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WOOD

International

the guide to applications, sources and trends

Buyers Guide

Exotic Accents from Around the World IW: A Decade of Innovation Plywood is Nordic Cool Trends in Outdoor Living


Veneers • Platforms • Panels

Over Sixty-Five Years of International Trade in Rotary Veneers

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P. O . B o x 4 8 7 6 • J a c k s o n , M S

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Tradelink I m p o r t

&

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Direct Importers and Manufacturers of Hardwood Flooring from South America

Direct Importers of Hardwood Decking from South America

Imported Lumber & Dimension from South America, West Africa and S.E. Asia

American Hardwoods for Export and Domestic Sale in Rough Sawn Lumber and Dimension

w w w. t r a d e l i n k- g r o u p . c o m TradeLink USA

Tel:

TradeLink CANADA

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4180 Morris Drive #2

Greensboro, NC 27406

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C A PA B L E .

R E L IA B L E .

DS. L I B E RT Y WO O

SINCE 1985

LIBERTY WOODS INTERNATIONAL

VALUE LEADER

THE IN HARDWOOD PLYWOOD PRODUCTS Over the past 27 years Liberty Woods has established itself as the industry leading, reliable source for imported hardwood plywood. Our expertly trained overseas inspection team ensures our customers receive high quality products at competitive prices.

As the only plywood importer to charter exclusive vessels, Liberty Woods has a distinct advantage over our competition when it comes to providing on-time delivery and inventory for the spot market.

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WOOD

International

the guide to applications, sources and trends

30 I W PA O f f i c e r s President:

Cindy Newman Newman Lumber Company Vice-President

Chris Connelly Wood Brokerage International Secretary/Treasurer

Craig Forester Rex Lumber Company Immediate Past President

Warren Spitz UCS Forest Group I W PA S ta f f

Cindy Squires, Esq. Executive Director

Felicia Johnson, MA Editor, International Wood Manager, Membership, Marketing, & Administration

Buyers Guide IWPA’s Membership Directory highlights the leading suppliers to the North American market of hardwood and softwood lumber, flooring, decking, veneer, plywood and other composite wood products. This one-stop resource guide also provides contact information for ports, shipping companies, third-party certifiers and others that are helping to advance international trade in wood products.

Bedford Falls Communications jaufderhaar@surfaceandpanel.com Graphic Design

Karen Leno KML Design, Inc. kmldesign@mchsi.com Contributing Writers

leahwheeler@cox.net

George Butters georgeb@newmediadrive.com

Gordon Clough UCS Forest Group gclough@ucsforestgroup.com

On the Cover: Carol Cozen of Cozen Architecture + Lighting customized and upgraded this Malibu residence, using exotic woods. The unusual combinations of media, intriguing details, and novel layering techniques make this sophisticated, comfortable and stunningly beautiful home a real standout. photogr aphy by Annik a Lundval

international wood products association 4214 King Street, West Alexandria, VA 22302

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A Decade of Innovation A look back at ten

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Tropical Forests: Sustaining Communities Around the World International Wood talks to

International Wood Products Association. years of International Wood through a decade of magazine covers.

14

Bob Johnston about the work of the Tropical Forest Foundation (TFF).

18

Janka Hardness Scale of Exotic Woods The Janka hardness scale is the go to resource when determining the hardness of wood.

22

The Ross Residence: Exotic Accents from Around the World A variety of exotic wood

34

species co-mingles effortlessly with an array of other materials in this spectacular Malibu residence.

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Aesthetic Design The Adobe Headquarters in

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Nordic Cool When the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. played host to a

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The Warmth of Wood Makes Winter Fun Patkua Architects design and build a

Lehi, Utah is a new LEED Gold Eco-office building featuring an acoustic ceiling made of Red Grandis ®. Nordic cultural festival, two of the exhibits converged around a retrospective of the life and work of Alfred Nobel and a mesmerizing exhibit of the wonders of plywood. set of unique skating shelters in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Trends in Outdoor Living Consumers often turn to exotic woods to create outdoor amenities that are durable, low-maintenance, elegant and tasteful.

Past and Present: Historical Techniques in Modern Designs Steven Sander discusses his stick bench project.

Publisher

John Aufderhaar

Leah Wheeler

From the Forest A message from the

36

Manager, Government & Public Affairs

Please direct all advertising, circulation, or subscription questions to: IWPA, 4214 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22302 USA. PH: 703/820-6696 www.iwpawood.org.

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52 34

Ashley Amidon

Copyright© 2013 International Wood is produced annually by the International Wood Products Association (IWPA) and its CURE (Conservation, Utilization, Reforestation, Education) program. CURE is the educational outreach program of IWPA.

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Zebrano: Wood on the Wild Side Boraam Industries ventures upmarket

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If Chairs Could Talk Designer Teshia Treuhaft develops her “curve chairs,”

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Modern Architecture with a Humanistic Touch Stephen Chung, host of the

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The Miniot Collection Makes Apple Shine

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Harding Pens: Exotic Innovation

with the addition of the Zebra Series, a furniture collection featuring zebrano or zebrawood veneer on an MDF base. created by vacuum forming Luann plywood. upcoming PBS television program, Cool Spaces, uses wood and other natural materials to impart warmth in his contemporary designs. Miniot BV, an independent woodworking shop located in Schagen, Netherlands, fabricates a line of wooden cases, covers and stands for mobile Apple devices.

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Brad Harding creates ballpoints, roller balls, fountain pens and touch screen styluses in a variety of woods, including exotic species.

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Advertisers Index

PH: 703-820-6696 fax: 703-820-8550 www.iwpawood.org

IWPA/CURE would like to thank the advertisers on page 80 who provided the financial support that made this publication possible. In addition, we thank the following organizations for their support and cooperation, insight and energy, in producing and distributing this annual publication: The American Home Furnishings Alliance, Architectural Woodwork Institute, ARE-Association for Retail Environments, Moulding & Millwork Producers Association, National Marine Manufacturers Association, National Wood Flooring Association, North American Wholesale Lumber Association and the Sarawak Timber Associationn.


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European Beech-The Chameleonic Hardwood European Beech is as versatile as a Chameleon - with a light natural look, tight, fine grain and uniform color it takes a variety of finishes well, emulating a number of different hardwoods with a simple change in stain color.

About the closest thing to a perfect close-grain temperate hardwood Availability: North American Sales Office Toll Free: 866-432-0699 U.S. 503-452-5800

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European Beech is the most available and sustainable hardwood in the world.

Yield & Throughput: European Beech has fewer defects-wider widths and will increase both yield and throughput. Sustainability: Europe’s forests are increasing at a higher rate than any other forests. Both PEFC & FSC certified. Machinability:

Although very hard and strong, European Beech machines 96% perfect parts and holds a fine edge better.

Affordability:

European Beech will provide a lower output cost in most products.

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Pollmeier Value Added German Beech™ is your readily available, sustainable, durable and easy-to-machine hardwood that is-best of all-surprisingly affordable.


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European Beech – themost mostavailable available European Beech – the and sustainable temperate hardwood and sustainable temperate hardwood on the planet. on the planet.

One Wood So Many Possibilites One Wood So Many Possibilites


From the Forest

W

elcome to the tenth edition of

International Wood. This edition showcases new and exciting

uses of exotic woods in a variety of applications. This year’s magazine features articles on exotic woods in hi-tech applications, innovative uses for traditional materials like plywood, and of course, stunning residential applications. IW also includes the must-have Buyers Guide for the industry. This sourcing guide shows the network of IWPA members around the world that can help you source the best in imported woods. As the President of IWPA, it gives me great pleasure to present this tenth edition of IW. Over 15,000 subscribers receive this magazine, and no matter if you are an architect, an interior designer, a member of the industry, or a consumer, there will be something for you in these pages. From the Adobe Headquarters to zebrawood pens, from big buildings to innovative iPadcases, IW represents the spectrum of exotic wood species and sizes. This edition continues the tradition of excellence started ten years ago – you can look at our retrospective of cover art on pages 12 and 13. IWPA welcomes a new Editor and a new Executive Director with this edition as well, and I know you will enjoy the projects they have selected. It is my hope that you will find International Wood a resource like I do. The articles show everything our products are capable of, and our Buyer’s Guide will help you create similar masterpieces of your own. To learn more about IWPA and the wood we import, I would like to invite you to join us in St. Petersburg, Florida from March 5-7th, 2014 for our annual convention. We’re planning a full and engaging program and you will be hearing from architects, designers, economists, and many other leaders in the industry. In addition, you’ll be able to enjoy the warmth and fun of Florida while learning how to grow your business. To learn more visit iwpawood.org. Sincerely,

N

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u

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e

s

P

a

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e

• Anegre (Aningeria spp.)

• Ayous (Triplochiton scleroxylon) • Balau, Red (Shorea spp.) • Beech (Fagus sylvatica)

• Birch, Baltic (Betula spp.)

• Birch, Karlian (Betula spp.)

• Bloodwood (Brosimum paraense)

• Bocote (Cordia spp.)

• Brazilian cherry/jatoba (Hymenaea courbaril) • Bubinga (Guibourtia spp.)

• Cedar, Spanish (Cedrela odorata)

• Cocobolo (Dalbergia retusa) • Cumaru (Dipteryx odorata)

• Doussie (Afzelia spp)

• Ebony (Diospyros spp.)

• Elm, Carpathian (Ulmus spp.)

• Garapa (Apuleia leiocarpa)

• Ipé (Tabebuia spp.)

• Iroko (Chlorophora excelsa)

• Khaya/African mahogany (Khaya spp.)

• Limba, Black (Terminalia superba)

• Macassar ebony (Diospyros spp.)

• Mahogany, Honduran (Swietenia macrophylla)

• Maple (Acer spp.)

• Massaranduba/Brazilian redwood (Manilkara spp.)

• Meranti/lauan (Shorea spp.)

• Obeche (Triplochiton scleroxvlon)

• Okoume (Aucoumea klaineana)

• Padauk (Pterocarpus spp.)

• Paldao (Dracontomelon dao) • Pau ferro (Machaerium spp.)

• Primavera (Cybistax donnell-smithii) • Purpleheart (Peltogyne spp.) • Rosewood (Dalbergia spp.)

• Rosewood, Madagascar (Dalbergia baroni)

• Santos rosewood/pau ferro (Machaerium spp.)

• Sapele (Entandrophragma spp.) • Spruce, Sitka (Picea sitchensis)

• Teak (Tectona grandis) • Walnut (Juglans spp.)

• Wenge (Millettia laurentii)

• Zebrawood (Microberlinia brazzavillensis) References:

– USDA Forest Products Lab: www.fpl.fs.fed.us/search/commonname_request.php – The Wood Database: www.wood-database.com 10

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The forests provide a natural, wondrous and renewable palette of wood species in an amazing multitude of colors and grain patterns. There are literally thousands of species globally that spark the imagination of our readers. Each edition of International Wood provides insight into the wide range of projects that successfully incorporate imported species. We have made every effort to identify the species referenced in this edition by its more common name and Genus species below. Clearly communicate your needs with a U.S. importer, manufacturer or supplier who can best assist you in locating the most appropriate species for your project.

• Shedua (Guibourtia ehie)

Cindy Newman • IWPA President 2013-2014 • Newman Lumber Company

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Tropical & European Hardwoods Producer and Exporter Sustainability

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Romea is a family company with over 300 years of history in the processing of timber, our timber history has led us build the right know-how to help our customers find the right timber and solution for their projects, building a long lasting relationship and mutual trust with them. We are specialized in delivering full service and we are flexible to respond to any custom-made enquiry. Our main products are: African Mahogany (Khaya), Afrormosia, Black/White Limba, Bubinga, Chestnut, Doussie, Edinam, Sycamore Maple, European White Oak, Iroko, Kosipo, Shedua, Padouk, Pearwood, Sapele, Sipo, Teak Burma, Wenge, Venetian Walnut, Zebrawood, European Beechwood, and much more.

ROMEA LEGNAMI S.p.A. Italy-30034 Gambarare di Mira (Venice)- S.S. 309 Romea – Ang. Via Onari – Ph. +39 041 562 9811 – Fax +39 041 562 9810 www.romealegnami.com – info@romealegnami.com

For any enquiry please contact our Sales Team at +39 041 562 9816


2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

A Decade of

Innovation

H

ow do you take an industry directory and turn it into an inspiration for unique ways to build and design with imported woods? That was the challenge the International Wood Products Association undertook in 2004, and the result was International Wood magazine, originally titled “Imported Wood.�

2004

International Wood was led in no small part by its editor and creator, Annette Ferri. After 22 years IWPA says goodbye to Annette with this edition. We thought it would be fitting to take a look back at the ten years of International Wood through a decade of magazine covers.

2005

2006 IW is an award-winning annual publication revealing real-life applications of imported lumber, plywood, veneer, flooring and decking from the initial specification to the finished project.

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i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

2007


International Wood has been honored as

2012

one of the best association magazines in America by Associations Trends magazine. International Wood is the recipient of the following awards: • Gold Award for Design, Production and Printing (Association Trends) • Gold, Silver and Bronze Awards for Annual Publication Produced by an Association (Association Trends) • Two Silver Awards for Graphic Design of an Association Piece (Association Trends) • Premiere issue nominated for the Forest Leadership Communication Award

The opportunities to

2013

incorporate exotic wood species in a variety of creative projects are limitless.

2011

If you know of an eye-catching, design-forward installation, please contact us at info@iwpawood.org. You might see it highlighted in a future issue.

2008 2010

2009

i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

13


Q It seems clear what TFF stands for, but can you talk a little bit about what the Foundation actually does on the ground? Johnston: TFF has established on-theground training schools in four countries: Guyana, Brazil, Gabon, and Indonesia. Each of these training centers offers classroom as well as on-the-ground training in sustainable forestry, specifically through Reduced Impact Logging (RIL).

Q Can you explain Reduced Impact Logging (RIL) a little more? How specifically does it contribute to sustainable forestry?

Sustaining Communities

around the world

B

ob Johnston does not seem an excitable man at first glance, but ask him about sustainable forestry, and he lights up. It’s clear what his passion is, and although we are sitting in a dimly lit conference room, you can almost see the forest when he talks about the work of the Tropical Forest Foundation (TFF).

“TFF was created to combine science, environmental groups, and industry to try to find common cause. We all realized there was a need to find ways to sustain tropical forestry.”

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“TFF was created to combine science, environmental groups, and industry to try to find common cause. We all realized there was a need to find ways to sustain tropical forestry,” he says. Representatives from those groups first came together at a workshop co-sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution and IWPA. He explains how since TFF’s founding in 1990, it has helped bridge the lines between environmental activists and industry, uniting them in the need to work with communities around the world to improve tropical forest management. Degradation in tropical forests around the world is historically difficult to quantify. Recent research from the Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) has shown the primary drivers of deforestation are subsistence and commercial agriculture. Particularly where subsistence farming is concerned, the community surrounding the forest is integral in managing the forest resources. Increasingly, there has been an emphasis on the economic value of tropical forests for the forest-dependent communities that surround them. As Johnston tells me repeatedly over the course of our interview, “In order to remain valuable as forests, there has to be a sustainable approach to forestry.” Johnston believes that TFF is slowly, but surely, getting that message out.

There are quite a few tenets of the program, so I won’t go into them all here – you can read our website for more information. Some of the more easily recognizable aspects are the emphasis on legal documentation, establishing a good pre-harvest inventory, and of course, the training of the workforce, which is where our centers come in.

Q So this really is a comprehensive approach that TFF takes? It isn’t just certification or just the social aspects: it’s everything. Johnston: That’s absolutely true. TFF strongly believes that logging can be a conservation process. Sustainable forestry is a conservation practice. When we practice sustainable forestry, and a community adopts those practices, that stops deforestation in its tracks.

Photos courtesy of the Tropical Forest Foundation ( TFF)

Tropical Forests

Johnston: RIL works to minimize the impact logging has on the environment (including wildlife), as well as minimizing the damage to potential future crop trees. There is also an emphasis placed on the regeneration of the forest. It’s really an inclusive approach.


Q Why the emphasis on the community training programs? Why not reach out to the businesses and let them do the training? Johnston: We do reach out to companies in the areas where our training schools operate – many businesses have put their employees through our training programs. But we are also focused on the impact logging has on local communities, and vice versa. Both of those factors need to be considered. You can’t just focus on big companies and forget about the people that live in or near these forests. It’s really all connected. Building sustainable forestry businesses builds sustainable jobs.

Q Why do businesses choose to invest in

In the long term, the costs really are lower. RIL appeals to good business sense and sound practices. That’s how we are able to get so many companies to practice RIL. They see how it helps their bottom line, and they understand that you have to invest in your own supply chain.

Q This sounds like a great narrative.

the Reduced Impact Logging approach?

What are the challenges in getting TFF’s story out there?

Johnston: Logging has changed significantly from the way it used to be done. It isn’t just logging then moving on from the area anymore. Many companies now realize that the long term income is better when you reduce operating costs by logging sustainably. Yes, there is more upfront investment but the dividends over time are a greater payoff.

Johnston: Unfortunately, it is mostly a lack of funds. We just don’t have the resources to do the kind of promotional activities that are necessary to affect a consumer and specifier shift in perspective. We are still fighting against the idea that not logging these forests will save them. It won’t. It will destroy them, because when they don’t have

value as forests, they are cut down and the land is converted to other purposes. Environmental groups, governments, and foundations oriented toward environmental projects all recognize this. Yet many in the architect and design community and commercial building industry are unaware of this important information.

The Tropical Forest Foundation advances environmental stewardship, economic prosperity, and social responsibility through sustainable forest management. Learn more and become a member at www.TropicalForestFoundation.org.

i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

15


Q How does TTF get the message out to the

Go from Survival Mode to Growth Mode: Join IWPA Now Look what our members have to say about IWPA. “We had an issue at the port: a simple miscommunication between government agencies. This miscommunication would have had disastrous results for Holland Southwest by most probably losing the customer and an immediate loss of profits exceeding $100,000.00 on this shipment. IWPA stepped in, and with their counsel and the help of our local Congressman, our staff was able to get the issue solved promptly, preventing a disastrous outcome.  IWPA doesn’t just work on remote issues of advocacy in Washington, DC: they work on bottom-line business issues.” Bob Gillebaard, Chairman Holland Southwest International

“IWPA membership exposes Georgia’s ports to a wealth of opportunities, industry exposure and the capability to network with the chief decision-makers driving port selection within the wood products industry. For anyone wanting to gauge the pulse of the wood products industry, it’s one of the best investments you’ll ever make.” Mark Troughton, Global Accounts Executive Georgia Ports Authority

“Over the years, I have had to call on IWPA with questions about new regulations and pending legislation that could impact our company. Their answers helped us grow our business, even in these tough times.”  Cynthia N. Newman, vice president Newman Lumber Company

Now find out what IWPA can do for you. Contact Felicia Johnson 703-820-6696 felicia@iwpawood.org

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i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

users of wood about the benefits of RIL? Johnston: I spend a lot of time on the road. I’m constantly speaking at and attending conferences and international meetings, and visiting universities, giving speeches around the world and visiting our training centers. To succeed in changing the way people think about forests, we have to be an active part of the dialogue surrounding sustainability, which is a constantly evolving debate. We’ve also just finished developing an education unit for architects and designers. It’s an educational program that talks not only about TFF but also about forestry in general. We know that once architects and designers can understand the precautions companies take to log sustainably and preserve the forests, they will feel more comfortable using wood. We want specifiers to understand how many communities around the world depend on sustainable logging. If an architect or designer cares about these people, then they will specify tropical wood from a reputable supplier. We also wanted to counter the idea that specific certified wood is the only type of acceptable wood. Less than 10% of the forests are certified by any of the various programs. If an architect or designer is buying from reputable companies they don’t necessarily have to buy certified. Good companies are buying legal wood from well managed sources. Specifiers can make life easier for their suppliers by not always specifying certified wood.

Q Does TFF offer a certification scheme? Johnston: We do. The TFF RIL Verified standard encompasses a number of the things we’ve talked about. The basis of our program is legal compliance. Then we add chain of custody, and finally sustainable practices. It’s like a pyramid – each step builds on the last. We help forest managers work towards any certification standard they wish to meet – or just to improve their practices. Our overall goal is not to force companies into certifying if they don’t feel it is right for their business model. TFF believes that sustainable forestry practices should be the ultimate end game.

Q Is anyone else doing what you do? Johnston: No. Everyone just works with us! For more information about the Tropical Forest Foundation or their Reduced Impact Logging program, you can visit their website at: http:// www.tropicalforestfoundation.org. IW


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Janka Hardness Each exotic wood has a different durability level to distinguish it from other species. When considering using exotic woods, learn about their unique traits in order to pick the optimal wood for the job.

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hen it comes to determining the hardness of wood, the Janka hardness scale is the go to resource. The Janka rating is determined by embedding a .444 inch steel ball to half of its diameter into a sample of wood. This method leaves an indent in the wood which displays the dent and wear of the specific wood species. The higher the scale, the harder the wood will be. The Janka hardness scale is the standard for determining what the optimal applications of specific woods’ characteristics are. Each exotic wood has a different durability level to distinguish it from other species. When considering using exotic woods, learn about their unique traits in order to pick the optimal wood for the job. African Blackwood (Dalbergia melonoxylon)

With a fine and even texture, African Blackwood is known as one of the hardest and densest woods in the world. The wood is difficult to work under machine tools, as it often blunts the cutters. However, it is considered the finest wood species for turning. The color is often completely black, although sometimes it can be slightly lighter with a dark brown and purple hue. The thin and pale yellow sapwood is visibly divided from the dark heartwood. Janka rating of 3670. Cumaru (Dipteryx odorata)

E X O T IC H A R D W O O D S

Teak, Afromosia, Cumaru, Fireland Cherry (Lenga), Garapa, Ipé, Jatoba, Kempas, Mahogany, Merbau, Sapele, Tigerwood C E R T IF IE D H A R D W O O D S

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With an excellent durability level, Cumaru is known for being strong, stiff and hard. The tree origin (from South America) comes from the Fabaceae family which contains seeds called tonka beans. The fragrance of the seeds consists of vanilla, almonds, cinnamon and clove. The Heartwood appearance consists of a medium to dark brown color. Oftentimes, there is reddish and a purplish hue along with pieces of yellowish or greenish streaks. Janka rating of 3330. cumaru was used on the exterior of this LEED for Homes Platinum level residence in the state of Kansas. Image courtesy of Cilek.


Scale of Exotic Woods Macassar Ebony (Diospyros celebica)

The name of the species comes from the Indonesian port-city of Makassar. Macassar Ebony is considered one of the most expensive timber woods in the world. Due to its high density, the wood can be rather difficult to work with. However, the texture of the wood is very fine with small pores. The light reddish, brown and black stripes resemble the appearance of Zebrawood. The rot resistance of Macassar’s heartwood is very resistant to fungi decay and reported to be susceptible to insect attack. Janka rating of 3220.

Macassar ebony veneer graces the door face and top of Earl Kelly’s “Africa Cabinet.”

Janka Hardness Rating [for species discussed in this article]

Cocobolo (Dalbergia retusa)

This tropical hardwood originates from Central America where only the heartwood is used. The rich texture has colors ranging from yellow, orange, red to shades of brown with purple and black streaks. The high level of oil causes difficulties in gluing. This exotic wood species is commonly used in musical instruments, fine furniture, turning and other small objects. Janka rating of 2960. Jatoba (Hymenaea courbaril)

Also known as “Brazilian Cherry”, Jatoba is a popular species for luxurious flooring in residential locations. The beautiful colors of light orange brown, reddish brown and grayish streaks make the finishing exquisitely magnificent. The interlocked grain has a good natural luster with a medium coarse texture. The durability level is high, with a good resistance to rot, termite, and other insects. Although considered difficult to work with for its density and hardness, Jatoba glues, stains, and finishes well. Janka rating of 2690.

jatoba flooring shines in the crisp, minimal interior detailing of the Harkavy House project.

The Janka rating is determined by embedding a .444 inch steel ball to half of its diameter into a sample of wood. This method leaves an indent in the wood which displays the dent and wear of the specific wood species. The higher the scale, the harder the wood will be. i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

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Pink Ivory (Berchemia zeyheri)

Zebrawood (Microberlinia brazzavillensis)

The magnificent durability of pink ivory has demonstrated resistance to decay and weathering. Its’ texture is fine with a tight and uniform grain. The beautiful colors of this species have vibrant pink shades, which include pale brownish pink, almost bright neon pink and a deep red. This tree, native to South-East Africa is commonly used in carving products, veneers, knife handles and other wood turning objects. Janka rating of 2540.

The black and brownish streaks in Zebrawood resemble the stripes of a zebra. The open pores in the grain are fairly coarse, wavy and have an interlocked texture. Its durability is strong, and has excellent rot resistance against insects. Zebrawood is popular in veneering and is mostly used in tool handles, furniture, boat building and skis. Janka rating of 2097. Lyptus® (Eucalyptus urograndis)

Plantation grown in Brazil, the wood is very hard, heavy and strong. The color appearance of light salmon pink to dark red is similar to Black Cherry and Honduran Mahogany. Lyptus has a fast growing rate which causes the cost to be relatively reasonable. The texture has small to medium sized open pores. The grain is straight and even with few or abnormal grain patterns. Janka rating 1420. Sapele (Entandrophragma cylindricum)

PurpleHeart is the wood used in this pergola at Center City Park in Greensboroo NC.

Purple Heart (Peltogyne spp.)

The heartwood of Purple Heart is a dull grayish color. UV exposure on the wood turns the color to a deep eggplant purple and the grain is straight with a fine texture. The workability level has unique challenges: if the cutter speed is too high, Purple Heart will release a gummy resin that will clog tools or complicate the machine process. The most common uses are furniture, flooring, turning or heavy construction. Sometimes called “Amaranth”, this Latin American wood species is known for being very water resistant. Janka rating 2390.

This African wood species has many grain patterns including pommele, quilted, mottle wavy, beeswing, and fiddleback. The grain is interlocked and sometimes wavy, and the heartwood is medium to dark, reddish brown or a purplish brown color. Although difficult to work in machinery operations, the quartersawn appearance displays the enhancement of its’ ribbon patterns. It is commonly used for veneering, flooring, musical instruments and turned objects. Occasionally, Sapele can be substituted as Genuine Mahogany and can be referred to as “Sapele Mahogany” since it comes from the mahogany family. Janka rating of 1410. IW Resource: “Wood Database – By Woodworkers, For Woodworkers.” www.wood-database.com Images courtesy of Eric Meier

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The Ross Residence

Exotic Accents from

photogr aphy by Annik a Lundval

Around theWorld

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Macassar ebony, jatoba, eucalyptus, pearwood, American cherry, zebrawood, polished stained concrete, curly ash, syndecrete, stainless steel and an array of other materials co-mingle effortlessly in this spectacular Malibu residence. It is the unusual combinations of media, intriguing details, and novel layering techniques that make this sophisticated, comfortable and stunningly beautiful home a real standout. When Rick and Robyn Ross moved into their home in 2000, they undertook an aggressive renovation to convert it into a family-friendly dwelling that reflected their taste and accommodated their lifestyle, interests, and activities. Both Rick and Robyn are savvy, sophisticated professionals. Confident in their tastes, they specified that they wanted a warm, modern, and functional environment in which to live, entertain and raise their three children. Robyn frequently hosts fundraisers and special events for charitable organizations in her work as a philanthropist. Rick, a real estate investor, sought a place to work and to indulge his passion for astronomy. With all this in mind, they engaged Carol Cozen of Cozen Architecture + Lighting to customize, update and upgrade the residence and expand its interior footprint to include a gym, playroom, arts and crafts deck, office and an observatory. Today, guests step across the Ross’ threshold into an entryway carpeted with stained concrete that is inlaid with tongues of jatoba, also known as Brazilian cherry wood. It’s an unusual and striking combination, one of many such juxtapositions throughout the home.


The jatoba wood fingers provide an eye-catching accent and serve as an introduction to some of the design themes throughout the house. “It’s like the overture to a symphony,” says Rick. “It welcomes people to the house and introduces them to what’s coming.” The entryway opens into a hall that is paved with solid jatoba, and, further on, there is a jatoba stair runner. Not only is Brazilian cherry hard, strong and tough enough to stand up to wear and tear, its rich, golden brown hue and beautiful grain imparts a soft warmth to the surrounding area. Macassar ebony is jet black with brown or brownish-gray streaks, and, when polished, it gleams brilliantly. The Macassar ebony makes a bold statement in the living room, where a curved macassar ebony wall featuring a carved handrail with lighting embedded in a recessed pocket gives off a spectacular glow. In the bar area, macassar ebony is paired with American cherry wood in a distinctive cabinet application, and used as facing on the drawers. A set of Donghia nesting tables adds a touch of zebrawood to the living room. Zebrawood has a distinctive striped appearance, with brown streaks pulsing through straw-colored wood. The tables are zebrawood, glass and soapstone in a layered configuration. In the home’s master bedroom, a floating bedwall/ headboard offers an interesting textural contrast employing pearwood and robusta eucalyptus. Pearwood is a light, pinkish, very fine grained, hard wood with a creamy texture, while robusta eucalyptus is moderately coarse textured with an interlocking grain. In tone, eucalyptus is light red to reddish brown and it darkens over time to a rich reddish brown. The master bedroom also features an undulating, wave-like ceiling made of cedar tongue and groove. Other applications throughout the home involving the use of woods, both exotic and domestic, include multi-colored aggregates of glass tile, copper, teak and limestone in the master bathroom, and curly ash bookshelves in the upstairs office. Rick’s observatory is lined with birds eye maple shelving.

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The innovative palette of materials of unusual pairings and distinctive stylings found in the Ross residence are the result of close collaboration between the architect and the homeowners. Rick and Robyn worked closely with Carol during the design and specification phases, looking at many wood and material combinations. “There are six, seven or eight different woods throughout the house, and they all blend together in interesting ways,” notes Rick. “We spent many hours putting samples of the woods together to see how they played off each other, how they contrasted. It was a fascinating process. After nine years, we still love it. It’s functional, yet striking and beautiful.” “Touches of wood add warmth and flair to a home, and bring nature into the viewplane,” Carol adds. As an architect, she says it’s important to work closely with owners, to understand their needs and incorporate their ideas, their dreams. “Rick and Robyn wanted a timeless home that is sophisticated, yet warm and welcoming. My goal was not to create my masterpiece, but to create their masterpiece.” IW Carol Cozen Cozen Architects + Lighting carol@cozenarchitecture.com 310.373.7001 24

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from around the globe. – All material quality inspected by our highly skilled on site staff. – Ike Trading can cover your Import panel requirements from Coast to Coast with prompt product available from warehouses or direct delivery to your door.

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White Oak: China, Vietnam Maple : China, Vietnam Photos courtesy of adobe

Cherry: China, Vietnam White Ash : China, Vietnam Walnut: China, Vietnam Alder : China, Vietnam Poplar : China Euro Beech : China, Vietnam UV Birch & Maple : China HPL: China, India Meranti : Indonesia, Malaysia, China, Philippines Okoume : China Sande : Ecuador Amescla: Brazil Ultralight MDF: New Zealand, Belgium, Uruguay Radiata Pine : Chile Italian Poplar : Italy Bending Ply: Brazil Jumbo Size : Brazil, China

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i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

A

s a premier importer, exporter and distributor, the UCS Forest Group of Companies is committed to sourcing environmentally responsible products. In line with this mission, UCS proudly distributes Red Grandis®, the world’s leading example of excellent environmental stewardship across our 12 distribution market areas. Adobe, one of the largest software companies in the world, is changing the world through digital experiences. Adobe products are everywhere you look – from websites, video games, and Smartphones to televisions, tablets, and beyond. Adobe® Creative Suite® software offers the most innovative tools for creating digital media, while Adobe Digital Marketing Suite delivers groundbreaking solutions for data-driven marketing. The new state-of-the-art Adobe office building in Lehi, Utah is home to more than 900 employees. The Lehi team is a creative group focused on engineering, product development, sales, marketing, and operations for the industry-leading Adobe® Marketing Cloud. They work in a new eco office building providing them with panoramic views, a full gym, and an NBA size basketball court, providing a unique work/life balance combining a spirit of innovation and abundant recreational opportunities. About the designers/architects and design elements:

American firm RAPT Studio of San Francisco designed the building, with interiors designed by San Francisco-based firm WRNS Studio with GSBS Architects of Salt Lake City.


Aesthetic Design The Adobe LEED Gold Eco-office Building Lehi, Utah Swaner Hardwood Company Since 1967, we have been committed to providing a product of superior quality, service and value to a wide range of loyal customers. Adobe, a company that has had unmatched influence in the design world, wanted a new building that would reflect and extend the company’s innovative and creative character. Wood is ubiquitous throughout the interior millwork and fixtures providing occupants with a comfortable and functional environment. Linking interior spaces with artistic quality, the campus is virtually unmatched. World-renowned street artist El Mac and tattoo artist Mike Giant were commissioned to create large colorful murals that cover entire walls. The massive atrium is the heart of the facility and features an acoustic ceiling configuration made of Red Grandis. Red Grandis is a FSC Pure wood from Uruguay and supplied by Sierra Forest Products of Salt Lake City through local millworkers. Seating and common areas feature wood seating elements and wood wall paneling. An ultra modern cafe that keeps the inhabitants well fed is lined with Red Grandis millwork. A full sized NBA basketball court, a gym, and rock climbing wall keep them well exercised, while a game room, titled ‘the bunker’, containing billiard tables and table-tennis keeps them entertained. ABOUT RED GRANDIS, FSC 100% since 2001

Red Grandis (Eucalyptus Grandis) is plantation grown by CofusaUrufor in Uruguay, South America. It is a high grade hardwood prized for its consistent color, workability and durability. Its attractive straight grain makes it a good substitute for Cherry, Mahogany and Sapele. It’s ideal for windows, doors, millwork, flooring, furniture, and paneling. IW Red Grandis is the proud winner of the 2012 IWPA Environmental Excellence Award.

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Nordic Cool photogr aphy by Yassine El Mansouri

The plywood exhibit – large-scale plywood sculptures in the Kennedy Center’s Hall of Nations, created by Norwegian architecture firm Snøhetta – celebrates “one of the most used products in Scandinavian design, from moulded to tensioned, from furniture to houses.”

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round 3600 BC, Mesopotamian woodworkers faced a quality wood shortage. To compensate, they invented veneers: high quality wood on the exposed surfaces glued to lower quality wood at the core. About 2000 years later, the Egyptians developed the two-man lathe to carve thin, vertical, continuous sheets of veneer from lengths of wood. Gluing these pieces of sheets together with their grains crossed was the precursor to modern plywood. Fast forward a few thousand years and Swedish engineer, architect, inventor and industrialist Immanuel Nobel re-invented the Egyptian lathe using industrial age tools and techniques, creating the modern version of plywood and plywood production. Immanuel was the patriarch of the Nobel family described as ‘the Russian Rockefellers’ who moved to St. Petersburg for two decades. His son Alfred held 350 patents in his lifetime, including the very lucrative patent for his invention of dynamite. Alfred, of course, posthumously created the Nobel Peace Institute in his name. Plywood – the ubiquitous manufactured wood product is one of the most common uses of wood on the planet today. Because of the Nobel Connection, it has a particularly firm place in Scandinavian design, including the iconic furniture that burst on the world scene in the middleto-late 1900s as well as more current Nordic uses of the flexible material. The Plywood Baby is Born

When the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., agreed to play host earlier this year to a Nordic cultural festival called ‘Nordic Cool’, two of the exhibits converged around the tale told above: a retrospective of the life and work of Alfred Nobel and a mesmerizing exhibit of the wonders of plywood writ large. The plywood exhibit – large-scale plywood sculptures in the Center’s Hall of Nations created by Norwegian architecture firm Snøhetta – was in the words of the Kennedy Center intended to celebrate “one of the most used products in Scandinavian design, from moulded to tensioned, from furniture to houses. Plywood experimentation from the 1920s and onwards, built a base for further development of low cost plywood products intended for a broader public. It is a material most representative for the development of social democracy in the Nordic region.” 28

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Snøhetta’s acclaimed projects include the National September 11th Memorial Museum Pavilion in New York, the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Alexandria, Egypt, and the Oslo Opera House. Kennedy Center vice-president Alicia Adams says that Snøhetta and Center staff worked side-by-side for more than a week to turn a prototype into a public exhibit: “They had an initial mockup,” she says, “but the installation really took shape only once they started to work on the site and to experiment.” “People were intrigued by the fact that the wood could be so flexible,” Adams says. “That just the tension of the ropes suspending, stretching the plywood would create such unique shapes and movement.” The Snøhetta sculptures, installed in one of the main entrances to the Center, were part of the month-long event that provided exposure to Nordic music, lectures, films, cuisine, art and culture attended by nearly 200,000 visitors. Adams noted the imagination could ‘run wild’ while looking at this installation: “For some, it looked like a roll of film. For others, the effect was like a roll of paper. For others, like some sort of flying object.” The Snøhetta crew and the Center staff

had to be aware of the large number of people that circulate through the Hall of Nations every day, the height and width restrictions, entry and exit points, and the way the plywood sheets responded to the different points of tension, suspended and anchored by ropes. “The suggestion of using plywood came from the Snøhetta office,” says Adams. “They

wanted to demonstrate its properties.” The Kennedy Center, concerned about visitor safety, insisted on fireproof certification. The Snøhetta team complied and had all of the plywood fireproofed before it was shipped from Norway. “At the very end, we are very happy with our plywood baby,” said Adams. IW

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Photos courtesy of Patkua Architects

the warmth of wood makes

Winter Fun

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raw a north-south line through the middle of North America and it will pass through the heart of Winnipeg, the capital and largest city in the Canadian province of Manitoba, where the Red and Assiniboine Rivers meet in the center of the city. The spring and fall are barely seasons; more like shortened blips between summer and winter. Winter can last six long months in the eastern edge of the Canadian Prairies with nothing to stop the howling winds from the west or worse, from the far north. The temperatures can dip to -40 before taking the effects of wind chill into account. The nickname “Winterpeg” comes from the half-year season. Residents are determined to enjoy the outdoors during the long winter by putting on a pair of skates and heading out to the frozen rivers. Outdoor skating in the winter comes in three basic parts: lacing up your skates, enjoying the skating, and taking them off again. In some cases, lacing up and taking off can be fairly miserable, especially in the face of a chill wind blowing in from the Arctic. To accommodate the safety and the comfort level for ice skaters, fairly rudimentary skating shelters were built to be hauled onto the pond or river at the beginning of winter, and hauled away before the spring melt. A Big Little Project

John Patkua, owner of Patkua Architects grew up in Winnipeg. “I remember what it was like,” he says from the offices of Patkua Architects in Vancouver. “I try to avoid Winnipeg in the winter now.” 30

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With more than 30 years of practice under his belt in Canada, the USA, and increasingly overseas, the company defines itself as an innovative architecture and design research studio and lists dozens of awards on their website going back to the 1980s. The firm's diverse list of projects includes galleries, urban libraries, homes, community and medical centers. Patkua's CV includes the Order of Canada, one of the country's most prestigious awards, membership in various architectural and art associations, and a visiting professorship of architecture at Yale University. When the opportunity came along to design and build a set of unique skating shelters, Patkua Architects jumped at the chance. Their proposal consisted of a cluster of intimate shelters to accommodate several people. The shelters would be grouped in clusters, described as a small village, or a herd or flock with their backs to the wind. “That was just fun,” Patkua says. “I mean, there were some tense moments in terms of me getting them actually accomplished, but it was sort of the perfect holiday for architects.” Bendy Ply

The shape of the individual shelters is the result of the use of specialized plywood and Luan wood species called Bendy Ply. “The volumes come out of the particular character of the plywood that was used and the forms into which it was cut and assembled. Those volumes are literally shaped by the nature of the material,” says Patkau. Unlike most plywood, which is equally stiff in both directions, bendy ply has a very weak and strong axis. “It's very flexible in one direction and not in the other. We used that characteristic to make the forms and to make the structure. We couldn't have the flexibility in both directions or they wouldn't stand up, but we needed the flexibility in one direction in order to make the volumes.” The group built a full-sized mockup in their Vancouver office. However, when the materials used to fabricate them in Winnipeg were delivered, they were quite a bit thicker than the material originally used. All of the shapes had to be modified in order to work with the thicker material. i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

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Bending Like Branches

“The reality is [Bendy Ply] is so light, it moves when the wind pushes on it,” Patkua says. “They don't flutter, but it has the ability to move like a tree branch in response to the wind.” The 'animate' form was intentional, he says, “We found that when we clustered them together, the quality was really amplified by virtue of the community that they created. Some people have called them penguins, some people buffalo, but they do elicit that kind of animism.” What wasn't intentional was the impact the project had on the firm. “Based on the shelters project, we initiated a series of research projects. We now have half a dozen skating shelter projects. Some of them have been executed and are in the public realm and others are in the vault waiting to see the light of day. It has definitely informed our line of projects.” The shelters project led to a phone call from a well-known Japanese fashion label, Comme des Garçons, which was building a new showroom in Ginza, Tokyo. The Japanese company wanted non-combustible versions of the skating shelters. Patkua Architects complied with versions made of stainless steel. “We then began investigating how to take these ideas and make them more building-sized rather than these smaller constructions that are almost furniture-like things,” Patkua says. “And we've developed a couple of systems that we have worked out, and we are looking for the big break to actually build one. One of our fun activities is trying to find an opportunity to do that.” IW

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Trends in Outdoor Living D

Photos courtesy of Walpole Outdoors

espite rain, snow, sleet, hail – and even hurricanes, tornadoes, and heat waves – Americans still love the great outdoors. Throughout the country, people take pride in creating beautiful outdoor living spaces that add charm, functionality and comfort to their surroundings. People create outdoor venues for a variety of reasons. Some are concerned about privacy or security. Others want to enhance or diversify their living areas. Some people seek to re-create the serenity of a wooded glen or a forest brook in a convenient location. Today, designers, architects and landscape architects excel at creative amenities and attractive features that not only enhance quality of life, but also boost a property’s curb appeal and significantly increase its value. Walpole Outdoors, headquartered in Walpole, MA, specializes in designing and installing pergolas, arbors, enclosures, gazebos, fences, gates and various types of exterior décor for commercial and residential clients. Lou Maglio, President of Walpole Outdoors, notes that whatever goals or intentions people have, they often turn to exotic woods to create outdoor amenities that are durable, low-maintenance, elegant and tasteful. “Pergolas are a particularly popular outdoor enhancement now,” according to Walpole Outdoors’ Purchasing Manager Bob Coyne. “A pergola is essentially an indoor/outdoor room that allows for breeze and light sun, but offers protection from the harsh glare of direct sunlight,” he says. A pergola may be a garden feature, a shaded walkway, a sitting area with vertical posts, pillars, an open lattice, or a retractable awning overhead.

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Exterior showers are also fashionable. “In addition to being very practical, many outdoor showers are beautiful, sculpted works of art,” Coyne says. “There is truly something magical about singing in the shower alfresco accompanied by a chorale of birds and the echoing strains of Mother Nature.” Outdoor features such as pergolas, gazebos, gates, enclosures and open-air showers often incorporate traditional exotic woods, such as teak, mahogany, sapele or ipe. “These woods are hard, stable and durable,” says Coyne. Teak is well known for its strength and resistance to water, insects and rot along with its rich golden brown color and lush texture. Teak’s high oil content, high tensile strength and tight grain makes it particularly suitable for outdoor applications. It is easily worked, an important consideration for pergolas, arbors and decorative gates, which can be very ornate. Teak can however, cause severe blunting on edged tools because of the presence of silica in the wood. Mahogany has long been prized for its straight, fine, even grain and lustrous reddish brown hue. Mahogany is relatively free of voids and pockets, has excellent workability and is extremely durable. Genuine mahogany is costly and is becoming difficult to obtain. However, more designers, architects and landscape architects who specify materials for outdoor applications are turning to other lesser known, but equally stable exotic species. One exotic gaining favor is Cedrela, a member of the mahogany family. Cedrela is commonly known as “Spanish cedar,” (although it is neither Spanish nor a cedar). This fragrant wood with good resistance to wood-boring insects and rot is traditionally used to make cigar boxes and for paneling, veneer and general outdoor and construction work. Cedrela is a relatively uniform light rose to reddish brown-toned

wood that darkens with age. It has a straight or shallowly interlocked grain, medium texture and moderate natural luster. Random pockets of gum and natural oils are often present. Spanish cedar works easily, but due to its low density and softness, it tends to leave hazy surfaces and must be machined with sharp cutters. Extra sanding with extremely fine grits may be required to obtain a smooth surface. Older slower-growing cedrela trees tend to produce wood that is more durable than wood from younger plantation-grown trees. “Nootka Cypress, often called Alaskan yellow cedar is an up-andcomer that is frequently specified for outdoor applications,” says Coyne. This beautiful pale blonde wood is native to the west coast of North America. When finished, it displays a soft golden glow. It has a straight grain and a uniform color that darkens with age and exposure to sunlight. If the wood is left untreated, it weathers to a uniform gray. Alaskan yellow cedar is hard, durable, offers good dimensional stability and is resistant to weather, insects, and contact with soil. It works easily with hand or machine tools, resists splintering and wears smoothly over time. Like the more familiar exotics, these lesser-known varieties of exotic and domestic woods are strong, long-wearing, stable, resistant to decay and able to withstand humidity and intense sunlight. As traditional woods become more expensive and difficult to source, these species provide an economical alternative and offer endless possibilities for creating outdoor environments that are functional, innovative, and aesthetically pleasing. IW Bob Coyne, Purchasing Manager, Walpole Outdoors bob.coyne@walpolewood.net www.walpolewoodworkers.com

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Past Present and

Historical Techniques in Modern Designs

Photogr aphy bt Chris Stuart

M

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any of the elements found in traditional Early American furniture designs constantly influence my work,” Steven Sander begins when discussing his stick bench project. He continues, adding “My work takes traditional woodworking elements and pairs them with a non-traditional material like steel or aluminum, creating a project that makes small details stand out and draws the viewer’s eye quickly to the piece.”

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Viewers will certainly be drawn to Sander’s stick bench. At first glance, it looks firm, stiff, and unyielding. But touching it, the project quickly becomes interactive and inviting. Created with over 2,500 wooden sticks, each individual piece of wood is captured in the metal frame but is still free to move up and down. The bench began life as a stack of well over 700 board feet of rough lumber. First, a radial arm saw was used to cut the boards into a millable size, and each individual piece was run over a joiner and a planer. Sander took over 20 hours just to mill the boards down to the correct thickness, after which he spent 4 hours on the chop saw, where the freshly milled wood was chopped into its final length. An additional 14 hours were spent on the table saw producing the final 3/4”x3/4”x11” stick. Each of the 2,500 plus sticks were then individually coated with an oil finish which took another 45 hours and over 2 gallons of Danish oil. This attention to detail and painstaking approach to craftsmanship is not new to Sander. He has been designing furniture using traditional Early American furniture techniques (1750 – 1850) since the beginning of his career. “My designs take cues from historical and traditional pieces and


combine them with non-traditional materials like metal and boldly colored paints,” he says. “I try to find ways to include these very different elements in my work to create something that is completely my own, yet still intriguing to others.” The stick bench perfectly encapsulates that approach. The bench is assembled by lining up by hand each individual stick in a tight grid filling the metal shell, showcasing different techniques and materials to create a bench that is simultaneously durable and yielding to the occupant. That duality of nature is possible only through the use of exotic wood. Sander compares his love of using wood to an addiction. “Wood’s gorgeous, unique qualities draw me in. Each of these woods has characteristics all their own that range from beautiful colors to stunning grain patterns”, he says. Beyond just the look of the piece, Sander uses exotic woods for their performance characteristics as well. Particularly in objects like the bench which will see a great deal of use, the density that exotic woods add is important to the life of the object. Above all, Sander treasures “the interaction with the user to my work. Not only do I enjoy the challenge of creating moveable parts but I believe that the incorporation of these moveable parts draws the user further into the piece. This creates an intimate connection with the user that is not easily forgotten.” The connection is further enhanced by “the natural attraction to wood as a medium people have” adds Sander. “The wood invites the person to experience its visual and tactile qualities. Exotic woods with their many varieties of grains, colors and hues bring an added dimension to my pieces and serve to enhance that visual and tactile experience.” IW Steven Sander www.sjsanderdesign.com

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Photos courtesy of Bor a am Industries

Zebran

zebrano: Wood on the Wild Side

F

or over a decade Boraam Industries has produced quality furniture for American homes. Located just north of Chicago in Mundelein, Illinois, Boraam Industries distributes its interior home products throughout the country via well-known online retailers, such as Walmart.com, Sears.com, Target. com and other outlets including Amazon.com, Overstock.com and Hayneedle.com. The company relies on market research and feedback from national retail distributors and end users to stay current with the tastes, preferences and price sensitivities of its target middlemarket demographic. It has gained wide renown for its popular mid-century-modern styled dining sets, accent tables, chairs, desks, pub tables and stools.

Recently, Boraam Industries ventured upmarket with the addition of the Zebra Series to its line-up of home furnishings. The Zebra Series is a collection featuring zebrano or zebrawood veneer on an MDF base. Zebrano (Microberlina brazzavillensis) is a decorative exotic wood, distinguished by its unique bold striping. It is a heavy, hardwood with a somewhat coarse texture, a high density and a distinct interlocked or wavy grain. “The Zebra Series is designed to appeal to a more discriminating customer base,” says Maggie Henning, Boraam Industries’ national account manager. “Our goal with this collection was to capture a slightly different sector of the market and yet still remain true to our strong value proposition.” Boraam’s Zebra Series currently includes a dining table

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and chairs, plus three accent tables, a Varberg side table, an Alborg end table and a Halmstad coffee table. The firm plans to eventually expand the series to include bar stools, pub tables, desks and desk chairs, TV stands and book shelves. “The Zebrawood collection appeals to interior designers and customers who shop in boutique brick-and-mortar stores as opposed to typical mass market retail outlets,” Henning says. “These are customers who are discerning about craftsmanship and also care about the back-end story of a piece. Often, they select items on an artistic basis, looking at it as not just a piece of furniture but also a piece of art.” “Based on the market response to the Zebra Series, we see great potential for use of zebrawood in other styles and other pieces,” says Henning. “We are also experimenting with mixing materials and contrasting woods grains and colors to create special eye-catching effects.” Henning notes that the zebrano “pops” and makes a very dramatic statement when paired with more subtly grained woods or when a contrast effect is achieved by staining it with a black or white wash, or a walnut stain to bring out the grain. She adds that the mid-century modern style, which features sleek, smooth, uncluttered surfaces, is ideal to set off the bold, dramatic look of zebrano. The zebrano wood Boraam Industries uses in its furniture manufacturing process is sourced from Malaysia. The raw wood is typically light yellow or pale brown and is marked by vivid, dark brown to black streaks of varying widths. When it is quartersawn, the wood’s exciting alternating color pattern resembles the stripes of a zebra – hence its name. When flatsawn, the stripes will appear wavy and somewhat chaotic. Zebrano generally saws well, but it can be difficult to plane or surface due to its interlocking grain. Despite occasional open pores in the grain, it glues and finishes well. When applied as a veneer, Zebrawood adds a rich, distinctive, exotic look that cannot be replicated by imitation wood. However, the Zebra Series remains an affordable luxury. “Veneer is far more economical than solid wood,” notes Henning. Because zebrano is not as expensive as other exotics such as ebony or rosewood, it is finding more use in applications such as wall paneling, custom furnishings, furniture trim and inlay, marquetry and turnery. It is also used on gun stocks, exotic guitars and even to add elegance and sophistication to luxury automobile interiors. “We listen carefully to feedback from our customers and interact frequently with buyers at exhibits and trade shows,” Henning says. “Our customers are telling us that the Zebra Series is stylish, charming, beautiful and that there is a strong market for it.” IW Maggie Henning, National Account Manager, Boraam Industries www.boraam.com | Maggie@boraam.com | 1-877-267-2261

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If Chairs Could Talk “If you’re essentially designing on a computer and printing it out or cutting it out on a machine, is it still handmade? Am I being true to my woodworking roots?”

Thanks. It's Luan Plywood

Nice Design.

These are some of the questions student designer/maker Teshia Treuhaft is asking herself as the world of design and creation are influenced by rapid changes in technology. “As young designers and as young woodworkers, we have to take hold of these new tools because that will be the way of the future. This will be the way furniture design as a career path stays relevant,” she says during an interview via Skype from the Rhode Island School of Design where she’s completing her Master of Fine Arts degree. “I think what’s interesting about digital technologies and how they might play out into traditional furniture design is that you will have the ability to manufacture on a one-on-one basis,” she says. “If you are in Toronto and I’m manufacturing a chair for you in New York, there’s all that shipping. That’s a pain. But what if there’s a way for the manufacturing to happen in Toronto because, I’m just sending you a digital file. It’s cost effective to do that.” The First Chairs

During her undergraduate studies in textiles at the University of Michigan, Treuhaft began what has become a series of experiments designing and creating plywood furniture. Her earliest project was what she calls the curve chairs, her first experience vacuum forming plywood.

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Teshia Treuhaft's curve chairs (above) and her copenhagen chair (at right) are crafted from vacuum formed luann plywood. Photos courtesy of Teshia Treuhaft


You are essentially creating a three-dimensional mold, then building a bag that can suck in from all directions so that everything can come together,” she says. The juxtaposition of traditional Danish aesthetic with Treuhaft’s interest in modern technology is a glimpse into where her experimentation may take her. But will there be more formed plywood furniture in her future? “I would love to work more with compound bends,” Treuhaft says. “I almost feel right now that I would want to do more than vacuum bag lamination. I’d really be interested in doing free-form steam bending. It’s a new skill I’d like to develop, but I would like to, in the next year, revisit the conversation chairs.” IW

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The chairs were made using two curved pieces of Luan bending plywood and beech veneer created with a single mold, then cut to retain the exact same radius. The chairs can be arranged for face-to-face conversations, or side-by-side to create a long bench, indicative of her interest in the social characteristics of furniture use, an interest that led more recently to a study of dynamic and static seating. “A lot of my time at Michigan was this exploration, this playing, an almost naive approach to chair design,” she says. “I just wanted to play with those materials.” In the process, having built a real piece of furniture, she developed the confidence to push the envelope. Copenhagen Influence

Treuhaft had the good fortune to travel widely during her school years, including a two-month sojourn in the studios of the Danish Royal Academy of Art and Design focused on furniture design. “I just fell in love with it,” she says of Denmark’s capital city. It's partly due to what she calls “good vibes” but is largely because of the Danish appreciation for quality design in their homes, transportation systems, clothing, and community spaces. The experience led to the Intersection Chairs project: a pair of conversation benches molded from bent plywood with black walnut seats. Six volunteers were required to bend the eight-foot long piece of three-quarter inch, five-ply Luan plywood. “It’s a huge bend; it’s a lot of surface area [and there’s a lot of room for things like air bubbling and other bad things to happen],” she says. “It’s a really sturdy object even though there’s so much surface area.” Compound Bends and Vacuum Bags

“In terms of complexity though, the Copenhagen Lounger is the only one that is a compound bend. Because it’s a compound curve, you never really have a surface that you can suck everything down to.

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Modern Architecture

with a Humanistic Touch

Photos courtesy of Stephen Chung

M

odern architecture is often characterized by simplicity and the absence of extraneous decoration or detail. This philosophy is based on the principle that “form follows function,” a phrase originally coined by Frank Lloyd Wright’s mentor, Louis Sullivan – the father of modernism.

Stephen Chung, host of the upcoming PBS television program, Cool Spaces, which profiles the best of contemporary architecture, considers himself a modern architect. His Bostonbased studio focuses primarily on designing small to mid-sized residential and hospitality projects in the modern style.  “Even in modern architecture,” Chung says, “there needs to be a humanist quality. Wood and other natural materials, such as stone, marble and leather, can impart warmth in a way that simulated materials made with industrialized manufacturing techniques cannot.” In addition to his duties as an on-air television personality and principal of his own firm, he has taught design and drawing at schools such as Syracuse University, Cornell University, the Rhode Island School of Design, the University of Texas at Austin and Yale University. Chung also gave a presentation entitled “Cool Spaces in Wood” at the IWPA Annual Convention in Vancouver in April. Chung employs exotic wood strategically in his own work. “I tend to think of a beautiful piece of wood or a unique piece of stone or some other unusual natural element as a piece of art,” he says. “I like to embrace its uniqueness and abstraction, and of course all of its natural irregularities, and work them into a setting as an accent of a focal point, much

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like a painting, a sculpture, a particularly stunning piece of furniture or even a viewplane that serves to complement and set off a design envelope.” In this regard, Chung adheres to a second fundamental principle of modern architecture, “truth to materials,” meaning that the true nature or natural appearance of the material should be seen rather than concealed or altered to represent something else. In using natural materials such as objets d’art within the context of modern design settings, Chung often places wood on vertical surfaces, where they are more likely to attract eyeballs. He recognizes grain as an essential consideration when choosing a particular type of wood, marble, sandstone or other natural material. “If it is a material with a strong grain that is likely to pop, I will use it sparingly,” he says. “If it is a more quiet grain, I might use more of it.” Chung often pairs materials that have contrasting hues, textures and grains. Such unusual pairings evoke nature and add qualities that depart from direct functionality, such as mood, atmosphere, intensity of life and even natural characteristics, he believes. In one residential application Chung paired a rich, glossy walnut wood with wenge (Millettia laurentii). Wenge is notable for its extremely dark brown color, distinctive black streaks and figures, and its low luster. He then added creamy beige travertine on the floors and walls to create a bold, striking contrast in the masculine-themed room.

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In his own home, Chung has paired maple with an Alaskan gloss together with white Cervaiole marble. “The maple is light and creamy and contrasts intriguingly with the aggressive gray veins of the Cervaiole marble. The two materials form a complementary palate and the result is an interesting dialogue between the contrasting elements,” he says. Chung’s approach to design is reflected in his studio’s tagline, “Combining art and purpose,” which reflects his emphasis on the aesthetic quality as well as the functionality of design. “Instructors in architectural schools don’t talk about beauty very much,” he says. “Their teaching is often about big concepts and theories, but rarely about the aesthetic effect of the design.” “Beauty is, of course, subjective, so it’s difficult to talk and teach about it,” he says. “But as designers and architects, we should not ignore it or overlook its importance in our work.” Chung sees beauty as a sensory experience, and notes that true beauty takes advantage of multiple senses. Natural materials can be simultaneously tactile, visual, fragrant, auditory and visceral. “The difference between manufactured building materials and natural materials is not unlike the difference between a Computer-Aided Design (CAD) rendering and a hand-drawn sketch,” Chung says. There is a certain unexpectedness or one-off quality to a hand-drawing that makes it appealing, just as the slight imperfections and irregularities in a piece of wood or natural stone add to its charm and appeal.” “Natural aesthetic qualities just cannot be replicated in manufactured materials, and I think designers and architects will always appreciate that,” he says. “People really do want their surroundings to be beautiful as well as functional and to have that elusive humanistic quality.” IW Stephen Chung, AIA, LEED AP | Boston, MA www.stephenchung.com | www.coolspaces.tv

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The Miniot Collection

Makes Apple Shine

M

iniot adds a touch of elegance and a mantle of protection to an iPad or iPhone.

Miniot BV, a tiny independent woodworking shop located in Schagen, Netherlands, fabricates a line of wooden cases, covers and stands for mobile Apple devices. Peter Kolkman, the principal designer and creative genius behind the Miniot collection, began carving wooden accessories for iPods in 2005. The following year, Miniot introduced the iWood nano, a hand-crafted case designed specifically for the iPod nano. The iWood nano was carved from a single piece of wood and came in a variety of wood types which included maple, mahogany, pear, wengé and walnut. The iWood nano caught on with Apple aficionados, and Miniot quickly became a highly respected consumer brand. In 2008, Kolkman, along with his partner, Greet van den Berg, founded Miniot BV. Today, the firm employs eight skilled artisans who design and manufacture the items in the collection and also handle other aspects of the business including sourcing, woodworking and engraving. Miniot products are prized for their elegance, quality, intelligent design and functionality. “To ensure these characteristics, the Miniot production process is quite intensive”, says Office Manager Els Remijnse. From start to finish it takes about two weeks to make a Miniot iWood 5 for an iPhone 5. “It takes this long because of the different handling steps in the production process, like the dry time of the varnish and the polishing, assemblage, and quality control procedures,” Remijnse says. “Without giving away any of our trade secrets, I can say that the production process is quite thorough and different for each product.”

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Argo Fine Imports (Better by definition) (är’go) 1. Importers of hardwood plywood 2. Consistently high quality panels 3. Experienced and knowledgeable sales staff. 4. Maintaining the highest integrity standards in the industry.

Offering these fine products: Miniot uses wood species from around the world, including walnut, maple, mahogany, oak, padouk, wengé, cherry, lauro faya, zebrano (zebra wood) and teak. They also experiment with other woods such as beech, purpleheart, African blackwood and rosewood. The firm uses only the finest wood species available, sourced from well-managed forests that are FSC-certified. “Hardwood is important for the creation of our products,” Kolkman notes. “Its characteristics are essential for us to make the designs in the way we do. This is very fine woodworking and there are variable challenges that we encounter.” “Next to the technical part, there is a strong motivation to choose wood types which are attractive and distinctive. We look at the grain, features, color, darkness and feeling of the wood to determine whether they are suitable to be used for our Miniot Collection,” he adds.  Working with many wood types requires skill, knowledge and above all, patience. “After working with all of the various wood types for a few years, we have become experienced with the differences, and are able to adapt our techniques as necessary,” says Kolkman. “For example, wengé is a strong wood type but splinters are also common. When there is a soft stripe adjacent to a more firm stripe, it makes it difficult to polish these evenly.”

“But there is no best wood,” says Remijnse. “It even depends per piece of wood how it reacts to the varnish. That’s the challenge but also the fun of working with wood. We generalize the wood types internally but always have exceptions which are easier, difficult or suddenly react differently to our handling because of different moisture conditions, or other light exposure.” 

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Among consumers, walnut is a “loved wood,” according to members of the Miniot team. Walnut is very workable and Miniot’s artisans take pride in ensuring that the cases, covers and sleeves they create fit on a device like a glove on a hand.

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“Miniot products are made from the best gift of nature: wood.” Els Remijnse, The miniot team

Every piece of wood is different, and so each item in the Miniot collection is unique. “Occasionally, a special piece of wood like walnut, has figures including strips, burls, mottles, crotches, curls and butts that add to its character and beauty and make the finished product even more unique to beautiful,” says Remijnse. Maple is frequently paired with other woods to create a harmonious contrast. Its creamy white color, subdued grain and uniform texture makes it a perfect complement to dark, aggressive or figured woods. The Miniot Cobra for iPhone 5 features strips of maple fused into a base of wengé or padouk. Maple is paired with walnut or wengé to create a contrasting effect in the Miniot Book for iPhone 5. The base of the Miniot Contour for iPhone 5 is rimmed with inlays

of contrasting wood: wengé/maple, walnut/ maple, or oak/smoked oak wood. “As for the design, it is not something that you have to over think,” says Kolkman. “Just let the wood speak and pay attention to what it is telling you. A designer thinks first about what looks good, what feels good and what works well with each piece of wood.” Kolkman’s creativity gives shape to these ideas as prototypes. “Miniot products are made from the best gift of nature: wood,” says Remijnse. Each piece of raw material is carefully selected and carved with precision. Our strategy is to use genuine wood, the choicest and most interesting types of wood that exist on the planet. To transform these woods from a raw material into a fine end product takes a lot of time, ingenuity, skillful workmanship and careful handling.” Miniot strives to create items of great quality, low environmental impact and high customer satisfaction that will be treasured by the customers who buy them. “These are premium products, and yes, they are costly,” says Remijnse. “We plan to stick to this strategy because we know that our customers value and enjoy our products, appreciate our way of working and find them worth the money.” IW Els Remijnse, the Miniot Team service@miniot.com | www.miniot.com

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2014: 121 years of customer commitment


Harding Pens Exotic Innovation. People are writing more than ever before, but not the way they used to. Pens and paper have often been replaced with keyboards and touchscreens. “A lot of the schools don’t even teach penmanship anymore,” says Brad Harding, of Aurora, Ontario, a town about 35 miles north of Toronto. “They just teach the kids how to print, but they’ve stopped teaching cursive writing.” A mechanical engineer by day, Harding has designed mining equipment, auto parts, commercial cooking equipment and currently works in the furniture industry. He spends his leisure time making handmade pens from exotic woods. “It’s a stress reliever. I come home from working with steels and plastics to work with natural wood,” he says.

“You cut into something and you see some grain patterns you didn’t expect, and you see some color come out. You get these surprises as you get into the wood.” Brad Harding, Harding Pens

Love At First Turn

“I’ve loved woodturning ever since I was a teenager,” he says, recalling a wood shop class in public school that offered basic training in woodturning. A few years after his school days, he bought a lathe. “I played around with that for a while. I set it aside when my kids were born. Eventually, I got it back out and was looking for different ideas for things to turn,” says Harding. He discovered pen hardware kits in a Toronto store, bought a few simple ones, scrounged scraps of wood at the local lumber yard, and then went to work combining the two together.

A Hobby Gone Wild

About ten years ago, Harding decided to create a series of hand-turned pens as Christmas gifts for friends and family. “Everyone loved them and said how wonderful they were and told me to start selling them because they are so great. It caught me by surprise.” When Harding purchased the pen hardware kits, he had also spotted small blanks of exotic species of foreign woods with all sorts of beautiful colors and grain patterns. “I tried a few of these African Blackwood Ball Point along with the kits and was amazed at all the color varieties you get from the international woods,” says Harding. The hobby gradually turned into a sideline business called Harding Pens.

Amboyna Burl fountain pen

Exotic Scraps

“I bought some purpleheart,” Harding says. “The purple is just so vibrant and beautiful.” Harding found a nearby supplier, Century Mill Lumber, which sources exotic species for custom furniture makers. “They have left over exotic wood after the furniture makers would come and buy the big pieces. I started buying little leftover pieces from them.” “They loved me because I was buying the cutoffs,” he laughs. “All these beautiful woods and I could try them on different pens.”

Burls and More Pink Ivory Ball Point

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As Harding’s interest, skills, and woodworking equipment increased, he began experimenting with different exotic woods and more difficult task of turning blanks made from exotic burls. He says that Century Lumber carries hard to find exotic burls. “A tree gets attacked by some disease or insects. It reacts to the attack and creates this bump on the side of the tree. Inside, the wood swirls as it grows around the attack areas, and creates these beautiful patterns,” he says.


“They are tricky to work with because you don’t have a consistent grain pattern. It changes the strength properties as you are working through it. You can get weak sections and then it changes. You have to be very delicate with it and use very sharp tools,” Harding says. “You cut into something and you see some grain patterns you didn’t expect, and you see some color come out. You get these surprises as you get into the wood.”

Exotic Favorites

Harding offers ballpoints, roller balls, fountain pens and touch screen styluses in a variety of woods, but like all woodworkers, he has his favorites. “The pen I carry every day is a Pink Ivory,” he says. “It’s a beautiful pink-colored wood originating from South Africa and was a well-known royal wood favored by Zulu Kings.” “African Blackwood is another beautiful wood. It has a very dark, black color. You can actually see the grain in it,” he says. “It’s extremely hard and it’s tough to do a finish on. It has a lot of oils in it. It took me a long time to be able to get a good pen out of that wood, but it is a very rewarding wood to work with. It’s very beautiful and it does have such unique properties.”

“The first one didn’t work very well,” he admits, but subsequent efforts have borne fruit. “They need capacitance (the ability to store an electrical charge). They actually have to have a connection between the stylus tip and the human body,” he says. Because the center of a pen is brass tubing, if you’re touching the center band or any part of the metal on the pen, the connection between the tip and human body is made. Harding is now making double-ended pens with a traditional ballpoint, roller or fountain pen tip on one end, and the computer-based stylus on the other. But he still leans towards the more traditional writing instruments: “It still has its place. You can be in a boat in the middle of a lake and still write. It won’t go haywire if you get it wet.” IW

This has a stylus tip suitable for an iPad or smart phone. fashioned from purpleheart, The dark rings are created by running a steel wire against the pen as it spins quickly on the lathe. The wood darkens as it begins to burn, creating decorative contrasting lines.

Back to the Future

About a quarter of Harding’s sales are fountain pens. “I get people who want to return to using a fountain pen,” Harding says. “The real surprise has been the recent interest in traditional pens with a new twist: the ability to also use them with smartphones and touch screens.” His first prototype was for his wife who likes to use the family iPad.

slim twist pen in Paela wood with gold plated hardware

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i w p a

a s s o c i a t e

M e m b e r s

Buyers Guide

Transportation, Logistics and other Service Providers

IWPA’s Membership Directory highlights the leading suppliers to the North American market of hardwood and softwood lumber, flooring, decking, veneer, plywood and composite wood products. This one-stop resource guide also provides contact information for ports, shipping companies, third-party certifiers and others that are helping to advance international trade in wood products.

Benchmark International LLC Eugene, OR (United States) Tel: 541-484-9212 Fax: 541-344-2735 Travis.Snapp@Benchmark-Intl.com www.benchmark-intl.com

Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. New York, NY (United States) Tel: 212-493-8920 Fax: 212-493-7280 alexandra.toskovich@bbh.com www.bbh.com

Coastal Cargo Company, Inc. New Orleans, LA (United States) Tel: 504-587-1200 Fax: 504-587-1226 dlh@jkgroup.com www.jkgroup.com

ting u b i r t s di

Fr. Meyer’s Sohn North America LLC Newport Beach, CA (United States) Tel: 949-732-7120 Fax: 949-732-7140 carlos.garcia@fms-logistics.com www.fms-logistics.com

Georgia Ports Authority Savannah, GA (United States) Tel: 912-964-3958 Fax: 912-964-3869 mtroughton@gaports.com www.gaports.com

International Wood Trade Publications Memphis, TN (United States) Tel: 901-372-8280 Fax: 901-373-6180 wayne@millerpublishing.com www.millerpublishing.com

wood products

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ExpErIEncE ExcELLEncE at camdEn’S BaLzanO & BrOadway marInE tErmInaLS. cOmIng SOOn Our nEw pauLSBOrO marInE tErmInaL 52 52 i ni nt te er rn na at ti oi on na al l wwood ood


i w p a

Law Offices of Nithya Nagarajan, LLC Bethesda, MD (United States) Tel: 202-656-2448 nithya@intl-tradelaw.com www.intl-tradelaw.com 

Liberty Terminals LLC Savannah, GA (United States) Tel: 912-341-0311 Fax: 912-341-0293 dpa@liberty-terminals.com www.liberty-terminals.com

Mowry & Grimson PLLC Washington, DC (United States) Tel: 202-688-3610 Fax: 202-595-8968  jsg@mowrygrimson.com www.mowrygrimson.com

OHL International Philadelphia, PA (United States) Tel: 267-570-2612 Fax: 267-570-2635 jemallough@ohl.com www.ohl.com

Peruvian Amazon Line Lima, Peru Tel: 511-475-2033 Fax: 511-475-9670/9680  lima@navieramaynas.com.pe www.lineaamazonica.com.pe

PFS Corporation Cottage Grove, WI (United States) Tel: 608-839-1013 Fax: 608-839-1014 jrothman@pfscorporation.com www.pfscorporation.com

Port of New Orleans New Orleans, LA (United States) Tel: 504 528 3262 / 800-776-6652 Fax: 504-528-3390 landryb@portno.com www.portno.com

Port of Port Arthur Port Arthur, TX (United States) Tel: 409-983-2011 Fax: 409-983-7572 orlando@portofportarthur.com www.portofportarthur.com

Port of Stockton Stockton, CA (United States) Tel: 209-946-0246 Fax: 209-466-5986 blewicki@stocktonport.com www.portofstockton.com

a s s o c i a t e

M e m b e r s

Rukert Terminals Corporation Baltimore, MD (United States) Tel: 410-276-1013 Fax: 410-327-2315 jason@rukert.com www.rukert.com

Shorepoint Insurance Services Costa Mesa, CA (United States) Tel: 714-430-0035 Fax: 714-430-0036 rmarkley@shorepointinsurance.com www.shorepointinsurance.com

South Jersey Port Corporation Camden, NJ (United States) Tel: 856-757-4927 Fax: 856-757-4903 kcastagnola@southjerseyport.com www.southjerseyport.com

Steer Company Philadelphia, PA (United States) Tel: 215-922-6610 Fax: 215-922-0784 d.wackerman@jasteer.com www.jasteer.com

Tampa Port Authority Tampa, FL (United States) Tel: 813-905-5122 Fax: 813-905-5109 jpyburn@tampaport.com www.tampaport.com

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Termimesh Honolulu, HI (United States) Tel: 808-843-1968 Fax: 808-843-0100 wparsons@hawaii.rr.com www.termimeshhawaii.com

U*C Coatings Corporation Buffalo, NY (United States) Tel: 716-833-9366 Fax: 716-833-0120 norm@uccoatings.com www.uccoatings.com

Westfal-Larsen Shipping Alpharetta, GA (United States) Tel: 770-569-5821 Fax: 770-569-5823 mike.hawe@wlshipping.com www.wlshipping.com

PO BOX 1066, BUFFALO NY 14215 USA 1 (716) 833-9366 www.uccoatings.com

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org i ni nt te er rn na a t ti oi on na al l wwood ood

53 53


OSB

MDF

Hardboard

Softwood

Hardwood

other panel products

Particleboard

other lumber products

cabinets and/or components

furniture and/or components

doors/windows

mouldings

flooring

decking

• • •

• •

• •

• •

• • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

• • • •

• •

www.martinguitar.com woodmgt@martinguitar.com

Clarke Veneers and Plywood www.crescenthardwood.com john@crescenthardwood.com www.darlingtonveneer.com rhubbard@darlingtonveneer.com

Darlington Veneer Co., Inc.

www.dlh-usa.com skm@dlh.com

DLH Nordisk Inc.

Buena Park, California

ernie@dvkco.com

DVK-Del Valle, Kahman & Company, Inc. www.dvkco.com

toughton, Massachusetts

Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc.

Greensboro, North Carolina

• •

• • • •

• • • • •

• • •

• •

• • • • •

• • • • • •

336 790-5696 Fax: 336 790-5696

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 912-447-7094 Fax: 912-232-3199

• • •

843-393-3861 Fax: 843-393-8243

504-309-6950 Fax: 504-309-6949

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

714-522-3100 Fax: 714-523-1900

www.downesandreader.com 800-788-5568 williamv@downesandreader.com Fax: 781-344-7110

www.dixieply.com  rccollins@dixieply.com

Savannah, Georgia

Dixie Plywood and Lumber Company

Darlington, South Carolina

Harahan, Louisiana

• • •

www.clarkeveneers.com 601-366-0331 info@clarkeveneers.com Fax: 601-366-0334

Crescent Hardwood Supply

Jackson, Mississippi

604-687-2254 Fax: 604-682-4691

610-759-2837 Fax: 610-759-5757

www.veneers.com 336-852-7721 bvsouth@bellsouth.net Fax: 336-808-1330

Canusa Wood Products Ltd. www.canusawoodproducts.com Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) canusa@canusawoodproducts.com

Nazareth, Pennsylvania

C.F. Martin & Co.

Greensboro, North Carolina

Brookside Veneers Ltd.

www.veneers.com 609-409-1311 eric@brooksideveneers.com Fax: 609-409-1322

• • •

• • • • • • • • •

Cranbury, New Jersey

www.bridgewellres.com 800-570-3566 info@bridgewellres.com Fax: 503-238-2671

Brookside Veneers Ltd.

Portland, Oregon

• •

www.bozovich.com 251-578-4604 infobtp@bozovichtimber.com Fax: 251-578-6844

www.boa-franc.com 418-222-7010 apoirier@boa-franc.com Fax: 418-227-1188

Bridgewell Resources LLC

Evergreen, Alabama

wholesalers

www.beaconhardwoods.com 305-392-9996 omar@beaconhardwoods.com Fax: 305-392-9245

Bozovich USA

504-828-0943 Fax: 504-828-0946

Boa-Franc

St. Georges, Canada

805-688-7919 Fax: 805-688-2956

Miami, Florida

662-252-1862 Fax: 662-252-1888

www.baillie.com 716-649-2850 jbach@baillie.com Fax: 716-648-6107

www.argofineimports.com argo@argofineimports.com

appiwood@silcom.com

www.americanpac.com smb@americanpac.com

Beacon Hardwoods LLC

Hamburg, New York

Baillie Lumber Co.

Metairie, Louisiana

Argo Fine Imports, Inc.

Solvang, California

American Pacific Plywood Inc.

Holly Springs, Mississippi

American Pacific Inc.

v o t i n g

Huntersville, North Carolina

www.craiglumber.com 800-351-9736 geninfo@craiglumber.com Fax: 901-853-5028

Hardwood

plywood

manufacturer

AHC Craig Imports

Softwood

veneers

Hardwood

LUMBER

Softwood

i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

Web Site/Email Phone/Fax

red meranti

Company Name

North American Importers, Users, Distributors

importer

business activity

Exporter

PRODUCTS agent/sales rep

54 Other

i w p a M e m b e r s


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goal is to work with you to improve your yield.

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years

of

experience,

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right technologies and the right resources with a passion to help you succeed. . . that’s the American way.

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INQUIRY@ALUMBER.COM

/

WWW.ALUMBER.COM


i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood LUMBER

mouldings

flooring

decking

plywood

other panel products

Softwood

Hardwood

Softwood

Hardwood

other lumber products

cabinets and/or components

furniture and/or components

doors/windows

Softwood

Hardwood

www.hardwoods-inc.com  tom.herga@hardwoods-inc.com

www.grossveneer.com robgross@grossveneer.com

www.hollandsw.com info@hollandsw.com www.homelegend.com officemanager@homelegend.com

Home Legend LLC www.ihlo.com ihlo@ihlo.com www.iketrading.com craig.smith@iketrading.net

Ike Trading Atlanta

• •

• •

• • •

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • • • •

• • • •

• •

www.ifpveneer.com info@ifpveneer.com www.libertywoods.com info@libertywoods.com

Interwood Forest Products Inc.

Liberty Woods International, Inc.

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

800-367-7054 Fax: 760-438-8018

• •

• • • • 502-633-0017 Fax: 502-633-0031

www.internationalspecialties.com 901-853-4620 twilson16@aol.com Fax: 901-221-0057

• • •

• • • • • •

www.ifpcorp.com 916-742-5590 buzz@ifcorp.com Fax: 508-698-1500

www.ichardwoods.com 910-283-9960 lshibley@ichardwoods.com Fax: 910-283-9964

www.iketrading.com 503-643-6688 ike@iketrading.com Fax: 503-641-7335

404-418-6344 Fax: 404-592-9126

• • • •

• • • • • •

936-598-2491 Fax: 936-598-8146

706-624-3272 Fax: 706-624-3276

713-644-1966 Fax: 713-644-7223

International Specialties, Inc.

Carlsbad, California

• • • • • • •

Shelbyville, Kentucky

604-856-1111 Fax: 604-856-8889

International Forest Products Corp.

Collierville, Tennessee

910-383-2578 Fax: 910-383-2580

Foxboro, Massachusetts

• • • •

• • • •

336-883-0196 Fax: 336-886-1366

Inter-Continental Hardwoods, LLC

Currie, North Carolina

615-871-4500 Fax: 615-391-2177

• •

Beaverton, Oregon

• • • •

310-822-7771 Fax: 310-822-2920

Ike Trading Company, Ltd.

Atlanta, Georgia

Center, Texas

Ihlo Sales & Import Company

Calhoun, Georgia

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

www.globalplywoodandlumber.com 858-486-8700 kpeabody@globalplywoodandlumber.com Fax: 858-486-8702

Holland Southwest International

Houston, Texas

wholesalers

• • •

www.gwv.com 450-674-4957 gwvmtl@aol.com Fax: 450-674-3494

www.feaco.com info@feaco.com

www.hardwoods-inc.com  Langley, British Columbia (Canada) gwarner@hardwoods-inc.com

Hardwoods Specialty Products

Leland, North Carolina

Hardwoods Import Lumber Division

High Point, North Carolina

Gross Veneer Sales, Inc.

Poway, California

Global Plywood & Lumber, Inc.

770-614-7896 Fax: 770-614-1942

www.eghardwoods.com 425-271-9292 info@eghardwoods.com Fax: 425-271-6969

www.elofhansson.com timber@us.elofhansson.com

www.gibson.com Nashville, Tennessee

Gibson Guitar Corp.

Longueuil, Quebec (Canada)

Genwood Industries Ltd.

Los Angeles, California

Far East American, Inc.

Renton, Washington

Evergreen Hardwoods Inc.

Suwanee, Georgia

v o t i n g

Sultan, Washington

• • • •

Hardboard

Elof Hansson Inc.

MDF

OSB

www.eastteak.com 360-793-3754 rick@eastteak.com Fax: 360-793-7835

Particleboard

East Teak Fine Hardwoods, Inc.

• • •

veneers

manufacturer

Web Site/Email Phone/Fax

teak

Company Name

North American Importers, Users, Distributors

importer

business activity

Exporter

PRODUCTS agent/sales rep

56 Other

i w p a M e m b e r s


flooring

decking

• •

importer

Exporter

manufacturer Other

Particleboard OSB

MDF

Hardboard

other lumber products

cabinets and/or components

furniture and/or components

doors/windows

mouldings

Softwood

Hardwood

• • • • •

• •

• • • • •

Alan McIlvain Company

• • • •

• • • •

• •

• • •

• •

• • •

• • • •

North American Wood Products

Oceania Hardwoods, LLC

www.pgwoodimports.com dhuryn@pgwoodimports.com

PG Wood Imports

Virginia Beach, Virginia

The Penrod Company

Greensboro, North Carolina

Patriot Timber Products, Inc.

Alpharetta, Georgia

www.thepenrodcompany.com penrod@thepenrodcompany.com

• • • •

• • • • • • • •

• • •

• • • •

• •

i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

757-498-0186 Fax: 757-498-1075

• • • • • • • • •

678-240-9390 Fax: 678-240-9391

574-294-7511 Fax: 574-522-5213

251-330-7708 Fax: 251-457-7633

• •

910-862-4447 Fax: 910-862-7753

www.patriottimber.com 336-299-7755 askus@patriottimber.com Fax: 336-299-4050

www.patrickind.com piraccid@patrickind.com

www.overseashardwoods.com sales@overseashardwoods.com

www.turnbulllumber.com  pemjenkins@turnbulllumber.com

v o t i n g

Elkhart, Indiana

• • • • •

www.nawpi.com 503-620-6655 stevea@nawpi.com Fax: 503-598-7959

Patrick Industries, Inc.

Mobile, Alabama

OHC, Inc.

Elizabethtown, North Carolina

Portland, Oregon

www.newmanlumber.com 228-832-1899 info@newmanlumber.com Fax: 228-831-1149

• • •

Gulfport, Mississippi

www.moxontimbers.com 800-662-9665 shaynelachlan@moxontimbers.net Fax: 540-869-5656

• • • •

• • • • • • • •

www.morelandcompany.com 800-397-7769 jasonn@morelandcompany.com Fax: 941-953-5180

• • • •

• • •

Newman Lumber Company

Winchester, Virginia

Moxon Timbers, Inc.

Sarasota, Florida

Moreland Co., USA

Naples, Florida

www.mixtimber.com 607-753-0107 mix@mixtimber.com Fax: 607-758-7407

MiX Timber Inc.

• •

253-479-3900 Fax: 425-251-6096

www.metrofloors.com gpayseno@metrofloors.com

Kent, Washington

Metropolitan Hardwood Flooring USA

• • •

www.medallionfp.com 503-288-5002 pgallagher@medallionfp.com Fax: 503-288-5511

• •

• • • • •

Portland, Oregon

• • • •

Medallion Forest Products

• •

• • • • •

www.alanmcilvain.com 610-485-6600 sales@alanmcilvain.com Fax: 610-485-0471

www.mcilvain.com 410-335-9600 info@mcilvain.com Fax: 410-335-3574

White Marsh, Maryland

• • •

www.mccauseylumber.com 586-294-9663 heleen@mccauseylumber.com Fax: 586-294-1505

J. Gibson McIlvain Company

Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania

Roseville, Michigan

• • • •

www.mccathaytimber.com 800-683-6337 info@mccathaytimber.com Fax: 773-227-6767

• • • •

• • • • •

McCausey Lumber Company

Chicago, Illinois

• •

• • • • •

• •

McCathay Timber, Inc.

• •

www.mbveneer.com 513-874-4400 rkuck@mbohlkeveneer.com Fax: 513-682-1469

770-486-0216 Fax: 770-486-0217

M.Bohkle Veneer Corporation

Fairfield, Ohio

Fayetteville, Georgia

keith@lbr1coga.com www.lbr1coga.com

Lumber One Co. - Georgia Inc.

Toano, Virginia

www.lumberliquidators.com 757-566-7128 asecter@lumberliquidators.com Fax: 757-259-4286

Hardwood

plywood

agent/sales rep

Lumber Liquidators Inc.

Softwood

veneers

Hardwood

LUMBER

wholesalers

Web Site/Email Phone/Fax

r a d i ata p i n e

Company Name

North American Importers, Users, Distributors Softwood

PRODUCTS

i w p a M e m b e r s

57


i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood Hardwood

veneers

plywood

other panel products

Particleboard OSB

MDF

Hardboard

Softwood

Hardwood

Softwood

Hardwood

other lumber products

cabinets and/or components

furniture and/or components

doors/windows

mouldings

flooring

decking

Softwood

• • • • • • • •

• • •

• • • • •

• • • • •

www.rexlumber.com salesinfo@rexlumber.com

• • • • •

978-263-0055 Fax: 978-263-9806

www.reitzhardwoods.com 443-248-0611 hreitz@reitzhardwoods.com Fax: 856-467-5510

• •

• • • •

• •

• •

• •

• • • • •

• • •

• •

Sitco Lumber Company

• •

Burbank, California

Swaner Hardwood Company

Tiverton, Rhode Island

• •

• • • • • • • • • • To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

www.swanerhardwood.com 818-953-5350 gary@swanerhardwood.com Fax: 818-846-3662

www.stangelohardwoods.com 401-624-3900 steve@stangelohardwoods.com Fax: 401-624-3940

St. Angelo Hardwoods, Inc.

• • • • • 915-771-6500 Fax: 915-771-6552

www.solbuilding.com info@solbuilding.com

El Paso, Texas

Sol Building Materials Corp.

• •

www.sitco.com 972-225-4283 sales@sitco.com Fax: 972-228-5987

• • • • • • • • • • •

• • •

• 503-863-2861 Fax: 503-863-2879

www.sierrafp.com 801-972-3377 sales@ucsforestgroup.com Fax: 801 972 3397

Desoto, Texas

• • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

www.shamrockbm.com 503-643-8800 dwohler@shamrockbm.com Fax: 503-643-6642

Sierra Forest Products

Salt Lake City, UT

www.samlingusa.com 602-200-5630 cbirch@samlingusa.com Fax: 602-200-5631

www.shelterforest.com ryanloe@mac.com

Portland, Oregon

www.sabrainternational.com 305-868-3663 brette@sabrainternational.com Fax: 305-868-5447

• • •

• •

• • • • •

• • •

Shelter Forest International

Portland, Oregon

Shamrock Trading

Phoenix, Arizona

Samling USA

Miami Beach, Florida

Sabra International

Henderson, Nevada

• •

702-565-7756 john@rplinternational.com Fax: 702-565-3264

504-895-6377 Fax: 504-897-0820

RPL International

New Orleans, Louisiana

www.roblumco.com rlcnola@roblumco.com

• • •

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

www.getwood.com 631-586-7700 scottree@aol.com Fax: 631-586-7009

• •

Robinson Lumber Company, Inc.

Deer Park, New York

Roberts Plywood

www.robertweedplywood.com 574-848-7631 websitemail@robertwoodplywood.com Fax: 574-848-5679

Robert Weed Plywood Corp.

Fax: 804-747-8884

ken.nelson@rifp.com

Glen Allen, Virginia

Bristol, Indiana

www.prsguitars.com 443-248-0610 hreitz@prsguitars.com Fax: 410-643-4545

• • • •

Richmond International Forest Products www.rifp.com 800-767-0111

Acton, Massachusetts

Rex Lumber Company

Wilmington, Delaware

Reitz Hardwoods LLC

Stevensville, Maryland

PRS Guitars Ltd.

Portland, Oregon

www.pollmeier.com 503-452-5800 usa@pollmeier.com Fax: 503-452-5801

Pollmeier Inc.

• • • • • • • •

908-687-7890 Fax: 908-687-5750

www.pdusa.com plywood@pdusa.com

Plywood & Door Mfrs. Corp.

Union, New Jersey

wholesalers

• • • •

manufacturer

www.pittsburghforest.com 724-969-5000 troyhalo@pittsburghforest.com Fax: 724-969-1100

cumaru

McMurray, Pennsylvania

Web Site/Email Phone/Fax

LUMBER

v o t i n g

Pittsburgh Forest Products Co.

Company Name

North American Importers, Users, Distributors

importer

business activity

Exporter

PRODUCTS agent/sales rep

58 Other

i w p a M e m b e r s


Softwood

Hardwood

Softwood

Hardwood

other lumber products

cabinets and/or components

furniture and/or components

doors/windows

mouldings

flooring

decking

Softwood

Hardwood

• • •

• •

• •

Totem Forest Products

TradeLeaf LLC

• • •

• • • • •

• • • •

• •

• •

• • •

• • • • •

• • •

• • •

Tumac Lumber Company

UCS Forest Group

Lake Oswego, Oregon

Wood Brokerage International

Brampton, Ontario (Canada)

• • • • • • •

• • •

• • • •

• • •

• • • •

• •

• • •

• • • •

• • • 252-223-6359 Fax: 252-223-3511

305-722-6622 Fax: 305-722-6623

604-522-3334 Fax: 604-522-3006

• • • • • •

• • • •

• • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

i ni nt te er rn na a t ti oi on na al l wwood ood

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

www.woodbrokerage.com 800-453-3554 connelly@woodbrokerage.com Fax: 503-848-9039

www.westonpremiumwoods.com 905-792-9797 info@westonpremiumwoods.com Fax: 905-792-2096

• • •

336-288-2027 cmengel@live.com

www.veneertech.com jvarner@veneertech.com

Weston Premium Woods

www.ucsglobal.com 856-693-7571 sales_ucsglobal@ucsglobal.com Fax: 630-231-0454

Veneer Technologies, Inc.

Greensboro, North Carolina

• •

www.ucsforestgroup.com 905-814-8000 ucsglobal@ucsforestgroup.com Fax: 905-814-8788

www.usply.net raddick@aol.com

VM International LLC

• • • •

v o t i n g

Newport, North Carolina

inquiries@tumac.com 503-226-6661 www.tumac.com Fax: 503-273-2653

USPly Trading Company

Medley, Florida

• • •

www.troutriverlumber.com 434-645-2600 johnbarber@troutriverlumber.com Fax: 434-645-2603

www.ucsforestgroup.com Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada) sales_vancouver@ucfp.com

Upper Canada Forest Products

West Chicago, Illinois

UCS Global

Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

Portland, Oregon

Crewe, Virginia

Triton Logging Inc. www.tritonlogging.com 250-652-4033 Saanichton, Britich Columbia (Canada) info@tritonlogging.com Fax: 250-483-1955

• • • •

Trout River Lumber LLC

44 (0) 20-7460-7788 Fax: 44(0)20-7460-7799

336-230-2220 Fax: 336-230-2207

www.tradelink-group.com uk@tradelink-group.com

www.tradelink-group.com usa@tradelink-group.com

• • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

www.tradeleaf.com 212-595-1371 info@tradeleaf.com Fax: 212-202-3542

www.totemfp.com 877-467-7808 lbrittner@totemsteel.com Fax: 503-467-7808

• •

www.timberwolfusa.com 410-770-4435 info@timberwolfusa.com Fax: 410-770-9553

London (United Kingdom)

Tradelink Wood Products Ltd.

Greensboro, North Carolina

Tradelink Wood Products Inc.

New York, New York

Portland, Oregon

• • •

215-624-1866 Fax: 215-338-1060

Easton, Maryland

www.thomahog.com info@thomahog.com

• • • • •

• •

importer

• • • • •

wholesalers

• •

757-491-0468 Fax: 757-491-0723

Timberwolf Tropical Hardwoods

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Thompson Mahogany Company

• • •

415-765-0422 Fax: 415-765-0447

• •

www.taracapacific.com woztaraca@yahoo.com

www.taracapacific.com taraca@taracapacific.com

Virginia Beach, Virginia

Taraca Pacific, Inc.

San Francisco, California

Taraca Pacific, Inc.

El Cajon, California

www.taylorguitars.com 619-258-1207 ccosgrove@taylorguitars.com Fax: 619-258-4053

Hardboard

Taylor Guitars

MDF

other panel products

OSB

plywood

Particleboard

veneers

Other

LUMBER

manufacturer

Web Site/Email Phone/Fax

massaranduba

Company Name

North American Importers, Users, Distributors

Exporter

business activity agent/sales rep

PRODUCTS

i w p a M e m b e r s

59 59


i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood veneers

plywood

other panel products

MDF

Hardboard

Softwood

Hardwood

Softwood

Hardwood

other lumber products

cabinets and/or components

furniture and/or components

doors/windows

mouldings

flooring

decking

Softwood

Hardwood

• •

• • • • •

Focus Lumber Berhad

www.holz-international.com 305-600-2387 ingryd.taracena@holz-international.com Fax: 305-437-8045

Panama City (Panama)

Fax: 44-208-906-9570

tiddlondon@ghanatimber.co.uk

London (England)

Holz International

• • • • • • •

• • •

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

• • •

Ghana Forestry Commission (London Office) www.ghanatimber.org 44-208-906-9560

Accra (Ghana)

www.ghanatimber.org 233-21-221315 info@tidd.fcghana.com Fax: 233-21-220818

Ghana Forestry Commission

86-21-54893839 Fax: 86-21-54893837

jianguo_lu@hotmail.com

Shanghai (China)

60-88-393255/7/8 Fax: 60-88-393169

Future (Timber) Trading Company Ltd.

Likas, Kota Kinabalu (Malaysia)

www.focuslumber.com.my focuskk@tm.net.my

32-2-360-3702 tarik@exott.com Fax: 32-2-360-3802

Brussels (Belgium)

• • •

EXOTT

593-2-268-8806 Fax: 593-2-268-3680

www.sandeplywood.com sebastian@endesabotrosa.com

ENDESA - BOTROSA

Quito (Ecuador)

Moscow (Russia)

74-956-603462 Fax: 74-956-287197

• •

www.rusexportles.ru gk@rusexportles.ru

• •

CJSC Rusexportles Trading

787-783-1919 Fax: 787-782-9235

www.castellexport.com castellexport@prtc.net

San Juan, P.R. (Puerto Rico)

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

www.BarthsHamburg.de 49-40-280-1440 info@barthshamburg.de Fax: +49-40-280-14427

Castell Export Corporation

331-4342-4200 Fax: 331-4342-5522

Hamburg (Germany)

F.W. Barth Co. GmbH

Paris (France)

ATIBT (Assn Technique Int’l des Bois Tropicaux)

APP Timber Ltd.

www.atibt.com sec@atibt.com

www.apptimber.com 603-7847-4716 info@apptimber.com Fax: 603 7843 9240

Shah Alam, Negeri Selangor (Malaysia)

• • • •

www.andrighettilegnami.it  ufficio.estero@andrighettilegnami.it 

Sant’ Angelo di Piove, Padova (Italy)

39-049-970-0630  Fax: 39-049-970-0630

abimci@abimci.com.br

Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

Andrighetti Legnami S.P.A

TRADE ASSociatioN/ ORGANIZATION

5541-3225-4358 Fax: 5541-3225-4358

o v e r s e a s

ABIMCI (Brazilian Assn of Mech Processed Timber) www.abimci.com.br

Bremen (Germany)

49-421-56639233 busse@ab-timber.de Fax: 49-421-3469830

OSB

AB Timber Agency e.K.

manufacturer

Web Site/Email Phone/Fax

okoume

Company Name

Overseas Members

LUMBER

Particleboard

business activity

Exporter

PRODUCTS agent/sales rep

60 Other

i w p a M e m b e r s


> How does the Georgia Ports Authority do more for Georgia-Pacific?

“ Having multiple options

with container and breakbulk carriers at the Georgia Ports Authority is very important to us. It helps us deliver that perfect order to our customers. On time. Right quantity. Right quality.

– Ryan Hutcherson Director – Supply Chain Georgia-Pacific

> Get the whole story at GAPORTS.COM/GP. See how one of the world’s leading manufacturers of pulp, paper and building products relies on Savannah and Brunswick for fast turn times and greater efficiency.


i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood plywood

other panel products

manufacturer

OSB

MDF

Hardboard

Softwood

Hardwood

Softwood

Hardwood

other lumber products

cabinets and/or components

furniture and/or components

doors/windows

mouldings

flooring

decking

• • • • • • •

www.jayatiasa.net sales@jayatiasa.net

www.lionex.biz 603-4043-8869 info@lionex.biz Fax: 603-4043-8857

Jaya Tiasa Timber Products Sdn. Bhd.

Lionex (M) Sdn. Bhd.

www.mpveneers.com exports@mpveneers.com www.nhgtimber.co.uk sales@nhgtimber.co.uk

NHG Timber Ltd.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • •

PT. Tanjung Selatan Makmur Jaya

Regalis International

Rettenmeier Tatra Timber s.r.o.

Liptovský, Hrádok (Slovakia)

Tunis (Tunisia)

Jakarta (Indonesia)

• •

www.rettenmeier.sk vins.karol@rettenmeier.com

+421 44 52070-00 +421 44 52220-99

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

216-7196-4344 commerciale@regalisinternational.com.tn Fax: 216-71964334

www.tasply.com 62-21-5270577 tasply@gmail.com Fax: 62-21-5270578

• •

Jakarta (Indonesia)

• • • • • • • • • • • •

www.kligroups.com 62-21-5306448 buniadi@kligroups.com Fax: 62-21-5301575

PT. Kayu Lapis Indonesia

Singapore (Singapore)

65-63394100 Fax: 65-63419320

• •

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

www.olameurope.com ashish@olamnet.com

44 (0) 208-651-4030 Fax: 44 (0) 208-651-0913

91-755-2462351, 2461243 Fax: 91-755-2468197

Olam International Limited

Surrey (United Kingdom)

Bhopal, MP (India)

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • •

www.mccorry.com 60-88-517030 info@mccorry.com Fax: 60-88-538620

MP Veneers Pvt. Ltd.

Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

McCorry & Co. Limited

Geneva (Switzerland)

Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

41-22-300-5258 thomas@mbs-trading.com Fax: 41-22-300-5355

• •

MBS Trading

603-9281-1999 Fax: 603-9282-8999

• • • •

www.mtc.com.my council@mtc.com.my

6084-213255 Fax: 6084-213855/212084

Malaysian Timber Council

Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

Sibu, Sarawak (Malaysia)

• • • • • • • • • •

www.kligroups.com 919-303-8027 oppinc@aol.com Fax: 919-303-8040

International Wood Products, Inc.

itto@itto.or.jp

Yokohama, Minato-Mirai (Japan)

Apex, North Carolina (USA)

TRADE ASSociatioN/ ORGANIZATION

81-45-223-1110 Fax: 81-45-223-1121

veneers

o v e r s e a s

International Tropical Timber Organization www.itto.or.jp

Interholco AG www.interholco.ch 4141-767-0303 emmi.herger@interholco.ch Fax: 4141-767-0372

Hardwood

Baar, Zurich (Switzerland)

Softwood

Web Site/Email Phone/Fax

ipÉ

Company Name

Overseas Members

LUMBER

Particleboard

business activity

Exporter

PRODUCTS agent/sales rep

62 Other

i w p a M e m b e r s


cabinets and/or components

furniture and/or components

doors/windows

mouldings

flooring

decking

Softwood

Hardwood

Particleboard OSB

MDF

Hardboard

Softwood

Hardwood

Softwood

Hardwood

• • •

Tortola, Anderson (British Virgin Islands)

World Wood Technology S.A.

Frederiksberg (Denmark)

WoodBois International

Kampen (The Netherlands)

• • • • • •

+39 0424 513815 Fax: +39 0424 383878

• • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • • • • •

6231-9900 0907 Fax: 6231-9900 0908

• • • • • • • • •

i n t e r n a t i o n a l w ood

• • • • To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

jcm.wwtech@gmail.com

• • • • • • •

www.woodbois.dk 45-33-13888 info@woodbois.dk Fax: 45-33-913788

• • • • • • •

www.wijma.com 31-38-331-6444 g.burgman@wijma.com Fax: 31-38-332-2040

www.woodunited.com  rostron@woodunited.com

www.vicwoodtimber.com.cn 852-2543-1943 vicwood@vicwood.com Fax: 852-2854-1728

www.vastolegno.com 3902-344-684 info@vastolegno.com Fax: 3902-331-4270

www.redgrandis.com 598-2200-5759 chris@redgrandis.com Fax: 598-2209 6590

www.timtrade.it eugenio.colao@timtrade.it

371-29372621 Fax:1(714)-5510050

www.technowood.co.uk 41-91-911-6816 kevazingo@technowood.co.uk Fax: 41-91-911-6801

www.sgknordic.com sergei.kotov@sgknordic.com

o v e r s e a s

Wijma Trading

Singapore (Singapore)

Wood United Source Pte. Ltd.

Central Hong Kong (China)

Vicwood Development Ltd.

Milan (Italy)

Vasto Legno SpA

Montevideo (Uruguay)

Urufor, S.A.

Romano d’Ezzelino, Veneto (Italy)

TimTrade

London (England)

Technowood Ltd.

Riga (Latvia)

SGK Nordic, SIA

• •

www.timber.sca.com 250-717-5990 michael.wicklund@sca.com Fax: 250-717-5707

SCA Forest Products AB

Sundsvall (Sweden)

6082-443477 Fax: 6082-442691

pusaka@po.jaring.my

Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

Sarawak Timber Industry Dev. Corp. (STIDC) www.pusaka.gov.my

Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

other panel products

TRADE ASSociatioN/ ORGANIZATION

6082-332-222 Fax: 6082-487-888 / 999

www.sta.org.my sta@sta.org.my

Sarawak Timber Association

Paris (France)

plywood

manufacturer

• • • • • • • •

other lumber products

www.rougier.fr 00331-5377-2500 auguin@rougier.fr Fax: 00331-5377-2508

african mahagony

Rougier Afrique International

0039 0415629811 Fax: 0039 0415629810

www.romealegnami.com info@romealegnami.com

Gambarare di Mira (30034) Venice (Italy)

Romea Legnami S.P.A.

Web Site/Email Phone/Fax

Company Name

Overseas Members

veneers

Other

LUMBER

Exporter

business activity agent/sales rep

PRODUCTS

i w p a M e m b e r s

63


Guide to the Advertisers page company

phone website

32

AHC Craig Imports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-248-4393 . . . . . . www.hardwoodweb.com

25

American Hardwood Export Council. . . 703-435-2900 . . . . . . www.ahec.org

55

American Lumber Company. . . . . . . . . . 888-438-7888 . . . . . . www.alumber.com

BC

American Pacific Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 662-252-1862. . . . . . . www.americanpac.com

47

Argo Fine Imports, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504-828-0943 . . . . . . www.argofineimports.com

17

Baillie Lumber Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . 716-649-2850. . . . . . . www.baillie.com

23

Bozovich USA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251-578-4604. . . . . . . www.bozovich.com

39

Bridgewell Resources LLC . . . . . . . . . . . 800-640-3458. . . . . . www.bridgewellresources.com

IFC

29

Clarke Veneers and Plywood . . . . . . . . . 601-366-0331. . . . . . www.clarkeveneers.com

S a v e

T h e

D a t e

March 5 - 7, 2014

Rethink… Renew… Execute for Results

Del Valle, Kahman & Company, Inc.. . . . 714-522-3100. . . . . . . www.dvkco.com

44 Dragonwood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314-989-0700. . . . . . . www.dragonwood.cn 18

East Teak Fine Hardwoods, Inc.. . . . . . . 360-793-3754. . . . . . . www.eastteak.com

61

Georgia Ports Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . 912-964-3958. . . . . . . www.gaports.com

Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Course St. Petersburg, FL

21

Hardwood Specialty Products . . . . . . . . 916- 730-1125. . . . . . . www.hardwoods-inc.com

26

IKE Trading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-6688. . . . . . . www.iketrading.com

48

Interholco AG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4141-767-0303. . . . . . www.interholco.ch

37

Interwood Forest Products. . . . . . . . . . . 502-633-0017. . . . . . . www.ifpveneer.com

5

Liberty Woods International, Inc.. . . . . 800-367-7054. . . . . . . www.libertywoods.com

7

Lumber Liquidators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-274-2360. . . . . . . www.lumberliquidators.com

38

The Magellan Group, Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . 360-779-3275. . . . . . . www.worldforest.com

65

Malaysian Timber Council . . . . . . . . . . . 603-9281-1999. . . . . . www.mtc.com.my

51

Alan McIlvain Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610-485-6600 . . . . . . www.alanmcilvain.com

31

J. Gibson McIlvain Company . . . . . . . . . 410-335-9600 . . . . . . www.mcilvain.com

40

MP Veneers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91-755-2461243. . . . . www.mpveneers.com

24

Newman Lumber Company. . . . . . . . . . . 228-832-1899. . . . . . . www.newmanlumber.com

8-9

Pollmeier Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-452-5800 . . . . . . www.pollmeier.com

45

Port of Port Arthur. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409-983-2011. . . . . . . www.portofportarthur.com

35

Rex Lumber Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-263-0055 . . . . . . www.rexlumber.com

49

Robinson Lumber Company. . . . . . . . . . 504-895-6377 . . . . . . www.roblumco.com

11

Romea Legnami S.P.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39-041-5629811. . . . . www.romealegnami.com

4

Sarawak Timber Association. . . . . . . . . 60-82-332-222. . . . . . www.sta.org.my

Learn about the latest key trends and highlights for imported wood products.

43

Shorepoint Insurance Services . . . . . . . 714-430-0035 . . . . . . www.shorepointinsurance.com

Growth for Business:

52

South Jersey Port Corporation. . . . . . . . 856-757-4927. . . . . . . www.southjerseyport.com

33

Stiles Machinery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336-688-0987 . . . . . . www.stilesmachinery.com

27

Swaner Hardwood Company . . . . . . . . . 818-953-5350. . . . . . www.swanerhardwood.com

41

Timberwolf Tropical Hardwoods . . . . . . 877-709-9663. . . . . . . www.timberwolfusa.com

FIFC

Tradelink Wood Products Inc. . . . . . . . . 336-230-2220 . . . . . . www.tradelink-group.com

15

Tropical Forest Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . 703-518-8834. . . . . . . www.tropicalforestfoundation.org

53

U*C Coatings Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . 716-833-9366 . . . . . . www.uccoatings.com

FIBC/IBC

UCS Forest Group - Sierra Forest Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 866 265 0624. . . . . . . - UCS Forest Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866 265 0624. . . . . . . - Upper Canada Forest Products . . . . . . 866 265 0624. . . . . . .

20

www.sierrafp.com www.ucsforestgroup.com www.ucfp.com

Wood Brokerage International. . . . . . . . 800-453-3554 . . . . . . www.woodbrokerage.com

BC: Back Cover IFC: Inside Front Cover FIFC: Facing Inside Front Cover FIBC: Facing Inside Back Cover IBC: Inside Back Cover

64

international wood

Join us for our 58th Annual Convention: World of Wood Global Connection: Network with over 300 importers, U.S. manufacturers, overseas producers and companies. Education & Outreach:

Logistics and trade resources to keep you in tune with the business environment.

Location Attractions: Enjoy the location of downtown St. Petersburg filled with restaurants, museums, and much more.

Sponsorships Available!

Don’t miss this exciting event! For more information, please visit: www.iwpawood.org


Supplying projects across

Residential archway made with Accoya, a modified wood with a 50 year exterior warranty.

Khaya

Traditional millwork designs come alive in this new courthouse using genuine African Mahogany (Khaya).

www.ucfp.com

www.sierrafp.com

www.ucsglobal.com

www.forloversofwood.com

1 866 265 0624

1 866 265 0624

1 866 656 3830

1 800 265 0624

T O R O N T O • C A M B R I D G E • E D M O N T O N • C A L G A R Y • K E L O W N A • VA N C O U V E R


North America Hardwood Lumber Softwood Lumber Hardwood Plywood TFL (Melamine) High Pressure Laminate Hardware The new state-of-the-art Adobe office building in Lehi, Utah, made extensive use of Red Grandis.

Veneer Reconstituted Veneer Particleboard and MDF

FSC® products are available in all categories.

Member of

C H I C A G O • D E N V E R • S A LT L A K E C I T Y • S E AT T L E • P O R T L A N D



International Wood 2013