment atmosphere in Nigeria is now positive given the abundant resources available, large market, enthronement of enduring democracy, and a package of incentive put together by government. Foreign investors and other interested individuals should take these advantages to invest in the Nigerian tourism industry for sustainable and profitable returns. Due to the importance the Nigerian government places on the tourism industry, a number of incentive strategies were adopted. These included the provision of basic infrastructure, the concession of land for tourism development, tourism as a preferred sector receiving tax rebates and soft loans with lengthy periods of grace. The industry has a number of regulatory policies and laws to protect both tourists as well as those involved in the industry. Nigeria has over 700km of unpolluted sandy beaches and

conserves and protects eight national parks and over 10 game reserves. National Parks: • Chad Basin: Covering 2,258 km² of Borno and Yobe; including part of the Hadejia-Nguru wetlands and the Sambisa Game Reserve. • Cross River: Covering 4,000 km² of Bashi-Okwango and Oban Forest Reserves; last remaining rain forest in Nigeria. • Gashaka-Gumti: Covering 6,731 km² of pristine wilderness mountains in Taraba and Adamawa; Nigeria’s most ecologically diverse conservation area. • Kainji: Covering 5,382 km² of the Borgu and Zugurma Game Reserves in Kwara and Niger State; also contains the Kainji Dam. • Kamuku: Covering 1,121 km² of Kaduna; has a typical Sudanian Savanna ecology; adjacent to the Kwiambana Game Reserve. • Okumu: Covering 181 km² of Edo and part of the Okomu Forest Reserve; holds only one third of the rich forest it once was and is the last habitat for many endangered species. • Old Oyo: Covering 2,512 km² of Oyo and Kwara; rich in plant, animal and cultural resources and is easily accessible. • Yankari Game Reserve: Covering 2,244 km² of Bauchi; most pop­ular reserve in Nigeria because of beauty, size and

accessibility; includes Wikki Warm Springs by Gagi River. Popular beaches include: • Bar Beach • Calabar Beach • Coconut Beach • Eleko Beach • Ibeno Beach • Lekki Beach • Tarkwa Bay Other tourist areas of interest include: • Agbokim Waterfalls • Azumini Blue River Rose • Benue River Valleys • Birikisu Sungbo Shrine  • Birnin Kudu Rock Paintings • Ezeagu Tourist Complex • Gurara Falls • Hills of Benue • Idanre Hills  • lgbo-Ukwu Burial Sites • Ikogosi Warm & Cold Springs • Lake Chad  • Long JuJu Shrine of Arochukwu • Mambilla Plateau • Mbari Cultural Centre • Niger River Valleys • Nok Village • Obudu Ranch  • Ogbunike Cave • Oguta Lake Holiday Complex • Okomu Wildlife Sanctuary  • Rojenny Tourist Village • Sillicon Hill • Yola Municipality • Zuma Rock  www.onlinenigeria.com Diplomat Africa

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2013 Promises to be a significant year for tourism in RETOSA Member States

Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe were also in attendance. All these RETOSA Member States have some of the most well-known Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Events (MICE) destinations, products and facilities, which are on par with the World’s best. Among the major attractions in these countries are the Okavango Delta, Thaba Bosiu, Lake Malawi, the beaches of Mozambique and Seychelles, The Namib Desert and the Swazi Cultural Village. The dynamism of RETOSA Member States’ capabilities to host major events is endorsed by the fact that Zambia and Zimbabwe will co-host the UNWTO General Assembly in August. This is a mega event which provides the two hosts a global platform to market themselves as serious players in the MICE industry – and as leisure destinations. Brand Zambia and Brand Zimbabwe will be in the global spotlight before, during and after the UNWTO General Assembly. It is anticipated to bring thousands of key global tourism stakeholders to the shores of Southern Africa. The year started with 2010 FIFA World Cup hosts South Africa, hosting the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations (AFCON). South Africa has proved to the world its competency and capability to host mega events. Following on from this, is the third edition of the Seychelles International Carnival of Victoria, held between 8 and 10 February 2013 – once again a focal point for representatives from the world’s most famous carnivals, invited to the islands to take part in this exciting international event. Also, Meetings Africa, an annual Business Tourism trade fair took place from 18 to 20 February 2013. Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles and Swaziland co-exhibited in the RETOSA and Boundless Southern Africa umbrella pavilion, themed “Experience Southern Africa”.

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In addition, Namibia is at an advanced stage of its preparation to host the Adventure Travel World Summit (ATWS) in October 2013. This event brings all global players in adventure tourism to Southern Africa. The Summit will give stakeholders the opportunity to take stock of what the region offers to adventure tourists across the globe. According to Chris ‘Chez’ Chesak, VP of Business Development at the Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA), the ATWS often reaches out to major mass media outlets like the BBC and CNN who cover the Summit. “We always have several ‘adventure’ publications represented at the Summit including National Geographic Traveller, Men’s Journal, Wanderlust and Backpacker, as well as editors and staff writers from publications like The New York Times, USA Today, Conde Nast, The London Times, and others,”


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Chesak told RETOSA. “This is another significant milestone and the first of its kind in the Adventure Tourism sector in Southern Africa,” he said. Widespread international press coverage and attention is expected for these events which are sure media-pleasers, as they bring global tourism industry stakeholders to Southern African shores. These, and many other national events outlined in the RETOSA regional tourism events calendar, will put the spotlight not only on the hosting countries but on the regional destination. The economies of RETOSA Member States are improving. Governments from the region are responding positively to the needs of the sector by improving infrastructure, including Airports, Border Posts and Trans-Boundary Road Systems, thus further improving the connectivity and accessibility of regional tourism products. More so, recently the Heads of States and Governments approved the SADC Regional Infrastructure Development Master Plan, which will definitely guide the sustainability of these improvements. RETOSA will be implementing the following key projects, among others, during the course of the year: • Regional Tourism Quality Standards and Skills Development Workshop; • RETOSA Member States National Tourism Statistics Capacity Building Workshop; • Southern Africa Tourism Chief Executives Forum; • Travel, Trade and Media Famaliarisation Trips to Member States; • RETOSA Website and Regional Tourism Database Enhancement Program; • Umbrella Southern Africa pavilion at targeted major events.

With these planned events, 2013 marks the beginning of positioning Southern Africa as a more competitive regional tourism destination brand and a key player in job creation for citizens in the region. RETOSA takes this opportunity to wish all Member States and Southern Africa tourism stakeholders a fruitful year. About RETOSA The Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa (RETOSA) is a permanent institution of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) responsible for tourism growth and development. In part, the aims of RETOSA are to increase tourism to the region through sustainable developments and initiatives, effective destination marketing, improved regional competitiveness, create investment awareness for tourism development in the region and ultimately, reduce poverty in local communities. RETOSA works with Member States’ Tourism Ministries, Tourism Boards, private sector Tourism Associations and numerous strategic partners such as United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO), Commonwealth Secretariat, Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and Centre for the Development of Enterprise (CDE). Kwakye Donkor Email: marketing@retosa.co.za Website: www.retosa.co.za Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ RegionalTourismOrganisationOfSouthernAfrica LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/retosa-online Twitter: @RETOSAOnline YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/RETOSAOnline Tel: +27 11 315 2420 | Fax: +27 11 315 2422

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Proudly African

Boosting inter-trade & cultural relations across the continent

www.ProudlyAfrican.info

Freedom Air Charter Services

Regardless of your destination in Africa, or the size of your group, Freedom Air will ensure that you arrive safely and in style. Freedom Air is an African air charter operator that offers flights to the discerning traveller. Regardless of your destination or the size of the group, Freedom Air will ensure that you arrive safely and in style. With a reputation that has been built on an unwavering commitment to safety and service, Freedom Air is proud to facilitate flights to and from any serviceable airport in Africa. Well-trained personnel are available 66

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24-hours a day, seven days a week, ensuring that you receive the best possible service and solutions perfectly suited to your travel requirements. Why Travel with Freedom Air? • Luxury options for high-profile travellers; • Flexibility to travel to any destination, at any time; • No queues or baggage delays; • A personalised meet-and-greet service; • Safe, convenient transport for groups of any size, from two to 100; • “Flying safaris” and tour charters to destinations not serviced by the regional and/or domestic airlines; • Travel to destinations where regular scheduled flights do not go;

• Tailor your own travel itinerary. Freedom Air Services Freedom Air offers charters and personalised service for any travel requirements. No matter the size of the group, the time of your travel or your destination, Freedom Air will get you there safely and conveniently. • Private Charters Freedom Air’s private charters offer travel for any group size on a craft that will fit both your budget and requirements. Charters can be booked to travel to almost any destination and can be planned around your schedule, eliminating the queues and baggage delays of regular scheduled flights. • Luxury Corporate Charters Freedom Air’s corporate charters


TRAVEL AND TOURISM

offer a specialised, luxury charter service for the discerning traveller. The preference for high-profile travellers, this VIP option provides all the comforts of first-class travel, including premium cabins, catering, and airport handling facilities. • Tours and Travel Freedom Air Travel offers unique adventure packages and trips to breath-taking destinations. Experience a fly-in Safari package to some of South Africa’s best Big 5 Game Reserves, or let us create a special holiday package that is tailored to your needs. • Cargo Charters Freedom Air utilises a wide-body aircraft to safely deliver your goods to any destination in Africa. The Freedom Air Fleet Freedom Air’s comprehensive network of nationwide charter aircrafts provides suitable and cost-effective charters for every travel requirement. • Light Single Engine (piston) A light, single-engine piston charter aircraft – useful for low-budget charter operations. These aircraft are restricted to fair weather/visual conditions and flight by day only. • Light Twin-Engine (piston) A light, twin-engine piston charter aircraft – ideal for economical charter operations. Flights are available in most weather conditions and at night. • Turbo Prop Turbo Prop aircrafts are ideal for corporate charter, larger groups and

charter flights over longer sectors as they are fitted with additional safety and comfort features such as pressurisation, air conditioning, weather radar and anti-icing equipment. • Corporate Jet Corporate jets are utilised primarily for business travel, particularly when time efficiency, privacy and comfort are vital. Corporate jets range from small, short to medium-range crafts, to wide-body, long-range global crafts. • Helicopter Helicopters include small piston and turbine crafts for short distance charters, as well as larger twinengine helicopters for corporate use. • Airliner Ideal for larger groups from 30 to 100 or more, charter airliners offer travel to Southern African and international destinations. From corporate getaways or tours, Freedom Air’s airliners offer seamless travel in luxury and comfort. About Freedom Air Freedom Air is a diversified Part 121 operator that manages a comprehensive selection of aircraft, offering a truly efficient and reliable charter solution. Established in 2005, Freedom Air began as an owner-operated air charter company. Since then it has developed into a charter operator that provides services both domestically

and internationally with distinction. Conveniently based at Wonderboom Airport (Pretoria), and also operating from OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, Lanseria International Airport and other South African airports, Freedom Air offers charters to any serviceable destination is Africa. Service excellence and safety are Freedom Air’s primary goals and referrals from satisfied customers have ensured a continued reputation for brilliance. Highly trained personnel are available to meet each and every travel need and each service is tailored to suit the client’s requirements, ensuring flexibility and satisfaction. Freedom Air aims to provide every client a safe, memorable service at a reasonable rate.

Office Tel: +27 (12) 751 1157 www.freedomair.co.za Charter Quotes Cindy v.d Walt Email: cindy@freedomair.co.za Manager Flight Operations WouterBotes Email: ops@freedomair.co.za Diplomat Africa

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Lansmore Masa Square Botswana beguiling the world

Botswana, known for its diamonds, has always held the world’s attention for these sparkling gems. Over the years, however, we have moved from a nation whose claim to fame lay solely in the fate of a single precious stone to a country which beguiles the world by producing a myriad of wonders, from our athletes to our ever changing skyline. One such bright star, set against the backdrop of an evolving cityscape, is the recently opened luxury hotel, Lansmore Masa Square. 68

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Lansmore Masa Square, a business first luxury hotel in the new CBD, has already charmed locals and business travellers alike. With its bevvy of unique offerings and its own particular brand of impeccable service, luxury and glamour, the hotel has truly set itself apart. In a city whose hospitality landscape had previously lain unchanged for years, Lansmore Masa Square offers a challenge to the rest in the way of a philosophy that mandates redefinition


TRAVEL AND TOURISM

of that very landscape. The hotel continues to urge guests and patrons to refuse to settle for anything but the epitome of perfection. Lansmore has already become the go-to choice for its infamous Thursday night cocktail evenings, its fabulous rooftop event space, and its Provençale cuisine that holds an elusively African twist. It has become the tourist gateway into the wonders of the city and beyond, as well as providing a long sought after base for a glamorous yet relaxed outing for city residents. What catapults Lansmore Masa Square to the ranks of sparkling gem, however, is not only its service standards and luxurious appeal for both business and leisure travellers.

The hotel’s numerous ‘firsts’ make for a uniquely tempting draw. Lansmore Masa Square is Botswana’s tallest hotel, the only business first luxury hotel in the country and the very first Lansmore hotel in the world. The seventh floor of the hotel enables guests to boast that they are sleeping on the highest hotel bed in the country, while the infinity pool, located on the third floor rooftop, serves as the highest infinity pool in the nation, holding an astounding 115,000 litres of water three floors high. The area is also the country’s highest rooftop event space, offering breathtaking views of the cityscape. As Botswana continues on its path to success and proves that it truly is one

of the most rapidly evolving countries on the African continent, the nation does not fail to impress. Botswana continues to take bold strides as a country birthing talents, wonders and shining stars. It’s not just our diamonds the world marvels at now, but gems ranging from our diverse people to the dazzling, evolving cityscape against the blue Botswana sky. For more information, go to www.lonrhohotels.com/content/ lansmore-masa-square www.facebook.com/ lansmoremasasquare reservations@lansmorems.com Tel: +267 3159954 / 72302543 Diplomat Africa

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Chapter 5: TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS


TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS

MTN launches skyward in Africa

A cross section of the Data Operator Room at the MTN Nigeria switch Ojota Lagos the largest switch installation in the world. South African born network and communications provider MTN has successfully branched outward into Africa and grabbed hold of a vast market-share. Even the sky doesn’t seem to be the limit as the company hit a record number of subscribers by the end of 2012. Not ending there, tests were then run on offering 72

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‘cloud’ services, reaching all over the continent. MTN Business in Africa ran a pilot project for its MTN cloud bouquet of services which allows a single point of contact for its customers. Cloud computing refers to the delivery of services over the Internet, such as software and data. MTN’s cloud service brokerage model centralises access to services, with MTN as the customers’ single point of contact. Administration is thus eased by dealing with only one service provider. This pilot project is being carried out in Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria, Cote d’Ivoire, Uganda and South Africa with an identified number of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). This allows wide testing of MTN’s cloud services and products in these markets. By targeting SMEs in Africa, MTN Cloud is aiming to reduce customers’ cost of doing business through ICT solutions. Paying is also more easily accessible as customers can pay for


TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS

A cross section of students at Lagelu Grammar School Agugu Oyo State a beneficiary of the MTN Foundation Learning Facility Supply project. this offering with MTN airtime or MTN Mobile Money. What this means for participating companies, is that they gain access to a variety of MTN cloud services such as back-up service for file and server management, as well as ondemand video conferencing. MTN also provides McAfee anti-virus and anti-spam security software. MTN records 182.7 million subscribers MTN achieved successful results in 2012, with an increase in subscriber numbers to 182.7 million – a jump of 3.8% in the final quarter. This was due to solid operational management and the rollout of appealing value propositions. This increased guidance for net additions for 2012 from 21.25 million to 23.70 million. MTN has maintained its drive to implement its strategic pillars of improving shareholder returns, by: • developing existing and new revenue streams; and • optimising costs and improving customer experience. A massive factor of MTN’s subscriber gains was their introduction of competitive products and services in the face of aggressive price declines in the market. They also kept focussed on data growth and improved their network rollout.

MTN Nigeria MTN Nigeria’s subscriber growth improved steadily during 2012 with an increase of 5.7%, maintaining its market share. A contributing factor was its competitive offerings with notable price deductions through heavy promotion. Data also continued its momentum with 2G data user growth only affected by network congestion. Network capacity and quality is a priority to be addressed through MTN’s comprehensive network rollout programme over the next year. MTN Ghana MTN Ghana is Ghana’s most reliable voice and data network. It increased its subscribers by 4.8% in the last part of 2012. This result is indicative of a strong presence in a highly competitive market. Major factors of this success were in effective promotions and wellmanaged sales and marketing. With the introduction of a new entrant in mid-2012, MTN saw only slight decline in market share. Data growth continued to impress as a result of further focus on distribution and coverage. Average Revenue Per User increased by 2.6% as a result of successful promotions which generated improved network usage. The on-going network rollout is addressing network capacity and quality.

MTN Cameroon MTN Cameroon showed an increase of 1.6% in subscribers in the last quarter of 2012. This market’s growth was slower due to a shortage in the number range. However, this has been addressed. MTN is the leader in the telecommunications market in Cameroon; attained after several years of relentless efforts to provide customers with innovative, simple and accessible communications solutions. MTN Cameroon was born on 15 February 2000, after MTN South Africa Group acquired the Camtel Mobile licence. MTN Cameroon has over 3,574,000 with over 62% market share. It is in the top five Cameroonian companies of highest turnover. www.mtnbusiness.co.za Diplomat Africa

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How we made it in Africa makes waves internationally A young South African media company received international recognition in 2011 for leading the way in business reporting on Africa.

www.howwemadeitinafrica.com, published by Maritz Publishing, was one of the three shortlisted publications in the Media of the Year category of the Diageo Africa Business Reporting Awards. The two other nominees were Reuters and The Africa Report, both established organisations that have been in business for decades. Diplomat Africa chats with Jaco Maritz, publisher of How we made it in Africa, to find out more about this groundbreaking publication. Tell us more about How we made it in Africa How we made it in Africa was launched in April 2010. The website is aimed at African business people and foreign 74

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investors with an interest in the continent. Through our network of journalists across the continent, the publication gives business people a better understanding about Africa’s business environment. We also seek to inspire through insightful interviews with African entrepreneurs and business people. Despite the upbeat title of the publication, we don’t necessarily ‘promote’ Africa as a business destination, but rather aim to give our readers a balanced perspective of Africa’s opportunities and challenges. Why did you decide to launch How we made it in Africa in the first place? Africa has gone through significant changes over the past decade. Through better political leadership and regulatory


TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS

reforms, the continent is slowly but surely transforming from a place of famine and war into an attractive business destination. Countries such as Nigeria, Ghana and Ethiopia are now among the fastest growing economies in the world. Despite this, Africa remains a challenging place to do business. How we made it in Africa goes beyond the news headlines to give business people the required information to make a success of their ventures on the continent. How does the publication make money? All revenue is generated through online advertising – both banner adverts and advertorials. There is an increasing number of South African and international companies looking to expand into the continent. With a loyal readership comprising African business people and foreign investors, How we made it in Africa is the perfect platform for these firms to promote their brands, products and services. Numerous blue-chip advertisers such as Standard Bank, Siemens and Imperial Logistics have used How we made it in Africa to promote their brands. We also cater for smaller firms looking to grow their African footprint.

of sleep and unhealthy amounts of coffee did not go unnoticed. Unfortunately Reuters snatched the top honours at the ceremony that took place at London’s Landmark Hotel. However, considering that How we made it in Africa had been in existence for barely 12 months at the time of the awards, we don’t feel too bad about losing out to a 150year-old news organisation such as Reuters. Direct Line: +27 21 801 1975 info@howwemadeitinafrica.com www.howwemadeitinafrica.com

Across the world newspapers and print magazines have to deal with falling readership and lower advertising revenues; but how open are companies to the idea of digital advertising? We’ve managed to stay in business for over two years now, so brands are definitely prepared to spend money on online campaigns. Look, digital advertising is not much different from print, the only difference is the advertisement is seen on a screen instead of a printed page. What makes online advertising more exciting and cost-effective is the fact that everything can be tracked and measured. Clients pay a set amount for the number of people that view their adverts – nothing more, nothing less. We can also target their advertisements to specific countries, or even cities, and tell them how many people clicked on their banner. That said, I still don’t think companies are taking full advantage of the digital medium. Brands give millions of rands to advertising agencies to produce the perfect television advert, but it doesn’t seem like the same degree of attention is given to digital campaigns. A company cannot send us a banner advertisement comprising only its logo and expect massive results. Just as television adverts need to stand out from the competition, digital campaigns also need to be creative and attract the reader’s attention. We try to help clients as much as we can, but at the end of the day we are a publisher, not an advertising agency. And then lastly, How we made it in Africa was shortlisted as one of the three finalists in the Media of the Year category at the 2011 Diageo Africa Business Reporting Awards. This is a remarkable achievement for such a young publication. Tell us more about the awards. Thanks. Yes, it was a great experience. We feel privileged to have been recognised in this way. We are a young publication and the nomination only motivated us to work harder and bring better stories to our readers. Still, it is good to know that all those nights with only two hours Diplomat Africa

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PAMRO conference promotes development through research

Graham Mytton of InterMedia, UK, received the Plus 94 Piet Smit Achiever of the Year Award at the 14th PAMRO meeting and All Africa Media Research Conference. The annual PAMRO All Africa Media Research Conference again proved that Africa’s media audience research industry is thriving and vibrant. Over 100 delegates from across the continent, with an impressive panel of international speakers, gathered at Lake Victoria, Uganda at the end of August 2012 to discuss, debate and learn at what has become the premier event on the pan-African media research calendar. 76

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The Pan African Media Research Organisation (PAMRO) plays an important role in promoting media audience research essential for the development of media in Africa. It is a forum where Africa’s industry organisations, media research providers, media owners, marketers and advertising agencies can exchange knowledge and learn from one another’s successes and failures in the media research sector.

The All Africa Media Research Conference is one of PAMRO’s key vehicles for bringing together professionals who are dedicated to growing media audience research across the continent. The event has been described by outgoing PAMRO President, Jennifer Daniel, as “a remarkable networking and learning opportunity that provides a valuable forum for intra-country communication and the exchange of ideas”.


TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS

for the elite and wealthy, but is being used by people from all walks of life throughout Africa.

(From left) Joe Otin (media research and monitoring director, Synovate PanAfrica), the new vice president of the Pan African Media Research Organisation, with PAMRO’s new president, Josiah Kimanzi (account director, TNS RMS Nigeria). The 2012 conference saw speakers from around the continent, as well as from Switzerland and the United Kingdom, presenting papers that revolved around three major topics: economic growth in Africa and a positive outlook on Africa as a whole; the rise of new media, including cellphones and social networking; and challenges to audience measurement. A Positive Outlook The keynote speaker, Godfrey Mutabazi, Executive Director of the Uganda Communications Commission, opened the conference on a positive note. He said that while Africa still experiences media freedom struggles, technological challenges in the media sphere, and economic problems, there is still a promise of hope. Mutabazi pointed out, for example, that the number of media choices available has grown over the years and Uganda had approximately 260 radio stations and 50 television channels. He stressed the importance of home-grown media research, and urged PAMRO to continue to encourage media research for Africans, by Africans.

Africa in a New Light These positive sentiments were echoed by Chris Maroleng, Africa Editor: Head of Department at eNews Channel Africa, South Africa, who challenged Africa and the world to start seeing the continent in a different light. According to Maroleng, Africa’s growth has accelerated in the medium term and is expected to grow from 3.4% in 2011 to 4.8% in 2013. Financial investment from sources outside Africa such as Overseas Direct Assistance (ODA) and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), and remittances to African countries, contribute to this growth. Maroleng suggested that good governance creates stability that leads to growth. Technology Transforms Africans’ Lives Several speakers noted that in Africa, high cellphone penetration is driving access to digital media and the internet. Oresti Patricios, CEO of Ornico Group, South Africa, argued that social media’s growth on the continent is being fuelled by the high penetration of cheaper cellphones as well as smart phones, which people use to access the internet. He stressed that social media is not just

New Ways to Measure Audiences Another dominant theme at the conference was new audience measurement methods. The media landscape is changing rapidly and new, more-effective audience measurement methods will be needed, sooner rather than later. TV audience measurement in particular, faces significant challenges in the future, as consumers now watch TV on their phones, tablets and internet, and with the imminent change from analogue to digital TV. Joe Otin, MediaCT director at Ipsos Synovate Pan-Africa, Kenya, and the new vice president of PAMRO, commented that the positive outlook that speakers and delegates held towards Africa as a whole, showed that there is hope indeed for the continent and for media audience research. He challenged PAMRO and its members to continue to fuel media research, particularly in the social media sphere, as this is where many people still need to be educated. PAMRO elects new leadership 2012 saw a changing of the guard for PAMRO. Following three years of dedicated service as PAMRO’s president, South Africa’s Jennifer Daniel handed over the reins to PAMRO’s vice president, Josiah Kimanzi of Nigeria. Kimanzi has a longstanding involvement with PAMRO and has been a regular speaker at past PAMRO conferences. An account director at TNS RMS Nigeria, he has substantial research experience across Africa, and has conducted research in over 30 African countries. He is supported by new vice president, Joe Otin,who is the media research and monitoring director at Synovate Pan-Africa. Otin has 15 years’ experience in the media and advertising industry in Kenya, and broad management experience in business and marketing. The 15th PAMRO All Africa Media Research Conference will be held from 25-28 August 2013 in Madagascar. www.pamro.org Diplomat Africa

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The perfect farm takes dedication, passion and AFGRI

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Chapter 6: GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

Cameroon Agriculture and Forest Resources

Cameroon is a country reliant on food imports and is introducing methods to aid growth in the agricultural sector and provide sustainable arable land. As the population has expanded, Cameroon’s magnificent forest resources and cultivatable land have come under threat. There are currently numerous efforts underway to encourage the agricultural sector and protect Cameroon’s unique forests. Agriculture in Cameroon was the main source of growth and foreign exchange until 1978 when oil production replaced it. The most important cash crops are cocoa, coffee, cotton, bananas, rubber, palm oil and kernels, and peanuts. The main food crops are plantains, 80

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cassava, corn, millet, and sugarcane. PACA to offer Cameroon farmers FCFA2-billion In 2013 PACA, known as the Farmer Competiveness Enhancement Project, is offering FCFA2-billion in financial support and technical backstopping to 257 farmer groups in central and southern Cameroon. This is an increase of 100 groups to receive support from this agricultural project. The project aims to help increase farmers’ production and productivity and raise levels of competitiveness within the country and the continent. PACA’s vision is to boost farmers’ productivity. PACA is a governmentinitiated and World Bank-supported

agricultural competiveness project that focuses on banana, plantain, maize, pork, and poultry production. An MOU has been signed between Cameroon’s Ministry of Agriculture & Rural Development (MINADER) and the Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD) to revitalise Cameroon’s Agricultural Sector. This agreement essentially takes Cameroon into its second generation of agriculture through new innovations and the introduction of the latest technology. IRAD will be creating mass production of planting materials using tissue culture techniques in an Invitro Plant Lab in the Ekona Centre, with the aid of FCFA100-million from MINADER.


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

Ekona Centre is a pioneer for agricultural research in Cameroon and the region, whose mandate is to promote agricultural development in crop and animal production, fisheries, livestock, forestry and the environment in the humid climate of Cameroon – an indigenous region for plantain. Protecting forests The Korup National Park in Mundemba, southwest Cameroon is Africa’s oldest and richest rainforest in terms of floral and faunal diversity. Its unique biodiversity makes it a critical area connecting five protected areas in the park which protects the growth of important wildlife. There are over 20 villages with ancestral lands inside the

concession, and 31 villages within a distance of the periphery, with 25,000 people depending on this land for small-scale food production, hunting, and non-timber forest products. There are a number of Cameroonian NGOs that help protect threats against the area, such as the Centre for Environment and Development, and Réseau de Lutte contre la Faim. Although increased farming activities are being encouraged, land governance remains high priority as deforestation threatens to eliminate masses of Cameroon’s lush bounty. At the forefront of this challenge is a new interactive Forest Atlas which will help improve forest management. Cameroon’s forests cover about 60% of the country and sustain large numbers of the population as well as being vital to the economy, accounting for more than 6% of the GDP – more than any country in the Congo Basin. This integrated system allows comprehensive monitoring forests in direct aid to forest management. This is vital in tracking the way the forest is used, such as logging concessions, community forests, and hunting zones. This information is now centralised and publicly accessible. The quality is sufficient in supporting

claims of legality or decisions on effective land use. The hope is that the system will help curb conflicts between stakeholders and encourage sustainable use of forest resources. Since 2002, the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife (MINFOF) has worked to improve transparency and governance in the forest sector by sharing regular updates of the Interactive Forest Atlas of Cameroon. Version 3.0 was recently released and includes information on mining permits and agro-industrial plantations. The Interactive Forest Atlas of Cameroon is a constantly updated information system, combining the use of remote sensing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and ground-truthing to monitor and manage forests. Through a combination of interactive mapping applications, posters, analytical reports, trainings, and outreach, the Atlas provides users with access to timely, accurate, and harmonised information in the forest sector and beyond. Stakeholders using the Atlas include Cameroon’s government, the private sector, research institutions, and civil society. www.globalforestwatch.org Diplomat Africa

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VISION 2016 TOWARDS PROSPERITY FOR ALL

Botswana – Beyond Vision 2016 A little-known fact is that Botswana’s Vision 2016 emanated from Malaysia’s Vision 2020. In 1996, after a presidential visit to Malaysia, then President Sir Ketumile returned revitalised after observing Malaysia’s development drives. Sir Ketumile found a kindred spirit in His Excellency Tun Dr. Mahathir bin Mohamad, then Prime Minister of Malaysia. His foresight for his country’s future mirrored Ketumile’s own. Mahathir concretised his depiction of a future Malaysia into a manifesto which he called ‘Vision 2020’ – a declaration of strategy and policy outlining how to accomplish the objective of an industrialised and developed society. The impetus for Botswana’s national vision may have been borrowed, but the sentiments that propelled its production were not. President Masire set about the arduous task of formulating a national vision. He appointed nine Presidential Task Force members to determine the boundaries of Vision 2016. From this came a publication entitled “A Framework for a Long Term Vision for Botswana”. In January 1997, 27 individuals representing various stakeholders nationwide joined the Task Force.

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Its duties were mainly consultative, resulting in “A Long Term Vision for Botswana: Towards Prosperity for All”. Production involved soliciting and gathering written and oral public submissions. A series of open hearings and kgotla meetings were held nationwide. A University of Botswana led research project collected ideas and suggestions from small villages and remote areas. An essay competition directed at youth was held. The Vision 2016 logo itself was the result of a competition with 470 submitted entries. In the words of the Vision Council, “Vision 2016 is Botswana’s strategy to propel its socio-economic and political development into a competitive, winning and prosperous nation. Seven key goals have been developed to achieve this. The vision reflects the aspirations of Batswana about their long-term future.” The vision pillars, or key goals, are: • an educated and informed nation; • a prosperous productive and innovative nation; • a compassionate, just and caring nation;


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

• building a safe and secure nation; • building an open, democratic and accountable nation; • building a moral and tolerant society; and • building a nation united and proud. The activities of the Vision Council have been relentless, attempting to secure popular buy-in and commitment to Vision 2016, a year that is almost here. Hence reflection with regard to how far we are as a nation in achieving the objectives. Botswana has made tremendous strides towards realising its vision: investment in education at an all-time high; enrolment in educational institutions burgeoned; improvements in access to health, safe drinking water, telecommunications and electricity; economic growth slowed but far from over; communities more involved in environmental management and preservation; workforce gender imbalance headed towards equilibrium; percentage of population living below poverty line declining; one of the most progressive and significantly funded set of programmes to combat HIV/ AIDS; and drop in incidence of road accidents and road fatalities. The list of advancements is impressive, but there’s still work to be done. Members of the Vision Council, who monitor the country’s progress of Vision 2016, say we are not there yet. In all likelihood, we won’t be ‘there’ by 2016. So when asked about Botswana beyond 2016, the overwhelming response is review,

revision, readjustment, recommitment; so that the future national vision will have become our national reality. Year 2016 is not an end or a deadline, but rather a beckoning distant horizon. If Batswana abandoned its Vision because 2016 had come into view, it would imply they had nothing more to strive for. As Botswana’s President Lieutenant General Seretse Khama Ian Khama stated, when interviewed by ‘Voice of Botswana’, “When you look at the seven pillars of Vision 2016 one of the key challenges is the call for mind-set change. You cannot simply come up with a law in parliament and make everyone compassionate and caring, so it’s a matter of leading by example, both as a government and as individuals. We must keep reminding people that we do live in a society and we are all one big family whilst never forgetting that there are always those worse-off than ourselves. We must try our best to encompass and embrace those who are disadvantaged. Over time the spirit of volunteering tends to wane and the more competitive the world… (greater is the tendency) to forget about others, selfishness tends to increase, so those are the kind of challenges that are present here and indeed elsewhere…” Visions are the determiners of our character. Botswana beyond Vision 2016 is still one that aspires “towards prosperity for all”, because tomorrow belongs to those who have vision today. Diplomat Africa

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Botswana Development Corporation Limited (BDC)

Botswana Development Corporation Limited (BDC) was established in 1970, with the purpose of being Botswanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main agency for commercial and industrial 86

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development. The control of the Corporation is vested in a board of Directors. All Directors are appointed (and removed) by the Minister of Finance and Development Planning.

BDC invests in projects covering a wide range of sectors. The sectors are divided into three divisions: Agribusiness and Services, Industry, and Property.


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

The Agribusiness and Services division covers: • agriculture, • hotels, • tourism, and • financial services. The Industry division covers: • construction, • textiles, • food and beverages, and • furniture. The Property division covers: • commercial, • hotel, • residential, and • industrial portfolios. In the Agribusiness and Services sectors, BDC is involved in businesses such as Talana Farms, Cresta Marakanelo Hotels, Lion Park Amusement Park, Botswana Horticultural Market and Investec Holdings, to name a few. Its Industry division boasts several large industrial-manufacturing projects including businesses such as Kwena Rocla, Lobatse Clay Works, Sechaba Brewery Holdings, Matsiloje Portland Cement, and Kwena Concrete Products. One of the highlights of BDC’s Property division’s projects is the upcoming Fairscape Precinct. This property development will feature

rental office space measuring 18,019 square meters, retail space measuring 1,874 square meters, penthouses covering 2,063 square meters, as well as 884 car parking bays in the basement. The development is expected to be completed by the end of 2014. BDC has defined its strategic intent as: “To invest in mega projects, primarily in the areas of Communication, Transportation, Infrastructure Development, Energy and Agriculture, that will enhance its contribution to development, economic diversification and citizen empowerment and treble the BDC Balance Sheet by 2015.” The Corporation has made impressive returns over its 40 years of existence with the deliberate divestment in a number of matured investments; therefore also contributing to both citizen empowerment and increase in shareholder value, as well as facilitating the growth of the local stock market. Notably, the Corporation divested 29% of its shareholding in Cresta Marakanelo through listing to the public; and consolidated its high-value properties into a special purpose vehicle, Letlole La Rona, that was then listed in the stock market through an initial price offering of P1.50. The Corporation also disposed of all its

investment in PPC Ltd – a dual-listed company on the Botswana and Johannesburg Stock Exchanges. With corporate social investment becoming ever more strategically focused, the Corporation ensures that by investing in the social good, it also seeks to align its corporate social investment spending with the core business objectives and imperatives of the Corporation, in which true partnerships with beneficiaries, government and NGOs bring about long-term sustainable development for the benefit of all. These include national development imperatives of job creation, education, as well as poverty alleviation. Customer satisfaction is central to BDC’s way of doing business. It is for this reason that the Corporation has adopted the International Standard Organisation (ISO) standard 9001:2008 to benchmark its quality management system, its total approach to customer happiness programs, as well as its handling of customer complaints and feedback processes. Audited for the last ten years (three times annually by independent internal quality auditors and annually by external quality auditors), and in all cases compliance to the international quality standard was confirmed by the auditors, the Corporation has a track record of being truly customer centric. Diplomat Africa

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Botswana Education Hub The Botswana Education Hub is a concept for Botswana as a whole as opposed to a specific area such as an economic zone. It positions Botswana as a cluster of education and research of international standards; a focus for investors, partners and institutions expanding or starting up in the country. It engages all education sectors as well as all levels and modes of education. The Botswana Education Hub is mandated to build and maintain excellence in the education sector in order to attract international scholars and students. The Education Hub does this through strengthening the capacity of existing institutions and attracting new providers, international and local, to establish ventures and attract international students and scholars. Botswana launched the ‘Study in Botswana’ programme in 2010, which attracts international students and is starting to bear financial returns to government and the private investment, from the economic to the social and environmental benefits this brings to Botswana.

Coordinator, Mr Lucky Moahi Botswana is slowly and gradually establishing itself as an education giant in the SADC Region; with a vision to be Africa’s education hub. Botswana Education Hub, established in 2008 through the Botswana Excellence Strategy (2008), drives the national vision to place Botswana as a centre of excellence in education, training and research. The Botswana Excellence Strategy highlights the need for Batswana to transform from being inward looking to being outward looking and competitive. The Education Hub concept is not intended to substitute existing organisations and education establishments, but rather to coordinate their efforts to ensure that there is common purpose and alignment with expectations in the achievement of Botswana as an Education Hub. 88

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Across the world, countries are realising that education is a key driver of development – more so that it is a long-term investment. Such investment typically gives rates of return averaging about 10 percent annually – with higher rates of return in developing countries. The BEDIA Report (2008) advises that the Botswana Education Hub should isolate niche areas of focus for investments and these are: Medical and Health Sciences, and Research; ICT; Hospitality and Tourism; Business and Management; Agriculture and Livestock Management; Conservation and Veterinary Science; Peace and Justice; and Mining and Energy. Over the past 10 to 20 years, Botswana has invested heavily in education infrastructure, human resource development and regulatory institutions to build a formidable education foundation. Over and above these, Botswana should build on its strong reputation for transparency and good governance, stable economy and high standard of living. Botswana is centrally located in southern Africa, which makes it well placed geographically as a destination for international students.


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

Besides ‘Study in Botswana’, Botswana Education Hub introduced a number of other initiatives that support its mandate. The ‘Top Achievers Scholarship’ programme influences excellence at secondary schools by rewarding students with external university placement if they do exceptionally well. To date, 91 students have been sent to universities of international repute worldwide to get the best education; later returning home to sow good practice. Botswana Education Hub has partnerships as one of its key values. ‘Adopt-A-School’ is another programme to encourage participation of local businesses in the provision of education at all levels, from primary to tertiary. The number of companies partnering with the Ministry of Education and Skills Development is increasing every month. Companies sponsor students, monitor performance, contribute materially and sponsor training of teachers, to name but a few. In the area of Capacity Building, Botswana Education Hub intends encouraging partnerships and establishment of the following institutions: • A graduate school of business management; • A graduate school of public administration and government; • An elite hotel and resort management school. Other initiatives such as a School of Medicine, School of Veterinary, and Agriculture School are being achieved in conjunction with the local universities, as they need to be strengthened in international reputation. The Botswana Education Hub is a small professional unit in the Ministry of Education and Skills Development, headed by The Coordinator. Private Bag 005, Gaborone Tel: +267 3674540 Fax: +267 3105865 www.beh.gov.bw

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Lenmed Health Bokamoso Private Hospital

relaxed and comfortable as possible during their stay. Our Vision To create a world-class centre of excellence within the healthcare environment. Our Mission To provide affordable and quality patient care, through excellent customer service that meets the standards of our patients and staff. Lenmed Health Bokamoso Private Hospital provides the highest standard of clinical skills and nursing care across an extensive range of specialties and world-class doctors. Our hospital is a specialised service private hospital located in Mmopane village about 15 kilometres west of Gaborone. Delivering a wide-range of medical services, we offer inpatient, outpatient and day case treatment in the finest 90

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state-of-the-art surroundings. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, these services can be provided as part of your medical aid scheme or purchased individually whenever you need them. We believe that paying close attention to the comfort of our patients is very vital to their recovery. The hospital caters to individual tastes by having spacious, luxurious private and semiâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; private wards to ensure that patients feel as

Our Core Values Compassion: we will be compassionate towards our patients. Accountable: we will be accountable to our stakeholders. Respect: we will demonstrate respect to all of our stakeholders Excellence: we will exhibit excellence in our work.


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

Our Specialities Lenmed Health Bokamoso Private Hospital offers a wide range of medical, interventional and diagnostic specialities. These include, but are not limited to: • Anaesthetics • Critical Care Unit • Intensive Care Unit • Neo-Natal Intensive Care unit • High Dependency • Dietetic Services • Endocrinology • Endocrine Surgery • Endocrine conditions • Diabetes, thyroid • ENT (Ear, Nose, Throat) • ENT Surgery • Gastroenterology • Gastroenterology/Endoscopy • Bowel Cancer Screening • Barium Studies • Colorectal Surgery • Proctoscopy • Sigmoidoscopy • Family Medicine • General Medicine • General Surgery • Infectious Diseases • Haematology/Pathology • Blood Disorders • Cellular Pathology • Heart & Lung • Cardiology • Angiography • Cardiothoracic Surgery • Respiratory/chest • Imaging Services • CT scan

• • • • • • • • • • •

• Mammography • MRI • Nuclear Medicine • Ultrasound Neurology • Neurosurgery • Neuroradiology • Neurophysiology Oncology • Chemotherapy • Palliative Care Orthopaedic Surgery Ophthalmology Physiotherapy Sports & Exercise Medicine Urgent Care Haemodialysis Peritoneal Dialysis Dermatology Internal Medicine

• Urology • Maxillofacial Surgery • Urgent Care Our Services • Pharmacy Department • Radiology • Cath-Lab • Operating Theatres • Pathology Department • 24-Hour Accident & Emergency Department • Chemotherapy & Heamodialysis • Paediatric Ward • Maternity Ward • Surgical Ward • Medical North • Intensive Care Units ( ICU) • Coronary Care Unit GETTING IN TOUCH FAX: +267 369 4141 Email: info@bokamosohospital.org Website: www.bokamosohospital.org

Accident & Emergency - Telephone: +267 369 4288 Case Management please contact: casemanagement@bokamosohospital.org Telephone: +267 369 4869/4110/4681 Other bookings: bookings@bokamosohospital.org Telephone: +267 369 4108/9 Outpatient Consultations: Appointments can be made via your Specialist’s private secretary. Self Pay: +267 369 4106 Further Assistance: For further information on the full range of services provided at Lenmed Health Bokamoso Private Hospital, please call our Marketing Department/PRO: +267 369 4144 Diplomat Africa

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THE BEST OF

AFRICA We brand and build the image of the world’s most exciting economic regions to affect a change in the perception of a continent, a nation, a city and its people by the rest of the world.

Global Village Africa is Africa’s premier platform for showcasing and networking governments, leading companies and entrepreneurs in business, tourism and lifestyle. The ‘Best of seriesmCPPLTDSJTQMZQSPÙMFMFBEJOH companies and innovators, as leaders within their genre. We celebrate the success of countries, individuals and companies with ‘the good news’ editorial and pictorial imagery in the highest quality print format available.

BRANDING A CONTINENT, A NATION, A CITY AND ITS PEOPLE

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