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AFRICA

www.DiplomatAfrica.org

Volume 4 • 2012 DIPLOMAT AFRICA Volume 4 • 2012 • www.DiplomatAfrica.org

BITC: Introducing the restructured Botswana Investment & Trade Centre African Union: New era with Dlamini-Zuma Proudly African Initiative: Uniting the continent www.ProudlyAfrican.info

PROMOTING ECONOMIC GROWTH AND SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH LEADERSHIP, DIPLOMACY AND TRADE


PUBLISHER’S FOREWORD “No man is an island; every man is a piece of a continent” (John Donne, 1572 – 1631) The African Century is dawning. Diplomat Africa has become a documentation of continued African growth over the past year. We have explored the diversity of the southern African region and uncovered the unique methods of diplomacy in various countries. After focussing on Intra-African trade in our last issue, the above quote from poet John Donne seems hugely relevant to our continent. Inter-African unity is being solidified through the ushering in of the new African Union chair, Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma. This momentous election is sure to see continental integration. The launch of the Proudly African Initiative shares the same crest of the Africa unity wave in this new era for Africanism. African countries are starting to work together for the greater good of Africa as a whole. This could not be more timeous as it coincides with the interest of international capital which has come with worldwide focus on Africa, in what is dubbed as the “African Century”. Our four featured countries for this issue of Diplomat Africa are Mauritius, Seychelles, Lesotho, and Botswana. The two island nations are part of the exciting Vanilla Islands grouping, which is anticipated to bring huge global tourist attention to our eastern shores. Lesotho has just ushered in a new era which is poised to bring economic growth to the mountain kingdom. Botswana is all set to take advantage of the rise of the African Century, through the newly restructured Botswana Investment & Trade Centre (BITC) in association with Brand Botswana. These exciting developments are positioning Botswana as a diversified economy and showcasing Botswana’s pride. In this issue, we are also excited to share an intricate look at the lives of some of Africa’s prominent icons and diplomats. With this, our profile of Future Visions in the SADC region which we have explored in these first four issues, are wrapped up. We look forward to exploring the endless well of sectors of development in Africa in our next issues. We are excited to be sharing all these growth stories with you as they develop.

Thapelo Letsholo Publisher

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Main Sponsors Botswana Investment & Trade Centre (BITC)


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CREDITS

ConTaCT DETaIlS GVPedia Publishing (Pty) Ltd Po Box 26382 Gaborone, Botswana Plot 119 Unit 2G Gaborone International Finance Park Tel: +267 3951363 (Gaborone) +27 117052097 (Johannesburg) Email General: info@gvpedia.com Email Editor: rebecca@gvpedia.com Website africa: www.Diplomatafrica.org www.Proudlyafrican.info Website Global: www.GVPedia.com

International Group Publisher: Sven Boermeester Ultimately we look forward to showcasing and connecting all the successful governments, companies and individuals that are spearheading africa’s incredible growth. GVPedia Communications: Managing Director Gia Bischofberger

THE TEaM Publisher: Editor: Project Manager: Production: Creative Direction: Printer: Website Development: Public Relations: Sales Team:

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Thapelo letsholo Rebecca Eb Gia Bischofberger GVPedia Communications iMedi8 Creative Creda Communications liam Dobell RedPepper PR & Communication Consultancy (Botswana) Yvonne Sinclair (South africa), Tshiamo Mhlanga, Kabo Garebakwena, Balepeng Montwedi (Botswana)

Proudly African

Boosting inter-trade & cultural relations across the continent

www.ProudlyAfrican.info

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in “Diplomat africa”. neither “Diplomat africa”, Red Pepper PR & Communication Consultancy nor GVPedia Communications cc assume any responsibility for errors or omissions. The editor reserves the right to amend and alter copy and visual material as deemed necessary. all rights reserved: no part of this publication shall be reproduced, copied, transmitted, adapted or modified in any form or by any means. This publication shall not be stored in whole or in part in any retrieval system.


IN THIS ISSUE

FUTURE VISIONS 12

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Botswana well-positioned for dawn of the African Century 12 Future Visions Mauritius 16 Future Visions Seychelles 20 Future Visions Lesotho

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IN THIS ISSUE CHAPTER 1: FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

CHAPTER 2: TRADE AND INVESTMENT

CHAPTER 3: AFRI-INDIA

26 Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma elected as African Union Chair 27 Proudly African 28 Lesotho welcomes The Right Honourable Motsoahae Thomas Thabane as its new Prime Minister 29 High Commissioner of India in South Africa Virendra Gupta 30 Lieutenant General Tebogo Carter Masire 31 Board Chairperson Mr Victor Senye Introduces the Botswana Investment & Trade Centre (BITC) 32 Salif Keita 33 Restructured MBSA appoints new executive director 34 Legwaila Joseph Manson John Legwaila 36 Moise Chapwe Katumbi 38 The African Presidential Roundtable 2012

42 Botswana Investment and Trade Centre 44 City of Ekurhuleni, Place of Peace, enters into own new era 46 Fairscape Precinct, A mixed-use concept for Fairgrounds 48 Botswana Examinations Council 50 Debswana Jwaneng Mine

54 Confederation of Indian Industry in South Africa 56 INDIALLIA 2012 58 Successful Indian Companies in South Africa

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CHAPTER 4: TRAVEL AND HOSPITALITY

CHAPTER 5: BUILDING AFRICA

CHAPTER 6: GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

62 Hospitality Marketplace Africa 64 Regional Branding and Communication Strategy for Southern Africa 66 Introducing the Vanilla Islands – a tourist’s Indian Ocean dream 68 Rani Resorts

72 Master Builders South Africa 74 African Federation of Construction Contractors’ Associations (AFCCA) 76 Infrastructure is on South Africa’s main agenda 78 Lesotho Highlands Water Project

82 Future of Trade at BRICS Africa 2012 84 NEPAD – Advancing Agriculture and Food Security in Africa 86 Africa Frontiers Forum 88 PAMRO Conference 2012 90 The Sugar Industry Mauritius 92 Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) regional meeting held in Africa 2012 94 BA ISAGO: A University College in Transition and Transformation

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Botswana well-positioned for dawn of the African Century

International capital is increasingly flowing away from developed markets and into emerging economies. Of the African states bidding to host this capital, all indicators point to Botswana as the most strategically positioned to benefit. While many believe the country’s journey to this point started in the late 1960s with the discovery of diamonds in the Orapa/Letlhakane area, Botswana’s history as an extractive economy began with gold mining, albeit on a small-scale, in the late 1800s. Large-scale extractive activities around diamonds, coal, soda ash, copper, and nickel were explored in the late 1950s, laying the foundation for the establishment of worldfamous operations such as Jwaneng and Orapa diamond mines, Morupule Colliery, Botash, and BCL Mine. The resource boom of the late 1960s and 1970s allowed extractive industries to outpace agriculture as the

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primary drivers of Botswana’s economy, with government using the revenues to direct growth mainly to national social development endeavours such as education, health, and primary infrastructure. While Botswana is most well known worldwide for this resource miracle, a lesser acknowledged but greatly more significant marvel was the government’s use of economic policy to carry the momentum of the wealth-boom towards broader economic development. While the resource boom exceedingly created employment, raising incomes and living standards, it was government policy that ensured this increased demand resulted in the creation of secondary industry such as financial services, manufacturing, hospitality and tourism, aviation, and other sectors. Economic diversification Since the 1980s, government’s economic diversification policy has seen the deployment of the burgeoning mineral revenues towards the growth and deepening of nationwide Information Communication Technologies, transport networks, and more recently, robust efforts towards selfsufficiency in energy generation. It is from these efforts that secondary industry has blossomed and deepened, with the result that the consumer demand originally built by mineral revenues, has become complimented by new and transformed economic pathways. In addition, these government social development policies, such as the billions of Pula spent on tertiary education investment, have transformed consumer demand towards more complex products, allowing market space for production of more specialised and modern products and services. From the 1980s when the Financial Assistance Policy first marked government’s attempts at countrywide industrialisation of the mineral revenues, economic policy since the millennium has been aimed at providing supporting infrastructure and policy conducive to the private sector. This two-pronged policy has seen the development and Diplomat Africa

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roll-out of key agencies such as the Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency, Local Enterprise Authority, Botswana Export Development and Investment Authority, International Financial Services Centre, and others. In the last four years, critical modern economy agencies such as the Competition Authority, Financial Intelligence Agency, and the Non-Bank Financial Institutions Regulatory Authority have emerged, closing policy loopholes and building confidence for investors. Over the same period, government has embarked on the most aggressive infrastructure outlay since Independence, with billions of Pula invested in road and air infrastructure, dam construction, power station development and extension of the transmission grid. In addition, government and the Bank of Botswana have developed a regular and high value domestic debt issuance programme chiefly designed to boost the development of capital markets. The result of this comprehensive approach by government over the years, has seen greater Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) with more moving into non-mining sectors, thus raising non-extractives’ contribution to the economy. A recent Ernst & Young survey suggested Botswana attracted approximately US$13.5-billion (P99-billion) in FDI between 2003 and 2011, placing it among the continent’s top 15 targets for foreign capital. While minerals accounted for more than a third of this FDI (part of the reason being the attendant high capital costs), foreign capital also targeted financial services, communications, real estate, hotels, and tourism. With key infrastructure slowly moving into place and the safety net of investor and support agencies gradually commingling, government has lately begun addressing 10

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the various factors influencing the country’s global competitiveness. Part of the motivation has been that the secondary economy (manufacturing/industrial economy feeding off the primary, raw material, activities) is growing rapidly. Further impetus is required in order to fill the space currently occupied by imports. At present, it could be argued that Botswana’s economy has more elements of primary and tertiary economy and fewer of secondary economy, with an annual merchandise import bill estimated at nearly a fifth of the Gross Domestic Product. Global competitiveness and relations The focus on competitiveness, as seen by the establishment of a select Cabinet committee on the issue, is seeing the targeting of eight policy areas identified by investors and enunciated by the World Economic Forum’s annual report, as problem areas. Besides these, Botswana as a member of the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) is also engaged in interregional industrialisation negotiations to ensure greater domestic capacity building from the value created within the union. In addition, the country has penned an interim Economic Partnership Agreement with the European Union and is in the process of finalising a more comprehensive arrangement, among the raft of international trade and tax protocols it has in place to enhance the domestic economy’s industrial allure. Indicators already exist that these policies have placed Botswana at the heart of the African Century. Already, the Botswana Stock Exchange, the agency with its pulse on foreign capital flows, has reported heavier

uptake of local counters by foreign companies and individuals, as global focus shifts to Africa. The Botswana Stock Exchange was the eighth best performing market in the world last year and this year, the local bourse expects to further improve its performance. Given the goodwill in the highest political offices, the support of policy and infrastructure as well as the robust investor agencies, sovereign credit rating, developed financial services, and skilled labour force – Botswana is well poised for the African Century. Diplomat Africa

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Future Visions Mauritius The economic landscape of Mauritius has undergone a major transformation. It has changed from an agricultural economy to an innovation-driven economy focusing on emerging sectors such as knowledge, healthcare and life sciences, financial services, sea-food, logistics, property development, ICT, and renewable energy in 2012. The island nation of Mauritius is world renowned as a tropical holiday destination with crisp white sands and turquoise warm Indian Ocean waters. The culture, vibrancy, and tourism infrastructure, make Mauritius one of Africa’s most beautiful and desirable island destinations. But it took a strategic economic diversification plan to get Mauritius to where it is today. Its growth regardless of its diminutive size, tells one of Africa’s greatest success stories. Mauritian industry has maintained its strength even in the face of economic turmoil worldwide – proving there’s a lot more to this spectacular island than agriculture and tourism. As proof that Mauritius is an attractive investment location, the country achieved nearly MUR10-billion in FDI for the year 2011 amidst growing global uncertainty. In most sectors of activity, namely financial services, hospitality and property development, construction, healthcare and manufacturing, Mauritius has in fact had an increase in the flow of investments. Ken Poonoosamy, the Managing Director of Board of Investment Mauritius, explains this was achieved largely by adopting a targeted approach to further consolidate existing markets, the identification and tapping of new and emerging markets, and a focus on Greenfield projects in order to boost investments. The new Repo rate set at 4,9% augurs well for the economy as a whole and allows a new window of opportunity for investors. The initiative of the Bank 12

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of Mauritius offsets prolonged adverse circumstances that seem to shackle the world market, in particular the uncertainties in Europe. The lowering of the interest rate offers a boost to investors’ confidence. This year, Mauritius celebrated the 44th anniversary of its independence. To mark the occasion, the Board of Investment (BOI) in Mauritius looked back over the economic growth of 40 years, whilst looking to the future by maintaining their resolve to promote Mauritius as a Republic of Mauritius Capital:

Port-Louis

Location:

Island 500 miles east of Madagascar, in the Indian Ocean

Area:

2,040 sq. km. (787 sq. mi.)

Population:

1,286,340 (including Rodrigues, Agalega, and St. Brandon)

Language:

Creole (common), French, English (official), Hindi, Urdu, Hakka, Bhojpuri

Independence:

March 12, 1968 (became a republic in 1992)

Government:

Parliamentary Republic Acting President Monique Ohsan Bellepeau Prime Minister Navinchandra Ramgoolam

Currency:

Mauritian rupee (MUR)

Terrain:

Volcanic island surrounded by coral reefs and a central plateau rimmed by mountains

Climate:

Tropical; cyclone season midDecember-April

GDP:

$19.276 billion (2011) Agriculture: 4.5% Industry: 24% Services: 71.4%

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de La Bourdonnais, who successfully developed the sugar industry. The island population was slowly grown and developed through each of the colonies as slaves were brought over from the mainland and Madagascar, forming the Creole population today. The impact of sugar on the population is evident in the indentured labourers brought over from India. The British took over in 1810 and ruled until independence in 1968.

green and sustainable island-State, keeping its ecological stewardship at heart. History Mauritius’ known history extends back over five centuries. The first historical evidence was on a map by Italian cartographer Alberto Cantino in 1502. Even though Mauritius was discovered and visited by the Portuguese between 1507 and 1513, it was the Dutch who first laid base there. The legacy the Dutch left, besides eliminating the Dodo and giant tortoise populations and much of the ebony heartwood forests, was to lay the foundations of industry with the introduction of sugarcane in the 1600s. They also contributed the name of the country after the main vessel in the fleet which first made landfall. After the Dutch abandoned their colony in 1710, the French developed a colony on the island in 1715, leaving an indelible and lasting mark on the island’s infrastructure and culture. It was also the French, under Governor Mahé 14

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Present economic situation Since independence, Mauritius has worked tirelessly to build on these foundations through the diversification of the economy. Currently, Mauritius is striving to add to its ‘four-pillar’ economy, namely sugar, textile, tourism and financial services. This is to make it more resilient to shocks, enhance productivity and competitiveness, and simultaneously support growth and job creation. The economy grew at an estimated 4% in 2011 driven by a resurgent textile industry, and a strong performance by the financial sector. In 2011, tourist arrivals were estimated at about 965,000 compared to 871,000 in 2009 and 2011 tourism earnings were estimated at about MUR43-billion, up from MUR35.7-billion in 2009. Gross foreign direct investment (FDI) stood at MUR9.5-billion in 2011, 10.6-billion in 2010 and MUR8.8-billion in 2009. The investment went mainly to sectors like health, real estate, finance, manufacturing, aquaculture, and the agro industry. Apart from infrastructure development, Mauritius is giving priority to the small and medium enterprise (SME) sector, which has been the main source of employment creation during the financial and economic crises. The government is also increasing its support to export-oriented industries, especially textile and clothing which have been under severe stress in the crisis. Indicators show that primary sector activities, mainly related to agriculture, grew by 2.5% in 2011. Sugarcane grew by only 0.6% while “other agriculture activities” expanded 3.7% in 2011. Mauritian banks are healthy, profitable, well-capitalised and resilient with an overall capital adequacy ratio well up with international standards.


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Future overall growth will rely in some part on the capacity of Mauritius to tackle: • fiscal and current account deficits • high dependency on traditional export partners • high import-dependence Future prospects of the economy With the lack of visibility on how the international business scene will be evolving in the future, the Vice Prime Minister and Minister of Finance and Economic Development, Honourable Xavier Duval presented a prudently optimistic budget for 2012 which builds on the momentum created by bold economic reforms as well as the buoyancy of an empowered population to pave the way for Mauritius to emerge as a world class city-State by the 2020s while playing a significant role in the development of Africa. It is of paramount importance for Mauritius to gather the right impetus to fulfil its economic potential whilst creating and unlocking opportunities. To achieve its full potential, the key sectors of the economy such as manufacturing and financial services need to shift gear to a new level of value addition while emerging sectors such as education and healthcare need to cement their role in the development of the economy. The future prospects of the Mauritian economy seem to be resistant to the shocks of the world economic scene. A concrete example is the Mauritian manufacturing sector. Mauritius has the right combination of factors such as an increasing industrial capacity, research potential and a powerful drive for innovation for sectors which are critical to its future development such as biotechnology, medical devices, nanotechnology, environmental technology and energy to play its major role as a manufacturing hub for Africa. Other sectors such as ICT are expected to provide new value-added services, for example cloud computing, while financial services such as fund management and investment banking are part of the logical way forward for the financial industry to position itself as the International Financial Centre for Africa. The Government has undertaken broad measures to

ensure an overhaul and upgrade of key infrastructures of Mauritius. Growth prospects of the economy will be dependent on the improvement in infrastructure levels such as high quality of logistics, utilities, connectivity, and transportation costs capable of supporting the emergence of a highly modernised country. These improvements, coupled with the right education system, are key to ensuring that Mauritius meets its economic prospects and positions itself as the gateway to Africa.

Board of Investment Level 10, One Cathedral Square Building 16 Jules Koenig Street Port Louis Mauritius Tel: +230 203 38 00 Fax: +230 208 29 24 Email: contact@investmauritius.com Diplomat Africa

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Future Visions Seychelles One thousand miles from the African coast in the western Indian Ocean at the crossroad of Asia and Africa, the 115 islands of Seychelles just below the equator, offer a diverse range of experiences in their white sandy beaches and verdant mountains and forests. Seychelles has retained a soulful way of life which is vibrant and captivating, yet still authentic. This archipelago of legendary natural beauty comprises 41 of the oldest mid-oceanic granitic islands on earth, which together, constitute the Inner Islands. The most prominent are Mahé (the principal island and home to the capital Victoria), together with its close neighbours Praslin and La Digue. Seychelles has two UNESCO World Heritage Sites: ‘Aldabra’ the largest raised coral atoll on earth; and Vallée de Mai where the Coco-de-Mer nut grows on ancient palms, which once earned Seychelles the reputation for being the site of the Garden of Eden. Seychelles’ culture is a melting pot of various ethic strains of the original European settlers of 1770 and their retainers – African slaves and Indian and Chinese migrants who form the well-integrated Seychellois society of today. History It is believed that Austronesian seafarers (and later Maldivian and Arab traders) were the first to visit the uninhabited Seychelles. Remains of Maldivian mariner presence from the 12th century were discovered on Silhouette Island. The earliest recorded sighting by Europeans took place in 1502 by the Portuguese Admiral Vasco da Gama, who passed through the Amirantes and named them after himself (islands of the Admiral). A transit point for trade between Africa and Asia, the 16

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islands were occasionally used by pirates until the French began to take control in 1756 when a Stone of Possession was laid by Captain Nicholas Morphey. The islands were named after Jean Moreau de Séchelles, Louis XV’s Minister of Finance. Climate Seychelles enjoys an average of seven hours of sunshine every day. March and April are the hottest months with temperatures in the shade rarely exceeding 30°C. During the cooler months of July and August, the temperature gets as low as 21°C. The south-east trade winds blow regularly from May to October when the temperature is slightly lower and the atmosphere less humid due to the mild sea-breezes. The north-west monsoon prevails from December to March, which is the hottest and wettest time with humidity averaging 65%. Economy Seychelles is one of the smallest independent countries in the world. The islands of the archipelago are scattered over one-million square kilometres of sea with a total land area of only 455 square kilometres (177 square miles). As a

Republic of Seychelles Capital:

Victoria

Location:

An island country spanning an archipelago of 115 islands in the Indian Ocean, 1,500 kilometres (932 mi) east of mainland Africa, northeast of the island of Madagascar.

Area:

451 km2 (174 sq mi)

Population:

85,525 (smallest population in Africa)

Language:

French, English, Seychellois Creole

Independence:

June 29, 1976 (from the United Kingdom)

Government:

Unitary representative presidential republic President James Michel Vice President Danny Faure

Currency:

Seychellois rupee (SCR)

Terrain:

115 islands fall under two groups: 43 tall granite Inner Islands; and 72 lowlying coral cays, atolls and reef Outer Islands. The Outer Islands are divided into five groups: Amirantes, Southern Coral Group, Alphonse Group, Farquhar Group, and Aldabra Group.

Climate:

Equable although quite humid; mostly lying outside the cyclone belt

GDP:

$2.245-billion (2011) Agriculture: 1.9% Industry: 18.7% Services: 79.3%

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result there is very limited cultivable land as well as no known mineral resources. Its main resource, is its beauty, which has been well capitalised on in a successful tourism industry. Despite its constraints of limited resources, the economic situation of Seychelles is one that many developing countries could envy. Even at US $2,053,000,000 GDP in 2010, its GDP per capita is the second highest in Africa, after Equatorial Guinea. Tourism The natural beauty and uniqueness of Seychelles has always attracted vast numbers of tourists, placing the tourism industry as the biggest sector of the economy. Factors such as globalisation, competitiveness, and the economic downturn worldwide have resulted in Seychelles having to refocus their marketing campaign. This led to the formation of a highly resourceful tourism body under the leadership of Minister for Tourism and Culture, Alain St.Ange. When Prince William and his new wife, Duchess Catherine, chose Seychelles as their honeymoon destination, it sparked a worldwide trend. The Seychelles tourism board were quick to market the country as the ‘Honeymoon Destination’ of the world. Seychelles is now understandably one of the first choice destinations for honeymooners. The Seychelles International Carnival of Victoria is an annual celebration which attracts numerous tourists as well as communities from all over the Indian Ocean. The Carnival for 2012 became an initiative of the Vanilla Islands organisation and was jointly hosted by Seychelles and La Réunion, and was a great success in drawing attention by celebrating this unique region. The Vanilla Islands organisation is a joint marketing concept between Seychelles, Comoros, Madagascar, La Réunion, Mauritius, and Mayotte. Seychelles Tourism Minister Alain St.Ange has been elected to be the first President of the Vanilla Islands organisation. This exciting concept has opened up the region for inter-travel.

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Environment The Seychelles government is finding alternative ways to sustain themselves. A new energy bill has been passed which allows sustainable energy producers to sell back their energy to the main power supply company. Photovoltaic cells would do very well in Seychelles given the number of hours of sunshine per day, and are also becoming more affordable. Eco capital of the world Seychelles aims to position itself as the Eco Capital of the World with standards which will be judged and measured. Almost 50% of the land area of these 115 islands in the middle of the Indian Ocean is under strict conservation and a host of eco-practices were announced as part of the Seychelles2020 Initiative. La Digue has been chosen as the repository of this ambition, but other islands such as Silhouette, North, Fregate, Conception and Cousin have already got their own programmes. Foreign Diplomacy In foreign relations, Seychelles’ representation is expanding with plans to cover five continents, namely North America, South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. This is visible through the opening of new diplomatic missions in Rome, Beijing, Pretoria and India, in addition to those already in existence in New York, Paris and Brussels, which all play a result-oriented role in bilateral, regional and international affairs. As a small nation, the government saw the need to gain more visibility and credibility in the international arena. They took the unprecedented move of inviting former Diplomats to Seychelles in a bid to set up an association of “Friends of Seychelles”. Key achievements President James Michel stressed the importance of diversifying the economy as soon as he took office after


FUTURE VISIONS

noticing the main challenges for investment in Seychelles was that focus was solely on the two main sectors of the economy – tourism and fisheries. His plan was to try to create more visibility, awareness and interest in other sectors of the economy, involving other services to support the industry. He started with a proactive promotion programme which organised investment forums in other countries to open up the other sectors. This publicised the offshore industry of Seychelles and its stable jurisdiction with favourable tax rates and conditions. Seychelles has potential for financial services and the banks are very profitable, with space for more financial intermediaries. There is also scope for development in the ICT sector. One of the visions of the country is to move towards a knowledge economy. The workforce is highly educated with a 98% literacy rate and the newly opened University of Seychelles offers a vehicle for this. The submarine cable is also one of the enablers as the connection opens many windows of opportunity. Particular areas of interest include e-commerce and business process outsourcing. Seychelles’ social indicators are good by international standards. The country’s success in improving the social conditions of its population is partly rooted in the welfarestate role assumed by the government over the last two decades. There is a comprehensive social safety net, whereby the government has sought to minimise income disparities. This is through subsidised housing, access to healthcare and education, and minimum income for the elderly, unemployed and the poor. Life expectancy has increased and infant mortality rates have been reduced. Competitive advantages Seychelles is unique because of its political, social, and economic stability. Since its reform, the country has had a strong economy, with inflation contained to single digits and built up reserves. The legal framework in place allows security and ease for new businesses and banks. The Seychelles environment is well placed for corporate

global positioning, with access to networking with the Middle East, Asia and Africa. The access to Africa is heightened by Seychelles’ membership with SADC and COMESA, with direct flights to South Africa, Kenya, and Ethiopia – making Seychelles the perfect stepping stone. Vision 2020 President Michel’s vision to transform Seychelles has been tangibly illustrated to his citizens through the annual ‘Touch the Future’ 2020 Expo, which highlights how these goals can become reality. The Vision was conceptualised through a thorough process of investigation of various sectors of society and their aspirations. Vision 2020 has been interwoven to Aspiration 2013, which focused on the youth, and Strategy 2017, which focused on developing the economy. The Vision notes innovation as the key to Seychelles’ success in the future. Ministry of Foreign Affairs Seychelles: www.mfa.gov.sc Virtual Seychelles: www.virtualseychelles.com

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Future Visions Lesotho Lesotho is a democratic, sovereign and independent country which is located in southern Africa. The name Lesotho translates into “the land of the people who speak Sotho”. Formerly a British protectorate until independence in October 1966, the Kingdom of Lesotho is one of the three remaining monarchies in Africa. The country has a land area of approximately 30,355 km², roughly the size of Belgium or Taiwan, or the American state of Maryland. Located at the southern tip of Africa, Lesotho is completely outside the tropics and enjoys a cool, temperate climate. Often referred to as the “Switzerland of Africa”, it is blessed with a beautiful, often snow-capped range of mountains, the Maluti. The Kingdom’s central position in the heart of Africa’s most developed economy the Republic of South Africa, is well served by air, rail and road links to all its major centres. The capital, Maseru, is only 600 km away from South Africa’s busiest harbour, Durban, and is one-hour’s drive from Bloemfontein, a judicial and academic centre. It is also only 45 minutes by air or four hours by road from Johannesburg. Lesotho is home to the largest and most ambitious civil engineering project in the whole of Africa, the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP), which has harnessed and commercialised her upstream surplus water resources – often referred to by Basotho as their “White Gold”. Lesotho enjoys a high literacy rate at 82% that has been further enhanced by the free primary education program introduced by the government in 2000. There are over 1200 Primary schools in Lesotho placing every child within walking distance to a school. The economy is divided into three sectors: primary, secondary and tertiary, contributing 12.75%, 29.48% and 57.77% respectively. The manufacturing sector contributes 17.3% to GDP. 20

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Republic of Lesotho Capital:

Maseru

Location:

The only independent state in the world lying entirely above 1,000 metres in elevation. It has an altitude of 3,400 metres at its highest, and its lowest point of 1,400 metres is the highest in the world. Lesotho is the southernmost landlocked country in the world and entirely surrounded by South Africa.

Area:

30,335 sq. km

Population:

2-million

Language:

Sesotho & English

Independence:

October 4, 1966 (from British protection)

Government:

Unitary Parliamentary Constitutional Monarchy under King Letsie III and Prime Minister Tom Thabane.

Currency:

Loti, plural Maloti; par with South African Rand (ZAR).

Terrain:

Mountainous highland with plateaus and hills with abundant water and grazing lands.

Climate:

The high altitude keeps Lesotho cool throughout the year with most rain falling in summer thunderstorms. Temperatures in summer can reach 30ยบC in the lowlands and as low as -7ยบC in winter and -18ยบC in winter. Snow is common from May to September.

GDP:

$3.672 billion (5.2% 2011) Agriculture: 7.5% Industry: 33.1% Services: 59.4%

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• Duty-free access for a large list of products except for dairy, poultry and egg products granted by Canada (34 million consumers) under the GSP system. • A preferential treatment agreement between SACU and MERCOSUR (comprising Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay (385 million consumers) grants trade preferences on specific products originating from Lesotho as member of SACU. • The SACU EFTA gives SACU originating industrial and fish products duty-free and quota free access to Switzerland, Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein. • 99% of Lesotho’s industrial products, including textiles and clothing can be exported duty- and quota-free to Japan (127 million consumers). • Lesotho’s products are eligible for duty-free access to New Zealand, under a GSP scheme introduced in 1972. • Turkey provides Lesotho’s industrial products duty free access under a GSP scheme.

Development Strategy The Government of Lesotho has adopted a private sector driven economic development and an export led industrial growth strategy. An essential part of the economy is an industry that comprises diamond mining and quarrying, construction, manufacturing of textiles, garments and footwear, assembly of electronics and electrical appliances, trout breeding and fishing, water bottling and food processing. Lesotho’s trade and investment framework provides for a duty-free and concessionary access of Lesotho made products into the Southern African Customs Union (SACU), Southern African Development Community (SADC), the US under Africa Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), and to the EU under the SADC Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA). Other significant markets include: • Preferential market access of Lesotho originating products into the Australian market (22 million consumers), affording them duty-free access or reduced rates of duty. 22

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Industries Lesotho’s main exports to these markets comprise crude materials (diamonds, wool and mohair), manufactured goods (garments, electronics and electrical appliances, footwear) and water (under the Lesotho Highlands Water Project). One of the first initiatives undertaken by government after independence in 1966 was the formation of the Lesotho National Development Corporation (LNDC) and the Lesotho Tourism Development Corporation (LTDC) in 2002. Both institutions are government’s arm to encourage investment and to assist in the development of tourism, commerce and industry. The key responsibility of the LNDC is to contribute to national economic growth and development by promoting Lesotho as an attractive and a preferred investment location to both foreign and local investors. LNDC offers a wide range of investment supportive services. These include serviced industrial sites; factory buildings; business support services; aftercare services; financial assistance to support joint ventures with local investors; and where possible, limited equity participation in projects considered to be of


FUTURE VISIONS

strategic importance to the economy. The LTDC deals with identification and promotion of investment opportunities in the tourism sector. The Corporation also plays an advisory role to the private sector and tourism programs in collaboration with tourism organisations. The LNDC and LTDC together with the Government and the business community of Lesotho are constantly promoting investments that combine natural resources with the existing skills. An example of this synergy is Lesotho’s wool and mohair products including jerseys, scarves, blankets and tapestries. A lucrative investment opportunity exists in the establishment of a vertically integrated industry that can process the abundant wool and mohair to the more value added stage of yarn. As is the case with many emerging economies, a substantial amount of capital has been channelled to labour intensive activities such as clothing, footwear, tourism, and electronics assembly. While Lesotho is very strong in these labour intensive activities with special reference to the clothing and textile sector, investment opportunities exist in other activities such as: • Garment industry integration (knitted fabric mill, accessories and packaging materials); • Automotive components; • Leather and footwear; • Assembly of consumer electrical and electronic appliances; • Food processing and water bottling; • Mining – resource based projects e.g. sandstone, ceramic ware and brick making; • Renewable energy and environmental projects such as water recycling and solid waste management; • Pharmaceuticals; and • Infrastructure development. Investments in these priority sectors are supported by a healthy government administered incentive package including: • 0% tax on income generated from exporting manufactured goods outside of the Southern African

Customs Union (SACU); • A permanent maximum manufacturing tax rate of 10% on profits; • Training subsidy allowable at 125% for tax purposes; and • No withholding tax on dividends distributed by manufacturing firms to local or foreign shareholders. Vision 2020 In 2000 the country took a policy decision to formulate a vision to provide a long-term perspective within which national short to medium-term plans could be formulated. The specific objectives of the Lesotho Vision 2020 are to: establish a long-term vision for Lesotho by looking beyond the short-term plans and adjustments; explore the options for economic, political and human development to the year 2020; identify alternative development strategies suitable for the Lesotho situation; promote a process of open dialogue and consultation with socio-economic groups countrywide; create an environment whereby Basotho will actively participate in achieving the Vision 2020; and, develop a focus along the horizon in the direction of which development plans could be rolled out. Lesotho’s Vision 2020 document identifies seven pillars of development. These are democracy, unity, peace, education and training, economic growth, management of the environment, and advancement in technology. With a new government and numerous exciting development projects in the pipeline, Lesotho is setting its own development agenda, which looks sure to see the country rise up to new heights. For more information contact: Lesotho National Development Corporation Block A, Development House Kingsway Street, Maseru, Lesotho Private Bag A96, Maseru 100, Lesotho Tel: (+266) 22 312 012 | Fax: (+266) 22 310 038 Email: info@lndc.org.ls | Website: www.lndc.org.ls YOUR STRATEGIC PARTNER IN INVESTMENT Diplomat Africa

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CHAPTER 1: FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma elected as African Union Chair

Southern Africa celebrated on 15 July 2012 as South African politician Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma was elected as the new Chairperson of the African Union Commission (AU) at its 19th session, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The victory came after three rounds of voting in which Dlamini-Zuma received 60% of the votes against outgoing chair since 2008, Jean Ping of Gabon. The momentous result means that Dlamini-Zuma becomes the first woman to lead the organisation. Nkosazana Clarice Dlamini-Zuma was born on 27 January, 1949 in Kwa-Zulu Natal and fought in the struggle against Apartheid. Dlamini-Zuma received honorary Doctor of Law degrees from the University of Natal (1995) and the University of Bristol (1996). She served as democratic South Africa’s Minister of 26

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Health from 1994 to 1999 as well as the Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1999 to 2009. She then became Minister of Home Affairs in 2009 – having served four Presidents in total: Nelson Mandela, Thabo Mbeki, Kgalema Molanthe (interim), and ex-husband Jacob Zuma. The first election for the AU Chair in January 2012 resulted in a deadlock with neither opponent able to secure the necessary two-thirds majority, meaning that Ping’s term was extended by six months. Throughout the voting process, Dlamini-Zuma has maintained that her stance as leader would not be determined by her region as she hopes to avoid polarisation on the continent in order to maintain global credibility for the whole of Africa. Many believe that her history as a freedom fighter bides well for the organisation, which will ensure that the best interests of African democracy will always be first priority and remain unhindered by bureaucracy. Dlamini-Zuma’s appointment brings a peaceful end to the succession battle, preserving the AU’s unity. What South Africa hopes to achieve after its active pursuit of this position, is empowerment for the AU through finding African solutions for African problems. Dlamini-Zuma aims to chair as an inclusive leader and avoid division at all costs. Her competency in her ministerial roles have spoken volumes for her ability at the helm of the organisation. Memorable achievements include Dlamini-Zuma’s shuttle diplomacy in ending the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo as Minister of Foreign Affairs, introducing legislation which gave equal access to free basic care as Minister of Health, and turning around a troubled Home Affairs ministry which then received its first clean audit in 16 years. Through her leadership and managerial efficiency, Dlamini-Zuma has promised to make the AU a more effective organisation, as she aims to consult all regions in implementation of programmes. As the new AU chair, Dlamini-Zuma is expected to stress economic growth and development, and women’s rights. This includes setting priorities for improving and building infrastructure, peace building, greater involvement of women in politics, and strengthened relations between North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa.


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Proudly African

Boosting inter-trade & cultural relations across the continent

Proudly African Boosting Trade, Development and Cultural Relations across Africa www.ProudlyAfrican.info

Proudly African is an initiative of Global Village Africa which is a marketing and business platform geared towards showcasing and harmonising Africa’s development, trade and cultural diversity to a global audience. This is where the BEST OF AFRICA in business, government and nonprofit organisations unite, promoting their vision and best practice in order to find the right customers, partnerships and joint ventures - in order to grow alongside the continent’s indisputable economic potential. The initiative has an unstoppable magnetic presence with its ever growing country and sectoral window already in over 20 African states. We invite all leaders in business and government across Africa to showcase and integrate their visions and activities so as to promote inter-Africa trade, investment and technology transfer from around the globe. We also invite all Africa’s media, trade exhibitions, conferences and business chambers to use the platform to gain mutually beneficial exposure.

Fully unlocking Africa’s promise requires greater continent-wide economic integration and inter-trade; such as in Europe, where integration has enabled the continent to become the world’s single biggest market. Integration and inter-trade is not only urgent, but also indispensable to unlock economies of scale and propel Africa’s competitiveness in the global economy, thus aligning the continent with the global flows of trade and finance as an equal partner.

Thapelo Letsholo, Proudly African Africa’s massive economic potential still lies largely untapped - but not for much longer. The world is coming and so is the dream of a more united Africa. We need to make sure we maximise on the growth for the benefit of all of Africa and its people.

www.ProudlyAfrican.info

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FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Lesotho welcomes The Right Honourable Motsoahae Thomas Thabane as its new Prime Minister

For the first time in 14 years, Lesotho welcomed a new Prime Minister to govern the mountain kingdom, as Motsoahae Thomas Thabane was sworn in on 8 June, 2012. Born as the eldest in a family of eight in Maseru on May 28, 1939, Thabane’s parents Isaiah and Malekhooa Grace Nkoya wanted their children to acquire the best education. Thabane has a BA degree in Political Science and English from Puis VII University and a PH from Morija Teacher Training College. As a young man, he was determined to graduate university at all costs and marry the girl of his dreams, Judith Fobo. Succeeding against all odds, Thabane’s culture of resilience, honesty and optimism was nurtured. He is now not only the father of five children, but the new father of a nation. 28

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Having been in government employment in various roles since 1965, Thabane’s recent prolific political career saw him serve as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1998 to 2003, Minister of Home Affairs and Public Safety from 2003 to 2005, and Minister of Communications, Science and Technology from 2005 to 2006. He also served as the Chairman of Council of Ministers in the Organisation of African Union, before it became the African Union. In the 1990s he led the negotiating team that aided the return of political exiles that fled the country in 1970. Thabane’s achievements include winning the 2006 Best ICT Minister in Africa Award, chairing the Committee of Ministers in the East African Submarine Cable System Project, pioneering the expansion of rural telecommunications networks in rural Lesotho, chairing the National Refugee Committee, chairing the National Democratisation Committee, and part-time consulting for the World Health Organisation on Primary Health Care Implementation in sub-Saharan Africa. Thabane’s resignation from Lesotho Congress for Democracy (LCD) on 9 October, 2006 to form his All Basotho Convention (ABC) party was driven by his desire to unite all Basotho. It was seen by many as the start of a new political dawn to lead Lesotho into economic development. The momentous transition of power from Mosisili to Thabane marked the first time in Lesotho’s history that the vote brought about a change in regime. The legislative election of May 26 saw Mosisili’s LCD fail to secure the majority. Thabane’s ABC then teamed up to share power with LCD and the Basotho National Party, thereby ousting Mosisili. Thabane’s appointment received wide support, with the governments of South Africa and France extending their congratulations. France lauded it as a “sign of Lesotho’s exemplary system of alternating political power”. Thabane believes being Prime Minister requires using one’s power and influence to help the citizens to push for the country’s wholesome development. Seen as the ‘man of all seasons’, it is hoped that Thabane’s term will see a better life for every one of Lesotho’s citizens.


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

High Commissioner of India in South Africa, Mr Virendra Gupta Salaam (1998-2001) and Port of Spain (2001-2005). In his capacity as High Commissioner of India in South Africa, he has dealt with wide-ranging issues including international security, southern Africa, disarmament, trade and investment promotion, energy security, and multilateral affairs. Under his guidance, the Indian High Commission in South Africa launched a new website to promote bilateral relations. Through this, High Commissioner Gupta expressed his belief that South Africa and India’s trade relationship is to be defined by economic growth in the next few years, and that job creation, value addition and government policy on beneficiation will further influence this relationship. He is married and has two children. His hobbies include Golf and Bridge. India is South Africa’s sixth largest trading partner with bilateral trade between the two countries reaching $10billion a year. An increase of $5-billion has been targeted for 2014. High Commissioner Gupta also feels that South Africa serves as India’s anchor on the African continent. This central status of South Africa in India’s policy in Africa arose from the countries’ shared position on the cusp of becoming developed countries. Mr Virendra Gupta is also concurrently accredited to the Kingdom of Lesotho. Born on August 19 1954, he obtained his Masters degree in Physics from the University of Allahabad. After briefly working at the State Bank of India, he joined the Indian Foreign Service in 1977.

The bilateral relationship between India and South Africa has a strong base through the hand of peace first extended by the iconic ‘Father of the Nation’, Mohandas ‘Mahatma’ Gandhi. This relationship has been continually upheld by the significant South African Indian community.

He has served as Director General, Indian Council for Cultural Relations, New Delhi. He was also posted at Indian Missions in Kathmandu, Lagos, New York (where he served as Rapporteur of the UN Special Committee against Apartheid), Permanent Mission of India to the United Nations, as well as Tel Aviv and Cairo in various capacities. He then served as High Commissioner of India in Dar-es-

High Commission of India, Pretoria 852, Schoeman Street Cnr of Schoeman Street and Eastwood Street Arcadia – 0083 Telephone: +27 12 342 5392 Facsimile: +27 12 342 5310 www.indiainsouthafrica.com Diplomat Africa

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FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Lieutenant General Tebogo Masire Lieutenant General Masire, the 4th Commander of the Botswana Defence Force, graduated from the East African School of Aviation, in 1975 and the US Airforce Command and Staff College in 1988. He also holds a BSc Degree from Troy State University and an MBA from University of Southern Queensland. He first worked at the Department of Civil Aviation as an Air Traffic Controller before joining the Military in 1977, when the Botswana Defence Force was formed. He holds the record of being the only member of the first intake of 1977 still in the BDF thirty-five years on. During his 35 years of an illustrious military career, Lt. Gen. Masire has held various operational, staff and command appointments: one of them being the Chief VIP Pilot. He has the honour and privilege of being the only BDF Pilot to have flown all the four Presidents of the Republic of Botswana to over thirty countries. The General was the longest serving Air Arm Commander starting in 1989 until 2006. He has over 4000 flying hours and was inducted into the International Honour Roll by the US Air University in 1993. Lt. Gen. Masire reached the pinnacle of his career in 2006, when he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant General and appointed the Commander, BDF in the same year. Some of the major developments and highlights of his command in the BDF include: the induction of the first female officers into the Defence Force in 2007; and the construction and completion of the premier Defence Command and Staff College which is scheduled for official opening on 26 July 2012 – the eve of his retirement. Furthermore, in his wisdom and foresight, he pioneered the restructuring of the Defence Force Formations to enhance the force’s capability to meet new challenges posed by operations such as international peacekeeping and peace support as well as developments in technology. He is a decorated General, who has been bestowed with the Duty Code Oder (DCO), Distinguished Service Medal (DSM) and Grand Officer of Meritorious Order of the International Military Sports Council (GOM). General Masire was born in Kanye. He did his primary education in Mochudi and moved to Gaborone in 1968 30

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where he completed his secondary education at Gaborone Secondary School. He married Orefitlhetse in 1984 and they are blessed with three daughters: Phatsimo, Tuduetso and Magadi. In his spare time the General is a keen football fan and a part-time farmer.


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Board Chairperson Mr Victor Senye Introduces the Botswana Investment & Trade Centre (BITC)

Botswana Export Development and Investment Authority (BEDIA) and Botswana International Financial Services Centre (IFSC) were merged on the 1st April, 2012 to become a single entity – the Botswana Investment and Trade Centre (BITC). I am pleased to note that the transition process is progressing well. We continue to receive support from the Ministry of Trade and Industry who are our principals and implementing partners. We are also grateful for the business community’s understanding during this transition period. Special mention goes to the BITC staff that have been at the core of the process of change. I urge them to continue being diligent and endeavour to make BITC the best Investment Promotion Agency (IPA) in the region.

Keeping in mind that with change comes the opportunity to become more efficient, agile and competitive. As the Board of Directors we have resolved to hold monthly meetings to ensure we expedite the migration process in a timely manner. In order to minimise disruption to business, the two former entities will continue to function as normal and be accommodated as they are until suitable accommodation for the BITC is secured. The process of systems and process integration is being systematically managed to ensure that by the 1st October, 2012 the basic systems and processes are in place and are fully functional. The recruitment process involved implementing the BITC CEO and populating the BITC organisational structure with employees thereafter. An appropriate, fair and transparent recruitment process was followed to ensure that the right employees with the required competencies are selected and placed in the right jobs. We anticipate that due to the merger there will be shorter turn-around times, more targeted investment promotion initiatives leading to improved service delivery. Our objective as the Board of Directors is that the BITC should be best placed to stimulate both local and foreign investment as well as position Botswana as a destination of choice for investment. I would like to urge all of you to partner with us as we endeavour in this journey that will diversify our economy, create jobs for Batswana and contribute towards the realisation of Botswana’s Vision 2016. In conclusion, I wish to take this opportunity to assure all BITC stakeholders that services provided by former BEDIA and IFSC will continue to be rendered to them accordingly. We urge you all to feel free to contact us if you require clarity or further details about the change we are currently embarking on. Contact Person: Ms W. Makwinja Title: BITC Care Taker Chief Executive Officer Tel: +267 3601435 Fax: +267 3971539 Email: wmakwinja@yahoo.com Diplomat Africa

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Salif Keita Keita’s music is a combination of traditional West African music styles with European and American influences. His overall style is Islamic using instruments such as Balafons, djembes, guitars, koras, organs, saxophones, and synthesisers.

Salif Keita was born in the village of Djoliba in Mali on the 25th of August, 1949. He is an afro-pop singersongwriter uniquely known for his reputation as the “Golden Voice of Africa” as well as his albinism. He is also a direct descendant of the founder of the Mali Empire, Sundiata Keita. 32

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Early life Keita was cast out by his family and community because his albinism was seen as a sign of bad luck in Mandinka culture. He began his musical career in 1967 when he left for Bamako and joined the government sponsored Super Rail Band de Bamako. He then joined the group Les Ambassadeurs in 1973. Together, the group fled to Abidjan in Côte d’Ivoire during the mid-1970’s political unrest in Mali. They changed their name to “Les Ambassadeurs Internationaux”. Their reputation achieved international status. Keita received a National Order award from the president of Guinea in 1977. Career Keita moved to Paris in 1984. He found success in Europe as an African star of world music. He returned to Bamako in Mali to live and record in the early 2000s. His 2002 album Moffou was hailed as his best album in many years. He built a recording studio in Bamako where he recorded M’Bemba, in 2005. In 2004, he was named United Nations Ambassador for Music and Sports and dedicated himself to causes like Malaria, AIDS and the plight of Albinos in Mali and

around the world. Keita’s album, La Différence, was produced in 2009 and recorded between Bamako, Beirut, Paris, and Los Angeles. He dedicated it to the struggle of the world albino community, for whom Keita has always championed. La Difference won Keita the Best World Music 2010 at the Victoires de la musique. Salif Keita’s first major US mainstream breakthrough was a feature on the soundtrack to Will Smith’s movie Ali. In 2010, Keita became Peace Ambassador for the African Union to end fighting in conflict zones and raise awareness about the plight of the African Albino. Keita has received multiple Grammy Award nominations. He has released a total of 19 albums since 1982. The Salif Keita Global Foundation With an Olympic medal winning albino niece, an albino child, and having lost his albino sister to skin cancer, Keita founded The Salif Keita Global Foundation in 2005 to raise awareness and money for free healthcare and educational services, for the care and integration, for Albinos in Africa. The foundation brings media attention to the global plight of people with albinism and advocates their rights and social integration. The organisation is headed by Keita’s Malian-American wife, journalist and activist, Coumba Makalou. www.salifkeita.us


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Restructured MBSA appoints new executive director Itumeleng ‘Tumi’ Dlamini has been appointed executive director of Master Builders South Africa (MBSA) – the first woman, and first black person, to become executive head of MBSA in its 108 year history. She joined MBSA on 1 March, 2012 as part of MBSA’s new strategic restructuring plan which involves the appointment of an executive director as the executive head of the organisation, and the creation of the new post of operations director, which will be filled by Pierre Fourie, former CEO of MBSA. Tumi Dlamini holds a BSoc Sci degree with majors in Industrial Sociology and African Politics as well as an LLB degree, both from the University of Cape Town. She joins MBSA with an impressive and diverse career history. She is an admitted attorney of the High Court of South Africa and was the first black female partner at international law firm, Bowman Gilfillan, where she practiced corporate and commercial law. After 10 years in legal practice which included time at the firm’s London offices, she joined the 2010 FIFA World Cup Organising Committee South Africa. There she held various key senior positions, including Manager in the Office of the CEO where she was responsible for organisational and executive management, as well as operational planning. She later served as the Head of African Legacy and Strategic Stakeholders, also part of the 2010 FIFA Soccer World Cup project and, in this position, engaged, networked and negotiated with key national and provincial government leaders, as well as business leaders in South Africa and Africa. She was also responsible for facilitating private and public partnerships for the delivery of the 2010 FIFA Soccer World Cup Legacy projects, one of which was the development of SMMEs to unlock and apply participation by SMMEs in the procurement spend of the World Cup projects. Master Builders South Africa President Danie Hattingh comments: “We are delighted about Tumi Dlamini’s appointment to our organisation. Her appointment marks the implementation of the next phase of Master Builders South Africa’s strategic plan and will strengthen the organisation’s liaison with Government and industry

stakeholders. She will be responsible for implementing the new growth strategy adopted by the MBSA Board.” “Over and above her leadership and executive management role, Tumi’s main focus will be to cultivate and strengthen strategic relationships with national and provincial governments, as well as key industry role players, to unlock investment and development within the building industry.” The new MBSA executive director says she is looking forward to working with Master Builders South Africa and achieving its strategic goals. “I will use my accumulated experience to lead the organisation towards the advancement of its priorities for the greater good of the industry,” she added. Diplomat Africa

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FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Legwaila Joseph Manson John Legwaila Legwaila was born in a little village called Mathathane in North-Eastern Botswana on 2 February, 1937. The fifth child of Morongwa and Madome Legwaila, he was named in honour of the Legwaila Clan. His professional career started fifty-four years ago as a teacher. In 1968, Legwaila was offered a scholarship to study in Canada. As he was doing a teacher’s course at Serowe Teachers Training College, his sponsors expected him to pursue a degree in education – which he did for one year at the University of Calgary in Canada. He then decided to change to History and Political Science. His appetite for international diplomacy was whetted when this course at the University of Alberta in Canada paid special emphasis on the study of international organisations, and he began to envision a career with the United Nations. In his final year, he received an unsolicited job offer in the Office of President Sir Seretse Khama. On returning to Botswana he was placed in the Department of External Affairs as an Assistant External Affairs Officer. In 1974 he was appointed Private Secretary to the President – sealing his fate as a diplomat. In 1980 Legwaila was appointed by President Sir Seretse Khama to represent Botswana at the United Nations in New York as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary and Permanent Representative. Concurrently, he was also accredited to Jamaica and Guyana as High Commissioner and Cuba as Ambassador. His work at the United Nations did not go unnoticed by the Secretaries General of the world body. In 1989 he was appointed by the Secretary General Peres de Cuellar to serve as his Deputy Special Representative in Namibia to assist in the implementation of the United Nations Plan leading to the independence of Namibia. His stint in Namibia as a peace-keeper and peacemaker was the beginning of a new career in the international arena assisted by continued service in New York as 34

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FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Botswana to the United Nations. On his return to New York in early 1990 at the conclusion of the U.N. Mission in Namibia, Legwaila looked forward to resuming his duties as permanent representative and the government decided to keep him in New York. In 1992 he was borrowed once again, by the Secretary General of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU), to lead the OAU Mission in South Africa during the country’s transition from Apartheid to a non-racial democracy. This included observing the CODESA negotiations for a new South Africa, which took place at the International Trade Centre in Kempton Park, Johannesburg. As the representative of the OAU it was Legwaila’s responsibility to serve as a conduit between the South African liberation movement and the Headquarters of the OAU, and as the eyes and ears of the OAU Secretary General and the Chairman of the Organisation. Under his leadership more than one hundred election observers from all over Africa (including Botswana) monitored the electoral process, which culminated in the election of Mr Nelson Mandela as the first democratically elected President of South Africa in April 1994. Botswana had bid for membership of the UN Security Council for 1995-1996 and Legwaila was to remain in his post at the Mission in New York to lead Botswana’s delegation on the Security Council. Longing to return to Botswana, he remained in New York even after officially retiring from the Civil Service in 1997. In November 2000 Legwaila was again borrowed by the UN Secretary General to serve as his Special Representative in Ethiopia and Eritrea where he headed the United Nations Mission (UNMEE) for five and a half years, whose mandate was to monitor a ceasefire between the two East African nations after a war over the border. He was then requested to return to Headquarters in New York, to take an assignment as Special Advisor on Africa for Secretary General Kofi Annan in the last year of

his stewardship of the U.N. This prominent assignment provided the most fitting way to wrap up an eventful career as a diplomat in the service of both his beloved country and the United Nations. He was touched to have seen Namibians and South Africans taste freedom after centuries of suffering and hopelessness; and witnessing war ravaged villages in Ethiopia and Eritrea and having to dodge mine fields, made Legwaila realise the fortune of coming from a peaceful country like Botswana. His twenty-year stint at the world body was his most fulfilling and he was honoured to represent his country and people at a global body such as the United Nations. Legwaila sees no comparable profession as fulfilling, as ennobling and as exciting as diplomacy – particularly the aspect of it which involves peacekeeping and peacemaking. Diplomat Africa

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FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

Moise Chapwe Katumbi the biblical Moses. Coincidentally, his father was an Israeli immigrant to DR Congo. Katumbi has endeared himself with the people partly because of their shared passion of football. Katumbi’s affection for Congolese giants TP Mazembe football club, a team he has lifted out of oblivion, has further endeared the charming politician to the masses beyond his territorial boundary. That is why when invisible political pressure was thrust on him to exit his position last year, Katanga virtually came to a standstill. In fact, at the time, he said he was quitting so he could concentrate on his businesses and his beloved TP Mazembe, Africa’s four-time continental champions and the first club from African soil to reach the finals of the prestigious FIFA World Club championships.

When Moise Chapwe Katumbi announced he was quitting his position as Katanga province governor in October 2011, seas of people poured into the streets of the mineral rich city of Lubumbashi to protest the decision. His popularity at home and abroad has impressively soared placing the 47-year-old businessman high in the echelon of the political history of DR Congo which is now on the path to recovery. Children, women, youths and the general populous in DR Congo adore Katumbi. His appearance in public is greeted with chants of “Moise! Moise! Moise!”. Moise is the Swahili name for Moses and as a result, his loyalists say in their native Swahili ‘Uyu ni Moise wa mubible’ [This is the Moise of the bible], to draw parallels between his leadership of the vast mineral endowed country after decades of war, poverty and civil strife – and 36

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As president of TP Mazembe, Katumbi has expanded to give Katanga their sporting prestige by investing in the white-and-black shirted men revered as the ‘Crocodile’ of the region. His presence at the team was immediately felt. After just two-years in charge, Mazembe was back on the continental scene winning back-to-back CAF Champions League titles in 2009 and 2010. Mazembe went a step further to become the continent’s first side to reach the FIFA Club World Cup final losing to the Italian side in Abu Dhabi. Stade de Kibassa Maliba, the current home of Mazembe, is filled to capacity whenever the Lubumbashi outfit is in action. Katumbi’s presence in his traditional white apparel and a black cowboy hat creates wild cheers from the fans. Under Katumbi, Mazembe’s brand new home-ground is near completion with an investment of over US $20-million; and he has further bought two planes for the team and for the fans to transport them to matches within and outside DR Congo. A snap-shot of the activities of October 10, 2011 when a solidarity march demanded Katumbi stay in office, attests to the incredible popularity built around his leadership since


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

2007 when he became governor. The protesting multitudes told Katumbi he was going nowhere. His role was to repair the rattled image Katanga had endured in decades of war. Katumbi promised to re-think his decision following the immense show of solidarity from his people. Since February 2007 when he returned from exile to be elected governor of the country’s southern region, Katumbi has dedicated his service to bettering the lives of his people. The road network, schools and factories are back to life and Katumbi has overseen a rapid and steady economic activity. The electrification of major parts of Katanga has also been rapid, the township road network, has been Katumbi’s passion too. The majority of Congolese people appreciated Katumbi’s commitment to lift not only Katanga, but the rest of the country out of its dark state. The densely populated townships of Kenya, Katuba, Kalubwe Kamalondo and upmarket areas like Golf and Carrefour have all received attention. Kolwezi and Likasi, other than Lubumbashi, are some cities in which Katumbi’s supervised projects are slowly but surely sprouting. His immediate policies upon taking over political office – including the ban on exporting raw ore, the ban on unnecessary dismissals in mining companies, and developing the energy sector – are credited for the revival of Katanga. Further, Katumbi has identified agriculture as one of the country’s other sectors that could support the country’s economy, instead of relying on mining. He discourages his compatriots from relying on imported maize, whose flour forms part of the country’s stable food, particularly in Katanga. To lead by example, Katumbi has himself engaged heavily in farming. Katumbi’s popularity is sometimes equalled to that of Moise Tshombe, the leader of Katanga in the early 60s; and Laurent Desire Kabila – the man who rescued DR Congo from Mobutu Sese Seko’s 30-year dictatorial rule; as well as the great Patrice Emery Lumumba.

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The African Presidential Roundtable 2012 Witwatersrand Communiqué: A 21st Century Energy Agenda for Africa

(L-R): Ambassador Charles R. Stith, Director, African Presidential Center; His Excellency Nicéphore Dieudonné Soglo, former President of Benin; His Excellency Amani Abeid Karume, former President of Zanzibar; His Excellency Ali Hassan Mwinyi, former President of Tanzania; His Excellency Thabo Mbeki, former President of South Africa; His Excellency Olusegun Obasanjo, former President of Nigeria; His Excellency Pedro Pires, former President of Cape Verde; His Excellency Benjamin Mkapa, former President of Tanzania; His Excellency Rupiah Bwezani Banda, former President of Zambia.

The African Presidential Roundtable 2012: A 21st Century Energy Agenda for Africa was held from May 23-25, at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. The Roundtable was a multicontinental conversation involving former African heads of state and government, diplomats, industry leaders, international dignitaries, and students and faculty from the United States, Europe, and Africa. 38

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The Roundtable marked the 10th Anniversary of the African Presidential Roundtable and coincided with the University of Witwatersrand’s 90th Year Celebrations. It was a followup to the Balaclava Summit held in Mauritius in 2011, which also focused on energy security in Africa. The focus of this meeting was the charge received in Balaclava to reconvene to refine the recommendations and expand the stakeholders in the conversation. The Roundtable deliberations were lead by experts in the public and private sector, from institutions such as the World Energy Council, USAID, CAMAC Energy, the Energy Power Group, Uranium One, the World Bank, the Ministries of Energy of Niger, South Africa, and Mozambique; Boston University and the University of the Witwatersrand.


FOREIGN POLICY, DIPLOMACY AND RELATIONS

(L) Dr Malcolm McCulloch and (R) His Excellency Nicéphore Dieudonné Soglo, former President of Benin Over 200 public and private sector leaders participated in the deliberations, forums, and functions. The following Heads of State and Government were co-conveners of the Roundtable: • His Excellency Nicéphore Dieudonné Soglo former President of the Republic of Benin, • His Excellency Pedro Pires former President of Cape Verde, • His Excellency Joaquim Chissano former President of the Republic of Mozambique, • His Excellency Olusegun Obasanjo former President of the Republic of Nigeria, • His Excellency Thabo Mbeki former President of the Republic of South Africa, • His Excellency Benjamin Mkapa former President of the Republic of Tanzania, • His Excellency Ali Hassan Mwinyi former President of the Republic of Tanzania, • His Excellency Rupiah Banda former President of the Republic of Zambia, and • His Excellency Amani Abeid Karume former President of Zanzibar. This year’s African Presidential Roundtable focused on how governments, institutions, and individuals can aid in bringing Africa closer to achieving energy security. If the challenge of achieving energy security for Africa is solved, it has the potential to drive development on the continent to unprecedented levels. This year’s African Presidential Roundtable focused on how governments, institutions, and individuals can aid in bringing Africa closer to achieving a resolution to this pressing dilemma. The deliberations explored ways to maximise the value/potential of Africa’s renewable, non-renewable, and sustainable energy resources; and the importance of mobilising its human resources in order to reach its potential. The Roundtable discussions also addressed the demand for qualified energy-sector personnel on the continent to meet the demands of Africa’s energy needs for

(R-L): 1. Dr Latsoucabé Fall, Regional Manager, Africa, World Energy Council, 2. Ambassador Charles R. Stith, Director of the African Presidential Center, 3. His Excellency Ali Hassan Mwinyi, former President of Tanzania, 4. His Excellency Amani Abeid Karume, former President of Zanzibar, 5. His Excellency Nicéphore Dieudonné Soglo, former President of Benin, 6. His Excellency Pedro Pires, former President of Cape Verde, 7. Verity Norman, Program Development Manager, African Presidential Center, 8. (obscured) Dr Linda Heywood, Director, African-American Studies, Boston University, 9. Ambassador Robin R. Sanders, former U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria. the next fifty years, and stressed the importance of more young people committing to scientific courses of study so as to contribute to the solution of this pressing problem. Africa is becoming the next World Energy Hub because it is strategically situated and has a wealth of natural resources. Africa has at least an 8-10% share of the proven global world oil and gas reserves, and has already overtaken the Middle East as the major oil supplier to the U.S. Africa’s ability to attain energy security rests on political leadership, policy, and its people. The Roundtable encouraged political leaders at every level to lead the necessary country and continental dialogue, which must take place if energy security is going to get the sustained attention it needs to be achieved. The uniqueness of the Roundtable is the contrast of past African leaders exchanging and sharing information with future leaders – such as the students in attendance. A surprising outcome of this however, was that the information was shared both ways. This is a positive indication of the independent and analytical thinking being nurtured in such high-level institutions. The tangible benefits of engaging past leaders are that they have call power, they impact on public opinion due to their profiles, and they have vast wisdom and experience. There was also mention of valuing African resources for controlled usage. This concept of natural capital was also one of the focuses of The Summit for Sustainability in Africa held in Gaborone Botswana from 24 – 25 May. Natural Capital prescribes to the notion that everything in our ecosystem is given a value so as to ensure economic growth does not damage the environment and similarly, that the protection of the environment is not to the detriment of the economy. This is especially important in Africa where resources are needed to pull populations out of poverty. Such key discussions are leading the way to defining this delicate balance of growing Africa sustainably. Photos courtesy of Thabane Maja of Maja Entertainment.

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The perfect farm takes dedication, passion and AFGRI

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CHAPTER 2: TRADE AND INVESTMENT


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City of Ekurhuleni

City of Ekurhuleni, Place of Peace, enters into own new era Situated in the heart of the Gauteng province, South Africa, the City of Ekurhuleni is poised to become the first Aerotropolis in Africa. An Aerotropolis is a type of urban form comprising aviationintensive businesses and related enterprises extending outward from major airports. It has an Airport City at its core and is surrounded by clusters of aviation-related enterprises. It is similar in form and function to a traditional metropolis, which hosts commuter-linked suburbs. From December 1991 to November 1992, South African political leaders met at the World Trade Centre in Kempton Park for the negotiation of a new South African nation, known as the Conference for a Democratic South Africa (CODESA). It is a fitting tribute that the place in which South Africa’s future was decided would be incorporated into one of only six metropolitan municipalities at the time, serving high density population areas in South Africa. Today there are eight metropolitan municipalities across the country. On 5 December 2000, seven years after the historic CODESA negotiations, the local government authorities of the nine cities and towns east of Gauteng entered their own new era with the formation of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. The municipality The region of Ekurhuleni, formerly known as the East Rand, was home to a number of good sized towns that had developed around the mines, and whose charters dated back nearly a century. Nine local administrations amalgamated to form Ekurhuleni – Alberton, Benoni, Boksburg, Brakpan, Edenvale, Germiston, Kempton Park/Tembisa, Nigel, and Springs – along with two other councils, the Khayalami Metropolitan Council and the Eastern Gauteng Services Council.

diverse than that of many countries in Africa. It accounts for nearly a quarter of the Gauteng province’s economy which, in turn, contributes over one third of the national Gross Domestic Product. Ekurhuleni contributes about 7% to the country’s spending power and another 6.2% to its production. In the majority of indicators of economic activity, namely per capita income, unemployment, poverty, average wages, as well as other indicators of human development, it is similar to the rest of Gauteng. It has the largest concentration in Africa of industry for the production of goods and commodities; which is why Ekurhuleni is often referred to as ‘Africa’s workshop’. Manufacturing in Ekurhuleni accounts for 32% of its total production output, and 26% of the GDP of Gauteng.

Economy The economy of the Ekurhuleni region is larger and more

Infrastructure The network of roads, airports, rail lines, telephones,

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• electricity grids and telecommunications, rivals that of many cities in developed Europe and America. This infrastructure supports a well established industrial and commercial complex. South Africa’s largest railway hub is located in Germiston and this links the city to all the major population centres and ports in the southern African region. Many of the country’s modern freeways and expressways crisscross one or other part of Ekurhuleni, connecting it to virtually all provinces, and many of the country’s major cities. The Maputo Corridor development, South Africa’s most advanced spatial development initiative, connects Ekurhuleni with Maputo, the capital of Mozambique. It is also linked directly via rail, road and air to Durban, South Africa’s biggest and busiest port. Why Ekurhuleni? • Ekurhuleni is home to OR Tambo International Airport

which is used by most of the world’s leading airlines and services most of the African continent. The Albertina Sisulu Corridor is a prime investment and development location. Lying on the R21 freeway which runs through Ekurhuleni, the corridor links Johannesburg, OR Tambo International Airport, and Pretoria (Tshwane). Investment opportunities lie in a wide range of sectors including telecommunications, business outsourcing, import, export, manufacturing, processing, transport services, office and retail space, agriculture, and ecotourism and conservation industries. The municipality has devised an urban development structure that creates investment opportunities for business while also contributing to social development and upliftment. Roads, railways and airports service Ekurhuleni well as it has a well developed network of infrastructure as well as strong telecommunications infrastructure and powerful electricity grids. A modern road network system reaches every part of the municipality and connects all the major towns, offering conveniences and a seamless travel experience. Roads are well maintained and more than capable of handling the city’s increasing commercial traffic. The N3 from Johannesburg to Durban, the N12 from Johannesburg to Witbank and the R21 highway, which joins OR Tambo International Airport to the rest of the province, all meet at Gillooly’s Interchange at the heart of Ekurhuleni. More than a quarter of Africa’s railway tracks are situated in South Africa and at the heart of this hub is Ekurhuleni.

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality Tel: +27 11 820 4321 Fax: +27 11 820 4310 www.ekurhuleni.com Diplomat Africa

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Fairscape Precinct, A mixed-use concept for Fairgrounds Botswana Development Corporation (BDC) and its 100% subsidiary, Commercial Holdings, have marked yet another milestone by investing in a property development initiative dubbed â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Fairscape Precinct.â&#x20AC;? Strategically located in the heart of Showground Office Precinct, this state of the art development will be unique and trend-setting as it will be a mixed development tower standing at 15 storeys and comprising of rental office space, retail space, penthouses, a hotel and 884 car parking bays in the basement. BDC found it imperative to initiate Fairscape Precinct to revitalise Fairgrounds by offering prospective commercial and retail tenants with a world class mixed-use property at a total cost of P466-million. Fairgrounds have since transformed into a major office hub in Gaborone but lack a development that truly places it as an office location of international stature. BDC therefore found it imperative to come up with Fairscape. The uniqueness of the development is derived from five major design principles: mixed land use, central piazza, district architectural identity, streetscape character and environmental sustainability. This mixed-use concept is the first of its kind to be implemented in Botswana and is envisaged to bring modern high-class working and living environment into the country. The core concept is to integrate the corporate and private culture into one domain â&#x20AC;&#x201C; where business meets pleasure. The central aim of the Fairscape Precinct development is to create an environment which promotes economic opportunities and stimulates enterprises with a lot of emphasis on investment sustainability. With a 15 storey high tower, the design and structure of the building is to accommodate pedestrian movements and accessibility to the amenities of the precinct with a piazza forming 46

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the central (focal point of the precinct) having an array of shops and open cafes, hence providing a vibrant â&#x20AC;&#x153;street architectureâ&#x20AC;? where locals and visitors can mingle. Also as a 15 storey high tower, this will make it one of the tallest buildings in Gaborone. The design and construction will incorporate modern green building status, which will render the development to be environmentally friendly and energy efficient, with a three level basement parking. Moedi, Plot 50380, Gaborone International Showgrounds, Private Bag, 160, Gaborone, Botswana Tel: +267 365 1300 Fax: +267 390 3114 or +267 390 4193 Email: enquiries@bdc.bw

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Botswana Examinations Council

It was all glitter and glamour for the Botswana General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) top ten achievers and a glimpse of the allure that awaits them as they would be preparing for the western world to pursue further studies. The Botswana Examinations Council (BEC) 3rd Annual Excellence Awards in collaboration with the Ministry of Education and Skills Development (MOESD) was by all standards an epic event in the Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 calendar of events. The immaculate dress and sometimes glittery costumes of achievers, parents, teachers and the VIPs; to the golden adorned table tops and golden reed chairs, all summed up the mood of the day. When Esther Modise was called onto the stage to receive the Golden Star Award from His Excellency President Lt. General Seretse Khama Ian Khama, the hall broke into a rupture of applause and competing flashlights as media personnel shoved each other to get the best shot. The former Selebi Phikwe Senior Secondary School student has outdone herself with eight A+ and an A to

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put herself in the world stage by unlocking a host of opportunities, that should she have failed, she would probably only have dreamed about. In the short term she has earned herself a whooping P20,000, a trophy and certificate as part of the Golden Star


TRADE AND INVESTMENT

play in meeting the country’s Vision, one of whose pillars is to be an educated and informed nation by 2016. He called on other students across all schools in the country to set their footsteps exactly where Esther and other 2011 academic top achievers stepped to secure educational success. His Excellency also implored relevant authorities to reward deserving teachers and invited teachers to come to state Houses to discuss with him their challenges in a relaxed atmosphere over a cup of tea. He requested the Ministry of Education and Skills Development to facilitate for this kind of a meeting. Esther Modise was to later go onto the podium to encourage those who are to still go through the BEC national examinations and left them with these words: “Take your school work seriously and refrain from anything which may distract you from your academics and face all the challenges as rewards are eminent”. “We are limited only by the mind and thoughts, the rest is borne of either one,” echoed the BEC Executive Secretary Dr Serara Moahi earlier on when giving the overview of the awards celebrations held at Gaborone International Convention Centre on the 31st May 2012. Dr Moahi pointed out that the words were earlier put across by a former student of Orapa CJSS, Karabo Sankoloba. “To derive the meaning from this quote shall take decades,” she said. The BEC Executive Secretary emphasised that the excellence awards are meant to increase learners’ confidence, raise their aspirations, improve their motivation for learning, keep them engaged in education and that recognition of achievement can help young people to reflect on their learning and development. She stated that for the 3rd Annual Excellence Awards a total of 72 students were to be awarded as follows: The Presidential award (highest performance in BGCSE), Ministerial award (second highest performance in BGCSE), top 10 high achievers in BGCSE, top 10 high achievers in Junior Certificate Examination (JCE), top 10 high achievers in Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE), top two achievers in special needs category at PSLE, JCE and BGCSE. Dr Moahi also stated that the top achievers at subject level at BGCSE, English, Mathematics and Science at JCE and English, Mathematics and Science combined at PSLE were also to receive awards. She also stated that the best performing school and its Parents Teachers Association at each level were also to be awarded on the Day. The curtain for the Day was closed with dance and laughter as Honourable Minister of Education and Skills Development Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi took to the floor with the BEC Chairperson Dr Joseph Tsonope to the tunes of Nnunu with her jazz melodies of yesteryears. Award goodies in addition to a laptop, Awards T-Shirt and above all a government scholarship in one of the prestigious Universities in the United Kingdom. His Excellency President Lt. General Seretse Khama Ian Khama applauded BEC and MOESD for the pivotal role they

Plot 54862, KT Motsete Rd Private Bag 0070, Gaborone Tel: +267 3650700 | Fax: +267 318 5011 E-mail: enquiries@bec.co.bw www.bec.co.bw Diplomat Africa

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DEBSWANA JWANENG MINE 30 years of sustainable partnership Debswana Jwaneng Mine’s approach to sustainable partnership is captured in their commitment to living up to diamonds. The Mine’s commitment to mining and recovering diamonds safely, cost effectively and responsibly when measured against the highest global mining standards to deliver superior value, always sits at the heart of its business strategy. The Mine’s aim is to ensure that its activities contribute significantly to the development and prosperity of Botswana, and community of Jwaneng and surrounding areas. This promise is underpinned by Debswana’s value of Show we Care, which says “The people whose lives we touch, their communities and nations and the environment we share, all matter deeply to us. We will always think through the consequences of what we do so that our contribution to the world is real, lasting and makes us proud.” The responsibility for the proper management of sustainable partnership is core to the way they operate as a business. Debswana 50

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Jwaneng Mine works in partnership with a broad range of stakeholders to improve communities in areas of healthcare, education, community upliftment, art and culture, sports development and environmental protection. Partnering with various stakeholders ensures that revenues from diamonds are transformed into economic wealth and improved quality of life and wellbeing for its employees, their families, the community of Jwaneng and surrounding areas, the nation of Botswana and its shareholders. The Mine’s biggest Corporate Social Investment project to date is Jwaneng Mine Hospital. Funded to the tune of over P64-million annually, the hospital serves as both a Mine hospital and district referral hospital for a radius of 200km. The hospital which has been accredited by Council for Health Services Accreditation of Southern Africa (COHSASA) has 55 beds and consults about 8100 public patients and 34,000 private patients. In April 2003, Debswana partnered with the government of Botswana to set up the Infectious Disease Care Clinic (IDCC), which provides free antiretroviral therapy (ART) to members of the community. Debswana is one of the few companies in the country which provides free ART to HIV positive employees and spouses. In addition, the Mine recently funded the electrification of Maokane Clinic at the value of P45,000. In 1979, the Mine established

Acacia Primary School which provides state-of-the-art pre-primary and primary education at a nominal fee for Mine employees and the community. Since education is the cornerstone of development in any community, in 2002 Jwaneng Mine started the


TRADE AND INVESTMENT

Debswana Government School’s Development Programme, which aims at developing the existing government primary schools in Jwaneng. The programme concentrates on Science, Maths and English subjects. Jwaneng Mine has made strides

in skills transfer. Through the Cut 8 Project the Mine partnered with the National Internship Programme under the Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs and gave 39 Batswana university graduates an opportunity to take part in an internship programme with Cut 8 contractors. Lecturers from various training institutions in Botswana have been taken for further training in areas of Rigging, Pipe Fitting, Mechanical Fitting and Boiler making at the Fluor Training Centre in Secunda, African Academy in Johannesburg and Southern African Institute of Welding in Johannesburg, South Africa. Three junior chefs went on a three-month training at Loire Valley Chef School in Blois, France, to become professional chefs. Sustainable management of the natural environment is key to the future prosperity of Botswana and Jwaneng. Good environmental stewardship involves avoiding, minimising and mitigating the negative environmental impacts at every stage of the mining lifecycle and maximising the positive environmental contributions. The Mine complies with international standards for environmental management systems. These systems provide systematic management of all environmental impacts of their operations with emphasis on water conservation, dust monitoring, energy management, land usage management, pollution prevention and waste management. In 1994, the Mine established Jwana Game Park with the objective to

conserve existing free roaming game in the area. The park, which measures 19 000 hectares, accommodates about 1 700 animals. The park also hosts Cheetah Conservation Botswana, which provides a base for research on the conflict between endangered cheetah and livestock. The Mine engages with communities throughout the year to ensure that they understand their expectations and to clarify their commitments to them. Twice a year, the General Manager hosts a Stakeholder’s Engagement Forum with external stakeholders in and around the town, to update the community on critical business issues, as well as give the stakeholders an opportunity to contribute more substantively to those issues. Ensuring that communities in which Jwaneng Mine operates are involved in decisions which affect them has always been a business priority for the Mine. The Mine also has a representative at Jwaneng Town Council meetings; this ensures that they effectively maintain their legal, social and political licence to operate on an on-going basis. Debswana Jwaneng Mine remains committed to sustaining their partnership in order to ensure that the Mine leaves a real and lasting impact on Botswana.

ABOUT DEBSWANA DIAMOND COMPANY • Debswana is a successful public-private partnership which has been in existence for 43 years. It is a 50/50 partnership between the Government of Botswana and De Beers. • Out of every P5 derived from diamond revenues, the Botswana government receives P4 through dividends, royalties and taxes. • Over 30% of government revenues are generated from Debswana diamond revenues. • Revenues from diamonds have been used to develop Botswana over the past 43 years. • The company operates four diamond mines and one coal mine. The diamonds mines are Orapa, Letlhakane, Damtshaa and Jwaneng, and the coal mine is Morupule Coal Mine.

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MAHINDRA BOTSWANA (PTY) LTD Plot 20694, Sekotlo Road, Block 3, Broadhurst Industrial Tel: +267 3160155 | Fax: +267 3160154 | mahindra@info.co.bw


CHAPTER 3: AFRI-INDIA


AFRI-INDIA

Confederation of Indian Industry in South Africa industry on both sides to create common platforms like the India Business Forum (IBF) South Africa and India-South Africa CEOs Forum, apart from holding the annual ‘Doing Business with India’ conference in South Africa. Engagements like these have had a visibly positive impact on the bilateral trade and investment flows.

Today, India and South Africa are key trading and investment partners of a large number of countries, lending fundamental strength to South-South Cooperation. The rise of both nations on the global plank is predicated to the resurgence of the private sector in both economies. Private corporates in India and South Africa have not only focused on building global competitiveness, but are also agents of inclusive growth and social change. It is this all-round character that makes

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Indian and South African businesses a perfect fit in the emerging global economic order that calls for both competitiveness and inclusivity. Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) in South Africa has played a key role in bringing businesses on both sides of a common platform by periodically organising bilateral and multilateral conclaves, conferences, seminars, business meets and expositions, with great success. To institutionalise the interaction in a systematic fashion, CII has helped

India Business Forum (IBF) South Africa Following CII’s interaction with several Indian companies operating in South Africa, coupled with the growing investments in South Africa, gave a reason for a “Forum” for Indian companies. The sheer range and diversity of the Indian corporate presence in South Africa prompted CII to take this initiative. The India Business Forum, South Africa (IBF) was formed as a result in March 2007 in Johannesburg. India Business Forum, South Africa consists of 55 leading Indian companies from the automotive, metallurgical, engineering, pharmaceutical, information technology, financial services and other sectors; and the membership is growing. The forum is being guided under the Chairmanship of Mr Raman Dhawan, Managing Director, Tata Africa Holdings (SA) (Pty) Limited. India-South Africa CEOs Forum The India-South Africa CEOs Forum is another key pillar of bilateral business


AFRI-INDIA

engagements. The CEOs Forum was started five years ago in August 2007 under the leadership of Mr Ratan Tata and South African business leader Mr Patrice Motsepe. The Forum was formed to enhance business cooperation and to ensure a closer and enduring economic partnership, leveraging the strengths and complementarities of the two countries and their long-standing relationship. In respect of bilateral trade, the Forum addresses both tariff and non-tariff barriers (NTBs) that impede the trade flow. The Forum has also highlighted the scope for cooperation on airport management, air navigation, communication systems, safety and security. Doing Business with India In an effort to increase India-South Africa business engagements, CII introduced a conference on ‘Doing Business with India’ in collaboration with the Consulate of India at Johannesburg. This annual conference is focused on promoting ‘Brand India’ and on projecting India as the favoured destination for South African Investments. The first conference on ‘Doing Business with India’, held in September 2008, was enthusiastically received with the participation of over 250 CEOs and senior business executives from India and South Africa. In 2011–2012 the approach has been sectoral and is received well by both Indian and South African businesses. Way Forward The stage is set for India and South Africa to take their business engagements to a higher plane – Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) and is committed to its role as a catalyst to greater bilateral trade and investment flows, and more people-to-people contacts. About Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) The Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) works to create and sustain an environment conducive to the growth of industry in India, partnering industry and government alike through advisory and consultative processes. CII is a non-government, not-for-profit, industry led and industry managed organisation, playing a proactive role

in India’s development process. Founded over 117 years ago, it is India’s premier business association, with a direct membership of over 7000 organisations from the private as well as public sectors, including SMEs and MNCs – and an indirect membership of over 90,000 companies from around 400 national and regional sectoral associations. CII catalyses change by working closely with government on policy issues, enhancing efficiency, competitiveness and expanding business opportunities for industry through a range of specialised services and global linkages. It also provides a platform for sectoral consensus building and networking. Major emphasis is laid on projecting a positive image of business, assisting industry to identify and execute corporate citizenship programmes. Partnerships with over 120 NGOs across the country carry forward our initiatives in integrated and inclusive developments, which include health, education, livelihood, diversity management, skill development and water, to name a few. With 63 offices including 10 Centres of Excellence in India, and 7 overseas offices in Australia, China, France, Singapore, South Africa, UK, and USA – as well as institutional partnerships with 223 counterpart organisations in 90 countries – CII serves as a reference point for Indian industry and the international business community. Confederation of Indian Industry Headquarters The Mantosh Sondhi Centre 23, Institutional Area, Lodi Road New Delhi – 110 003 (India) Tel: +91 11 2462 9994 -7 | Fax: +91 11 2462 6149 Email: info@cii.in | Website: www.cii.in South Africa Office Ms Dorin Nelson Country Representative Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) C/O BUSA- Business Unity South Africa, 3 Gwen Lane 1st Floor, Sandton, 2146 Johannesburg, Gauteng Tel: +27 11 7848000, Ext: 202 Fax: +27 11 784 8004 / 0866098248 Email: cii.africadesk@gmail.com / dorin.nelson@cii.in Diplomat Africa

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INDIALLIA 2012

Hosted by WTC Mumbai and All India Association of Industries

GVPedia Directors Sven Boermeester and Thapelo Letsholo recently attended the 2012 INDIALLIA event in Mumbai India. Since 1990, 16 FUTURALLIA forums have brought together more than 10,000 participants and made possible about 80,000 individual business meetings, thus initiating thousands of business partnerships between SMEs all over the world. GVPedia Africa President Thapelo Letsholo, GVPedia India President Sandhya Mendonca, and GVPedia International President Sven Boermeester at INDIALLIA Run from the 23rd to the 25th April, the 2012 INDIALLIA brought together 400 different companies â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 200 from India and 200 from the rest of the world. The International Business Development Forum At The Incredible Destination, India aims to connect business globally and is organised by a partnership between World Trade Center Mumbai and All India Association of Industries and supported by the Government of Maharashtra. Presentation by Mr Vijay Kalantri at INDIALLIA 2012 INDIALLIA allowed the perfect opportunity to promote Africa and specifically the Future Of Trade Africa as a platform for African trade with India. The doors between India and Africa are open for trade and this is the start of many new and developing business relations. The launch of the Proudly African initiative fits directly in line with these aims. www.indiallia.com World Trade Center Mumbai in brief The World Trade Center Mumbai is the realisation of the vision of one man, Dr M. Visvesvaraya â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an Indian engineer 56

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and scientist. Named after him, M. Visvesvaraya Industrial Research & Development Centre (MVIRDC), a non-profit company registered under the Indian Companies Act, is the promoter of WTC. Established in 1970, MVIRDC is governed by a Council of Management, comprising industrialists, representative from Central and State Governments and Trade Promotion Bodies. www.wtcmumbai.org


AFRI-INDIA

GVPedia Africa President Thapelo Letsholo, GVPedia India President Sandhya Mendonca, and GVPedia International President Sven Boermeester at INDIALLIA

Presentation by Mr Vijay Kalantri at INDIALLIA 2012 All India Association of Industries in brief The All India Association of Industries has been serving trade and industry for over 50 years. Under the dynamic leadership of the Late Shri Babubhai M. Chinai (M.P), the AIAI was established in 1956, which is today the leading association of industries in Indiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commercial capital. Their membership spans across a wide spectrum of industries with direct membership strength of over 1400 and indirect membership of over 30,000 through affiliated trade bodies. About 70% of the membership relate to the SME Sector.

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Successful Indian Companies in South Africa in Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The years to come will see the introduction of several innovative vehicles focussed on emerging customer needs and environmental technologies. www.tatasa.co.za

Tata Automobile Tata Motors Limited is India’s largest automobile company, with consolidated revenues of US$-15 billion in 2008-09. Established in 1945, Tata Motors’ presence cuts across the length and breadth of India. Tata Motors, was the first company from India’s engineering sector to be listed in the New York Stock Exchange, emerging as an international automobile company. Tata Motors is also expanding its international footprint, established through exports since 1961. Tata entered the next level of internationalisation with its assembly plant in South Africa – along with several offices throughout the country. Tata’s plans for South Africa came amid rising vehicle sales in the country. The company’s commercial and passenger vehicles are marketed in several countries in Africa, with offices now 58

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Ranbaxy Pharmaceuticals Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited, India’s largest pharmaceutical company, is an integrated, researchbased international company, producing a wide range of quality, affordable generic medicines, trusted by healthcare professionals and patients worldwide. Ranbaxy has a presence in 23 of the top 25 pharmaceutical world markets. Ranbaxy (S.A.) (Pty) Ltd – South Africa, a wholly owned subsidiary of Ranbaxy, was set up in 1998. There has been a constant effort to differentiate Ranbaxy from the myriad of other generic manufacturers by establishing the corporate heritage and the vision of becoming a research based international pharmaceutical company. During 2006 Ranbaxy acquired Be-Tabs with US$-30million turnover, becoming the 5th largest generic company in South Africa. The product portfolio is divided into three strategic areas: Acute, Chronic and OTC. Ranbaxy’s joint-venture with Community Investment Holdings (South Africa), “Sonke Pharmaceuticals (Pty) Ltd”, (Sonke) markets and sells Ranbaxy’s range of Anti-retroviral products in South Africa and other African markets, with local tie ups in 27 Brands. www.ranbaxy.com Suzlon Wind Turbines Suzlon began after founder Mr Tulsi R. Tanti noted soaring power costs and the unreliability of available power. He saw wind energy as an alternative, opening a wind farm in Gujarat, India in 1995. He set up Suzlon Energy Limited – India’s first home-grown wind technology company. Suzlon delivers wind power solutions from assembly, to installation, to commissioning. The company manufactures blades, generators, panels and towers in-house. The Suzlon Group is the world’s fifth largest wind turbine


AFRI-INDIA

supplier, in cumulative installed capacity. The footprint extends across Asia, Australia, Europe, Africa and North and South America. The Group is a leader in offshore wind technology. Suzlonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s global footprint in South Africa is part of its Emerging Markets focus. The vision of Suzlon is as the technology leader in the wind sector, in the top three wind companies in all the key markets of the world, to be the global leader in providing profitable, end-to-end wind power solutions. www.suzlon.com Apollo Tyres Apollo Tyres Ltd is a high-performance company and leading Indian tyre manufacturer. Apollo is an ambitious and dynamic organisation. Registered in 1976, Apollo is built around the core principles of creating stakeholder value through product reliability. In 2006, Apollo ventured outside India for the first time, acquiring Dunlop Tyres International Pty Ltd in South Africa (renamed Apollo Tyres South Africa Pty Ltd) and Zimbabwe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; taking on southern Africa as the second domestic market. The company holds brand rights for Dunlop across 30 African countries. The company currently produces the entire range of automotive tyres for ultra and high speed passenger cars, trucks and buses, farm and Off-The-Road, industrial and specialty applications like mining, retreaded tyres, and retreading material. The two South African manufacturing plants are in Durban (1935) and Ladysmith (1973) in Kwa-Zulu Natal. The South Africa branded outlets are called Dunlop Zones. Exports out of these key manufacturing locations reach over 70 destinations across the world. www.apollotyres.com Mahindra Mahindra SA is a fully-owned subsidiary of Mahindra & Mahindra of India, which was established in 1945. The company is a fully-fledged organisation operating in South Africa, leveraging on the strength of its Indian roots and 65

year history. The company has vehicle dealerships in all nine provinces of South Africa, which are fully-fledged facilities that handle sales, service and spare parts. With over 35 dealerships in cities and towns across South Africa, Mahindra has a growing national footprint, moving ever deeper into communities as it continues its drive to offer value-for-money products and services to customers. The company has also expanded into other subSaharan countries and currently exports vehicles to Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana, Swaziland and Namibia. Mahindra South Africa has a powerful network in place to ensure the effective and efficient distribution of all parts in all areas of South Africa. Mahindra South Africa has achieved significant growth in the country since its establishment in October 2004. www.mahindra.co.za

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Maseru is an ideal base from which to explore the western region of Lesotho with its magnificent scenery, rich history, culture and crafts. Lesotho offers the ultimate outdoor experience, whether you enjoy hiking, mountain biking, pony trekking or 4x4â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.


CHAPTER 4: TRAVEL AND HOSPITALITY


TRAVEL AND HOSPITALITY

Proudly African

Boosting inter-trade & cultural relations across the continent

www.ProudlyAfrican.info

Hospitality Marketplace Africa

The African Trade and Export Promotion Agency for the Food and Beverage Hospitality Industry

goal of providing functional trade information as well as building trade relations for companies wishing to grow their business in Africa. Localised knowledge, content and contacts is the key to successful trade relations in Africa. Future of Trade Africa is also building the agriculture, agroprocessing and agribusinesses marketplace for Africa which has clear synergies as the products move from farm gate to retail to restaurant. We invite all stakeholders focusing on Africa in the food, beverage and hospitality industry to showcase their projects, products and services. In terms of the system and interactive platform, Hospitality Marketplace will combine a comprehensive trade publication targeting the African market as well as be a fully supported products and services search platform for the food beverage and hospitality sector. We have invested in development upgrades of our successful South African platform, www.hospitalitymarketplace.co.za. We are confident that this platform will represent the most comprehensive information portal available to professionals looking for industry news, product solutions or resources in Africa within the next 2 years! We have maximised exsisting Food, Beverage and Hospitality platforms that combine the best of the industry with the following marketing, media and business products: Online Directories and Content Management systems:

In a focused effort to establish the marketing and communications footprint for the food, beverage and hospitality sector in Africa, Future of Trade Africa has entered into a strategic relationship with Shout Factory, South Africa’s leader in the hospitality media and marketing space to build a Hospitality Marketplace for Africa. This initiative will be the most comprehensive African trade and promotion agency for the hospitality sector with the 62

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Industry directory • www.HospitalityAfrica.info • www.HospitalityMarketplace.co.za All Africa portal • www.ProudlyAfrican.info Industry news • www.chefmag.co.za • www.saca.co.za • www.retailchef.com


TRAVEL AND HOSPITALITY

Print • Hospitality Market Place Africa • Hospitality Market Place South Africa • Chef Magazine • Retail Chef Magazine • Diplomat Africa Magazine • Best of South Africa Hospitality Marketplace Africa will be promoted at the folowing exhibitions and conferences across Africa: • SAITEX • Hospitality Expo Ghana • HOSTEX • Food Agro Kenya Hospitality Marketplace Africa will be copromoted with the following African initiatives: • African Foodservice Trade Shows 2012/2013 • Future Of Trade Africa 2012 • Africa’s Big Seven • Foodbext 2012 – The Pan-West African Food And Beverage Exhibition • Africa International Autumn Trade Fair 2012 • Ethio Chamber International Trade Fair 2012 • Gulfood • Hostex Gauteng 2013 • The 2013 United Nations World Tourism Organisation (Unwto) General Assembly • Ifea 2013 – Africa’s International Food & Drink Event • The Hotel Show • West African Hotel, Hospitality & Catering Exhibition (Ghana) www.HospitalityAfrica.info www.ProudlyAfrican.info

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Regional Branding and Communication Strategy for Southern Africa The Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa (RETOSA) in collaboration with the Commonwealth Secretariat, have commissioned UK based Yellow Railroad International Destination Consultancy, to prepare a destination brand management and communication strategy and implementation guidelines for the southern Africa region. To gather input from both the private and public sectors, RETOSA used the Indaba travel trade show at Durban’s International Convention Centre during May to convene a workshop in collaboration with the Commonwealth Secretariat. The workshop was attended by public and private sector representatives from all the 15 RETOSA member states including senior tourism officials, travel trade, industry experts and consultants. Francis Mfune, executive director of RETOSA opened the proceedings. “The SADC region currently has a two percent share of the international travel market and want to grow this 64

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to five percent by 2020. A cohesive brand and communication strategy is an essential component in achieving this aim”, he said. In his opening address Tom Buncle, Managing Director of Yellow Railroad, stated that, “Establishing Southern Africa as a brand in the minds of international travellers will be built on four key pillars, namely: diversity,


TRAVEL AND HOSPITALITY

wilderness, humanity, and climate. But how RETOSA members engage and support the brand is critical to its success.” Buncle identified three travel motivation trends in his presentation, these being: • Feel Fulfilled Typically emanating from “old” Western Europe, North America, Australasia and Japan this group want to visit “undiscovered” destinations that offer “active” relaxation, escapism, authenticity and personal fulfilment. • Fly and Flop Buncle describes this group as “Sunticipation” who want resort based venues and are family orientated and price conscious. They emanate from Northern Europe, “New” Eastern Europe and Russia. • Bling and Buy This group demonstrate their wealth and social status and are noted for their ostentatious consumption habits. “Look where I’ve been” and “What’s global warming got to do with me?” are typical mantras from this group who emanate from “New” Eastern Europe, Russia, China, Brazil and India. Describing the benefits of a successful brand, Buncle maintains that brands that are distinctive, have personality and are memorable can distinguish themselves from competitors and build loyalty at a premium price. He differentiates branding from marketing as: • Branding – who you are (personality / essence) • Marketing – how you communicate this to your customers. “A destination brand is the mix of the core characteristics of the place that make it distinctive and memorable. It is the enduring essence of the place that makes it different from all other places (and competitors). Importantly, the brand exists in the eyes of the beholder. It has to be credible and real, it cannot be manufactured. It is the way in which a destination nurtures, develops and presents its core characteristics to

Francis Mfune, executive director of RETOSA

Tom Buncle, Managing Director of Yellow Railroad

Hon. Minister Alain St Ange, Seychelles Minister for Tourism and Culture and Member States’ representatives its main audiences that enables it to establish, reinforce, or even change its reputation” says Buncle. Describing the primary risks to destination branding, Buncle cites conflicting stakeholder interests, political compromise, dishonesty and unclear thinking as contributing factors that result in bland, indistinct and consequently forgettable brands. “Branding is no substitute for substance, says Buncle. Your brand already exists – it just needs clarification, commitment and communication. A brand is not budget dependent – communicating it is what costs.” In concluding his presentation, Buncle urged RETOSA members to collaborate through shared resources,

market intelligence and skills development. “As a region, southern Africa is only as strong as its weakest link. Individual interests must be put aside in favour of shared goals to attain consumer credibility.” Audience participation highlighted stumbling blocks that the governments of member states would need to address as priorities for the brand to succeed, which included air access constraints, cross-border visa issues, corruption and nepotism among other constraints. Yellow Railroad will be presenting their brand strategy proposal by the end of October this year. For more information or to contribute to this proposal email tom@yellowrailroad.com

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Introducing the Vanilla Islands – a tourist’s Indian Ocean dream The exciting concept of the Vanilla Islands was conceptualised by six Indian Ocean island nations who saw the benefit in forming a new travel destination brand. The affiliated islands comprise of Seychelles, Madagascar, La Réunion, Comoros, Mayotte, and Mauritius. The aim of the co-operation partnership which was founded on August 4th, 2010 at La Réunion is to pool forces and jointly market the region. Growth of the Vanilla Islands The collective name of the islands is a play on the senses – conjuring up smells and flavours of the islands and their cultures. The vanilla plant is cultivated on all the islands and also ties in closely to each of their cultures and natural heritage. Through this agreement between these jewellike Indian Ocean islands, island hopping between them could soon become a regular and seamless option for tourists. This agreement still aims to celebrate and uplift the uniqueness and individuality of each island, but also calls to pool resources to work together in attracting more visitors to the region. Visitors will be encouraged to mix and match island experiences: one can enjoy water sports or golf in Mauritius, a wellness experience in the Seychelles, hiking in La Réunion, getting up close with lemurs in their natural environment in Madagascar, and excellent snorkelling in the Comoros and Mayotte – all achievable in one trip. The success of the Vanilla Islands concept will be based on four pillars: visa-free travel facilitated between the islands; an extended and enhanced transportation network between the islands; close cooperation between tour operators, hotels, and authorities; and a homogenous marketing strategy, focusing on the uniqueness of each of the Vanilla Islands by simultaneously strengthening the joint identity. 66

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Inter-island flights range from a quick 40 minutes to a maximum of two hours and 20 minutes. Additionally, new cruise routes between Mauritius, La Réunion, Madagascar, and the Seychelles will help facilitate the diverse experience of the Indian Ocean. This joint marketing venture will help to increase the profile of the little known Indian Ocean islands to a new audience – and therefore increase visitor numbers and aid in economic growth and local employment, whilst protecting the serenity and natural heritage. The Vanilla Islands concept is a celebration of accessibility, quality, uniqueness, and competitiveness, which are attributes which will help raise the region. The more positive image helps create visibility through highlighting the charms of the Indian Ocean in all its exotic glory. The multi-layered experience holds a new value for the tourism industry.


TRAVEL AND HOSPITALITY

Bringing the pod to flower Before beginning to build this new collective image, there were a number of key steps to first put in place, such as the development of a website, the joint promotion of further developing the cruise ship industry, as well as the establishment of a “regional academy”. The idea of the academy is to allow locals to grow and develop skills to meet new demands by specialising in certain products in the region. During the 2012 International Tourism Fair of Madagascar, Seychelles Tourism and Culture Minister Alain St.Ange met with various other tourism officers to support the call made by Pascal Viroleau, the Head of the IRT (La Réunion Tourisme), for a General Meeting of the Vanilla Islands on July 11 2012 in the Seychelles. At the meeting, the Vanilla Islands grouping became an official organisation – Minister Alain St.Ange was elected as the first President of the Indian Ocean Vanilla Islands with Mauritian Tourism Minister Michael Sik Yuen as Vice President. La Réunion is to be the Secretary and Mayotte the Treasurer. Madagascar is positioning its International Tourism Fair as its event for the Indian Ocean Vanilla islands, Seychelles on its part continues to position its Carnaval International de Victoria as the Indian Ocean Vanilla Islands event, and Mayotte have said that they are studying the possibilities of also launching an event for the Indian Ocean Vanilla Islands. Alain St.Ange said that the concept of labelling the Indian Ocean islands was a necessity due to the globalised pace of the world: “We all need to be proud of our region, and then to push that region to ensure that the strengths and unique selling points of each of our islands are put forward in our bid to bring the Indian Ocean Islands to the minds of potential visitors. Together we are strong, and together we are not an island but part of a whole destination”. www.ilesvanille.com/ www.facebook.com/Les.iles.vanille/info

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Rani Resorts Rani Resorts boasts a total of seven resorts in Mozambique and Zimbabwe – from the breathtaking Victoria Falls and the unspoilt wilderness of Niassa Game Reserve, to the white sand beaches of the Bazaruto and Quirimbas Archipelagos. The Stanley and Livingstone The Stanley and Livingstone is a sixteen room all-suite boutique hotel idyllically situated near Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe, one of the Seven Wonders of the World. The hotel is a 10 minute drive from Victoria Falls on the Victoria Falls Private Game Reserve. Old Ursula This camp is ideal for families or small groups and presents the perfect base for exploring the beautiful surrounds of Victoria Falls. Guests can enjoy the private swimming pool, excellent game viewing, or take part in the many adventures on offer such as white water rafting or bungee jumping. Indigo Bay Island Resort and Spa Indigo Bay Island Resort and Spa on Bazaruto Island in Mozambique was Rani Resorts’ first operation and flagship resort. This tropical island paradise of palm tree speckled white sand beaches lapped by the Indian Ocean is home to some of the world’s 68

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best fishing and diving. If not relaxing in the luxury chalets, guests can also enjoy horse rides on the majestic Bazaruto sand dunes. Indigo Bay has 30 beach chalets, 14 Bayview villas. Pemba Beach Hotel and Spa Located in Pemba in the far reaches of the northern coastline of Mozambique, Pemba Beach Hotel and Spa is a modern oasis perfect for the business traveller or as an overnight respite before exploring the islands of the Quirimbas or the Niassa Reserve. The hotel has 102 rooms, a magnificent spa facility and is within reach of several restaurants. Medjumbe Private Island Within the Quirimbas Archipelago is

Medjumbe Private Island – an exclusive luxury private island with 13 luxury beach chalets in one of the world’s most beautiful locations. Its diminutive size provides ultimate exclusivity and is therefore perfect for romantic getaways. Outside each chalet is a private plunge pool looking over the turquoise water of the Indian Ocean. The location is in a protected marine reserve. The resort offers fishing on a strictly catch-and-release policy and they educate fisherman in the area about what types of sustainable fish to catch. Matemo Island Also located in the Quirimbas Archipelago in northern Mozambique is Matemo Island which provides the


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islands on the Mozambique coast called Santa Carolina. Otherwise known as Paradise Island, this island gem lies in the crown of the Bazaruto Archipelago. There is an old hotel resort on the island, but over the years following the Mozambique Civil War, it has become derelict. Rani Resorts are in the planning stages of developing a whole new resort on the island.

ideal idyllic island experience for guests. With 24 individual palm-thatched beach chalets and pristine beaches, the environment is a tropical dream. Matemo caters to families and honeymooners and is an interesting historical and cultural hub with community based activities and excursions. Lugenda Wilderness Camp The Lugenda Wilderness Camp is in the Niassa National Reserve in a remote area of northern Mozambique, bordering with Tanzania. The Niassa National Reserve is an expanse of 42,000 square kilometres. With experienced guides, Rani Resorts runs a conservation concession and has been operating in the area for about ten years. The Camp is an eight roomed tented luxury safari-lodge. Lugenda offers a truly remarkable wilderness experience in one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most beautiful and unspoilt areas of nature. Santa Carolina development Rani Resorts has recently secured one of the treasured

Community involvement and conservation Rani Resortsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; short term focus remains in these locations. Rani Resorts utilises community involvement in its resorts and employs and supports as many local people as possible. Rani Resorts has also brought in language teachers for hotel staff in order to further their education. They have also built schools and clinics for surrounding communities and have teamed up with various NGOs for wildlife preservation. Rani Resorts reintroduced black rhino into their Victoria Falls Private Game Reserve, on which The Stanley and Livingstone is located and started a successful black rhino breeding program. Rani Resorts is also active in the Endangered Wildlife Trust which runs a Dugong conservation program in the Bazaruto marine reserve. Currently, the company is looking at alternative energy usage in its resorts and is committed to conserving energy and lessening its carbon footprint. They are looking to switch over to solar energy with the possibility of wind turbines, LED lighting throughout the resorts and energy efficient equipment. Rani Resorts is currently planning an alternative energy program for Medjumbe Private Island. The company recognises the rich natural resources in Mozambique and Zimbabwe and has integrated its resorts to create jobs for the local communities and preserve their natural habitat.

Tel: +27 11 658 0633 (SA) +258 21 301 618 (Moz) Email: info@raniresorts.com www.raniresorts.com Diplomat Africa

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HRDAC LONG TERM PROSPERITY FOR ALL IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY BUILDING WORLD CLASS SKILLS FOR BOTSWANA

THE MANDATE OF THE HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COUNCIL The Human Resource Development Advisory Council (HRDAC) was established as an interim structure by Presidential Directive (CAB 19 (B)/2009) issued on July 9th 2009 to drive the implementation of the National Human Resource Development Strategy (HRDS). The strategy is a macro level initiative that sets out an approach to develop the human resource capacities and match them with the anticipated skills requirements in line with the national economic growth and development ambitions. It is planned that the Human Resource Development Council will have been legally established and will be operational before the end of 2012.

THE VALUE PROPOSITION OF THE NATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Over the last three decades Botswana has had the natural resources to guarantee its prosperity. The warning signs are clearly evident that this may not be the case in the future. The country’s dependence on a single natural resource is not sustainable in the long term and alternative engines of growth need to be developed if Botswana is to compete and prosper in the future.

the creation of wealth, long term prosperity for all and societal transformation and social justice. The challenge is formidable. Skills matter fundamentally for the economic and social health of Botswana. Our nation’s skills are not world class and we run the risk of undermining the gains that we have made as a nation over the last four decades. Productivity continues to trail behind our peers and competitors and our unemployment rate is unacceptably high. Demographic, technological and global changes are presenting enormous challenges and brilliant opportunities. The population is very dramatically altering the way we work. Globally competitive pressures on all sectors of the economy are increasing. Manufactured goods and services are traded across the world. If the Botswana economy is to successfully diversify into these areas, the ability to do so will depend almost entirely on the skills and knowledge of its people. Improving our skills levels will address these systemic problems. In sum, skills development is the most important lever within our control to create wealth and ensure the long term prosperity of our people. The Government has made individuals we must take a personal responsibility for improving our skills. Employer’s appetite for skills training must be increased. This is the vision of the National Human Resource Development Strategy (2009), a vision that we must all embrace to guarantee the long term prosperity of Botswana.

PROGRESS IN ESTABLISHING THE HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL focussed on the design of the strategic architecture of the proposed Council and has included three components of organisational design, legislative drafting and due diligence. The organisational blueprint sets out the strategic positioning, mandate, objects and functions of the Council followed by a comprehensive detailing of the governance framework, organisational structure processes and systems, human resource and funding requirements. This was concluded in December 2010 with the approval by the HRDAC governing Council of the ‘Organisational Design and Implementation Plan’. The second component is about legislation. The HRDAC has concluded the preparation of the draft Human Resource Development Bill which sets out the statutory requirements for establishing the Council. The preparation of the draft Bill is the outcome of an extensive nationwide consultation which elicited a wealth of inputs from public and private sectors, civil society representatives and institutions and organisations across the entire education and skills training sector. The Draft Bill has been passed to the Minister of Education and Skills Development with a recommendation that it be processed for consideration and approval by the National Assembly. The expectation is that the Draft Bill will be considered by Parliament during 2012 which in turn will lead to the HRDC being established and formally commencing operations.

out the merger. The Due Diligence Report was approved by the HRDAC governing Council on December 2011 bringing to a close this initial phase of establishing the HRDC. With the HRDAC’s responsibility for the Design Phase concluded the next step in establishing the Human Resource Development Council is the pre-merger or transition phase. This will require the HRDAC to lay the foundation for the statutory Council to commence operations on Day 1. This is anticipated to take place before the end of 2012.


CHAPTER 5: BUILDING AFRICA

Courtesy Gautrain


BUILDING AFRICA

Master Builders South Africa Master Builders South Africa is the leading representative body in the building and construction industry in South Africa. The primary role of MBSA is to promote the viewpoints and interests of the industry, to promote the highest quality and standards through excellence in service to our members, engaging government and legislative bodies on national policies that affect the industry, for the purpose of creating a sustainable building industry in South Africa. More than a hundred years is a long time for any organisation to have survived and flourished, and still have a meaningful role in today’s fast-track world. Master Builders South Africa was founded as the National Federation for Building Trade Employers in 1904 and has seen many trials and tribulations, successes and disasters through the intervening years. The Federation’s initial aims were to unite the contractors of the day to gain better bargaining power with government authorities and to negotiate with trades unions. Master Builders South Africa is today the national voice of the Master Builders Associations (MBAs) in the country and represents all sectors of the building industry. It functions as a federation of registered employer organisations which represent employers operating in the building industry. It is regulated in terms of section 107 of the Labour Relations Act, Act 66 of 1995. MBSA represents its members on national bodies and liaises with national government on legislative and other issues which encompass training needs, legal services, labour relations, building codes and standards, and economics which affect the building industry. Such bodies include the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB), Construction Education & Training Authority (CETA), and The South African Council for the Project and Construction Management Professions (SACPCMP). As a member of the African Federation of Construction Contractors’ Association (AFCCA), MBSA promotes international and African fellowship and cooperation 72

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between the South African building and construction industry and other African industry associations. Through AFCCA, MBSA established cooperative, networking and working arrangements in furtherance of building construction projects on the continent. The MBAs have offices in the major cities of South Africa and their members range from large national, international, residential and commercial builders and civil contractors, to specialist subcontractors both large and small, as well as suppliers and professional industry advisers. They collectively employ over 100 experienced staff with qualifications in a diverse range of disciplines including building, law, management, economics, marketing, accounting, labour relations, safety, and education and training, to serve their members. Each MBA has a code of ethics to which members must adhere, and they also provide advice and assistance on various aspects of business practice. All MBAs cater for emerging contractors and offer a special membership fee


BUILDING AFRICA

Publications SA Builder/Bouer is the official journal of MBSA and has been published since 1923. It offers the latest news on projects, products, personalities and developments in the building industry and has an estimated readership of 20,000. MBSA has developed and offers a range of standard building agreements for sale to MBA members as well as members of the public, The MBSA Safety Manual for Construction Sites is a comprehensive document that provides all the necessary information pertaining to health and safety.

structure and assistance to encourage such membership. Members of the public are encouraged to use an MBA member for all building work – whether a new luxury house, renovation, refurbishment, additions or alterations, however large or small. The MBA offices can provide names and contact details of appropriate member companies, so that quotes and references can be obtained before negotiating a contract. Awards Each year MBSA acknowledges excellence in the building industry through its prestigious President’s Award of Excellence which is presented in conjunction with the MBSA annual national congress. MBSA conducts an annual safety competition for member companies which compete in a number of categories. This competition, initiated in 1963, attracts large numbers of entries from the best occupational health and safety managed sites in South Africa.

Our corporate members, the Master Builders Associations, have offices in the following areas: • Boland: + 27 21 863 3330 | info@mbaboland.org.za • Eastern Cape: + 27 41 365 1835 | ecmba@global.co.za • Free State: + 27 57 352 6269 | masterbuilders@mbafs.co.za • Gauteng: + 27 11 805 6611 | info@gmba.co.za • KwaZulu-Natal: + 27 31 266 7070 | info@masterbuilders.co.za • North Boland: + 27 23 342 6964 | mbanb@telkomsa.net • Northern Cape: + 27 53 831 1845 | vicsmba@xsinet.co.za • West Boland: + 27 22 772 2251 • Western Cape: + 27 21 685 2625 | info@mbawc.org.za Our affiliate members, representing specialist subcontracting companies, are: • Association of Architectural Aluminium Manufacturers of South Africa (AAAMSA) + 27 11 805 5002 | aaamsa@iafrica.com • SA Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Contractors’ Association (SARACCA) + 27 11 622 3890 | saracca@icon.co.za • SA Reinforced Concrete Engineers’ Association (SARCEA) + 27 11 455 6321 | sarcea@iafrica.com Master Builders South Africa No.1 Second Road, Halfway House 1685 Tel: + 27 11 205 9000 Fax: + 27 11 315 1644 info@mbsa.org.za www.mbsa.org.za Diplomat Africa

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African Federation of Construction Contractors’ Associations (AFCCA) Establishment Master Builders South Africa was invited to the office of the Egyptian Embassy in 2006 to attend a meeting in Cairo, Egypt, with a view to creating an African Federation of Contractors. The meeting constituted 25 African Countries represented by their respective Construction Associations, including MBSA’s then President, Mr Sean Moffatt. The organisation was established under the name of the African Federation of Construction Contractors’ Associations (AFCCA) and meetings of the Federation have been held at its Headquarters in Cairo each subsequent year. Over the last five years, which included the Fifth Anniversary of AFCCA’s General Assembly and Executive Bureau Meetings in 2010, the meetings have been attended by the Past President and current Board Member of Master Builders South Africa, Mrs Eunice Forbes. The organisation is partially funded through membership subscriptions, the Egyptian Federation, and government has provided financial assistance to cover, initially, travelling and accommodation costs of delegates to attend the annual meetings. MBSA was elected to hold one of the five seats allocated for the positions of Vice Presidents of AFCCA. Each of the Regions, North, South, East, West, and Central Africa holds such a seat, representing its area on the Executive Bureau, and General Assembly of AFCCA. In effect, 74

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AFCCA General Assembly meeting, Cairo, June 2012 South Africa through Master Builders South Africa occupies one of the seats and in so doing, represents the Southern Africa Region. In order for the African members to be afforded the opportunity of meeting in each other’s countries, it was proposed that the General Assembly Meeting be held annually in Cairo, and that the Executive Bureau meeting be held twice a year in different member countries – once during the same period as the General Assembly, which is June of each year, and the other either November or January. This proposal was put into effect three years ago, resulting in three Executive Bureau Meetings having been hosted by Libya, Morocco, and recently Sudan. It is hoped that MBSA will host the next meeting of the Executive Bureau scheduled to be held in South Africa either in October 2012 or in January 2013. Holding the meeting in

South Africa would have far reaching benefits, not only for the industry, but also contributing to Government’s objective and goals to increase intra-Africa economic and industry relations. The positive role that South African building contractors and material suppliers can play in the African economy and the associated benefits to South Africa as well as the Continent as a whole, can be far reaching. At the same time, they can contribute towards building mutually beneficial Regional and Continental relations, advancing South Africa’s building and construction industry. Aims of the organisation • Establishing professional ties among the contractors in African countries for developing the contracting sector at all technical, economic, human and administrative levels. • Promoting the Contracting


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Mrs Eunice Forbes, MBSA Past President and current board member and AFCCA Vice President

New AFCCA President Eng. Ibrahim Mahleb shaking hands with Eunice Forbes after being elected at the General Assembly meeting, Cairo, June 2012

Executive Bureau Opening Session, Sudan, January 2012 Profession in fields of building and Public Works, to realise the highest level of quality. • Supporting African contractors to enable them to achieve high levels of professional responsibility for all sectors of construction in Africa. • Defending legal material or moral rights of African contractors. • Calling for establishing groups of contractors in the African countries at general, private and partnership levels for execution of building projects. • Finding a mechanism that gives competitive advantages for African contractors when participating in a tender in African countries. • Establishing contact and cooperation channels with other groups of contractors all over the world. • Establishing a network aiming at arranging and connecting unions

of African contractors in various African countries; an effective database, and establishing “consortiums” enabling acquisition of the large projects. Current activities • Develop classification rules and regulations. Develop training courses to produce engineers, accountants and technical skills. • Undertake mutual visits between AFCCA Members in order to activate partnerships between companies. • Organise meetings with the AFCCA President and two Vice Presidents with the Chairman of the African Development Fund in order to make recommendations with African Governments for the benefit of the African companies. • Facilitate travel opportunities for Executive Bureau members in

AFCCA Executive Bureau meeting, Sudan, January 2012

order to interact with the German Contractors Association and French Contractors Association in order to open new avenues through CICA membership. • Commence with a media campaign to increase AFCCA’s exposure to countries that have not as yet joined. • A CD on Standards for Uniformity and Registration Criteria which had been prepared by South Africa’s CIDB, was tabled by Master Builders at the Classification Commission. Discussion on the matter created the awareness that the subject required an in-depth analysis. The Committee felt that the relevant criteria would be collated again which would be of assistance to all members – the object being that when either those countries who wished to join forces and work with South African contractors, or any other contractors, or viceversa, there would be a clear understanding of the requirements and expectations of the countries involved. Master Builders would like to record its thanks to CIDB for arranging this CD. AFCCA has secured the position of Observer at Confederation of International Contractors’ Associations (CICA). Master Builders South Africa Eunice Forbes Tel: + 27 11 883 9867

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Infrastructure is on South Africa’s main agenda

During 2012’s State of the Nation Address on the 9th of February, President Jacob Zuma made it very clear that South Africa’s main focus according to the New Growth Path is the upgrade and development of infrastructure. Infrastructure is the key to the country’s economic growth and will enable self-sufficiency and entice investment whilst simultaneously creating jobs. The infrastructure drive was heralded when South Africa won the bid to host the 2010 FIFA Football World Cup. The government immediately increased spending on infrastructure development through the build programme. The economy was stimulated through the influx in employment numbers. The National Planning Commission was established in 2009 in order to produce a national development plan for South Africa along the lines of its constitution. The first draft of the plan outlines South Africa’s goals for the next 20 years as well as the aims of addressing poverty and 76

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inequality. It is hoped that higher growth and job creation through infrastructure development will be the solution. The New Growth Path framework was launched in 2010 and identified South Africa’s job drivers as infrastructure development, tourism, agriculture, mining, manufacturing and the green economy. As part of this, 2011 was a milestone in job creation in South Africa with the rate of unemployment coming down from 25% to 23.9% with 365,000 people employed in the formal sector during the year. President Jacob Zuma called on all South Africans to join government in the infrastructure development drive. The drive will be pursued during the next couple of years through the vast experience gained during the 2010 FIFA Soccer World Cup to manage the project successfully. The plan is being driven by the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC). The PICC has identified strategic projects through five major geographically-focused programmes: (focusing on health and basic education infrastructure, information and


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communication technologies, and regional integration.) 1. Development and integration of rail, road and water infrastructure centred around two main areas in the Limpopo mineral belt. 2. Improvement of the movement of goods and economic integration through a Durban-Free State-Gauteng logistics and industrial corridor. 3. Development of a major new South Eastern node that will improve the industrial and agricultural development and export capacity of the Eastern Cape region. 4. Expansion of the roll-out of water, roads, rail and electricity infrastructure in the North-West. Ten priority roads will be upgraded. 5. Improvement of infrastructure of the west coast which has enormous potential waiting to be unlocked. In addition to these plans, Southern Africa was dually awarded the bid to host the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope infrastructure project along with Australia

and New Zealand. The South African contingent was bid in partnership with eight other African countries. The decision was made on 25 May 2012 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands and Southern Africa was identified as the preferred site. As a result, South Africa will host the majority of SKA dishes in Phase 1 which will be added to MeerKAT. Further SKA dishes will be added to the ASKAP array in Australia. All the dishes and the mid frequency aperture arrays for Phase II of the SKA will be built in Southern Africa while the low frequency aperture array antennas for Phase I and II will be built in Australia and New Zealand. SKA is the most powerful telescope in the world and is a major milestone in utilising the potential of Africaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skies through the installation of 3000 different satellite dishes. This is a historic moment not only for Africa, but for the world, in the advancement of information technologies. The North-South Road and Rail Corridor is another major infrastructure project for the continent which South Africa is a major champion of. This is a Presidential Infrastructure Championing initiative of the African Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NEPAD which will open up borders and inter-trade. The massive investment in infrastructure aims to leave more than just power stations, rail-lines, dams and roads. The hope is that apart from the physical factors, the country will be industrialised and skills and jobs will be generated. President Jacob Zuma has convened an infrastructure summit to discuss the implementation of the plan with potential investors and social partners. Extracts from the State of the Nation Address By His Excellency Jacob G Zuma, President of the Republic of South Africa on the occasion of the Joint Sitting of Parliament, Cape Town, 9 Feb 2012. Images courtesy Gautrain.

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Lesotho Highlands Water Project Developing a Country - Not a Dam

The Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP) is an ongoing water supply and hydropower project of the governments of Lesotho and South Africa, and is Africa’s largest water transfer project. The first treaty between the two countries for the transfer of water was signed in 1986. It includes a system of several large dams and tunnels throughout both countries. The Lesotho component involves the rivers Malibamatso, Matsoku, Senqunyane and Senqu. In South Africa, it involves the Vaal River. The project’s aims are to provide jobs and income for 78

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Lesotho, as well as hydroelectric power, in exchange for water to Gauteng, South Africa’s industrial and mining hub. The Vision In the aftermath of the global economic meltdown and the mainstreaming of concepts like global warming and climate change, it is becoming increasingly evident that economic growth and prosperity going forward will be built on very different fundamentals. International money is following scarce resources (i.e. water), “green” industry and energy,


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and easy access to labour. This shift in investment favours Africa. Funding for projects that offer spatial development opportunities and open up corridors for trade are far more likely to attract favourable, global funding. The development of an integrated “Special Economic Zone” (SEZ) would offer Lesotho the opportunity to become a part of this global movement. First phases The first phase of the project was reached on the completion of Katse Dam in 1998. The Katse dam is a concrete arch dam across the Malibamatso River. Although the Katse dam has power generation capability for local use, the primary purpose is as the storage basin for Phase 1A and provides discharge into the transfer tunnel. Phase 1B of the project was completed in 2002 with the construction of the Mohale dam, a very large rock-fill dam, located on the Senqunyane River. The system is interconnected in such a way that water may be transferred in either direction for storage in Mohale or ultimate transfer to South Africa through the Katse reservoir. Dam-Hydro-Special Economic Zone Experts warned at NEDLAC that South Africa’s, and in particular Gauteng’s, future water security is only assured until 2018. MK Malefane, heading up the Polihali Consortium proposal, believes the only solution for the delivery of Lesotho Polihali Phase 2 Dam is on a turnkey finance-design-build basis with a consortium team. The consortium needs to have the capability and resources to undertake such construction and delivery of water to Gauteng by the deadline 2018. Due to the sensitive nature of land-ownership with traditional leaders, community membership in the consortium is imperative in preventing further delays as experienced in Phase 1. The Polihali Consortium proposes a Special Economic Zone (SEZ) Project that already has a growing number of South African and international manufacturers registered to invest, supported by the new roads being built linking the Phase 2-SEZ with the Durban sea-port. Incorporated in the

SEZ plans to benefit from the Phase 2 infrastructure is the development of a tourist resort city. This approximate R20-billion Phase 2 Dam-Hydro-SEZ development initiative is set to be the model and driving force for the new SACU industrial diversification program that will be implemented in the rest of the member countries of Swaziland, Botswana, and Namibia with support from member South Africa. This solution ensures sustainable economic development activity and job creation amongst the member countries. The project is set to become one of the key catalysts for delivery of over 100,000 jobs particularly in Lesotho and South Africa. Malefane maintains there are two key imperatives in Phase 2: that there needs to be a final turnkey solution accepted by the end of 2012 and that major economic development for Lesotho needs to be generated from an infrastructure project this size. In a project of this size which includes over 47 kilometres of tunnelling, it is vital that the usual tendering processes in this case, which could delay the processing and awarding of the + 400 main and sub-contracts resulting in delivery of water to Gauteng way beyond the 2018 water security threshold, need to be abandoned. It is therefore in the best interests of South Africa particularly for political and social stability. By offering a turnkey solution in 2012 for Phase 2 of LHWP, the impending catastrophic COSATU-led labour and public reaction when taps start running dry will be prevented. It will also ensure South Africa maintains on its current growth path and employment vision, and Lesotho can progress on their recovery path. For Lesotho, Polihali Consortium’s committed strategy is to mobilise South African and foreign investment for the realisation of broader poverty reduction, job creation and economic development as a key offset offering of the turnkey solution. Polihali Investment & Development Consortium Johannesburg, South Africa Cell: +27 83 982 0658 Fax: +27 86 693 3353 Email: mkmalefane@gmail.com Diplomat Africa

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Kamoso Empowering leaders today, to create an inspired vision for the Africa of tomorrow

In February 2012, an innovative new creative agency Kamoso Consulting was established in Botswana, leveraging the resources of international brand consultancy SouthSouthWest and Gaborone–based communications firm Red Pepper. Drawing on this depth of local and international knowledge and experience, Kamoso develops powerful brand strategies; converting business strategy into meaningful brand activation and engagement, driving increased value in organisations, their products and services. Kamoso will play a unique and valuable role in assisting Botswana’s evolving economy at the dawn of the African century. 80

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Directors Thapelo Letsholo and Andy Sargent first met during an inbound trade mission from Australia, hosted by the Botswana Export Development and Investment Authority (BEDIA) in March 2011. After identifying a niche in the market for their combined offering, their respective companies have been working closely together ever since. “We are proud to welcome Kamoso as a member of the Botswana business community, which has been the outcome of a joint effort with BEDIA. Collaborating with such extensive experience and professionalism required no hesitation.” Reitumetse Aphiri, BEDIA. “The decision to formalise our partnership and form Kamoso was driven by the genuine desire to continue to build local capacity and further facilitate the transferal of skills, in and out of Botswana. There is much to be learnt from all sides. Botswana is the logical base for us in Africa as the economy is stable and the business environment is well regulated. There is general excitement across all sectors for the future of the nation, driven by the responsible management of recent economic growth and development.” Andy Sargent, Kamoso. Kamoso currently has major branding projects underway in Botswana in both the Education and Tourism industries. These industries were identified as central to Botswana achieving Vision 2016 (Botswana’s strategy to propel its socio-economic and political development). This is a direct alignment with the continued focus on building local capacity and the continued diversity of the economy in Botswana – proof of Kamoso playing a vital role the the continued growth of both the public and private sectors across Botswana. Carrying strong endorsement from institutions such as BEDIA and the Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) has assisted Kamoso as it enters the market with a powerful service offering unlike any other domestically. “Branding is an essential part of the growth and development of any country – especially in an expanding economy such as Botswana’s. The unique drive of Kamoso to connect business strategy with brand strategy and activation is a breath of fresh air in Botswana.” Bosisi Ntshole, Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA).

Tel: +267 395 1363 Email: dumela@kamoso.co.bw Web: www.kamoso.co.bw


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Proudly African

Boosting inter-trade & cultural relations across the continent

www.ProudlyAfrican.info

Future of Trade at BRICS Africa 2012

GVPedia / Proudly African team

The Future of Trade Africa – Trade and Investment Commerce Exchange was held in the specially designed conference centre on the DHL BRICS Africa Import Export floor of SAITEX 2012 from 15 to 17 July at Gallagher Convention Centre in Midrand, South Africa. As key stakeholders deliberated on the topics of the Future of Trade Africa at the conference, the Proudly African initiative launched through its display of BEST OF books and businessmatchmaking opportunities. 82

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Aiming to jointly display Africa’s diverse countries through “pages of timeless history”, both in high-end coffee table book print format and eBook format, the Proudly African initiative is a new concept which brings together the achievements of GVPedia Publishing and various industry bodies. The initiative celebrates all things African – in trade and industry, commerce, tourism, and development. The continent’s shared success stories and areas of potential investment come together under one banner as a showcase to the world. Visitors to the Proudly African exhibition at BRICS Africa were greeted with the display of the BEST OF coffee-table book collection, Diplomat Africa magazines, and the new Hospitality Marketplace publication. Strategically located on the BRICS Africa B2B floor, Proudly African’s display created an expose of the continent’s finest offerings,


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Rebecca Eb, Proudly African Managing Editor and Kabo Garebakwena, Proudly African Botswana

Virendra Gupta, High Commissioner of India to South Africa and Sandhya Mendonca, Best of India Publisher. Also launched on the BRICS Africa B2B floor in partnership with Adele Lucas Promotions, was the new Best of Soweto book in the VIP lounge. The books were on display and for sale and were complimented by impressive art murals depicting life in Soweto. The response to the books was overwhelmingly positive.

Advocate Leslie Sedibe, CEO Proudly South African and Thapelo Letsholo, Partner Proudly African relevant to new players from the other BRICS member countries, and most notably, from India. “India is increasingly becoming a major trading partner with the region and South African businesses should take the opportunity that our ties with India, both historically and through new initiatives such as BRICS (the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa association of leading economies) afford for local businesses to establish a footprint on the Indian continent,” said Stephen Oehley, director at South African Trade Promotions.

The High Commissioner of India to South Africa, Mr Virendra Gupta, was taken through the display by GVPedia India partner, Sandhya Mendonca. The High Commissioner helped officially launch the new Best of India book in front of a multitude of cameras, including those of CNBC Africa. The launch of the Proudly African Initiative allowed for a time of reflection and celebration. In attendance was Best of Zambia partner, Lee-Anne Singh, who brought with her copies of the well-received Best of Zambia book.

The Future of Trade Africa – Trade and Investment Commerce Exchange impressed with its calibre of high-level speakers, and included discussions on topics such as Identifying New Markets in Africa, Logistics and Inter-Regional Integration, and the Practicalities of Business in Africa. Speakers included: MEC of Gauteng Department of Economic Development, Ms Qedani Mahlangu; Lead Partner of Africa Business Centre of Ernst & Young, Michael Lalor; MD DHL Express Central Africa and Indian Ocean Islands, Hennie Heymans; Business Development Director of Imperial Logistics, Cyril Laubscher; and Programme Director of Trade Mark Southern Africa, Mark Pearson. There were ample opportunities for delegates to network and the conference was designed to offer a platform for South African businesses to ensure they benefit from the expected boom in trade between the BRICS countries. www.ProudlyAfrican.info Diplomat Africa

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NEPAD – Advancing Agriculture and Food Security in Africa In the last few decades, a number of African countries have experienced severe food shortages. The New Partnership for Africa’s Development, the NEPAD Agency, recognises that attaining sustainable food security is a major challenge for Africa. NEPAD has been working with country and regional partners to support more coherent and integrated agricultural development. One of the key achievements has been NEPAD’s support for the implementation of the African Union framework for agricultural development, known as the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP). Through this Programme, whose objective is to raise agricultural productivity on the continent to at least six percent annually to contribute to poverty alleviation and elimination of hunger, NEPAD brings together various agricultural institutions in Africa. Countries that have signed up to the Programme are required to commit at least 10 percent of their national budgets to agriculture. The programme is premised on four pillars: sustainable land and reliable water control systems; private sector development, rural infrastructure and improved trade-related capacities for market access; increasing food supply and reducing hunger; and agricultural research and technology sharing. Among its achievements, the programme has succeeded in getting 30 African countries to sign the CAADP Compact which brings out national consensus and commitment to give agriculture top priority in terms of budgetary allocation. Also, more than 24 have established agriculture and food security investment plans. To date seven countries have exceeded the six percent target and another four have achieved growth of between five and six percent. Through this, CAADP has boosted agricultural growth across the continent; accelerated cassava commercialisation in southern Africa; enhanced livelihoods in rural Africa; and improved regional trade in food staples, through natural disaster risk management tools and platforms for skills transfers. CAADP has inspired and energised African agricultural research institutions, farmers’ associations, and African 84

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governments who believe that agriculture has a pivotal role in development. Development partners looking for a champion for agricultural development in Africa have rallied around CAADP. In essence, CAADP is about boosting investment to stimulate growth in the agricultural sector. This means bringing together the public and private sectors and civil society – at the continental, regional and national levels – to increase investment, improve coordination, share knowledge, successes and failures, encourage one another, and to promote joint and separate efforts. NEPAD’s Pan-African Cassava Initiative (NPACI), which links national agricultural research with regional cassava schemes, has succeeded in the commercialising of cassava by encouraging the processing of the root crop into starch and other industrial products. Under TerrAfrica, NEPAD’s strategic investment


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Programme which is also funded by the World Bank and other partners, the Agency aims to leverage funds to upscale sustainable land management in sub-Saharan Africa. The programme has secured close to US$1-billion and has disbursed funds to 27 countries in the last few years. One of the beneficiaries is Ethiopia, which received almost US$30million. In addition, over 23,700 households in Lesotho, Mozambique, Swaziland and Zimbabwe have been given improved seed varieties and trained in appropriate farming techniques such as jab planting and basin planting. Ploughing land breaks down soil structures and is not sustainable, whereas jab planting allows farmers to plant seed into ground that has not been ploughed. Planting basins leave over 90 percent of the soil undisturbed, capture rainwater and allow farmers to place fertiliser or manure more precisely. This means farmers harvest more and do not have to buy highly priced staples. In 2010 the project was extended to Eastern Africa. CAADPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Food and Nutrition Security Programme has gained significant grounds in Botswana and Namibia through its school feeding programme where about 270,000 children in Namibia and 330,000 children in Botswana have benefitted so far from the programme. The scheme is an important strategy for addressing inequalities in education, including providing access and expanding education opportunities for disadvantaged Namibian children. Not only will it result in increased food supply and boost responses to food emergency crises, it will also lead to better childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nutrition and education due to the jump in school enrolment that is likely to be witnessed. From the health perspective, it will act as a vehicle for fighting diseases. The programme runs in 20 countries in East, West and Central Africa. Among the main drivers of NEPADâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agricultural programme include an increased level and quality of productivity; enabling incentives for both state and nonstate players such as security, investments and governance. CAADP ensures local African ownership and responsibility, and encourages transparency and accountability. www.nepad.org Diplomat Africa

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Africa Frontiers Forum

Frontier Advisory hosts a series of thought-leadership forums and conferences both in South Africa and internationally. These globally orientated executive events bring together corporate leaders to discuss issues of key importance around frontier and emerging markets. In partnership with the Johannesburg Stock Exchange since 2009, Frontier Advisory hosts the monthly Africa Frontiers Forum. The forum invites leading companies, organisations and business personalities to speak at the monthly forums focusing on topics relevant for business on the continent. These forums are interactive and are designed to encourage conversation and provide a platform for shared learning. The Africa Frontiers Forum is the only dedicated series in South Africa that on a monthly basis addresses topics relating to Africa that impact on business on the continent. The topics and themes of the Africa Frontiers Forum are always timely and designed in consultation with our partner, the JSE, and our other stakeholders. The Africa Frontiers Forum is hosted monthly in Johannesburg at the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, and the forums have been extended to the Western Cape and KwaZuluNatal. Four events will be held in Cape Town and Durban each for 2012. Partnerships range from government organisations such as Wesgro in the Western Cape and TIKZN in KwaZulu-Natal to corporate 86

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organisations such as Deloitte, FNB and Webber Wentzel. The benefits of partnering in these thought-leadership series provides organisations with clear brand exposure on thought leadership of the Africa Frontiers Forum, access to an average of 120 attendees on a monthly basis, media exposure, as well as direct benefits for organisationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; clients and staff. The success of the structure of the Africa Frontiers Forum is reflected in the high degree of media exposure

that the seminars receive. Constant coverage is provided by Business Day, Business Report, CNBC Africa, Engineering News, Mining Weekly, the SABC, Thomson Reuters, and Xinhua News. The Financial Times is the dedicated Media Partner of the Africa Frontiers Forum. Due to the demand of the Africa Frontiers Forums across the region, Frontier Advisory will extend the Africa Frontier Forums to East Africa and West Africa in 2013.


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Topics addressed and to be addressed in 2012 • January: Africa Outlook Conference 2012. • February: Will Special Economic Zones rescue Manufacturing in South Africa and the Region? • March: The Commercial Strategies of Emerging Markets and new Emerging Multinationals in Africa. • April: Will Political Instability derail Economic Growth in Francophone Africa’s 250 million-strong Market? • May: The State of Africa: Reporting from the World Economic Forum’s Africa Summit, Ethiopia. • June: Capital Market Integration in Africa-Aligning Regulatory & Capital Market Growth Interests in the Region. • July: New Policy Direction in China’s Investment Strategy Direction. • August: The Rise of Social Media in Africa and how it is shaping Companies’ Business Models. • September: Ethiopia. • October: BRICS/ Infrastructure. • 6 November: Eurozone Crisis and its economic Impact on Africa. • 20 November: BRICS Development Bank. • January 2013: South Africa Looks Ahead to 2013. AFF in Cape Town in 2012 Four AFF business seminars are planned to be held in Cape Town during the course of the year. Seminar Prioritised Themes: • The BRICS Summit – What does it mean for South

• • •

African Business? Africa’s Oil-led Growth Model: How can Cape Town be positioned as a Services Hub for Oil-Rich Africa? Private Equity in Africa. China’s Commercial Relations with Africa.

Launching the AFF in Durban in 2012 Four AFF business seminars are planned to be held in Durban during the course of the year. Seminar Prioritised Themes: • India’s Commercial ties with Africa: Leveraging the second wave of investment. • Logistics as an Enabler of Commerce in Africa. • BRICS Infrastructure Development in Africa. • Strategies for Successful Retail in Africa. Please contact AfricaFrontiersForum@ frontieradvisory.com. or Suheima Shamsoodeen on +27 11 447 8038 for interest in partnering on the Africa Frontiers Forum. Please contact mmohohlo@frontieradvisory.com or Metja Mohohlo on +27 11 447 8038 for interest in attending any of our Africa Frontiers Forum events. Diplomat Africa

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PAMRO Conference 2012

Sharing learning in media research across the continent

Inspiring cooperation and knowledge sharing across the myriad of cultural and political lines which segment Africa is no easy task. In the field of media research however, there is a vibrant cross-border community of professionals dedicated to growing media audience research across the continent, which is essential for the development of media in Africa. This community is held together by PAMRO, the Pan African Media Research Organisation – a forum where industry organisations, media research providers, media owners, marketers and advertising agencies from across the continent can exchange knowledge and learn from one another’s successes and failures. Ultimately, by bringing together the media research industry across African borders, PAMRO aims to produce harmonised, compatible and comprehensive audience measurement data for the entire continent. By promoting media research in Africa, PAMRO aims to assist in uncovering the opportunities that exist for growth and development in all African countries. One of PAMRO’s key vehicles for bringing people together from around the continent is its annual conference, the PAMRO All Africa Media Research Conference. Meeting in a new city each year – this year’s event takes place at Lake Victoria, Uganda, from 26-29 August – delegates from across the continent come together to touch base at what is surely the premier event on the pan-African media research calendar. “The PAMRO conference has grown into a remarkable networking and learning opportunity, and provides a valuable forum for intra-country communication and the exchange of ideas,” says PAMRO president and MD of Telmar Media Systems, Jennifer Daniel. Food for thought From the measurement and status of radio, print, TV, internet and outdoor across Africa, to future trends and challenges in the media audience field, the programme for the 14th PAMRO Conference covers a wide range of media research topics, based around the theme “From Local to Global: Media Research in a Developing World”. 88

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Speakers are coming from across Africa – Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa to date – and will be joined by experts from as far afield as the UK, Hong Kong and Switzerland. • Romi Hofer of GfK Switzerland will look at approaches to facing the challenges of media research. • Keld Nielsen, global business development director of TNS Media Research, UK, and Laurence Chausson, marketing director of Kantar Media, UK, will give their perspectives on new media measurement. • Looking specifically at television measurement, Craig


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Jennifer Daniel, President, PAMRO

how Africans access products and services, highlighting the critical factors behind successfully utilising mobile as a marketing and communications channel. Another confirmed speaker is Andrzej Suski of Millward Brown Africa and Middle East, who asks whether multichannel campaigns in Africa can maximise return on investment.

A number of other speakers will also be presenting at this year’s conference, including Joe Otin of Ipsos sub-Saharan Africa, and Adelaide McKelvey of Continental Outdoor Media, to name a few. Finally, there will be updates on media audience research activities from PAMRO member countries across the continent. “The 14th PAMRO conference promises to be an event not to be missed,” Daniel sums up. “The conference has grown enormously since it was first held in Johannesburg in 1999, and is truly the key networking opportunity for media researchers and clients on the African continent. I look forward to seeing you all in Uganda.”

Johnson and Candice Ulrich from Nielsen SA will explore the route to installing peoplemeter panels in Africa to measure television viewing. Into the realm of outdoor media, Mike Broom, CEO of Panel Services Africa, and Graham Tomes of Eagle Outdoor, will present “African Solutions to African Problems: Sun, Illumination, Jobs and Media Measurement”. James Fergusson, manager of TNS, Singapore, and Karin du Chenne, MD of TNS Johannesburg, will demonstrate the crucial role which mobile will play in

The when and where The 14th PAMRO All Africa Media Research Conference runs from Sunday 26 August 2012 to Wednesday 29 August 2012, at the Speke Resort and Conference Centre in Munyonyo, Lake Victoria, Uganda. Programme highlights include a get-together dinner, a breakfast session, conference outing, and the Speciality Dinner where the Piet Smit Achiever Award will be awarded by the President of PAMRO. How to register Conference costs and registration forms can be found on the PAMRO website at www.pamro.org. To become a PAMRO member and qualify for the special conference rate, visit www.pamro.org and click on the link under “All about PAMRO”, or email pamro@saarf. co.za or call +27 (11) 463-5340.

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The Sugar Industry Mauritius

Sugarcane was introduced to Mauritius by the Dutch in 1639. It grew well and by 1641, two sugar processing plants had been established. The manufacture of sugar was abandoned in 1652 but cultivation continued. When the French occupied the island, sugar production received no attention until Mahé de Labourdonnais built the first sugar factories. At the beginning of the 19th Century, there were nearly 80 factories producing over 3,000 tonnes of sugar. Since then, the Mauritian sugar factories have undergone continual expansion, modernisation, and centralisation. Today there are 17 sugar factories in Mauritius, producing around 630,000 tonnes of sugar every year, with 530,000 tonnes exported to the European Union. Sugarcane is presently cultivated on 72,000 hectares, representing 85% of the arable land in Mauritius. The sugarcane crop has adapted very well to Mauritius’ growing conditions and the industry has been supported through the development of efficient organisations. Sugarcane is set to remain one of the major contributors of the Mauritius economy. Fields of sugarcane have been a steady feature of the Mauritian landscape for over two centuries. Once the country’s leading export, sugar is still considered to form the backbone of the Mauritian economy. The sugar industry owes much of its success to the Sugar Protocol attached to the Third Lome Convention. This saw Mauritius benefitting from export quotas at preferential guaranteed prices well above world market prices. The quota has been fixed at 507,000 metric tonnes, resulting in a ‘sugar dividend’ yield estimated at US$200million annually. The Sugar Action Plan further boosted the industry in the 1980s when the government reduced export duty on sugar. The ban on mill closures was also lifted, which allowed the industry to benefit from significant economies of scale. Both the Sugar Protocol and the Sugar Action Plan played a critical role in Mauritius’ economic growth and resultant transition from a low-income single-crop economy to a middle-income diversified economy. Many manufacturing enterprises as well as tourism ventures benefitted from the sugar dividend through start-up capital. They also benefitted from the technical and managerial 90

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expertise already in place in the sugar sector. As a result, the stable revenues from sugar exports helped to develop and foster a more diversified Mauritian economy. The success of the sugar industry in Mauritius can also be significantly attributed to the positive trade agreements with the United Kingdom and the European Union. There are a number of challenges the Mauritian sugar industry now faces, such as the high cost of production due to a low milling capacity, a short milling season, and high labour costs. The rocky terrain in places adds further constraint to production. In order to achieve increased sugar yield in Mauritius, the government plans to embark on a number of research strategies. The aim is to decrease production costs of sugar


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

• • • • • • • • • • while simultaneously increasing productivity per unit of resources. These strategies include the scientific disciplines of agronomy (irrigation, nitrogen nutrition, and cultural operations), research and development on mechanisation of cultural practices, as well as breeding high yielding varieties with high sucrose and fibre content for sustainable production levels. Focuses for increasing sugar yield: • Increase the efficiency of breeding and selection of new cane varieties; • Improve sugarcane husbandry with particular emphasis on mechanisation, ripening and irrigation; • Efficient use of fertilisers;

Improved cultural operations and practices; Pest and disease control; Biometrical studies; Sugar milling and processing; Rehabilitation of abandoned cane lands; Yield gap between planters and millers; Improving labour efficiency; Environmental studies and monitoring; Reduction of costs of production; Crop diversification to rotate food crops between cane cycles; • Technology transfer; • Diversification within sugar for maximum use of byproducts and derivatives: • The use of bagasse for generation of electricity • Sucrochemistry • Organic sugar. The diversification of the Mauritian economy built on the backbone of the country’s sugar legacy has ensured it is one of Africa’s wealthiest nations. Through careful government research priorities, the legacy of sugar in Mauritius will remain strong. Source: Society for Sugar Research and Promotion on Maurinet. com – Mauritius Island Online; and the Government of Mauritius in Survival of the Mauritius Sugar Industry – D R. Julien Amas 1995.

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Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) regional meeting held in Africa 2012

World Trade Center Cape Town had the pleasure of hosting the first ever World Trade Center Association’s (WTCA) Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) regional meeting to be held in Africa. This annual regional meeting saw over 70 representatives from World Trade Centers from EMEA regions converging in Cape Town, South Africa from 30th – 1st June 2012. The purpose of WTCA’s EMEA regional meeting 2012 was to encourage peer-to-peer dialogues through various interactive panel discussions and networking, amongst World Trade Center (WTC) representatives and WTC Trade Mission Participants, with the objective to increase interregional trade amongst EMEA regions and hence stimulate multiple economies. This event resulted in the signing of several MOUs that will positively impact economic growth in Africa. World Trade Centers in attendance included Accra (Ghana), Algiers (Algeria), Almere Area (Netherlands), Basilicata (Italy), Bhubaneswar (India), Bucharest (Romania), Cape Town (South Africa), Cyprus, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), Gaborone (Botswana), Istanbul (Turkey), Jaipur (India), Lagos (Nigeria), Lausanne (Switzerland), Lille (France), Marseille Provence (France), Minsk (Belarus), Moscow (Russia), Mumbai (India), Pescara (Italy), San Marino, Venlo (Netherlands), as well as the World Trade Center Association. Also in attendance was Chris van Biljon of the Captains of Industry Forum and Vuyo Mzozoyana of Peermont Global Ltd. The first day’s program consisted of dialogues and round table discussions centred on Imparting of Knowledge as Tools for Success. The delegation was welcomed by host Julius Steyn, CEO of WTC Cape Town, as well as Ghazi 92

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GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

Abu Nahl, the Chairman of the World Trade Centers Association. The second day ended with the launch of AGRI World Africa and included the signing of the trade agreement, before the delegation headed off on a tour of Cape Town and the closing Gala dinner. AGRI World Africa Agriculture on the African continent and the showcasing thereof will undoubtedly soon be venturing into unchartered territory with the launch of AGRI World Africa. This is the exciting sentiment that prevails within the ranks of the World Trade Centre, Agri Mega Group and other key stakeholders in the agriculture sector.

The first milestone was reached when the Agri Mega Group (AMG) and World Trade Centre (WTC) signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) at the EMEA event in not only addressing the agriculture challenges on the African Continent, but to formulate new methodologies in positioning Africa to be the potential food hub of the world. Africa will soon have its own Agriculture Expo and promises to be the centre point of interests of the relevant role-players throughout the agriculture value-chain. Agri World Africa (AWA) will be a catalyst in transforming the Agriculture industry on the African continent.

Amongst others, the AWA aims to showcase agricultural products; promote trade and commerce in Africa between African Countries; promote trade and commerce between Africa and the international world; put African agriculture on a sound path of growth and development; develop and grow economies with the focus on enhanced agricultural activities; and facilitate sustainable food production in Africa. World Trade Centre CEO, Julius Steyn said that Agri World Africa will give the continent access to world markets that ordinarily are not accessible to agriculture producers. “Furthermore, this joint-venture with the Agri Mega Group will support and cooperate with the existing pool of Agriculture experts who currently play pivotal roles throughout the African continent,” Steyn added. Steyn has alluded to the historic agreement and subsequent strategic planning session, as an integral step in the right direction to ensure that both the political and development goals of the relevant heads of African states and regional organisations, like Nepad and COMESA, are adhered to. “The joint-venture agreement’s success in venturing into Africa is underpinned by the enormous continental footprint of World Trade Center,” Steyn concluded. Orton King, Group Executive Director: Agri Mega Group, said, “It is time that we look at Agriculture with an Africafor-Africa approach and that we must look beyond the current challenges that prevail on the continent. In it we must see the agriculture potential for Africa and therefore we are very excited to be part of a facilitation process to position Africa as a commercial agri-market to the rest of the world.” This ground-breaking joint-venture agreement will make a contribution to Africa in the positioning to be the food hub of the world.

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BA ISAGO: A University College in Transition and Transformation All its programmes have a direct bearing on the human capital development of Botswana. The College’s philosophy and guiding business principles are always premised on the understanding that there must, at all times, be a meaningful balance between its business imperatives and the academic pursuits of its students. All these, resonate well and are in tandem with the country’s new National Human Resources Development Strategy and also some of the vital pillars of Botswana’s Vision 2016. BA ISAGO is focused and committed to transforming itself from a University College to full university status.

In today’s global economy, a graduate needs abundant choices of programmes and career paths to select from. BA ISAGO University College is increasingly and steadily becoming a preferred institution of choice for tertiary education. BACKGROuND BA ISAGO, a dynamic private tertiary education institution offering market-driven programmes of international repute, was originally established in Francistown in 2002 with only 50 students. In the last ten years, its student population has risen to over 2000, with branches in Gaborone, Francistown and Maun. Fully accredited by the Tertiary Education Council (TEC) in 2006 and the Botswana Training Authority (BOTA) in 2004, the College offers a wide range of degree, diploma and certificate level programmes, on a full-time and part-time basis. 94

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ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP BA ISAGO offers its own home-grown programmes, as well as some which are offered through license agreements with the University of South Africa (UNISA) and the National University of Science and Technology (NUST) in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. All these programmes have been approved and registered by the Tertiary Education Council (TEC). Other strong collaborative partnerships include ACCA, ICDL, UNISA Graduate School of Business Leadership (SBL), UNISA’s Centre for Business Management (CBM) and the Botswana Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA). Centre for Research, Entrepreneurship and Project Management (CREPM) CREPM is a value-adding research, enterprise, project management and consultancy Strategic Business Unit of BA ISAGO. The following are core functions of CREPM: • Research • Training • Consultancies • Community Engagement • Conferencing The following Degree, Diploma and Certificate programmes are offered on a full or part-time basis: Degree and Diploma Programmes offered through uNISA: • Human Resources Management


GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT AFRICA

• • • • • • • • • •

Marketing Management Financial Management Management Accounting Transport and Logistics Business Informatics Law Tourism Management Industrial and Organisational Psychology Bachelor of Accounting Sciences in Financial Accounting National Diploma in Safety Management

Degree and Diploma Programmes offered through NuST: • Risk Management and Insurance (Hons.) • Fiscal Studies (Hons.) • Diploma in Development and Disaster Management BA ISAGO Diploma and Degree Programmes: • Diploma in Court Administration • Diploma in Real Estate (leading to a BTech Degree) • National Professional Diploma in Education (NPDE) • Diploma in Accounting • Diploma in Transport and Logistics • Diploma in Entrepreneurship • Diploma in Insurance • BCOM in Accounting • BCOM in Banking and Finance • BCOM in Risk Management • BCOM in Human Resources Management Professional Programmes: • Association of Certified Chartered Accountants (ACCA) • Certified Accounting Technician (CAT) • International Computer Driving Licence (ICDL) • Botswana Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA) BA ISAGO Certificate Programmes: • Vocational Education and Training (Training of Trainers Course) • Human Resources Management

• • • • • • •

Business Management Entrepreneurship Court Administration Real Estate Foundation and Intermediate Certificate Course for Deputy Sheriffs and Court Bailiffs Customary Law Law

Workshops and Seminars The Centre for Research, Entrepreneurship and Project Management (CREPM) conducts workshops and seminars as and when required by various interest groups. Registration Registration is now open to all interested candidates until 15th December 2012. BA ISAGO also runs an Evening School for in service trainees which runs from 1730 hrs to 2030 hrs during the week.

GABORONE CAMPuS Plot 54831, Block 7, Corner of Western Bypass (Motsete Road) and Mogoditshane Road, Gaborone, Botswana Email: anamika.singh@baisago.co.bw Tel: (+267) 395 7744 • Fax: (+267) 395 7709 Mobile: (+267) 714 37500 FRANCISTOWN CAMPuS Haskins Building, Plot 1602/3, Light Industrial Site, Francistown, Botswana Email: gertrude.kachere@baisago.co.bw Tel: (+267) 241 8780 • Fax: (+267) 241 8778 MAuN CAMPuS Suite 6, Lewis Building, Old Mall Extension, Maun, Botswana Email: maun.campus@baisago.co.bw Tel: (+267) 686 7021 • Fax: (+267) 686 7021 Diplomat Africa

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We brand and build the image of the world’s most exciting economic regions to affect a change in the perception of a continent, a nation, a city and its people by the rest of the world. Global Village Africa is Africa’s premier platform for showcasing and networking governments, leading companies and entrepreneurs in business, tourism and lifestyle. The ‘Best of series’ books crisply profile leading companies and innovators, as leaders within their genre. We celebrate the success of countries, individuals and companies with ‘the good news’ editorial and pictorial imagery in the highest quality print format available.

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Mining the Resource, Enriching the Nation www.debswana.com I am owned in equal shares by the Botswana Government (Batswana), and De Beers. My establishment in 1969, during the early years of this country’s birth, would greatly shape her economic landscape and alter the course of her future forever. Being the world’s largest diamond producer by value and second largest producer by volume, I operate four exceptional open pit mines in Jwaneng, Orapa, Letlhakane and Damtshaa. Over the years, I have proved to be a major contributor to the economy of Botswana, contributing 30% to GDP, 70% to foreign exchange earnings and 32% to Government revenue. Out of every P5 derived from diamond revenues, the Botswana Government receives P4 through dividends, royalties and taxes. I produce 25 to 30 million carats a year. I am undoubtedly the largest private sector employer, with over 4 500 employees. My pride in being a part of our country’s success story is demonstrated by my commitment in mining safely, optimally and responsibly, and contributing to communities, thus leaving a lasting legacy.

I am Debswana Diamond Company and this is my story and yours too, Batswana betsho!

DIPLOMAT Africa - Volume 4  

Diplomat Africa has become a documentation of continued African growth over the past year. Our four featured countries for this issue of Dip...

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