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continued FALL 2018

D I V I S I O N O F C O N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N · S C H O O L O F V I S U A L A R T S

C R E AT E / C O N N E C T/ C O M M U N I T Y

Felipe Galindo CARTOONS AND ACTIVISM by Sarah Grass SVACE instructor and internationally renowned cartoonist Felipe Galindo draws simplicity and humor from the complexities of our world. A master of the culturally intertwined tableau, Galindo’s cartoons embrace cultural difference in order to provoke awareness of universal values and empathy. Tackling subjects such as immigration, climate change, gun control and free speech, Galindo has developed a distinct style of art/activism with which he brilliantly simplifies our most complicated human issues. continued on page 4 v

WHAT’S INSIDE

3 NE WS

Photographer Kathy Shorr’s latest project focuses on survivors of gun violence.

6 IN THE CL A S SROOM

We visit Andrew Castrucci’s painting course Between Realism and Abstraction.

8 SPECIAL PROGR AMS

Writer Jarrett Earnest led MFA Art Writing Summer Residency.

10 MUSEUM PRE VIE W

Warhol at the Whitney, Charles White at MoMA, and more.


START TO CONTINUE...

HERE

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VISUAL NARRATIVE

Wednesday, September 12 6:30-8:30pm 136 West 21st Street, 11th floor MODERATOR : Panayiotis Terzis These information sessions are offered to the general public free of charge. Seating is given on a first-come, first-served basis.


Nir Arieli

S VA C O N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N N E W S

FROM THE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

SINCE THE BEGINNING OF TIME,

politics has been a catalyst for inspiring social movements and sparking the creation of works of art. Artists across all disciplines play a tremendous role in social activism and are intertwined and integrated into social justice movements. They help to raise awareness, start conversations and motivate us to envision a better world. Whether through film, paint, photography, the written word or performance, art holds up a mirror to our society and reflects our place in history. The time-honored role of the artist as activist is at the heart of this issue of ContinuEd. This fall and each fall moving forward, we will be focusing on and celebrating art and activism. I welcome you to read about our faculty and students who are socially engaged and active members within the arts community. I also encourage you to visit our website sva.edu/ce to view the many courses offered this fall that address social practice and activism. —Joseph Cipri, on behalf of the Division of Continuing Education

Veteran and Artist Essam Attia on His Duty to Society

E

ssam Attia’s career trajectory took him from serving as a geospatial analyst in the U.S. Army to SVA student, to participant in SVA’s City as Site Summer Residency Program, and most recently, SVACE faculty. These experiences were instrumental in transforming his identity and informing his choices as an artist and a citizen. Attia’s work exemplifies intentionality, self-discovery, and his realization that “the artist has a duty to society.” His work as a whole explores identity and sparks conversations about socio-political issues often left unspoken. Attia explains what art as activism means in the context of his artistic practice: “As an artist I hope to engage communities and expand consciousness. I would like for people to grasp from my work the realities of war, and war’s emotional and psychological effects on people. Perhaps with that understanding, people can make decisions that could better those communities’ futures down the line. I find that we are all enormously powerful, since our individual decisions collectively create the reality we live in. When this awareness spreads to enough people, they will begin to change their modus operandi. I get that sounds idealistic, but it’s real too. My work has solidified a moral compass in me, that of a need for everyone to take more responsibility for each other and our world. I don’t think we do that enough.” Attia’s work includes Drone Campaign, developed while a BFA Photography student, as a response to his experience with drones while stationed in Iraq in 2004. Through photography and installation work, he altered street signs and public service announcements to invoke awareness, introspection and dialogue. Drone Campaign emphasizes the relationship between individual identity and information, and how an object’s context can affect its associated connotations. Res Judicata, partially developed during SVA’s City as Site Residency, and then exhibited in 2017 as part of SVA’s Summer Residency Program alumni exhibition “Astral America,” uses photography of aerial surveillance technology— or drones—to offer society’s reflections,

Antonius: shot while walking down a crowded Brooklyn street in the early afternoon. Brooklyn, 2013. Photo by Kathy Shorr.

A Photographer Shines a Light on Gun Violence Survivors

Kathy Shorr is a photographer whose work centers on urgent issues. Her recent project, SHOT: The 101, focuses on survivors of gun violence. Finding that the media under-reported gun violence survivors, Shorr made it her mission to travel around the country, photographing and learning their stories. “SHOT was meant to put a humanness, a face, onto the subject. Statistics are numbers and are hard to identify with, but the diverse group of 101 survivors from across America give us the opportunity to see that gun violence affects all Americans.” Shorr first became interested in photography at age 16 and studied it in SVA’s Continuing

Education and undergraduate departments. “I liked that the camera made everything accessible to me. It allowed me to be at locations with people who were different than me. The camera gave me a purpose that allowed access.” Shorr was surprised by the exposure and publicity that the project got. With write-ups and interviews in a number of major publications, SHOT reached a wider audience than Shorr imagined. “By the end of my photographing, I had survivors emailing me, asking if they could be a part of SHOT. I did not anticipate that there would be such an interest in the project. I am very grateful for the support it has received from around the world.” [William Patterson]

C O N TI N UED P R O J ECT S PAC E E X H I B I TI O N S

CONTI NUE D Fall 2018

e d ito rial staff Joseph Cipri, editorial director Keren Moscovitch, managing editor Nika Lopez, editor

Untitled, 2017, stuffed plush doll, 8 x 18"

v isual arts press, lt d. Anthony P. Rhodes, executive creative director Gail Anderson, creative director Brian E. Smith, senior art director Sheilah Ledwidge, editor Carli Malec, Matt Iacovelli, designers

August Aaron Elin

ARTIST:

“My photos represent my curiosity of the world as I go through my daily experiences.” DATES: August 1 - 30

co nt ributors Michael Bilsborough Catalina Cipri Sarah Grass Georgette Maniatis Stephanie McGovern William Patterson Eric Sutphin

Res Judicata 6, 2014, archival pigment print

deeper understandings of drone usage, and the effects drone imagery have on how we view and represent the world. Attia’s current project, Children of Drones, explores children’s perception of drone technology and the social and emotional impact this new era in warfare has on the crisis-affected children of the Middle East. The work has been a multiyear collaboration with children from the U.S. and Syria. Attia has gathered dozens of drawings from the children with whom he has collaborated, and is transforming those drawings into sculptural plush toys that use the visual and material language of childhood to express the deeply troubling aftermath of military conflict. Later this fall, Attia will be exhibiting “Children of Drones.” [Catalina Cipri]

© 2018 Visual Arts Press, Ltd. ContinuEd is published by the Division of Continuing Education s ch oo l o f v isual arts Milton Glaser Acting Chairman David Rhodes President Anthony P. Rhodes Executive Vice President

September ARTIST: Htet T San

“The works in Dreams and Memories is an attempt to communicate with the unconscious and a reflection on the conscious states of mind based on personal journey.” DATES:

September 1 - 30

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FELIPE GALINDO: CARTOONS AND ACTIVISM

We recently had the pleasure of speaking with Galindo about the social role he takes on as an artist/activist and his new SVACE course, Cartoons and Activism. Feggo, the name with which Galindo signs his work, is an amalgam of his family-given name, Felipe Galindo Gomez. Born in Cuernavaca, Mexico, he moved to New York City in 1983. His work has been included in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Reader’s Digest, MAD, The International Herald Tribune (France), La Jornada, Nexos, Hoja por Hoja (Mexico), among many other publications worldwide.

“I believe art connects us through our humanity. At its best, the role of artists is to break boundaries by crossing imposed cultural, political and social limitations such as borders and languages.” FELIPE GALINDO faculty

How would you describe your role as an artist/activist? I am an observer and a graphic commentator. I use art and humor in a simple and straightforward manner to bring attention to complex issues like immigration and the environment. Much of my work celebrates communities that are often underrepresented or misrepresented. In order to move toward a more socially just society, we need to see the humanity in each other first. Activism is action, and making my community visible is one of the ways I impact change. My project

e

RELATED COURSES

Digital Coloring (ILC-2149-A) Exploring Career Opportunities for Illustrators: A Drawing Workshop (ILC-3596-A) Illustration for Social Media (ILC-2152-A) For more information, visit sva.edu/ce

4 • CONTINUED / FALL 2018

Manhatitlan: Mexican and American Cultures Intertwined, marks my experience as an immigrant, connecting historical and current migration dynamics in the U.S. and around the world. The courses you teach in SVACE surround the notion of intertwined cultures as well. How do you include the subject matter of your work in your courses? I’ve taught two different courses in the past, Opportunities in the Bilingual Markets and Art Intertwined. The first was aimed at students from Spanish-speaking countries, discussing how to understand the bilingual industry and find opportunities for their work in the U.S. or back in their home countries. The markets are globalized nowadays and it’s important to take advantage of that. The course Art Intertwined was aimed at creating an artistic project based on the student’s cultural heritage, or using another culture as inspiration for it. I give the example of artists like Picasso, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Diego Rivera and many others who were inspired by art from other cultures to develop their own. Beginning this fall, I will offer a new course called Cartoons

and Activism, aimed at art in response to current events, and contributing thought-provoking images to influence social change. I always encourage my students to embrace their heritage, and to analyze how it informs their experience at the personal and professional level. To embrace the other in ourselves helps us to understand that we all share

basic universal values and we all have something important to contribute. Can you speak a bit about your experience belonging to two cultures? Belonging to two cultures is fasciTop: New Immigrant, ink and watercolor on paper, 9 x 12" Bottom: ICE Arresting Immigrants...Indiscriminately, digital, 8¾ x 7½"


nating and challenging. Rather than considering myself half-Mexican/ half-American, I consider myself wholly Mexican and wholly American, so I get two for the price of one! I treasure my heritage and my adopted homeland every day, merging them in my life and in my work. For me it is a privilege to access my Pre-Columbian roots through my DNA, and a responsibility to honor both cultures. I believe art connects us through our humanity. At its best, the role of artists is to break boundaries by crossing imposed cultural, political and social limitations such as borders and languages. You spoke out in support of cartoonists’ “free speech” after the deadly attack at Charlie Hebdo, and

continue to discuss the subject as Secretary General of FECO (Federation of Cartoonists Organisations). What are some of the risks you see cartoonists facing in media today? I met George Wolinski, one of the slain Charlie Hebdo cartoonists, at a humor festival in Portugal in 2012, where I won an award for a global warming cartoon (he presented me with the award). Utterly shocked to have lost a colleague, I became more outspoken about the issue of freedom of expression. French cartoonists pioneered political cartooning in the late 18th century, and I think in a free society we need to allow all voices to be heard. As FECO’s Secretary General, I work with an international team that connects and supports cartoonists around the world, tackling issues like work

and human rights, censorship, compensation and political oppression. It is important to note that freedom of expression is taken for granted in the U.S., but in many countries cartoonists are regularly detained, harassed and even killed for political reasons, so FECO aims to create an international network of support for cartoonists around the world. Cartoons should definitely question the status quo and encourage dialogue about controversial issues, but art should not be a hazardous profession. You’ve been publishing images in The Nation’s new OppArt section, self-described as “Artistic Dispatches from the Frontlines of Resistance.” Can you tell us a bit about more about this platform? My images for OppArt range in subject,

from gun control to immigration to tax reform. For example, Artists Take Aim at Guns was published after the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida. My image was a reflection of the preposterous accessibility to guns in the U.S. that endangers everyone in society, including kids. My new course, Cartoons and Activism, will direct students’ attention toward work of this kind: an immediate response to what’s happening in the world right now.

Above: Global Warming (Polar Pandas), digital, 8½ x 11"

READY TO CHECK OUT OUR COURSES?

sva.edu/ce

5


IN THE CLASSROOM

Painting as a Form of Consciousness

by Georgette Maniatis

O

Top of page: James H. Trowell focuses on translating the model into a political form. Directly above: James H. Trowell’s colorful palette. Left: Harry Wyatt paints hands of resistance. Below: Christina Ballantyne paints futurist lines.

6 • CONTINUED / FALL 2018

ne evening while walking into one of Andrew Castrucci’s painting classes, I was struck by the metallic sound of jazz floating around the classroom. Each student was transfixed on translating the model in front of them with an intent that transcended both realism and abstraction. Their energy was palpable, focused. When I asked about the students’ depth of feeling, Castrucci explained that the lesson this week was “reflective of the culture of war, the atomic bomb, Jackson Pollock vs industrial noise music, the Italian Futurists and Picasso’s Guernica. The style of painting that week was to encompass this fast angular explosive energy.” Looking at the students’ paintings, there was powerful evidence that the figure interpreted on the canvases reflected a voice of the future and a rejection of the past. For decades, Castrucci has built a reputation for inspiring students to not only create beautiful art, but to create art that can inspire change in the world. I asked him about what he thinks about making art under the current administration. He responded, “Pols are elected to protect us. When they don’t do their job, this forces us as artists to be the muckrakers, the

moral compass, the high priests, the shamans.” In 2001 he founded Dirty Graphics, a collective activist group based out of SVA’s print shop. There, students create art as a means of resistance, as a tool raising collective consciousness. The powerful imagery displayed on the posters created within the Dirty Graphics collective are then taken to the streets of NYC where they are seen by the thousands during protests such as Not My President, the Women’s March and March for Our Lives. Following the protests, the posters are then wheat-pasted on open spaces throughout the city, further activating the public to engage in conversation through guerilla installation art. In the fall 2018 semester, SVACE will be offering a printmaking and silkscreen course entitled Dirty Graphics: Art and Activism, where students will be encouraged to take a closer look at the political landscape of our times and magnify the issues at hand through their creative work. For the majority of Andrew Castrucci’s students, their art is much more than a thing of beauty. Their art reflects a strong sense of social justice, determined and willing to stand tall in the face of adversity.


Above: Pujen Derg’s larger-than-life portrait. Left: Bryn Kenny paints a modernist figure.

! photography by Georgette Maniatis

e

RELATED COURSES

Memory, Imagination and Mixed Media (FIC-2551-A) Artist as Philosopher: Postmodernism in Practice (OLC-2612-A) Textile Printing: An Introduction (FIC-2876-AA) Minor Histories and the New York Downtown Art Scene 1960-1990 (AHC-2307-A) For more information, visit sva.edu/ce

READY TO CHECK OUT OUR COURSES?

sva.edu/ce

7


SPECIAL PROGRAMS

MFA Art Writing Summer Residency:

Meditations in an Emergency A

rt writing is an ever-evolving field in which philosophy, poetry, art history, and at times fiction, coalesce. Participants in this year’s MFA Art Writing Summer Residency Meditations in an Emergency came together for two weeks of deep engagement with visual art and language. Participants of varied backgrounds from California to China sought to broaden the purview of their writing practice. During their time in the program residents visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Frick Collection and the New Museum—as well as exhibitions in Chelsea and the

Lower East Side. The program culminated in a zine, a format that arose out of the need for activists and members of resistance groups to distribute their message widely. The residency was led by Jarrett Earnest, author of the forthcoming book What it Means to Write About Art: Interviews with Art Critics (David Zwirner Books, fall 2018). Earnest recently told fellow critic Roberta Smith in The Brooklyn Rail, “Something I love about art criticism is that the ethical agreements that are actually articulated and hashed out in real journalism are completely amorphous and opaque in art writing—there is no set standard for what constitutes the ethical

boundaries between artists and critics socially and professionally.” Throughout the intensive, participants were able to test their critical thinking and writing skills through discussions, seminars and field work. Residents—whether artists, art administrators or creative writers— brought their own unique perspectives that charged the program with a spirit of passion and curiosity. “Criticism is about our passions,” Earnest said. “From a critic you want clarity, you want clear thinking—but mostly, I think you want huge passion.” [Eric Sutphin] Images: MFA Art Writing Department

D E PA R T M E N T P R O F I L E

MFA Photography, Video and Related Media “That which withers in the age of mechanical reproduction is the aura of the work of art. This is a symptomatic process whose significance points beyond the realm of art.” —Walter Benjamin SVA’s MFA Photography, Video and Related Media Department celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, marking three decades of innovation in art, technology and activism. According to chair Charles Traub, who has spearheaded the department since its inception, social progress has always been an unofficial mission and conceptual backbone of the program. From its early transition to digital processes to its global outreach in the wake of natural and geopolitical disasters, the department’s history mirrors the impact of photographic imaging on the social body and invites image-makers from diverse contexts to contribute to a discourse of visual culture. The department was actively involved in the post 9/11 initiative here is new york: A Democracy of Photographs. The crowd-sourced exhibition, book and website gave voice to all

8 • CONTINUED / FALL 2018

those affected by the events and created an egalitarian hub for collective memory. People from around the world submitted photographs of the catastrophe and its aftermath to be printed, exhibited and sold for the benefit of the Children’s Aid Society’s initiative to support victims. Following the Katrina hurricane, the department was once again involved in collecting and preserving photographs and memorabilia in New Orleans to preserve family histories. The department is currently collaborating with photographer, educator and SVA alum Kathy Shorr (see page 3) on the project SHOT: We the People, an online platform collating the stories and images of Americans affected by gun violence. For its anniversary, the department will host a number of presentations, panels and discussions celebrating its distinguished alumni who are involved in using their imagery for the better social good. These initiatives mirror Traub’s belief that rapidly proliferating technologies, while necessarily inviting concerns about privacy and ethics, empower millions of people to raise their voices and participate in social change. Despite the potential pitfalls, Traub says, “Technology allows

the little person to speak for the many, and perhaps many to react to the one.” As photography becomes increasingly democratized, the role of lens-based arts continues to expand beyond the gallery walls into the social and political sphere. Contemporary technologies have the potential to break down hierarchies, placing power in the hands of the people. And that, according to Traub, is the future of images. [Keren Moscovitch]

Top left: Anders Jones (MFA 2017), Ota Benga Tryptic Above: Fengli Yuan (MFA 2016), The Chinese Dream I (top) and II (bottom)


Fall 2018

Continuing Education F E AT U R E D

COURSE OFFERINGS

ñ EXPLORE OUR ˜

G R AD UAT E PROGRAMS MFA Art Practice Art Writing

Art and Activism

Computer Arts Design Design for Social Innovation Fine Arts Illustration as Visual Essay Interaction Design DRAWING AS SOCIAL PRACTICE VSC-2316-A In this course we will examine the ways

Products of Design

in which drawing can probe identities,

Social Documentary Film

expose power structures and reimagine a relationship to a place.

DIRTY GRAPHICS

POW! The Art of Politics: Creating Art that Packs a Punch OLC-2208-A Satiric artist and illustrator Steve Brodner guides you on a lecture/workshop adventure through the world of the strongest art in illustration. The greatest of all time will be discussed. Art will be created. And the greatest in you is encouraged.

Photography, Video and Related Media

FIC-2865-A Take your art to the streets using silkscreen printing to create guerrilla art, posters and other work focused on art and activism.

For more information about these courses please visit:

sva.edu/ce/artandactivism

DIGNITY FOR ALL STUDENTS ACT (DASA) TRAINING

STREET

AEC-4 432-A

In this course we will discuss camera

This workshop will address the social

technique, lighting, composition and

patterns of harassment, bullying and

perspective, and grow our understanding

discrimination, marginalization, and

of what street photography can be.

Visual Narrative

MA Critical Theory and the Arts Curatorial Practice Design Research, Writing and Criticism

MAT Art Education

MPS Art Therapy Branding Digital Photography Directing Fashion Photography

PHC-2157-A Visit sva.edu/grad for more information about our graduate program offerings

microaggressions. Successful completion for certification/licensure under the

TRANSMEDIA

PHOTOGRAPHY, PERFORMANCE AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Dignity for All Students Act (DASA).

FIC-2422-A

PHC-2 509-A

This course will allow you to explore and

This course will take the organizing

invent by embracing all media, and will

principles of social media as a starting point

encourage anyone who desires a nurturing

for developing a series of new photographic

of this workshop fulfills training required

critical discourse and consciousness of

and performative works that integrate skills

themselves in relation to what is happening

CREATING A DOCUMENTARY FILM

in the visual arts today.

CFC-3027-A

in various areas of photography.

Emphasizing storytelling and character development, this comprehensive course will give students the necessary tools to produce a truly compelling documentary.

EMERGENT ART WORLDS: EXPLORING POWER AND POLITICS IN CONTEMPORARY ART

LATINO MEDIA IN THE UNITED STATES: A SOCIAL HISTORY RISO PRINTING: ZINES AND SMALL PUBLISHING

VCC-2423-A

OLC-2743-A

This introduction to the shifting Latino cul-

ART THERAPY AS A CAREER

This course uses New York City as a lens for

VNC-2239-A

ture will address such topics as

PDC-1026-A

understanding power and politics in the

In this course students will be given a

bilingualism, border cultures, Hispanic

This course will provide an overview of

contemporary art world. You will be intro-

rigorous introduction to RISO Printing

marketing and media, Latinos in film and

careers in the field of art therapy.

duced to contemporary artists who address

and how to use it effectively as a tool

advertising, as well as the widespread

Sessions will consist of lectures as

power and politics in multiple art worlds.

for self-publishing.

Latino interaction with social media.

well as art experientials.

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ART IN NEW YORK CITY

Sarah Lucas, Edith, 2015, plaster, cigarette, toilet, table, 54 3/4 x 73 5/8 x 38 ¾". © Sarah Lucas. Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London.

Top: Sarah Lucas, Self-portrait with Fried Eggs, 1996, C-print, 60 x 48". © Sarah Lucas. Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London. Opposite: Andy Warhol (1928-1987), Green Coca-Cola Bottles, 1962, acrylic, screenprint, graphite pencil on canvas, 82 3/4 x 57 1/8”. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchased with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art. © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Fall

A

Museum Preview

ndy Warhol exhibitions are ubiquitous, so what’s so special about the Whitney Museum’s upcoming retrospective? For starters, it’s actually the first comprehensive retrospective organized by an American institution since 1989. Second, the interdisciplinary range of Warhol’s output—including commercial illustration, experimental film, paint­ing, and more— should attract creative people of all types. Moreover, there’s new research that updates our understanding of the Pop Art icon and—as the Whitney puts it— “introduces a Warhol for the 21st century.” “Andy Warhol, From A to B and Back Again” opens at the Whitney Museum on November 12, 2018. Sarah Lucas, the mastermind behind exhibitions like “Penis Nailed to a Board,” and the subject of the BBC’s Two Melons and a Stinking Fish, takes over three floors of the New Museum this fall. After launching her career with the YBA generation

10 • CONTINUED / FALL 2018

30 years ago, Lucas continues to appropriate commonplace objects in a practice exploring sex, gender and feminism. The catalog will include an essay, among others, by Linda Nochlin, the late art historian and critic known for her article, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” “Sarah Lucas: Au Naturel” opens at the New Museum on September 26, 2018. Charles White’s “images of dignity” combine his exceptional drawing and painting virtuosity with his vision of African American inclusion. A veteran of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) legacy and a longtime teacher, White’s socially committed practice has influenced giants like David Hammons and Kerry James Marshall. Since White’s last major museum survey over 30 years ago, American race relations have seen revolutionary changes. What will Charles White’s work mean to audiences who have seen the Obama Presidency and Black Lives Matter activism?

“Charles White: A Retrospective” opens at the Museum of Modern Art on October 7, 2018. “QI 2018,” the Queens International, returns for its eighth iteration. Through an open call, the biennial exhibition will focus on “the inherently diverse cultural output of Queens.” The exhibition will expand beyond the walls of the Queens Museum, through a partnership with the Queens Library. “QI 2018” opens at the Queens Museum on October 7, 2018. [Michael Bilsborough]

@

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STUDENT PROFILE

Portrait of the Assembly team during a public family photo day. Photo credit: Tiffany Smith.

Redefining Incarceration Through the Arts

M

by Stephanie McGovern

FA Photography, Video and Related Media alumnus Tiffany Smith is utilizing art to explore notions of displacement and identity through collaborative experience. One of Smith’s latest projects takes place at Recess Assembly, an artist-led program designed as an alternative to incarceration for teens and young adults who are caught up in the justice system. Please tell us about your latest project with Recess Assembly. I worked with the Recess Assembly team to lead a series of photo and video workshops for the court-mandated section of the residency. These sessions focused on technical training and creating empowered portraits, which manifested into a working photo studio. For the culminating exhibit “A Moment in the Sun,” I am presenting a series of installations: active photo booth areas, images captured during my time working in the space, a meditation corner and a staged Florida Room that prominently displays images captured by and of the Assembly team. Collectively it is a reflection of a

safe and self-appointed “home” space where participants can feel supported and encouraged to tell their own stories in their own voice. Has the experience of working with youth differed from past collaborative projects? I worked with the youth more directly and over a longer period of time than I have in the past. I was able to get to know them more personally and develop closer bonds. I also feel that the way that Recess Assembly respects, employs and empowers the participants is unique and highly effective. They are treated as young developing artists who are given the opportunity to earn income and gain experience in the business of art production, which is particularly revelatory for the age and demographic they target. How is representation an act of activism? The impact for a young person seeing someone who looks like them, who understands the circumstances they’ve come from, and exemplifies how to successfully sustain a career as an artist is immeasurable and increasingly necessary.

Top: Tiffany Smith’s Staged Florida Room of Recess Assembly. Photo Credit: Cary Whittier. Left: A family photo wall showcasing Recess Assembly members. Photo Credit: Cary Whittier. Above: Recess Assembly zine compiled during Smith’s occupancy. Photo Credit: Cary Whittier.

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FALL 2018 D I V I S I O N O F C O N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N

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ContinuEd Fall 2018: Art and Activism  

The Division of Continuing Education at The School of Visual Arts

ContinuEd Fall 2018: Art and Activism  

The Division of Continuing Education at The School of Visual Arts

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