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I N T E R N AT I O N A L W O O D • T H E G U I D E T O A P P L I C AT I O N S , S O U R C E S A N D T R E N D S

WOOD

INTERNATIONAL

the guide to applications, sources and trends

Plywood: Hard Working and Good Looking Built to Last Designing For Good Featuring: I N TE R N ATIO N A L

FLOORS &DECKS

BUYERS GUIDE

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Our Priorities – Your Satisfaction.

QUALITY. SERVICE. Since 1973, Medley Hardwoods has served South Florida and the US market with top quality grade lumber to customers nationwide.

IMPORTED HARDWOODS

Genuine Mahogany (SOUTH AMERICA) Spanish Cedar African Mahogany (KHAYA IVORENSIS) Sapele Jatoba Santos Mahogany (CABREUVA) Cumaru Ipe Nogal (PERUVIAN WALNUT) Banak-Virola DOMESTIC HARDWOODS

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WOOD

INTERNATIONAL

the guide to applications, sources and trends

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46 I W PA O F F I C E R S PRESIDENT:

Chris Paras The Penrod Company VICE-PRESIDENT

Alan McIlvain Alan McIlvain Company SECRETARY/TREASURER

Warren Spitz UCS Forest Group IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT

Scott Beggs American Pacific, Inc. I W PA S TA F F

Brent J. McClendon, CAE Executive Vice President

Annette Ferri Director, Finance & Administration Editor/Sales, International Wood

Brigid Shea Director, Government Affairs and Membership Outreach PUBLISHER

John Aufderhaar Bedford Falls Communications 1617 Country Club Lane Watertown, Wisconsin 53098 aufderhaar@charter.net

I N T E R N AT I O N A L

FLOORS &DECKS Exotic woods are beautiful and durable, allowing most of them to seamlessly connect an external environment with an internal environment, flowing from your deck to your kitchen floor, or from a boardwalk into an art gallery, without a hitch. This resource guide provides detailed information on the favorite and emerging species for flooring and decking, with interesting case-studies, design pointers and wood sourcing tips.

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KML Design kmldesign@mchsi.com EDITORIAL

Suzanne VanGilder International Wood suzannevangilder@sbcglobal.net

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Please direct all advertising, circulation, or subscription questions to: IWPA, 4214 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22302 USA. PH: 703/820-6696 www.iwpawood.org.

From the Forest A message from the International Wood Products Association.

All Hands on Deck In New Orleans’ Warehouse District lies the 300,000 square-foot National World War II Museum. The experience offers a multi-sensory lesson that goes beyond viewing artifacts. The presence of cumaru, a Brazilian hardwood, soothes visitors’ emotional journeys into the past.

From Sea to Shining Sea Boat builders have relied on exotic wood species throughout recorded history, and for good reasons. Consistent exposure to sunlight and ample rainfall, tight grain structure and naturally occurring oils make species that grow near the equator a natural choice for marine usage.

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Plywood: Hard Working and Good Looking

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Exploring the Unexpected, Sensing New Styles

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DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Karen Leno

Copyright© 2010 International Wood is produced annually by the International Wood Products Association (IWPA) and its CURE (Conservation, Utilization, Reforestation, Education) program. CURE is the educational outreach program of IWPA.

Imported plywood made from Baltic birch, meranti/lauan and other tropical species are workhorse materials that perform consistently across a broad range of applications. In this collection of inspired projects, International Wood examines artists’ inspiration behind unique uses of exotic solid wood, plywood and veneers for objects stirring our human senses.

Built to Last What market researchers describe as “new consumers,” today’s buyers are placing more value on the life-cycle of products and materials, and exhibiting a renewed appreciation for quality craftsmanship.

Winning with Wood This year began an annual IWPA Awards Program that celebrates environmental, aesthetic design and innovative excellence. This recognition acknowledges the benefits of using tropical wood to promote sustainable forest management and support forest-dependent communities.

Supporting the Arts A performing arts hall is a dynamic, cultural space, and more than a box to put music in. A peek into three premier music halls in the United States shows how imported woods blend beauty and functionality in perfect harmony.

Designing for Good. Creating Impact Where it Counts. Imported wood species can meet or exceed any design requirement, but it is a choice that has positive implications far beyond the wood.

BUYERS GUIDE

IWPA Membership Directory highlighting the leading suppliers to the North American market of hardwood and softwood veneer, plywood, lumber, decking and other wood products and services. This one-stop resource guide provides contact information for the importers, overseas manufacturers, ports, shipping companies, third-party certifiers and others that advance international trade in wood products.

On the Cover: Jatoba flooring and makore veneered plywood

INTERNATIONAL WOOD PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION 4214 KING STREET, WEST ALEXANDRIA, VA 22302

703-820-6696 FAX: 703-820-8550 www.iwpawood.org PH:

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adorn the interior of Bijou Resto Bar located in the MontréalTrudeau Airport Marriott Hotel. Provencher Roy Associés Architectes and Moureaux Hauspy Associés Designers collaborated on the exquisite use of this Brazilian hardwood. PH OTO COURTESY OF STAYBULL FLO ORING .

IWPA/CURE would like to thank the advertisers on page 80 who provided the financial support that made this publication possible. In addition, we thank the following organizations for their support and cooperation, insight and energy, in producing and distributing this annual publication: The American Home Furnishings Alliance, Architectural Woodwork Institute, Moulding & Millwork Producers Association, National Marine Manufacturers Association, National Wood Flooring Association, North American Association of Floor Covering Distributors, North American Wholesale Lumber Association, and the Sarawak Timber Association.

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Panels / Lumber / Moulding / Decking / Flooring Sourcing wood overseas is one thing. Getting it delivered reliably is another. With our in-house customs and logistics team, Bridgewell Resources takes the hassles out of importing the world’s highest quality hardwoods and the headaches out of keeping up on the current, complex import regulations like the Lacey Act & ISF (10+2). Enjoy a trusted, long-term resource for pre-finished paneling, exotic hardwood flooring, decking, hardwood plywood, jambs, fingerjointed blanks and blocks, and timbers in all grades and sizes. When it comes to importing, we make it painless.

800.570.3566 / www.BridgewellResources.com Š2010 Bridgewell Resources LLC. All rights reserved.

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NATURAL

VALUE

Photo courtesy of Fetzer Architectural Woodwork.

There’s simply no match to the authentic beauty and durability of real hardwood. Pollmeier German beech complements any design style. It’s subtle grain pattern and light, uniform color takes a variety of finishes beautifully; creating an expensive look at a faction of the cost compared to cherry, walnut, mahogany and more. PEFC Certified Pollmeier beech is a renewable resource that is readily available now – and will be for thousands of years to come.

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Value you can see. Value you can profit from. Value you’ll want to experience. POLLMEIER VALUE ADDED GERMAN BEECH™ ■

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European Beech – the most available and sustainable temperate hardwood on the planet. North American Sales Office Portland, Oregon Toll Free 866-432-0699 Outside U.S. 503-452-5800 www.pollmeier.com At least 70% of our production is PEFC-certified.

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From the Forest

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elcome to the 7th edition of International Wood. This year’s edition features articles highlighting award-winning applications and designs, along with a “must have” sourcing Buyers Guide to the leading importers and service providers in the North American market. The sourcing guide is your link to the professionals who focus on procuring the best solution to a given situation in an ever changing environment. In today’s challenging conditions, it is common to see businesses lose their competitive edge by not considering all the available options in our global marketplace. Members of the International Wood Products Association (IWPA) are your source for global forest product solutions. You can count on IWPA members to supply your product needs in a sustainable, reliable and competitive manner. As President of IWPA it gives me great pleasure to present this edition of IW. The profile stories and information about imported wood projects offer inspiration to the 30,000 users, distributors, architects, specifiers and designers who make up the readership of IW. From commodity plywood applications to high-end flooring and architectural millwork, IW covers it all. We also report on the uses of imported wood in niche markets that have potential for growth. With exotic wood, the only limit is your imagination. It’s our hope that you will find this a valuable resource, one that helps connect you to new ideas, new business partners and a new understanding of the role of imported wood in sustainability of the world’s forests. To learn more about IWPA and imported wood, I invite you to attend our 2011 convention from April 13-15 in New Orleans. We’re planning a full program with sessions hosted by architects, designers and industry leaders. Plus, you’ll enjoy the best that New Orleans has to offer in food, music and hospitality. Please join us. To learn more, visit www.iwpawood.org.

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The forests provide a natural, wondrous and renewable palette of woods species in an amazing multitude of colors and grain patterns. There are literally thousands of species globally that spark the imagination of our readers. Each edition of International Wood provides insight into the wide range of projects that successfully incorporate imported species. We have made every effort below to identify the species referenced in this edition by its more common name and Genus species. Clearly communicating your needs with a U.S. importer, manufacturer, or supplier, can best assist you in locating the most appropriate species for your project. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Acacia/Asian walnut (Acacia spp.) Amendoim (Pterogyne nitens) Andiroba/royal mahogany (Carapa guianensis) Angelim pedra (Hymenolobium petraeum) Ash, European (Fraxinus excelsior) Balau, red/yellow (Shorea spp.) Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Birch, Baltic (Betula spp.) Brazilian cherry/jatoba (Hymenaea courbaril) Bubinga (Guibourtia spp.) Cocobolo (Dalbergia retusa) Couma (Couma spp.) Cumaru (Dipteryx odorata) Ebony (Diospyros spp.) Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.) Fir, Douglas (Pseudotsuga menziesii) Garapa (Apuleia leiocarpa) Greenheart (Ocotea rodiaei) Hura (Hura crepitans) Imbuia (Phoebe porosa) Ipé (Tabebuia spp.) Khaya/African mahogany (Khaya spp.) Koa (Acacia koa) Lacewood (Cardwellia sublimis) Macassar ebony (Diospyros spp.) Machiche (Lonchocarpus castilloi) Mahogany, Honduran (Swietenia macrophylla) Mahogany, Philippine/white lauan (Pentacme contorta) Makoré/African cherry (Tieghemella heckelii and T. africana) Mandioqueira, Red/ Mandio (Qualea spp.) Massaranduba/Brazilian redwood (Manilkara bidentata) Meranti/lauan (Shorea spp.) Moabi/guajara (Baillonella toxisperma) Okoume (Aucoumea klaineana) Padauk (Pterocarpus spp.) Pearwood (Pyrus communis) Purpleheart (Peltogyne spp.) Requia (Guarea trichilioides) Rosewood, East Indian (Dalbergia latifolia) Sande (Brosimum utile) Santos mahogany/cabreuva (Myroxylon balsamum) Sapele (Entandrophragma spp.) Sycamore, English (Acer pseudoplatanus) Tigerwood (Astronium fraxinifolium) Wallaba (Eperua spp.) Wenge (Millettia laurentii) Zebrawood (Microberlinia brazzavillensis)

REFERENCES:

Chris Paras, IWPA President | The Penrod Company 10

– USDA Forest Products Lab: www.fpl.fs.fed.us/search/commonname_request.php – The Wood Explorer: www.thewoodexplorer.com – CIRAD-Agricultural Research Center for International Development: http://tropix.cirad.fr/index_gb.htm

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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THE FINAL PIECE TO THE HARDWOOD PUZZLE Baillie has long been recognized as the trusted name in premium North American hardwood lumber.

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Jesper Bach Exotic Hardwoods Manager

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prides itself on meeting any customer’s most demanding challenges with custom sorts. So whether the answer to your hardwood question is domestic or exotic, Baillie Lumber wants to be your... Single Source Solution.

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IM AG ES COURTESY OF THE N ATION A L WOR LD WA R II MUSEUM

ALL HANDS ON DECK To provide some emotional respite from the heavy subject matter of war, the National World War II Museum also built a restaurant (recently named the second best in New Orleans) and a USO-style entertainment canteen. All venues utilize cumaru as a primary surface finish because the wood is durable, attractive and provides a periodappropriate aesthetic. ORIGIN STORY

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estled between New Orleans’ famous French Quarter and Garden District is the Warehouse District. In an area that once housed an old beer factory, a 300,000 square-foot museum of national and local importance is unfolding. Conceived and built in stages, the National World War II Museum offers visitors a multi-sensory experience that goes beyond viewing artifacts. Everywhere you look, you are soothed by the presence of cumaru (Dipteryx odorata), a Brazilian hardwood. “Visiting the museum is an intimate, emotional experience, where you learn with your head and your heart. You are inspired by what this grand republic can achieve when we work together,” says Academy award-winning actor Tom Hanks, who serves as the honorary chair of the museum’s capital campaign. “Our mission is urgent. We are losing WWII veterans everyday. Their stories form a foundation that is valuable for learning and sharing. This was the dream of Stephen Ambrose. He wanted the lessons and the stories of the generation that fought the war, on the home-front and on the battle-front, preserved for all future generations.”

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Famed historian Dr. Stephen E. Ambrose was the official biographer of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. According to Bob Farnsworth, senior vice president of Capital Programs for the National WWII Museum, it was during an interview that Eisenhower learned Ambrose lived and worked in New Orleans, Louisiana. “Do you know Andy Higgins?” the President asked Ambrose. “No, I don’t,” Ambrose replied. “That’s too bad,” said Eisenhower, “because he is the man that won the war for us.” While Andrew Jackson Higgins did not personally win WWII, his New Orleans-based company designed and built the landing crafts that made the D-Day invasions possible. (Read more about the use of exotic wood in the construction of Higgins boats and modern day water crafts on page 16.)

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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Many years later in 1991 Ambrose and his good friend, current National WWII Museum president, Gordon H. “Nick” Mueller were sitting in Ambrose’s backyard. They came up with the idea to build a D-Day museum as a tribute to the brave men and women who made the amphibious invasions in Europe, Africa and the Pacific theaters successful. They chose New Orleans as the location to pay homage to Higgins. On the 56th anniversary of the Normandy invasion that liberated Europe, June 6, 2000, the National D-Day museum opened. Early fundraising efforts quickly caught the attention of many influential people, from governors and senators, to Tom Hanks and Tom Brokaw. It became clear that there was a driving interest to create a museum that told the entire story of WWII. In 2003 the D-Day Museum received the congressional designation as the National World War II Museum, and with it, an opportunity to create a tribute of grander scale. “My friend, historian Stephen E. Ambrose, imbued this museum with his deep regard for the citizen soldier, for the men and women who went halfway around the world, not to conquer, but to liberate. He understood that America’s gift of democracy was an act unparalleled in the course of human history,” says Hanks. Designing a Legacy

“Natural wood is used in a most spectacular way in the bar. The ceiling has this perforated, stainless steel screen that is suspended between cumaru veneered fins. There is this dialect between the steel mesh and the cumaru that reinforces both. It is really quite beautiful, with a very natural feeling.” Todd Kinser, senior project manager, Gallagher Associates

shuttersto ck im ag e for ed itoria l use only

The National World War II Museum has been described by a veteran from the USS Indianapolis as, “A place where you come to feel the greatness of America.” An international competition was launched to find the right design firm for the job. Voorsanger Architects of New York City won the project, working in conjunction with local firm Mathes Brierre Architects and renowned exhibit designers Gallagher & Associates. Principal Bart Voorsanger, himself an army veteran, invited a WWII veteran Lt. Commander who stormed the beaches of Normandy, to meet with the design team and convey the appropriate tone for the project. “This could not be designed intellectually,” says Voorsanger. “There had to be an emotional component, a commitment.” “How do you tell the story of WWII in terms of architecture? What we didn’t want was a neutral, minimalistic container. That’s fine for art museums, but we wanted an architecture of visual strength, yet it could not be intimidating,” says Voorsanger. Large pre-cast concrete panels and ribbed metal are prominent features of the exterior that carry into the museum. To temper the effect, cumaru flooring and decking flows through public spaces, in both interior and exterior applications. “It is strong, without making visitors feel subordinated. The fine-grained wood humanizes the spaces,” says Voorsanger.

Cumaru Completes the Scene

The National WWII Museum will eventually include five pavilions built around a central parade ground that tell the story of the war from the events that led to United States involvement, through post-war liberation. The first phase of the expansion finished in 2009 with the Solomon Victory Theatre, American Sector restaurant and Stage Door Canteen. Since completion of the first phase, visitation has doubled, far exceeding projections. “About 80 percent of visitors come from outside the region,” says Farnsworth, “and about a third of them come to the city specifically for the museum. It has become a cultural destination.” The Solomon Victory Theater mixes immersive theatrics, digital effects and star power to convey the authentic epic of WWII in Beyond All Boundaries, a film produced by Tom Hanks. This 4-D experience is designed to appeal to the broadest possible audience. It includes a 120-foot scrim, life-sized props and atmospherics (like feeling tanks rumble), in addition to traditional film and sound effects.

above: the American Sector Restaurant offers a place of emotional respite from the heavy subject of war. left: Museum founder Stephen E. Ambrose talks with World War II Reenactors at the June 6, 2000, opening events. international wood

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“Our wood flooring selections are based on durability, cost, aesthetic coordination and environmental sustainability. For this project we felt the quality and look of the cumaru worked well with the design intent and function of the space.” Todd Kinser, senior project manager Gallagher Associates

After an emotionally-charged viewing, visitors can head over to the American Sector restaurant to decompress. Acclaimed chef (and former marine) John Besh offers a menu that honors the food of the Greatest Generation with a contemporary twist on old favorites. Housemade bologna with spicy chow-chow, anyone? Diners enjoy a relaxing atmosphere that is at the same time upscale and down home. “The cumaru flows from the deck where there is patio seating into the restaurant,” says Voorsanger. “Natural wood is used in a most spectacular way in the bar. The ceiling has this perforated, stainless steel screen that is suspended between cumaru veneered fins. There is this dialect between the steel mesh and the cumaru that reinforces both. It is really quite beautiful, with a very natural feeling.”

The Stage Door Canteen is an entertainment and dining venue created by exhibition design firm Gallagher & Associates to bring the memorable traditions of war-time diversions to life. Patterned after the original Canteens where Bette Davis served desserts and Red Skelton told jokes to GI’s headed off to war, the National WWII Museum’s venue also features live entertainment of the era. Cumaru was also specified for the stage and flooring in the venue, which features live jazz, swing dancing, comedy and musical theater of yesteryear. “Our wood flooring

selections are based on durability, cost, aesthetic coordination and environmental sustainability,” says Todd Kinser, senior project manager for Gallagher Associates. “For this project, we felt the quality and look of the cumaru worked well with the design intent and function of the space.” We’re All In This Together

Although Stephen Ambrose (1936-2002) would not live to see his vision for a National World War II Museum come to life, he started a campaign to teach future generations the true cost of liberty, so that it would never be forgotten. “People came together – black and white, old and young, men and women – to propel the war effort. They believed that, as a popular saying of the times had it, 'we're all in this together.' Their sense of duty, of right and wrong, their teamwork and their courage embody the American spirit. The National D-Day Museum celebrates the American spirit. Since 1945, democracy and freedom have been on the march. But visitors will learn not just of what we have done, they will learn of what we can do. They will learn that we are still in this together." An imported wood used as the foundation for a quintessential American experience is just another way the museum successfully conveys that message of unity. IW

The National WWII Museum will eventually include five pavilions built around a central parade ground that tell the story of the war from the events that led to United States involvement, through post-war liberation.

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international wood

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FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA

© ISTOCKPHOTO.COM /A ND R E J G OD JE VAC

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xotic wood species have been used in boatbuilding throughout recorded history, and for good reasons. Species that grow near the equator, with consistent exposure to sunlight and ample rainfall, are dense with tight grain structure and oils that give them desirable characteristics for marine usage. Different species of both plank and plywood are used to build vessels of varying size and shape. Large boats, like the Higgins LCVP landing crafts and PT torpedo boats used throughout World War II used a great deal of Honduras mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) and Philippine mahogany (Pentacme contorta). Similar techniques and materials show up in the classic Chris-Craft motorboats and today’s artisan yachts. Small vessels like kayaks and skiffs, favor exotic plywood such as okoume (Aucoumea klaineana), meranti (Shorea spp.) and sapele (Entandrophragma spp.) that are strong, flexible, lightweight and free of knots and voids.

“Mahogany has been a favorite of boat builders forever. It is just lovely wood to work with for boats. It is uniform and generally straight, but it is also virtually impervious to salt water rot.” BRUCE HARRIS, SHIPWRIGHT NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM

FOR DUT Y

Andrew Jackson Higgins is one of the unsung heroes of WWII. His New Orleans- based company, Higgins Industries, was the designer and manufacturer of the Higgins boats, including the PT (Patrol Torpedo) boats and the famed LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel) boats that enabled Allied troops to land on beaches and swamps. Pre-war, Higgins imported lumber from the Philippines, Central America and Africa and exported cypress and pine. He built a shipyard that serviced cargomen, tugs and barges. And he also developed a shallow-draft craft used by oil drillers and trappers that was the pre-cursor to the LCVP. The National World War II Museum built an LCVP from the original plans, and is in the

process of restoring a PT-305. Bruce Harris is the shipwright for both projects. “The LCVP with the ramps, the one you see in the old film footage, is virtually all exotic wood,” says Harris. “They were made from a combination of Honduran mahogany for the frames, and Philippine mahogany double-planking for the hull. People called them plywood, but on the LCVPs the only plywood was the side hulls. Some of the larger timbers were yellow pine as well.” The PT boats used a combination of Honduran mahogany and white spruce for the ribs, and the same Philippine mahogany double planking for the hull, with plywood bulkheads. “The framing is very typical of 20th century industrial boat building, there is nothing new there. It is the same basic plan for most larger wood boats, with a standard ribs, keel and chine (angle and shape of the hull). They’re planked and caulked.” “Mahogany has been a favorite of boat builders forever,” says Harris. “It is just lovely wood to work with for boats. It is uniform and generally straight, but it is also virtually impervious to salt water rot. It is a deciduous

THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM BUILT AN LCVP FROM THE ORIGINAL PLANS (ABOVE) AND IS IN THE PROCESS OF RESTORING A PT-305 (LEFT).

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tree, so there is not great grain differential. The material itself is very easily worked.” Higgins had his own plant where he made the plywood and planks for his boats, and he understood the value of the exotic species. According to Harris, just before the fall of the Philippines Higgins saw what was coming. He bought all the available lumber and got it out of the Philippines within days of when the Japanese took over Manila. Higgins bought so much lumber that it lasted him throughout the entire war. Over 20,000 Higgins boats of various models were built during WWII by Higgins and licensees. By 1943, they made up 92% of the vessels in the United States fleet.

ArgoFine Imports (Better by definition) (är’go) 1. Importers of hardwood plywood 2. Consistently high quality panels 3. Experienced and knowledgeable sales staff. 4. Maintaining the highest integrity standards in the industry. HIGGINS FACTORY

“The more ply, the more stability, so you get a stronger material that is lighter-weight,” explains Steeves. The final characteristic of exotic species plywood that makes it valuable for boatbuilding is flexibility. “The majority of boats being built right now are relatively small ones out of okoume,” says Steeves. “By the numbers, there are more kayaks, skiffs and rowing boats. The okoume is used for construction, and meranti is used for interior structure and repair of existing boats.” Most of these smaller vessels are built FOR PLEASURE using the classic stitch and glue method. The About the time WWII was resolved, Rick plywood panels are designed on a computer Steeves, owner of Noah’s Marine was getting and cut on a CNC machine. The shaped panels interested in boats. Noah’s Marine sells mahave pre-drilled holes. “It is very simple and efterials and kits for boat building, and though fective, “says Steeves. “Copper wire is threaded their boats are used for pleasure rather than through the holes in the plywood panels from battle, they appreciate exotic wood materials. the outside. Then you twist the wire with pliers “Modern-day marine plywood probably does to tighten it up. That is what gives the boat its not differ a lot from the wood used during war shape.” Fiberglass tape and epoxy are applied time,” says Steeves. to the inside, the stitches are removed, and the Steeves identifies three different characteroutside is finished. istics of marine-grade exotic plywood, beyond machineability and resistance to water-rot, FOR ALL that make it unique.” Marine plywood needs Whether for battle or recreation, exotic to be knot-free, and the exotic species are wood plywood and lumber has long been usually big trees, so they offer that,” says the material of choice for boat builders. It is Steeves. Another important characteristic is free of voids, strong, lightweight and flexible. that with the okoume and meranti/lauan, it “They naturally make splendid boats,” says is possible to get more layers of thinner veneer. Harris. IW

Offering these fine products: CARB PHASE 2 PANELS AVAILABLE MERANTI Indonesian, Malaysian, Chinese MELAPI Indonesian FLORCORE EXTREME UNDERLAYMENT RED OAK Indonesian, Chinese, UV BIRCH CABINET SELECT Chinese BIRCH Russian, Chinese OBECHE China POPLAR China OKOUME Chinese BIRCH / OKOUME Chinese PARTICLEBOARD Mexico KERUING/KAPUR Indonesian FIR FINGER JOINT LUMBER CORE Chinese, Brazil CONTAINER FLOORING Indonesian FRAMESTOCK Chinese, Indonesian,Brazil RADIATA PINE Chile ELLIOTTIS PINE Brazil

Sales contacts DON MACMASTER President DICK OLANO TODD WAGER ROBERT MACMASTER JOE MANGUNO KENNY MACMASTER BUZZ CLANTON

PHOTO COURTESY OF BURG ER BOATS

BOB KEEP

Metairie, Louisiana PHONE: 504-828-0943 FAX: 504-828-0946 E-MAIL: argo@argofineimports.com INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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Plywood:

HARD WORKING AND GOOD LOOKING

© ISTO CK PH OTO.COM YENWEN LU

PERFORMANCE WITH ST YLE

To “ply” is to work at diligently, or to apply something repeatedly. Imported plywood made from species such as Baltic birch (Betula spp.), meranti/lauan (Shorea spp.), and other tropical species are workhorse materials that perform consistently across a broad range of applications. Generally available from 3-ply thickness up to 13-ply, they are used extensively as framing, interiors and core materials. For people who design and build, exotic plywood is easy to love. It is strong, lightweight, flexible, has a very smooth surface for laminating and is dimensionally stable.

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Imported plywood is readily available and easy to machine. These characteristics alone are enough for some contemporary designers to use it as a primary material in their work. Despite its wide usage as a structural product, furniture designer Nathan Tobiason of RevolDesign chose Baltic birch plywood for his clever Folding Chair and Ottoman. “It has a couple of great qualities,” says Tobiason. “The material has thirteen plies, which is unheard of in domestic species of the same thickness. And there are no voids. With most plywood, if you cut it down the middle, there are going to be little gaps. Not so with the Baltic birch. It is clean.” The uniformity that Tobiason values is due to the density of Baltic birch, a species well suited for rotary cutting. Because of the inherent characteristics of the material, it can be sheared in one long slice. That piece is then cut to size, in this case 5 foot by 5 foot sheets. Each of the thirteen plies is laid up with the grain perpendicular to the adjacent layers. The resulting panel has superior strength and more flexibility than solid lumber, and is less prone to warping. Tobiason came up with the idea for his furniture design while experimenting with cardboard models. He was trying to fashion a shelf that could easily go from square to flat. Instead, he hit upon a concept for furniture that can quickly and easily open and fold without any tools. “Both the chair and the ottoman are made out of the same sheet of Baltic birch plywood, so they have the same wood throughout the pieces, and the grain patterns line up,” says Tobiason. The design is nested and cut out by a CNC router. Folding Chair and Ottoman uses twelve feet of custom stainless steel piano hinges that run the length of all the junctions. “It just seemed nicer than to have a couple of big, fat hinges,” says Tobiason, who makes his furniture in the USA. A basic sanding and polyeurethane finish complete this simple, elegant concept.

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CURB APPEAL In some applications, exotic plywood has both aesthetic and functional value. John Southard works in marketing and product development for Northwest Door, a garage door manufacturer based in Tacoma, Washington. He has been in the garage door industry since 1976. Garage doors have to be able to perform in both indoor and outdoor environments. “We use meranti and lauan plywood because doors have to look good, and we don’t want to use materials that are not going to hold up,” says Southard. According to Southard, about thirteen years ago carriage-style swing doors that open like conventional garage doors were introduced to the marketplace. They were immediately in demand, and the only way to achieve the attractive design was with exotic plywood. “Steel products were really popular with consumers for awhile,” says Southard. “But to get that classic, upscale look of the carriage doors, you have to use wood. You can make it look like anything, which is not true with sheet metal. It is also very workable.” There are several versions of carriage-style garage doors, but the basic design involves a framework of stiles and rails, a wood panel face and a ¼ inch lauan plywood back panel. “Most plywood that is ¼ inch doesn’t have an exterior glue line, but the lauan does,” says Southard. “Lauan plywood is the industry standard. The logs are rotary cut, pulling off big beautiful layers, so we can get large sheets that have the same grain all the way across. That gives the interior side a smooth regular face with a nice, clean appearance.”

Supplying U.S. industry with the best panel products from the world’s greenest sources

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TradeLeaf LLC P.O. Box 232 New York, NY 10024-0232 Phone: 212 595 1371 Fax: 212 202 3542 info@tradeleaf.com www.tradeleaf.com John Andl

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The door fronts are generally 5/8-inch meranti, redwood or western red cedar panels. “All three species perform really well. The difference comes in finishing. Western red cedar has a lot of resin, and both the cedar and the redwood have tannins. So if you paint them instead of finishing them naturally, it tends to bleed through,” says Southard. “The meranti is more of a dual purpose material, it looks nice when it is finished naturally, but it also looks very good painted.” Meranti’s characteristic grain structure means the material is less likely to cup or bow. “When you cut it straight, it stays straight.” Northwest Door distributes high-quality garage doors exclusively through installation dealers in the United States. Although their carriage-style swing doors typically adorn beautiful higher-end residences, they are constructed using predictable, readily available, costeffective imported plywood.

“The meranti is more of a dual purpose material, it looks nice when it is finished naturally, but it also looks very good painted.” JOHN SOUTHARD MARKETING AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, NORTHWEST DOOR

DEL VALLE, KAHMAN & COMPANY, INC. Serving the Industry Since 1905 “With our large and diverse inventory of top-quality plywood, DVK is the preferred supplier to the wholesale industry.”

Major Importer of Certified Hardwood Plywood to the Western U.S. and to Mexico • PROVEN QUALITY AND VALUE • CUSTOMER FOCUSED – DIRECT DELIVERIES AVAILABLE • PRIVATE FULLY-STOCKED WAREHOUSE, NO APPOINTMENTS REQUIRED • EXCLUSIVE U.S. DISTRIBUTOR OF JAPANESE “RIKA” UNIVEN VENEER TAPE, 3/8" X 3,300' 20

ernie@dvkco.com TEL:

714-522-3100 • FAX: 714-523-1900 • Los Angeles, California

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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CERTIFICATION AND LEGALITY FROM COAST TO COAST, IMPORTED PLYWOOD MEETS THE GRADE

Holland Southwest International, Inc.

Several new laws are now on the books to assure that domestic and imported woods meet the same standards. The U.S. Lacey Act requires due diligence to ensure that the wood products traded (whether domestic or imported) are harvested in compliance with the country of origin. IWPA members conduct due diligence (risk assessment) of their supply chain to demonstrate that they know their suppliers are operating within the confines of the forestry laws of their country. Due diligence may include such tools as supplier questionnaires, site visits, auditing and third-party verification, among others. There are additional requirements for composite wood products (plywood) to assure they meet national formaldehyde emission standards. The new standards are similar to those already being enforced in the state of California, which have already expanded the market for imported products in the state. The new laws assure imported wood products are on equal footing with domestic products in terms of legality and consumer safety. As a result, U.S. manufacturers and distributors are increasingly recognizing that these higher standards create a value proposition for imports that has never been higher. ■

Holland Southwest International is a global trader in a wide range of panel products, and the largest importer and distributor of hardboard and thin MDF in the United States. Holland’s experienced professionals have long standing relationships with suppliers around the world to ensure you get the highest quality products at the lowest cost. If you are sourcing panel products for furniture and cabinet manufacturing or for your next commercial or OEM project, call Holland Southwest today. If you need it…Holland has it…ready to ship direct to you from strategically located domestic warehouses.

LAUAN IS EASY TO BEND AND MACHINE, MAKING IT THE IDEAL “SKIN” FOR HOLLYWOOD SETS AND THEATRE PRODUCTIONS.

© ISTO CKPHOTO.COM SERG E YL AV R ENTE V

Holland’s product lines include:

• • • •

HARDBOARD PARTICLEBOARD MDF MELAMINE

• PLYWOOD including Russian and Chinese Birch • PANELING • TILEBOARD … and we offer custom finishing and cut-to-size to your specifications

HIDDEN TALENTS Although it can be visually appealing, exotic plywood is used extensively in unseen applications. From Hollywood to Broadway, sets for movies, television shows and theatre productions are framed and “skinned” with lauan plywood of varying thickness. Because it is lightweight and flexible, it is the primary material used in the construction of Mardi Gras floats and 3-dimensional props in theme parks. Beyond decorative objects, imported plywood is also indispensible in structural construction. Specialty panels engineered with alternating layers of hardwood and softwood, such as birch and spruce from Finland, are the material of choice for concrete forming. Face veneers are made from the hardwood, which has a tighter grain structure that is less likely to telegraph (imprint texture) as the concrete sets. The plywood surfaces are treated with a releasing agent, typically an overlaid phenolic surface film (PSF) that prevents the concrete from sticking to the form. Large, concrete structures are possible because the multi-layered construction of imported plywood forms provides excellent strength and support. In fact, plywood forms are so durable that they are routinely reused.

Holland Southwest “Working Globally to Serve You Locally” CALL OUR SALES DEPARTMENT TODAY 800-356-4144 EXT 113

iwpa@hollandsw.com

www.hollandsw.com INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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Kaochuan Woodwork Co., Ltd. (TAIWANESE ENTERPRISE) Manufacturer and Exporter of Fancy Plywood, Plywood, Layons, Drum Plywood & Relevant Products AMERICAN SPECIES

Red Oak, Maple, Cherry, White Ash, Hickory, White Oak, Walnut, Alder, Curly Maple, Bird’s eye Maple AFRICAN SPECIES

Aniegre, Sapele, Zebra, Bubinga, Wenge, Makore, Okume, Artificial Figured Aniegre, Mahogany

“When you offer customers a solid environmental product with beautiful characteristics, you are going to see an increase in sales.”

CHINESE SPECIES

Cherry, White Birch, Basswood, Ash, Oak, Maple, Lacewood, Teak

SCOTT KORSTEN, MARKETING DIRECTOR, SHOWPLACE WOOD PRODUCTS

BURLS

Mappa Burl, Indonesia Camphor, Maple Burl, Cypress Burl, Chinese Maple Burl, Chinese Mappa Burl, Cat’s eye Burl

MORE THAN JUST A PRETT Y FACE In many applications, imported plywood serves as a substrate or interior material in products that showcase exotic lumber and decorative veneer. This common interplay of materials improves the stability and reduces construction costs for U.S. manufacturers of furniture, cabinetry and flooring. It also promotes the responsible use of renewable materials, which is increasingly important to consumers. Showplace Wood Products, Inc. manufactures a premium kitchen cabinet line with Lyptus®, a rapidly replenishable eucalyptus hybrid grown on plantations in South America. “When you offer customers a solid environmental product with beautiful characteristics, you are going to see an increase in sales,” says Scott Korsten, marketing director, Showplace Wood Products. The cabinets feature solid Lyptus® face frames, panel doors, drawer fronts and moldings. Lyptus® veneer plywood is used for the exposed end panels and box frame construction. “We’ve seen an overall decrease in sales as customers put home building or remodeling projects on hold, but Lyptus® sales have held strong,” adds Korsten. “At Showplace, this indicates a paradigm shift in customer purchasing. Cabinetry can no longer be only beautiful or only sustainable to attract customers; it needs to be both.” Using exotic plywood, lumber and veneer creates real value in consumer products and commercial applications. IW

OTHER SPECIES

Burma Teak, European Beech, Ebony, Pao Rose, Nyatoh, Rose Wood, Ramin, Agathis, Mersawa, White sycamore, Swiss pear CORE

Plywood, MDF, Blockboard, Particle Board VENEER

Both Thick & Thin realwood veneer / Paper SIZE

4’X8’ / 3’X7’ / Oversize / Cut to size THICKNESS

2.5~25mm for Fancy Plywood ; 1.6~40mm for Plywood ; 0.1~2.5mm for Veneer

Please visit our website at: www.kaochuanwoodwork.com CERTIFICATIONS:

MUTU Certification-ARB Approved TPC6 • ISO 9001 ISO 14001 • EWC-Ever Win Quality Certification Center •

MEMBER:

International Wood Products Association • Architectural Woodwork Institute • Hardwood Plywood & Veneer Association • Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association • IAF-Multilateral Recognition Arrangement •

Jiaxing Kaochuan Woodwork Co., Ltd Ms Barbara Chiu Huimin Industrial District, Jiashan County 314112 Zhejiang Province, China Tel: +86-573-84646168 Fax: +86-573-84646038 kaochuan@kaochuanwoodwork.com www.kaochuanwoodwork.com 22

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A Renewable Resource Company With over 100 years in the wood products business, DLH Nordisk takes pride in providing our customers the best quality wood on time and on price. With sourcing in Europe, Africa, Asia, South America, and the United States we stand ready to supply your specific needs from landed stock and from the source. Rough Lumber, Decking, Flooring, Plywood, Timbers, Post and Pilings are only some of the products we can provide in species ranging from Mahogany, Jatoba, and Cedar to super durable woods like Ipe, Azobe and Greenheart. Give us a call for all your wood needs.

DLH Nordisk, Inc. 2307 West Cone Blvd. Suite 200 Greensboro, NC 27408 www.dlhusa.com dlhusa@dlh窶身roup.com

1.800.688.2882 1.

ツゥ

SW-COC-004114 Responsible Forest Management ツゥ 1996 Forest Stewardship Council A.C.

The FSC logo identifies products which contain wood from well managed forests certified in accordance with ac the rules of the Forest Stewardship Council.

international wood

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The Leading Edge of Design

P

INTER N ATION AL

FLOORS &DECKS Designing with imported wood flooring and decking is an extraordinary means of self-expression that goes beyond just picking a pretty plank. No other investment in décor has the power to both immediately increase property value, and simultaneously support responsible forest stewardship worldwide.

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eople are ready for growth. Recent studies show that consumers are ready to start spending again, even on luxury items, but that they are buying based on new criteria. More than ever the “new consumer” is concerned about value and sustainability. Whether in residential or commercial applications, the cautious nature of today’s market requires materials to deliver on both fronts. Exotic wood flooring and decking products are especially well-suited to the current market ideals. Though luxurious, these natural materials are also environmentally responsible and long lasting. The development of legislation, certification programs and industry associations dedicated to ensuring the legitimacy of imported wood now enables consumers and specifiers to select exotic species with confidence. Designing with imported wood flooring and decking is an extraordinary means of self-expression that goes beyond just picking a pretty plank. No other investment in décor has the power to both immediately increase property value, and simultaneously support responsible forest stewardship worldwide. Specifying exotic species generally reflects research and critical thinking, the desire to understand where things come from, where they end up, and how to care for them in the interim. This guide is in no means comprehensive. It would be impossible to answer every question about the specification and application of all the varieties of imported wood suitable for flooring and decking. Instead it is designed to address the fundamentals of species, styling, sustainability and sourcing; particularly in relationship to the market’s demand for real value and environmental accountability. The guide provides insight into contemporary design trends. It is also a catalyst, providing just enough information to spark the imagination. For more details about any of the topics discussed here, or for answers to specific questions, please visit www.iwpawood.org.

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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Reinventing with Wood

T

he Peninsula House started out as a simple attic remodel for the client’s two children. When that was finished, the owners were so thrilled with the way the massaranduba (Manilkara bidentata) looked on the floor and walls that they decided to do more. “By the end of it we gutted the whole house and added a pool, a boat dock, deck and green roofs,” says Tom Tornbjerg, project architect and construction manager with Bercy Chen Studio LP, Design + Construction, a design build firm located in Austin, Texas. The existing home was a 1980’s pink brick builder home. “It was actually fronting Lake Austin,” says Tornbjerg, “but you would never know it. There was no connection to the lake.” In order to bring the outside in, Tornbjerg opened up the house with glass and steel to create a view of the lake, then brought in exotic hardwoods to soften and warm the design. “We like to use exotic woods like massaranduba because the durability is really great and we are able to keep a restrained material palette; using the same wood inside for things like flooring and cabinetry, and then bringing it outside for siding, decking, fencing, docking and even furniture.”

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work with both the natural characteristics of the material and the conditions of the local environment. “We use a lot of ipé and massaranduba because the woods are beautiful and we understand how to work them,” says Tornbjerg. VERSATILIT Y

The Peninsula House features solid massaranduba flooring and decking, but for other projects, Bercy Chen sometimes specs engineered exotic wood to meet different project’s budget requirements. The firm also considers what is going to happen to the wood, both inside and outside, after the project is built.

THE KNOW-HOW

Bercy Chen Studio is one of the many modern firms that combine design and construction capabilities to create projects that closely meet the owners’ specifications. “When people have a better understanding of materials, they know how to use them,” says Tornbjerg. “Working with specialty materials like exotic woods that need special acclimation and machining techniques requires practical knowledge. We think that is generally true for architecture, that you become a better architect by doing construction.” It is certainly possible to achieve the same effect by working with knowledgeable suppliers, contractors or flooring stylists. But the team at Bercy Chen

Studio feels that by building their own designs, there is no chance of someone further down the line changing the spec for convenience or lack of knowledge, even if that spec requires machining exotic wood species – lots and lots of an exotic wood species. Many sustainable innovations, including the use of exotic wood species, are running themes in Bercy Chen’s projects. Part of what sets them apart as a practice is the ability to not only dream up customized solutions for clients who want eco-friendly designs, but to see those ideas through. In order to make materials work for them, the firm has developed methods for seasoning and machining that

Naturally Durable Wood Products – The Cornerstone of Sustainability and Green Building www.ironwoods.com 26

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“We like to use exotic woods like massaranduba because the durability is really great and we are able to keep a restrained material palette; using the same wood inside for things like flooring and cabinetry, and then bringing it outside for siding, decking, fencing, docking and even furniture.” Tom Tornbjerg, project architect and construction manager Bercy Chen Studio LP, Design + Construction

In this case the interior flooring was pre-finished with standard zinc-oxide. Exterior treatments also offer options, both in application and end results. “Sometimes we will let the wood weather and gray out,” says Tornbjerg. “The exotics hold up so well and are really decay resistant.” Bercy Chen Studio uses the design/build concept to push the envelope as far as details and materials used for their residential and commercial projects. This hands-on approach enables them to expand their body of knowledge, growing both as an architecture firm and as a construction company. “Because we have tighter control we are able to explore the feasibility of ideas,” says Tornbjerg, who often “backwards engineers” concepts, such as the rooftop gardens in the Peninsula project, to create systems that are custom fit to specific projects. Clearly this benefits the clients, who receive tailored craftsmanship. And certainly this “built-in intelligence” enriches the practical knowledge of the team at Bercy Chen. But the firm’s dedication to quality also results in the responsible use of exquisite exotic materials. n

14 Countries. 32 Hardwood Species. Yes, we counted.

HARDWOOD

FLOORING

w w w. n o v a u s a w o o d . c o m

international wood

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!

Species that

EXCITE

D

eciding to install exotic wood flooring or decking is the easy part. Unlike other surfacing options, wood is a natural material that immediately adds long-lasting value to the property. Exotic species develop character overtime, becoming heirlooms. And because exotic wood flooring and decking is derived from a living, renewable resource, it is the perfect specification for the conscientious homeowner or designer. This guide is not exhaustive, but includes both popular species and emerging species that are becoming more available. Each entry includes a description of the wood’s visual and physical characteristics, as well as its Janka value. The Janka scale is a system for evaluating the hardness of a wood, which is a good indication of how a species will stand up to denting and wear. It is also a good gauge of how hard a wood is to nail or saw. Due to the environment where exotic species grow, they typically have significantly higher Janka ratings than species that grow in North America. These exotic woods also possess natural characteristics that make them so unique and valuable. They are stable, durable and naturally resistant to insects, mold and decay. When it comes to beautiful, durable, natural flooring and decking, exotic wood is always a great choice. The species in this guide are already being used with great success in projects throughout North America. Experts stand ready to assist you as you move forward with your project (see Buyers Guide beginning on page 66).

Premiere Finishing

Coating

Introduces

the only us company offering this unique & eco-friendly finishing technology. ecoGRAIN looks and feels like exotic wood or forest grown species with the great advantage of: • More environmentally friendly – made from plantation grown timber, it does not deplete rainforests or natural grown forests

to learn more: Contact Jeff Beach or George Palmer. 336.349.1994 • www.prefinishfloors.com

• Allows you to “value add” to lower cost species • Equal benefits and beauty at a lower cost • Improved technical features and durability

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MASSARANDUBA:

IPÉ: THIS FINE-GRAINED, RICH-HUED CUMARU: THIS IS AN EXCELLENT SPECIES FOR BOTH DECKING AND FLOORING, WITH A COLOR RANGE FROM GOLDEN TAN TO REDDISH BROWN. JANKA RATING OF 3540.

PERFECT FOR DECKING AND FLOORING, THIS SPECIES HAS CHARACTERISTICS SIMILAR TO MANY EXOTIC SPECIES, INCLUDING RESISTANCE TO FUNGI AND TERMITES. IT HAS A STRAIGHT GRAIN AND PLEASING RED RUSSET HUE. JANKA RATING OF 3190.

SPECIES HAS A JANKA RATING ABOVE 3600, MAKING IT EXTREMELY DURABLE AND RESISTANT TO INSECTS, MOLD AND DECAY. IPÉ IS COMMONLY USED FOR BOARDWALKS AND OUTDOOR APPLICATIONS, AND IS INCREASINGLY USED AS FLOORING.

JATOBA: DEEP RED, ORANGE AND

PHOTO COURTESY OF A DVA NTAG E TRIM & LUMBER

FAMILIAR FAVORITES They are something like foreign diplomats, these familiar exotic species. Ipé (Tabebuia spp.) and Santos mahogany (Myroxylon balsamum) were some of the first to take up residence in domestic design palettes. Their performance was so dependably excellent that they paved the way for others. Now species like cumaru (Dipteryx odorata), jatoba (Hymenaea courbaril), massaranduba (Manilkara bidentata), and tigerwood (Astronium fraxinifolium) are well received. Armed with the knowledge of performance and machining characteristics, architects, contractors and even consumers confidently specify this group of familiar favorites for flooring and decking. Considering nature’s un-ending ability to create amazing and durable creations, what else could be out there just waiting to become a defining architectural installation?

RUSSET HUES WITH DARK STREAKS COMBINE WITH EXTREME HARDNESS TO MAKE THIS A POPULAR FLOORING OPTION. JANKA RATING OF 2350.

PH OTO COURTESY OF A DVA NTAG E TRIM & LUMBER

PH OTO COURTESY OF N OVA USA WOOD PRODUCTS

“We are Cikel.”

For exotic hardwood flooring...

...the name to know is “Cikel.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF A DVA NTAG E TRIM & LUMBER

SANTOS MAHOGANY: THIS BEAUTIFUL, RICH, RED WOOD IS VERY DENSE AND STABLE. ITS HARDNESS AND COLORFASTNESS MAKE IT IDEAL FOR COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL FLOORING. JANKA RATING OF 2200.

PHOTO COURTESY OF N OVA USA WO OD PRODUCTS

shown: 3/8” x 5” Vila Velha Jatoba, stained in Tobacco

TIGERWOOD: A DIMENSIONALLY STABLE SPECIES WITH A BOLD, STRIPED VISUAL, THIS WOOD IS POPULAR FOR COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL FLOORING AND DECKING. JANKA RATING OF 2160.

Cikel, one of the world’s leading producers of sustainable exotic hardwood flooring, is the name to know. Cikel has all the collections, the colors and the sizes to meet most any design specification. And not only are Cikel wood floors beautiful… they are incredibly durable. Sure, you can select a stained domestic material which masquerades as exotic hardwood flooring. Or, you can select the real thing. From a real company that owns its own forests, operates its own factories and is staffed stateside by experienced American flooring executives.

We are Cikel. The Responsible Choice.

solids(finished

and unfinished)

• sliced • sawn • rotary products

Contact Gerry Schappell: gschappell@cikel.com.br or George Celtrick: gceltrick@cikel.com.br today! Customers purchasing Cikel exotic hardwood flooring are in compliance with The Lacey Act.

800-971-7896 8300 NW 53rd Street, Suite 350 • Miami, FL 33166 • www.cikel.com

The Responsible Choice

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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PHOTO COURTESY OF A DVA NTAG E TRIM & LUMBER

Aljoma Lumber Worldwide distributor of premium hardwoods

Panel and Lumber Products

EXCITE

EMERGING SPECIES Before they got popular, even the familiar favorites seemed like mysterious mouthfuls of syllables that moved unpredictably. But with a little patience and understanding, domestic suppliers and craftspeople learned how to season and machine the species, resulting in some of the most highlyprized flooring and decking materials available. The following species are on their way up. Their beauty, availability and performance make them worth the time it takes to get to know them.

ACACIA

FSC Supplier

GARAPA

Responsible use forest resources.

-001831 Š1996.FSC

Medley, FL • 800.524.3146 www.aljoma.com

ANGELIM PEDRA (Hymenolobium petraeum): Known for its stability, durability and stunning good looks, this species is relatively easy to work. Its color varies from tan to yellow with dark red and brown striping and unique marbling. In addition to a Janka rating of 1720, this species is naturally resistant to decay and termites, making it a great choice for decking. PHOTO COURTESY OF N OVA USA WO OD PROD UCTS

Specializing in Tropical Hardwoods

!

Species that

PH OTO COURTESY OF ACACIA WO OD FLO ORS

Trusted for over 30 years Mill-direct Importer Staff NHLA Grader 80,000bf Kiln Capacity

Real haRdwood. Real beauty. Real value.

AbacoDecking.com by Aljoma Lumber 30

AMENDOIM (Pterogyne nitens): With good bending strength and greater stability than most hardwoods, amendoim is a popular choice for flooring. The wood appears lustrous with a warm reddish tan/brown color, swirling grain and small burl figures. Janka rating of 1900.

ANGELIM PEDRA AMENDOIM

PH OTO COURTESY OF BR-111

ACACIA (Acacia spp.): Commonly referred to as Asian walnut, the wood has dark brown to black tones. Large swirls and a loose grain structure give it a very unique visual that fits large rooms. Board lengths are typically shorter than standard. Acacia is a very dense species with a Janka rating of 2300.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF DUR A BLE WOOD PRODUCTS

BUBINGA

GREENHEART (Ocotea rodiaei): As the name implies, greenheart varies in color from black/brown to olive and green. This wood is extremely durable with Janka ratings listed between 2500 and 3500, and is known for its great crushing strength and natural resistance to marine borers. Though difficult to machine, greenheart is very well suited for marine applications, decking, docking and piling. BUBINGA (Guibourtia spp.): This lustrous wood has a rose-color background that is accented with darker, sometimes purple streaks. Different cuts of the wood will reveal different patterns. When quarter-sawn, the figure of bubinga shows considerable “flame,” while it exhibits attractive rosewood graining when flat-sawn. When fully aged, bubinga has a rich burgundy red color. Janka rating of 1980. GARAPA (Apuleia leiocarpa): This species is extremely dense. Its natural resistance to scratches, decay, splinters and fire make it an excellent choice for decking. Garapa is a finegrained timber with light yellow to warm, golden hues. Janka rating of 1630.

RED BALAU/BATU (Shorea spp.): Batu closely resembles the rich classic look of mahogany. This wood has less color variations than other hardwoods, a tight grain and stunning deep rich red color. The hardwood’s natural resistance to shrinkage, splintering and checking, make it an ideal and beautiful decking material. Janka rating of 2100. WENGE (Millettia laurentii): Uniform dark chocolate brown color with thin, nearly black striation makes this species a favorite flooring among designers who seek a strong statement or accent. It is a heavy, dense wood with excellent dimensional stability and a Janka rating of 1630. ■

GREENHEART

WENGE

When it comes to beautiful, durable, natural flooring and decking, exotic wood is always a great choice.

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fine-grained timber looks similar to the famed decking species ipé. According to Don Ernst, LEED AP who specified the material, “Garapa is class A fire-rated without treatment and meets ADA requirements for co-efficient of friction, rubber soled shoes, wet or dry.” But to understand why garapa is truly a perfect choice for this project, it is important to appreciate what exactly the crossovers are protecting. NATURE’S BEAUT Y

Boardwalk Bonanza Tropical Wood Delivers Safety & Savings

F

or decking, nothing can compare to exotic wood for a natural, durable, chemical-free solution. When the yellow pine dune crossovers on Tybee Island, Georgia began to check and shred, it became obvious that different material should be specified for the replacements. Garapa (Apuleia leiocarpa), which is naturally resistant to rot, decay and insects, was chosen to build the 35 dune crossovers that protect the fragile local environment. When naturally grayed, this

Tybee Island sits at the easternmost point of Georgia. It is a small barrier island with a three-mile long beach backed by sea-oat covered sand dunes. To Native Americans Tybee means “salt,” but to the thousands of visitors each year, the island is a low-key seaside resort that brings to mind words like “sun,” “surf” and “fun.” People aren’t the only ones that flock to Tybee Island to relax and rejuvenate. The island’s sand dunes are an important, protected nesting area for shorebirds and several species of sea turtles, including the endangered loggerhead turtle. Dune plants such as sea oats also create a dense mat of vegetation that helps to stabilize the coastal environment and reduce erosion, protecting the property of the 4000 residents. The dunes are so important to both the natural eco-system and the interests of residents that it is unlawful to disturb the dunes in anyway, including by walking on them. For the people of Tybee Island, the United States Department of Agriculture, wildlife advocates and the Soil Conservation Service, it was never a question of if the dunes should be protected, but rather how. An in-depth study resulted in the construction of dune crossovers, decking structures that provide pedestrian access to the beach without damage to the dune ecology.

GUYANA

Beautiful. Durable. Sustainable

Barama Company Ltd.

‘Concern for People, Environment & Quality’ Land of Canaan, East Bank Demerara, -Plywood Guyana -Flooring & Decking South America. -Logs & Sawn Timber Tel: +592-225-4555 Fax: +592-225-8360 barama@samling.com

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Guyana Timber Products Inc.

Forest Products Association of Guyana 157 Waterloo Street, Georgetown, Guyana Tel: +592-226-9848 / 2621 Fax: +592-226-2832 fpasect@guyana.net.gy www.fpaguyana.org

Guyana Mats & Timbers Inc.

Factory: 81 Soesdyke, E.B.D ‘Exporter of Guyana’s Finest Timbers’ Head Office: 283-285 Shantinikatan Street Tel: +592-225-0519 Fax: +592- 227-7588 Prashad Nagar jenezongtp@yahoo.com Georgetown Guyana -Crane Mats -Mats for temporary roads, etc. Sales Office: The Netherlands -Decking & Bearers www.gtp-europe.com -Marine Timbers & Fenders -Greenheart Piles

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© ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

AFTER AN IN-DEPTH COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS, THE CITY OF TYBEE ISLAND, GEORGIA, SPECIFIED GARAPA AS THE SPECIES OF CHOICE FOR ALL OF THEIR 35 DUNE CROSSOVERS. IN ADDITION TO THE IMPROVED AESTHETIC OF THE GARAPA, THE REDUCED MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT COSTS HAVE ALLOWED THE CITY TO FOCUS LIMITED RESOURCES ON OTHER MORE PRESSING INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS.

SAFE AND PURE

The specification for the original dune crossovers was pressure-treated yellow pine, a domestic softwood species. Despite its availability and traditional usage, the yellow pine soon began to check and warp, causing hazards for human traffic ranging from splinters to slippery un-even planking. Perhaps more concerning is the possible impact that pressure treated lumber has on the local environment. According to several studies performed by reputable research institutions including Purdue University and the University of Minnesota, vegetables planted in raised beds constructed from pressure treated wood show traces of the chemicals used to treat the material, even in plants located as far as 15 inches from the wood. “As we build more and more along the coast or on inland bodies of water, we need to be conscious of what products we put in the sensitive transitional environments, the areas that cross dunes and enter the water,” says Ernst. “When you look at the combined effect of putting hundreds of thousands of treated piles into the water for docks and decks, into our waterways, there must be a better way. Particularly when you take into account the fact that we eat seafood from those areas. I think we have a better way in using tropical species.” Considering the fragile nature of the local ecosystem, garapa was the natural choice for replacing the dune crossovers on Tybee Island. Not only does garapa deliver far better, long-lasting performance than domestic species, it does so without leaching potentially harmful chemicals into the environment. PRACTICAL SAVINGS

Untreated garapa is said to have a conservative lifespan of 25-years, even in an environment that is constantly exposed to sun, sand, salt and water. Originally that was very attractive to city officials who had to be able to justify any expenditure to the taxpayers. But after the garapa crossovers were installed, it became clear that simply installing solid, durable exotic wood decking could save money. At a meeting of the sustainability committee for Tybee Island held in July of 2010, the mayor, Jason INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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Buelterman, commented on the dramatic decrease of lifeguard calls due to splinters and people tripping over uneven boards. Since the installation of the garapa crossovers, Buelterman estimates that lifeguard calls have decreased 30 percent, which equates to real dollars saved. Beyond dollars, it also means that the lifeguard staff can focus more on keeping people safe in the water. Responsible Choices

As more public access is required for coastal beaches, dune crossovers become more important to protecting the dynamic dune fields, which also protect coastal development. Garapa, as a species, works extremely well and contributes no chemical additives to the surrounding fragile environment. It will not chunk out as pressure-treated pine does over time, protecting bare feet and reducing liability while providing the public with safe secure access to the beaches. The density of the wood reduces maintenance costs dramatically due to the structural integrity of the species, plus it discourages vandalism. After an in-depth cost benefit analysis, the City of Tybee Island, Georgia, a city heavily invested in the tourism market, specified garapa as the species of choice for all of their 35 dune crossovers. In addition to the improved aesthetic of the garapa, the reduced maintenance and replacement costs have allowed the city to focus limited resources on other more pressing infrastructure projects. When it comes to decking, there is no better choice than natural, durable exotic wood. n

Exotic Wood Sourcing Tips From the Experts

Worried about price? There are several options to consider that extend your budget further: ■ Instead of fixed lengths, think more random lengths and narrow/shorter

lengths. This can also be used to enhance visual interest. ■ Know the product. For example, there are plenty of applications where

4/4 X 6 decking is perfectly adequate and saves you money compared to 5/4 x 6. ■ Consider lesser-known-species. It is good for the environment and they

offer a better value for their clients. There are literally dozens of other potential species to consider for your project.

other Tips: ■ Instead of choosing a specific exotic species for your product, identify

the project’s performance criteria. Then talk to suppliers about what species are available that match the criteria. This will often result in a better quality product, shorter lead times and increased value. ■ If certified material is not available then find out from your supplier

what other options exists to meet your clients’ interests. Most tropical countries have programs and policies that advance sustainable forest management. ■ When using exotic wood for flooring and decking, consider contracting

with a professional installer who understands how the material behaves.

www.diamonddecking.com sales@diamonddecking.com

800.815.9555 34

international wood

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Naturally Sustainable Tropical hardwoods are a naturally occurring, renewable and sustainable resource. Of course, these days every product claims to be “green” in the right context, a marketing tactic so prevalent that it has spawned the term “green-washing.” To truly evaluate the environmental impact of a material it is necessary to look at its entire life cycle. Closer examination of all aspects of growing, using and disposing of exotic wood reveals what is referred to as a “complete eco-cycle.” Additionally, long-lasting exotic species have a useful service life that exceeds their natural growth cycle, making them truly sustainable. FROM THE FOREST

Exotic wood is an organic material born of earth, sun and water. Unlike steel, plastics or cement that requires fossil fuels for production, trees use only solar power. Forests are naturally self-sustaining eco-systems that constantly renew without genetic modification or chemical fertilizers. Beyond providing beautiful and durable wood material for building, forests also play an important role in managing carbon to limit global warming. Throughout their lifecycle, trees take in carbon and produce oxygen through photosynthesis. The carbon remains sequestered within finished wood products indefinitely. According to CORRIM (The Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials), exotic wood products, such as flooring, are considered to be carbon-neutral, meaning they offset enough carbon to cover the entire production cycle of the material. TO THE FLOOR

Throughout time people have used exotic wood flooring and decking because it is both aesthetically pleasing and practical. Wood processing utilizes 100% of the raw material resources, either in product or bio-mass. This entirely eliminates the negative environmental impact associated with the production waste of inorganic or stone materials.

As an extension of the natural world, wood is a reminder of beauty that can never be manufactured. Beyond looking good, exotic species have remarkable natural performance characteristics. They do not require chemical treatments or off-gas VOC’s (volatile organic compounds) into the local environment. Like all hard surfaces, wood floors do not harbor allergens. When it comes to heat dissipation properties, wood is superior to concrete (which holds heat) and plastic (which is a conductor). This makes exotic wood the ideal flooring material for radiant heating systems, an integral part of some sustainable home designs. AND BEYOND

Exotic wood flooring and decking can last hundreds of years. When the application comes to an end there are several environmentally friendly ways to dispose of wood. One method that is gaining popularity is to reclaim the material, and reuse it. Wood is also a combustible bio-fuel. Or if left to nature, biodegradable exotic wood simply returns to soil nutrients through composting. According to CORRIM, solid wood flooring has less environmental impact along the life cycle of the material than any other option. But the sustainability value of the material is only relevant if people use exotic wood species. Professionals committed to maintaining forest ecosystems recognize that their job is to both protect trees and promote the commercial use of wood products. In a global market, forests are only preserved when the economic value of wood products exceeds the value of non-forest land uses, such as agriculture or mining. ■

Sustainable Design CEU’s Sustainability is so important in modern design that professional architects require more continuing education units (CEU’s) related to sustainability than other subject matter. To learn more about the role and application of exotic wood species within the green building movement, and earn credit for AIA / SD LU for architects and/or USGBC for LEED professionals, visit www.aecdaily.com; Course #AEC370. ■

Swaner Hardwood Company Since 1967, we have been committed to providing a product of superior quality, service and value to a wide range of loyal customers.

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The House That Art Built

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This extraordinary home, set in a postwar subdivision of Los Angeles, echoes the occupants’ unique set of values. The owners’ lifestyle revolves around the creation, exhibition and sale of art and photography.

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In terms of architecture, “phenomenology” refers to the experience of building materials and their sensory properties. Architect Andrew Liang, principal of Studio 0.10 designed the home using this philosophy to guide the materials selection. “Materials for us aren’t just chosen based on their technical and performance criteria but also their phenomenological potentials, impacts and their ability to negotiate with time, to ‘age gracefully,’” says Liang, whose simple, yet powerful palette of ipé (Tabebuia spp.), zinc, Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and high-performance UV-blocking glass (to protect the artwork) was very deliberately selected to outfit the home. “This issue, of course, also enters into the sustainability realm of the material selection and specification process,” says Liang. In addition to living quarters, the project includes an art studio, home office and dedi-

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© BENNY CH A N / FOTOWOR KS

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cated exhibition space. The property also features an autonomous but fully incorporated apartment for an elderly mother and maximized outdoor living space for entertaining. To integrate the domestic, entertainment and professional objectives into a cohesive home, Liang employed two primary organizing strategies. First, due to the restrictive lot dimensions and the desire to maximize outdoor living space, the original plan was split into two independent structures with a courtyard in between. Second, in order to maximize display surfaces, the exhibition space was conceived as three-dimensional movement throughout the entire volume of the three-story main home. “To create that sense of integration a “ribbon of display surfaces” flows from the main house, throughout the other elements of the property,” says Liang. To define that element Liang specified ipé solid wood flooring for the interior spaces, and carried the specification throughout all the wood trim, exterior siding, windows and doors. “Ipé was selected for its durability, rigidity, finish quality, finish coloration and aging process,” says Liang. But beyond the species’ physical characteristics, the ipé was chosen because it conveys the desired experience. “Much like fashion, how you dress tells something about your mood, your personality and also your activities and endeavors. Cotton, silk, wool, rayon are all different, with their own narratives waiting to be explored, pushed and formed. We see materiality in architecture as having similar properties, narratives and potentials to communicate and establish ideas about the work,” explains Liang. Both structures are clad in a custom-patterned zinc rain screen built from panels of various sizes. The zinc is conceptualized as a simple wrapper, under which a ribbon of wood circulates through spaces designed to resonate with family, art, friends, life. IW

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Surface Style Before they were beautiful hardwoods, they were

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The Peninsula Residence designers (see story page 25) opted to use surface finishes that stayed true to the natural aesthetic of the exotic wood species. And while natural wood is in and of itself beautiful, different surface techniques can be applied to create unique, signature floors. TEXTURE

Applying specialized finishing treatments and/or techniques adds another dimension of character to an exotic wood floor. ■ For a rustic or earthy look, surfaces can be “hand-scraped” or “distressed” creating planking that looks like it has been around awhile and has some stories to tell. ■ For a more sophisticated or subdued look, matte finishes allow the natural beauty of the wood grain to shine through. This finish has the added benefit of hiding imperfections. ■ High-gloss treatments dry to a bright, reflective surface, which can appear quite glamorous. But be warned, high-gloss exaggerates the look of any damage done to the floor, and cannot be repaired without refinishing the entire floor. ■ Some finishes also carry pigment that can accentuate or tone down a wood’s natural color and grain to meet the design objective of a project. ST YLING

You Bring THE WOOD We’ll Bring THE PROTECTION

Although parallel planking is lovely and respectable, a more dramatic effect can be achieved by specially configuring the flooring installation. ■ Extra narrow plank width recall colonial sensibilities ■ A variety of plank lengths adds subtle interest and contrast to a floor ■ Extra wide plank width creates a confident, modern look ■ Herringbone construction conveys a distinctly elegant feeling ■ Geometric parquets can add movement to the foundation of a room’s design ■ Artistic parquet creates a focal point in a room ■ Borders, medallions and grates make lovely accents and direct the visual flow of the space.

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We can fill your needs from our extensive inventory of imported woods, one of the largest in the USA. We prepare orders in special sizes as well as flat or quartered grain. Our facilities include a 7 acre yard, 200,000 BF dry kiln capacity, 130,000 square feet of warehouse storage and millwork facilities.

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Exploring the Unexpected

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S E N S I N G

N E W

S T Y L E S

n this collection of inspired projects, International Wood examines unique uses of exotic solid wood, plywood and veneers for objects stirring our human senses. The concept of a simple side table becomes functional sculpture that begs a grazing hand. Wood lanterns extend vertebrally to define their spaces in light. The exploration goes multi-sensory when a modern twist on an ancient surfboard artform excites a new generation of waveriders, while engineering and aesthetics meet in an elegant drum kit that promises an equally excellent sound. With exotic wood species, the only limit is the imagination.

this case, the client was looking for something over-the-top in terms of figure and quality. I ended up going through an entire pallet of boards before I found the exact look I needed.

PROJECT:

Arboreal Lanterns WOOD:

Macassar ebony (Diospyros spp.) Zebrawood (Microberlinia brazzavillensis) CR E ATOR :

Jane Woodward Stevenson Stevenson Designs

W

ith titles such as “Woodcutter’s Graffiti,” “Big Red Mother” and “Worm Totem,” wooden art by Jane Woodward Stevenson of Buffalo, New York, blurs lines between fine art, design and architecture. Among her works is a collection of arboreal lanterns, floating boxes cantilevered from a spine. Stevenson achieves the varying luminosity of these sizable units (as large as 118 inches by 12 inches) by aiming halogen spots in a telescopic fashion with never more than three small bulbs fi xed in the base or top box. “This creates many branches of light from a single trunk,” Stevenson says, noting that the grain pattern of these spaciously hollow boxes has a center axis similar to book matching in cabinetry. “It’s a bit like matching butterfly wings but along a vertical column.” The lanterns are built for both interior and landscape applications.

IW: What inspired you to design the Macassar ebony arboreal lantern? With all of my lanterns, the focus is on an organic form unique in each lantern. In

JWS:

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IW: Why was this species a great choice for the project? JWS: The contrast between color bands was so appealing, but furthermore this kind of figure struck me like an alphabet of pictograms. It goes beyond merely decorative. Nothing is more diverse and surprising than what you come across while sorting through longer solid boards in pallets. Unlike the repetition and consistency of veneer stacks that aid the typical cabinet maker, here you have to deal with what I’d call very and loud distinct quotes. As an artist I arrange these into some sort of simple narrative logic. In this case, symmetry of expansion and increased complexity grows from a still black center point.

IW: Why do you like working with exotic woods? I like the density and polish that one can achieve with many of the exotics, but especially line quality in figure gives me something to work with in a minimal design meant to showcase a natural material. As with my zebrawood lantern with West African zebrano, I wanted subtle horizontal activity, like earthy strata that was veering slightly off kilter, to contrast with a very strict series of right angles and vertical structure. I’m always trying to evade the mentality of a faux-exotic laminate! ■ JWS:

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PROJECT:

Drums WOOD:

Ash, European (Fraxinus excelsior) CR E ATOR :

David Pimentel, Spaun Drum Company

I

like olive ash burl because it has a light base color, is highly figured and has a nice contrast of light and medium tan colors,” says Brian Spaun, president of Spaun Drum Co., which makes custom, handmade drum kits in Chino, California. This kit showing olive ash burl over maple shells is from the company’s Exotic Series. “This makes it very good to use under candy colors, but it also looks great with just a high-gloss finish without any color. I’ve used this veneer under candy flame paint jobs. The color fades and bursts, and it always looks great.”

F

urniture artist James Esworthy of Red Star Furniture Design in Vancouver, B.C., Canada, says a doodle he scribbled while on the telephone conjured images of tufted upholstery. The idea led to building his Diamond Cabinet on speculation and of his own design. The main wood is quartercut East Indian rosewood with a very fine and uniform grain, and the black diamonds

Design features that define Spaun Drum Co. include its double 45-degree bearing edge technology to assure the wood shell meets the surface of the drum head and not the collar, as well as a consistent shell thickness to ensure maximum tuning range and consistent voicing from drum to drum. “We glue 100-percent of the veneer and 100-percent of the drum shell it goes on, and then run it through our high-pressure laminating machine to achieve a super-high-quality adhesion of the veneer

are dyed pearwood. Each diamond is individually placed, and a slight misalignment of the grain on each helps pronounce a perception of a three-dimensional quality. The contour of this piece improves the design by carrying the pattern uninterrupted from one side to the other. “I enjoy cutting things up and rearranging them puzzle-like,” Esworthy says. “I try hard to have the viewer’s eye flow around the piece. I love curved form work. I learned early on in my career that curved work would cause many a cabinetmaker’s hair to fall out. It seemed to come easy to me and I enjoyed new challenges.” With only a clear lacquer applied to the piece, the rosewood’s natural opulence is evident. Esworthy says he finds the contrast between the two woods to be a most important quality in the cabinet’s allure. Esworthy tells how the Diamond Cabinet’s striking appearance helped to stage a client’s home. “The buyer loved the way it was decorated and bought everything, including the furniture,” he says. ■

to the drum shell so it will resonate as one,” Spaun says. “Most production drum companies use double-stick tape to put on a veneer or decorative wrap material. When done this way, it really deadens the shell vibration and is bad for the drum sound.” Spaun says because olive ash burl is a thin veneer, it doesn’t change the sound of the core drum shell it goes over; unlike thick veneers that choke the sound of the shell. That’s music to the ears. ■

PROJECT:

Diamond Cabinet WOOD:

East Indian Rosewood (Dalbergia latifolia) Pearwood (Pyrus communis) CR E ATOR :

James Esworthy Red Star Furniture Design

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PHOTOG R A PHY BY ISA AC FR ASER

International Specialties, Inc. SPECIALIZING IN DIRECT MILL CONTAINER & TRUCK LOAD QUANTITY SHIPMENTS

Offering Lumber, Plywood, and Solid Wood Components. With more than 35 years of experience in the international wood and wood products trade, we use our vast experience and knowledge to match customer’s needs with producer’s capabilities. We design and implement supply programs to answer customers’ needs.

PROJECT: WOOD:

Alaia Lite Surfboards

Koa (Acacia koa)

Gary Young Bamboo Surfboards

CR E ATOR :

SW-COC-910 ©1996 FSC Responsible Forest Management

TEL: (901)

853-4620 • FAX: (901) 221-0057 E: info@intlspecialties.com www.intlspecialties.com

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awaiian resident and surfer Gary Young makes form laminated exotic wood surfboards in ancient Alaia fashion (a traditionally solid, flat and finless style). “Of all things wooden, nothing quite pleases the eye like a well finished, compound curved wooden sculpture,” Young says. “Because I have been rushing shoreward on various watercraft for more than 50 years, wooden surfboards top my list. For light weight, resource economy and high performance, nothing beats multi-layered sliced veneers epoxy-laminated over foam cores. All-in, a 6'6" weighs as little as 6 lbs.” With a portfolio spanning diverse wood species and beaches worldwide, Young not only builds boards, but for decades has developed and tested his own epoxy laminating techniques and technology. “I started making them of vacuum-bagged veneers (first sliced, now sawn) 35 years ago,” says Young, whose designs showcase everything from contrast-laden bacote, English brown oak and zebrawood to the flashy glints of koa, vertical grain padauk and lacewood, and even the muted glows of teak, sycamore and mahogany. Waterproofing and UV protection are achieved by satin-clear, epoxy-compatible film coatings. “A koa Alaia Lite is the modern culmination of ancient watercraft and modern technique that inspires musings of man’s first wave rides.” ■

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PROJECT:

Africa Cabinet, Cocoleaf Table WOOD:

Cocobolo (Dalbergia retusa), Wenge (Millettia laurentii), Honduran Mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla), Lacewood (Cardwellia sublimis), Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.), Macassar ebony (Diospyros spp.), Koa (Acacia koa), Bubinga (Guibourtia spp.) CR E ATOR :

Earl Kelly, Studio Furniture by Earl Kelly

I

n Earl Kelly’s artistic furnishings, exotic veneers and solid woods are the main attraction, but he often complements designs with domestic woods such as maple. His Cocoleaf table, one in a tropical leaf series, is cocobolo veneer and Honduras mahogany with wenge accents on the legs. One desk is lacewood with wenge legs, and the other is eucalyptus with aluminum legs. These pieces began as a solution to a foyer walkway problem; the leaf shape allowed for a table that did not protrude into the space at both ends. The leaf tables started with flat tops and shaped bottoms and have evolved to a slightly larger size with complex shapes and sculpted tops. Kelly uses solid wood – wenge, mahogany and domestics like maple and walnut – as a substrate. He says he began using exotics, such as cocobolo and rosewoods, for their beautiful grain and color. He also found

their quarter-cut striped and undulating grain worked great in helping to achieve the appearance of a leaf. “With my construction methods, using exotics on the top and as accents, I get not only beautiful works of art in wood that please the eye, but also beg to be touched,” Kelly says. “And they still fulfi ll their purpose and function as a table.” Kelly’s Africa Cabinet is made up of Macassar ebony veneer on the door face and

top. While the sides and back are recomposed/man-made veneer, the frame and legs are wenge. Other examples of this design include koa, bubinga and smoked eucalyptus. His Xoddics collection of small tables is a fine union of exotic wood and veneers with complementary domestics. At about 16 inches wide by 20 inches tall, this table shows waterfall bubinga veneer with birdseye maple trim, maple legs and wenge accents. ■

Interholco AG Your direct connection to Africa for FSC and Legality Verified Timber out of our own concessions. Sapelli • Sipo • Afrormosia • African Mahogany & More

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www.interholco.com INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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PROJECT:

Oceana Tables

WOOD: Sapele (Entandrophragma spp.), Khaya (Khaya spp.), Purpleheart (Peltogyne spp.) CR E ATOR :

Paul Wanrooij, Paulus Fine Furniture

P Custom Kiln Drying of Import Lumber

BUCHANAN LUMBER MOBILE, INC.

Located within yards of the Port of Mobile, Alabama. Over 400,000' of kiln capacity and 65,000' of warehouse storage. We provide custom kiln drying, millwork, inspection, surfacing, export preparation, container loading/unloading, rail service, barge handling, etc.

Processing Quality Import and Export Lumber Since 1965!

aul Wanrooij describes his Oceana table series as “a play of consciousness.” The rounded feminine lines of bent sapele, khaya and even purpleheart show no limitations to the ways exotic veneer can form beautiful curves. In his Maine workshop, Wanrooij uses his 30 years of woodworking experience to make functional art that is a “completely spontaneous expression of creativity.” Wanrooji inherited artistic sensibilities from his native Netherlands, where his father and grandfather were craftsmen in their own right. “With the Oceana tables, the lines suggest horizons and infinity,” Wanrooij says, explaining that his work attempts to capture harmony, beauty and functionality to create a piece that is pleasant to the eye with lines emphasizing unboundedness. “In school, they teach you how to build but not what to build, so I build what I like; I like curves.” IW

PROJECT:

Full-Dress Aaron Burr Desk

BUCHANAN LUMBER MOBILE, INC CONTACT: Dick Buchanan 251-433-9567 dick@buchananlumbermobile.com 44

I N T E R N A18 TIO NAL WOOD timber

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WOOD: Imbuia (Phoebe porosa), English Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus), Sapele (Entandrophragma spp.), Makoré (Tieghemella heckelii and T. africana), Pearwood (Pyrus communis) CR E ATOR : Barry Tribble Just Wood Custom Millwork, Inc

An independent supplement produced by Lyonsdown Media Group

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Ghana’s new standards The key elemenTs in Ghana’s new reGulaTed foresTry operaTions: The Forest Service Division (FSD) of the Forestry Commission regulates the supply chain from the forest stock survey through harvesting to commencement of log transport. FSD is responsible for undertaking post-felling inspections and accurate tree and log measurement. The Timber Industry Development Division (TIDD) regulates the supply chain from commencement of log transport through processing to export and to domestic market. TIDD is responsible for: log yard tag checking; checking of wood products in transit at roadside; input/output declaration checking and finished products inspection at sawmills and pre-shipment inspection; registration and inspection of timber suppliers and buyers. TIDD will also be the designated licensing authority under VLTP, issuing FLEGT licenses and export permits reconciliating export permit applications with datasets supplied by the Timber Validation Department. The London Office of the TIDD will be responsible for promotion of the verified legal products.

Ghana is working hard to become a source of credible, verified legal timber.

The Resource Management Support Centre (RMSC), the technical wing of the FC will continue to support the FSD, TIDD and other departments in the development of efficient forest management systems and procedures.

While Ghana has long promoted sustainable forest management and has operated a comprehensive set of procedures to enforce forest laws, the existing structure has flaws. A reform process initiated under a Voluntary Partnership Agreement (VPA) with the European Union has been designed to improve the regulation of forestry operations and the timber industry and trade and prevent the flow of illegal wood products from Ghana into the EU.

A new Timber Validation Department (TVD) of the FC is being established to provide independent oversight of the entire system. Key functions of the TVD will include reporting on infractions and recommending improvement to the legality assurance system to the Ministry of Lands & Natural Resources and to give clearance for FLEGT licences to be issued by TIDD.

Under the terms of the VPA, Ghana is developing a comprehensive Validation of Legal Timber Programme (VLTP). This comprises a Wood Tracking System to establish legal origin and a Verification of Legal Compliance (VLC) system. Products successfully verified as both legally sourced and legally produced will qualify as validated legal timber.

For more information visit: www.ghanatimber.org

An independent supplement produced by Lyonsdown Media Group

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ALTHOUGH MASTER CARPENTERS WERE CAREFUL TO REPLICATE THE ARTS AND CRAFTS STYLE IN CREATING ROOMDEFINING DOORWAYS IN REQUIA, THE BATHROOM CABINETS IN ANDIROBA SHOW AN APPRECIATION FOR CONVENIENCES OF STORAGE CAPACITY COMMON TODAY. photo by Sa r a h A r neson

Built toLast

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ider usage of exotic wood species in residential applications is one result of two major trends converging. The first has to do with the people who live in houses. Market researchers describe “the new consumers,” as being more concerned with long-lasting value than convenience. New consumers are willing to spend money, but they buy more carefully. They think about the life-cycle of products and materials, and will pay more for products they feel good about. There is a renewed appreciation for craftsmanship. While it would be easy to connect the economic downturn of recent history to this shift in buying philosophy, this change of sensibility is a part of a more legitimate trend that has been evolving over the past decade and increasing the demand for exotic wood species. The second trend has to do with the people who design houses. Architectural curriculum increasingly includes construction training (see story about Studio 804 on page 53). As a result, architects have better material sensibility, which translates to more practical designs. Many firms partner with trusted craftsmen or offer “design/build” services, where the same company functions as both the architect and the contractor. This has advantages for both the design professional and the homeowner in terms of tighter control over the quality of the end product, where once again, exotic wood species benefit.

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THE 16TH STREET REMODEL HOUSES A DYNAMIC MIX OF ELEGANTLY CONTRASTING WOODGRAINS THROUGHOUT, FROM CABINETS AND FURNITURE TO FLOORING AND WALLS.

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It’s Kuhl to be Lean

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rchitect James Meyer grew up on the west coast, but he spent time in New York working for Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP before settling in the City of Manhattan Beach, California. Rapid development of the area left Meyer increasingly frustrated. “There seemed to me to be a lot of homes being built by speculative building contractors who didn’t really care about the things I felt were important, such as sustainable building concepts and passive building techniques,” says Meyer. In 1991 Meyer founded LeanArch, a boutique design/build firm dedicated to regionally appropriate sustainable architecture. “One of the main reasons behind becoming a general contractor was that we were running into problems when specifying. Contractors who were unfamiliar with alternative energy systems, or who didn’t know how to source exotic materials, were very hesitant,” explains Meyer. “We found that a lot of times important components of the design were being taken out before they were even looked into.” LeanArch began to quietly stage a design revolution. In 2007 they finished Kuhlhaus I, a site-specific home engineered to lead by example. The project is oriented to optimize daylight and ventilation for passive heating and cooling. It includes radiant floor heating and a solar panel array that provides electricity for tankless “flash” water heaters. Eco-friendly finish materials, including 85% recycled aluminum panels, concrete fiber and sustainably harvested cumaru

BELOW: BIGGER ISN'T ALWAYS BETTER AS EVIDENCED IN KUHLHAUS 01, A THREE-BEDROOM, THREE-BATH HOME ON A HALF LOT WITH LESS THAN 1,800 SQUARE FEET OF SPACE. LEFT:  KUHLHAUS 02  IS A SOLAR-POWERED FOURBEDROOM, FOUR-BATH DWELLING WITH AN OPEN FLOOR PLAN FEATURING DURABLE CUMARU INSIDE AND OUT FOR CONTINUITY BETWEEN THE INTERIOR AND OUTDOOR SPACES.

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make up the interior and exterior finishes. “We consider aesthetics,” says Meyer,” but we also look at how the materials perform. Take the wood for example. We use a lot of FSC-certified exotic species, red balau (Shorea spp.), machiche (Lonchocarpus castilloi), santos mahogany (Myroxylon balsamum), cumaru (Dipteryx odorata), because they hold up in a marine environment. Plus they’re insect resistant, and in this area there are problems with termites and boring bees.” The goal of the project was to demonstrate that responsible design is not only possible, but also desirable. Although the house sits on a small 30ft x 40ft lot, there were four cash offers for the property before construction was completed; and the final sales price of $3.25 million set a new record high for the area. That got some attention. “I give tours and talks to people from the City of Manhattan Beach, builders, contractors etc., and explain the benefits of this type of design.” The local government now implements many of Meyer’s techniques for civic projects and there is steady demand for Lean’s services. Beyond that, the firm has received quite a collection of awards. Meyer is pleased with the results his team of consultants, engineers and subcontractors has achieved. “All of us work together to bring these big ideas down to earth,” he says. But more than recognition, Meyer is committed to educating people that there are better ways to build than development for quick turn around. “I try to promote in our work projects that they are not only meaningful, but also long lasting. I always promote using exotic wood products from a sustainability perspective because it is a renewable resource. Properly built structures made from wood can last thousands of years. That’s longevity.” ■

P.O. Box 380 • 501 Market Street Marcus Hook, PA 19061 USA ten miles south of Philadelphia on I-95 TEL:

610-485-6600 FAX: 610-485-0471 E-MAIL: sales@alanmcilvain.com www.alanmcilvain.com

SW-COC-000921

5 million board feet in stock – 6 moulders at your service • • • • • • • 48

Sapele Mahogany African Mahogany (Khaya) Mahogany Spanish Cedar Teak Jatoba (Brazilian Cherry) Northern Appalachian Hardwoods

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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When the homeowners saw the requia and andiroba, it was love at first sight. Both species have hues that go from black to white with dark pink. The striations and interlocking grain require an expert’s skills to machine, but the swirls have remarkable visual impact.

CONNECTING TO QUALITY

PH OTOG R A PHY BY SA R A H A R NESON

T

he arts and crafts style really resonated with the clients. They wanted something native to the area that had a certain design integrity inside and outside,” says David Arneson, one of the founding architects of Center Studio Architecture in Durham, North Carolina. The owners were also very particular about craftsmanship and long-term durability. At the heart of the aesthetic was the intention to create a home that convincingly looks like it was built 100 years ago, complete with rooms that are clearly defined with articulated doorways (as opposed to the modern open floor plan). It would eventually take a team of over a dozen master carpenters to clad this large home in carefully-crafted wood. Two exotic species were chosen as the main materials for the project. Andiroba (Carapa guianensis) makes up the bulk of the cabinetry, including in a butler’s pantry, kitchen, office and bathrooms. Requia (Guarea trichilioides), which is similar in color, was specified for the built-ins and trim (including the ceilings) and all of the custom doors. “We did go with domestic species in the secondary areas, where durability was not as important, and the woodwork would not be the main focal point, which follows suit in the traditional style,” say Arneson. The closets are finished in painted poplar, the attic ceiling in pine.

For more information contact sales staff Doug - Bill - Pam - Roy (228) 832-1899 / fax: (228) 831-1149

1-800-647-9547 www.newmanlumber.com Gulfport, Mississippi USA

SCS-COC-002027 Available Upon Request

NEWMAN INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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If this same arts and crafts house had been built in 1915, it probably would have been made with quarter-sawn white oak. “We had several woods to choose from, sapele, African mahogany, genuine mahogany, possibly cedar. But they chose the requia and andiroba for the figuring and notation,” says Andrew Sloop of Amazon Millworks, the materials supplier. “The homeowners were very particular about their vision, and they were not 100% happy with the other species. When they saw the requia and andiroba, it was love at first sight.” Both species have hues that go from black to white with dark pink. The striations and interlocking grain require an expert’s skills to machine, but the swirls have remarkable visual impact. Although the end product in its own right is outstanding, it is the synergy of relationships that made this project possible. Sloop entered the business of distributing exotic wood species during a missionary trip to Peru. He stayed with a carpenter whose artisan skill, working with species that were equally beautiful and challenging to machine, was inspiring. Sloop set up a facility in Peru with the carpenter’s son, and provided a means for their goods to reach the broad U.S. market. Upon return to North Carolina, Sloop also cultivated a network of local architects, including Arneson, and specialized craftsmen who could confidently specify and work with imported species. The result is an international community of professionals that maintain a high level of quality and integrity. And in this case, very satisfied homeowners. Done Right

Exotic wood is the original high-quality, environmentally friendly building material. Sustainably harvested species benefit local and global economies. They are completely renewable, long-lasting and recyclable, not to mention beautiful. So it is not surprising that the “new consumer” is increasingly demanding exotics, or that the design/build architect is becoming more confident sourcing and using them. IW

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Winning withWood Celebrating Environmental, Aesthetic design and Innovative e xcellence

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reating compelling and unique designs for both residential and commercial spaces often begins with exotic woods. They are recognized for their beauty, warmth and durability, and can transform any project into an award winner. This year began an annual IWPA Awards Program to recognize and reward excellence for the use of imported wood. Best practices in aesthetics, innovative design and environmental stewardship were the categories of competition. The awards are designed to bring about a greater knowledge and awareness of the benefits of using tropical wood to promote sustainable forest management and support forest-dependent communities. The awards program also brings the positive recommendation of imported wood to architects, designers and U.S. manufacturers encouraging them to explore an ever expanding palette of opportunities. The IWPA recognized Cikel America with the Environmental Excellence Award for its role in advancing the University of Kansas School of Architecture and Urban Planning students’ understanding of sustainable building. Graduate students used Cikel’s donation of Brazilian cherry and cumaru in the build of a LEEDPlatinum home. The Award for Aesthetic Design Excellence winner Veneer Technologies, Inc. reflected the market’s demand for made-to-order exotic faces in an annual woodworking competition that bridges imported species and end-use applications. Durable Wood Products earned the Innovative Design Excellence Award after developing its Turada®-brand wallaba shingles, an effort that included reaching out to architects and designers to demonstrate the value of underutilized tropical hardwoods. In each one’s own way, these 2010 IWPA award winners display the kind of collaboration and interaction all along the supply chain that sustains the global imported wood network and celebrates the good this industry brings for forests, communities and U.S. consumers.

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ABOVE: THE JATOBA CEILING BRINGS WARMTH TO THE KITCHEN, COMPLIMENTING THE EUROPEAN CABINET DESIGN'S CLEAN LINES. LEFT: BRAZILIAN CHERRY FLOORING EXTENDS FROM THE FIRST LEVEL TO THE STAIR TREADS. ABOVE: STUDIO 804 STUDENTS CUT THE CUMARU, PREDRILLED HOLES FOR COUNTERSUNK SCREWS AND FINISHED THE WOOD WITH A UV-PROTECTIVE OIL BEFORE INSTALLING THE BUILDING'S RAIN SCREEN, WHICH SITS 3 INCHES AWAY FROM THE FACADE. THE BARRIER ABSORBS THE SUMMER SUN WHILE ALLOWING AIRFLOW BUT ALSO FUNCTIONS AS AN INSULATOR IN THE WINTER MONTHS.

Environmental Cikel has always been highly motivated by social responsibility from how they manage their forests and products, to interacting with the communities where they do business. One example, the Studio 804 program in Kansas, teaches young architects the value of sustainable building. In keeping with its long-standing dedication to corporate and social responsibility, Cikel America donated an impressive 6,000 board-feet (22,000 lineal feet) of Brazilian cumaru (Dipteryx odorata) for graduatelevel architecture students building the first LEED for Homes Platinum level residence in the state of Kansas. This Studio 804 project is referred to as “3716 Springfield House.” The project used cumaru for the two-level home’s exterior rainscreen cladding and roof. In addition, Cikel donated 1,350 square feet of its exotic Brazilian cherry (Hymenaea courbaril) for the flooring and stair treads on the home’s second level. “I pursued hardwoods because I knew the Kansas climate has high humidity and temperature changes from season to season,” says Megin Sevier, architectural intern, Tobin & Associates. “The building needed a strong, external rainscreen that would last more than 80 years. Cumaru ended up being a good choice for the project because, being South American, it can handle high humidity.” Studio 804 is a full-time, one semester, design-build program at the University of Kansas School of Architecture and Urban Planning. Professor Dan Rockhill, who as J.L. constant distinguished professor of

architecture at the University of Kansas, oversaw the LEED-Platinum project. Rockhill’s Studio 804 has garnered a national reputation in sustainable building by completing nine “green” houses in nine years. On each project, including the 3716 Springfield House, the students do all of the design work, provide the labor, develop the budget, raise the money, keep the books, and solicit building product donations. A trend toward architecture students experiencing more handson curricula coincides with architects exercising tighter control over materials, and results in better-quality design. “It’s about preparing people to function responsibly in a global economy. We are probably one of the only companies in the world that could provide them certified material from the forest to the finished product,” says George Celtrick of Cikel America. Cikel donated the material for this project in collaboration with its distribution partner, The Master’s Craft. “Participating in a project like this, where young architects are learning the value of sustainable building, is certainly a positive thing for us,” says Celtrick. “We’ve had a great relationship with The Master’s Craft for years, and they are quite familiar with our products and how we like to do business. This was one of those win-win opportunities for everyone involved.” Another win for Cikel: Cikel was recipient of IWPA’s 2010 Environmental Excellence Award in recognition of their commitment to the environment through corporate social responsibility. n international wood

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Innovative

Aesthetic “It’s amazing what people can do with veneer,” says Alan Hubbard, sales manager for Veneer Technologies, Inc., of Newport, North Carolina. The company manufactures high-end decorative exotic and domestic hardwood veneer faces to the tune of 5-million square feet finished per month on eight continuous cross-feed splicers. “We’re looking for ways to encourage the use of natural wood veneers and wood products and want to recognize the skills of the craftsmen,” says Hubbard. So, in an ongoing effort to inspire creativity with wood, Veneer Technologies hosts its annual Craftsman’s Challenge, which rewards excellence in woodworkers, distributors and sales representatives throughout the supply chain. The contest draws a diverse showcase of submissions with extraordinary veneer techniques, including ornate pieces in unique and unexpected forms ranging from fine furniture and trinket boxes to provocative automobile paneling, piano inlays and retail fixtures. Among Veneer Technologies’ 2010 competition’s standouts is a stunning display where marquetry, a 500-year-old artform, meets the modern advantages of digital photo manipulation. Using Photoshop, long-time wood buff Rob Milam creates custom line-drawings based on a photo’s light and dark values to use as templates for his intricate veneer images. His entry in the specialty items category, wall art showing the face of a young girl with amazing realism, is a perfect example of the freedom exotic veneers provide to artists. “The fact that I can buy veneers in hundreds of colors in lights and darks inspires me,” Milam says. “The exotics are particularly desirable to me because I can get ultra-dark tones with several rosewood species, and brilliant colors like oranges with satinwood, and reds with African padauk (Pterocarpus spp.). I don’t think I could do what I’m doing if I was limited to domestic veneers.” Milam’s is one of more than 130 submissions in six categories awaiting Veneer Technologies’ judgment at IWF in Atlanta, Georgia, August 25 through 28. “As the wood industry works to recover from the recent economic downturn, it is critical to our success that we encourage and reward our best craftsmen and students,” says Patrick Molzahn, Craftsman’s Challenge judge; cabinetmaking and millwork program director at Wisconsin’s Madison Area Technical College and vice-president of the WoodLINKS USA board of directors. And just as Veneer Technologies acknowledges best of’s with its own contest, this year it received recognition as the winner of the IWPA 2010 Award for Aesthetic Design Excellence. Veneer Technologies was recognized for their novel approach to inspire architects, designers, architectural woodworkers and students to create visual masterpieces with veneer products from around the world. n 54

Innovation is not always about invention; sometimes it has to do with providing a simple and elegant solution to a problem. Case in point, wallaba shingles. Wallaba shingles are not new. They have been used throughout the Caribbean and North America for nearly a century, and for good reason. Wallaba (Eperua spp.) is a dense tropical hardwood native to South America. It is world-renowned for being naturally resistant to moisture, insects and decay. “Ten years ago we realized that the demand for the product was decreasing mainly because of poor manufacturing quality. And architects were losing trust,” says Calixto Orta of Durable Wood Products USA. “We believed in this product,” says Orta, “and saw a need to revitalize it.” So Durable Wood Products started a state-of-the art manufacturing plant in Guyana where they could source wallaba from sustainably managed forests. They devised rigorous quality standards that are inline with international building codes, and hired 50 people from local communities to work in the plant, which is operated by Superior Shingles & Wood Products. Durable gave their standardized shakes and shingles the brand name Turada®. They contracted with a highly accredited independent laboratory from North America to test the product, and then embarked upon a vigorous marketing campaign to introduce Turada® shingles to architects, designers and distributors. “It really is a unique product with superior performance,” says Orta. “Turada® shingles are the only wood shingles capable of achieving a ‘Class A’ fire-rated roof system without any chemical treatment. And the natural consistency of the tropical hardwood makes them resistant to moisture, insects and decay. That makes Turada® very interesting environmentally.” Durable told the story of Turada® and convinced a few architects to use it on a handful of prestigious residential and resort projects. Since then, the brand’s popularity has surged within the design community. “We are quite happy with the Turada® shingles,” says Thomas W. Gay, AIA. “We like to use them as an alternative to clay or cement tile when the buildings really need to be warm and welcoming, domestic in scale and in

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THE SHINGLES ON THESE ROOFS FEATURE WALLABA, A DENSE, TROPICAL HARDWOOD LONG USED TO MAKE TRANSMISSION POLES, FENCE POSTS AND CLADDING.

harmony with the natural setting. They also lend a certain authenticity that allows us to create the feeling that the buildings belong to the place and that they’ve been there for a long time.” Durable Wood Products received the IWPA 2010 Innovative Excellence Award in recognition of their pioneering approach to rejuvenating the market potential for an underutilized tropical species. IW

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Supporting THE Arts

PH OTOG R A PHY BY IWA N BA A N

A performing arts hall is more than a box to put music in. It is a dynamic space that accompanies the artists and connects community with culture. Although every venue is unique, exotic wood species are often used in the design of performing arts centers. A peek into three of the premier music halls in the United States shows how imported woods blend beauty and functionality in perfect harmony.

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Intimacy “Our big mission here was to interpret the single-word program we got from our clients, which was ‘intimacy,’” says Elizabeth Diller, principal architect of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the MacArthur Prize-winning firm responsible for the renovation of the Alice Tully Hall, a concert hall located in the Julliard School. “Intimacy is interpreted as an acoustic and visual pursuit,” says Diller, the idea being that in live music performance, when people can see better, they actually hear better. To minimize visual distraction every surface of the interior is finished with African moabi veneer (Baillonella toxisperma). Moabi has a straight grain, and silky appearance. “What is really spectacular is that the entire project, several thousand square feet, was achieved out of one log,” says Paul Fetzer, vice president of Fetzer Architectural Woodwork. The veneer was cut to a customized, ultra-thin 1/80th of an inch and laminated to a cloth backer. About 80 percent of the moabi veneer was laid up on MDF panels, some of which are two-feet thick. The panels were sculpted with a CNC router, hand-sanded and then laminated in a vacuum press to create undulating shapes in precise dimensions. “Acoustical engineers love it,” says Fetzer. “The panels reflect sound to their specifications.” To relieve excess weight, the large MDF panels were carved out from the backside.

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“We used exotic woods in the theatre to help maintain an image of high-quality and luxury, but in a way that is more cutting-edge.”

The remaining 20 percent of the moabi veneer was laminated to recycled eco-resin panels from 3form, a manufacturer of chemical resin materials for the architecture and design industry. These specialty panels, including the 40-foot tall stage-right and stage-left doors, are backlit through a full-spectrum LED lighting system. This allows the moabi’s natural red to shine through, and also carries illuminated colors. The panels above and to the sides of the stage can pivot and tilt to achieve different acoustic properties, and a modular wall stack behind the stage folds back to reveal a pipe organ. Diller’s new interior liner isolates the existing hall from the 7th Avenue subway, and also distributes sound evenly throughout the house. Moabi veneer eliminates all visual noise without compromising the feeling of cultural sophistication. And in the balance, the Alice Tully Hall has finally achieved intimacy. n

Jim Van Duys, project architect Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates

From the start it was understood that for the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre to be successful, it would have to be multi-functional, supporting everything from grand opera to American Idol Kelly Clarkson, and approachable by all. The Atlanta-based architecture firm Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates won the project, led by one of the firm’s principals, veteran architect Keller Smith, and principal project architect Jim Van Duys. “The target market is not exclusively opera-goers,” says Van Duys. “There was a conscious effort through the programming and space design to create a venue that is comfortable and appealing to guests of all ages. We used exotic woods in the theatre to help maintain an image of high-quality and luxury, but in a way that is more cutting-edge.”

Ph otog r a phy by Fr ed G er lich Photog r a phy

Opportunity

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“We are always interested in using exotic wood. It is responsible, beautiful, and completely renewable.” Keller Smith, architect, Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates

Ph otog r a phy by Paul Wa rch ol Ph otog r a phy Inc.

Importers of fine flooring, lumber and decking

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The interior is an updated take on the traditional opera house. Makoré (African cherry) (Tieghemella heckelii and T. africana) is used extensively in the auditorium. “We have used this species frequently prior to this,” says Smith. “It is very predictable and very beautiful. We can specify both the solid wood, which is used in the slat treatment on the walls, and the veneer that is on the curved faces of the balconies.” Reconstituted ebony (Diospyros spp.) veneer, made from scraps of the precious species, is used as trim, and the seating is built from the South American species couma (Couma spp.). “We are always interested in using exotic wood,” says Smith, who requires proof of due diligence from his suppliers. “It is responsible, beautiful, and completely renewable.” The Cobb Energy Centre sits near highways, tall commercial office buildings and a convention center. “The building became a modern sculptural expression,” says Smith. Composite metal panels of all different sizes are arranged in a complex geometry, curving outwards to give the exterior its signature shape. The campus includes a 2,750- seat theatre, a 10,000 square-foot ballroom, an elegant three-story lobby, a commercial kitchen and 700-car parking deck. “The people who had the foresight to establish this facility were risk takers, and they were rewarded,” says Smith. “But it is the arts community that received the real benefit.” n

SW-COC-1627 The FSC trademark identifies products from well-managed forests © 1996 Forest Stewardship Council A.C.

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Photog r a phy by L awr ence Kir keg a a r d, principa l , Kir k eg a a r d as so ciates

Community

“We’ve taken the beech and put it in the most visible places, all of the trim elements and balcony edges, so that no matter where the audience is looking, the wood is always a part of the pictures. It adds a universal element to the experience.” Cliff Gayley, design architect, William Rawn and Associates

Two principles guided the design for Sonoma State University’s Green Music Center Concert Hall, creating interpersonal experiences and acoustic excellence. The hall was designed by William Rawn and Associates in Boston, Massachusetts, the same firm that designed the famous Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood in Lenox, Massachusetts. “We believe in creating rooms that are inviting and welcoming places for communities to gather,” says Cliff Gayley, design architect for the project. “So natural wood is something we often use in our spaces to bring warmth to the room, making spaces feel humane and tactile, warm and inviting.” European steamed beech (Fagus sylvatica) was selected for the vertical surfaces of the Green Music Hall, intermingling with maple (Acer spp.) for the stage floor and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) for the main floor.

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Photog r a phy by L awr ence Kir k eg a a r d, principa l , Kir keg a a r d as sociates

“Natural light is also a strong element of this particular space. In selecting a wood, the beech in particular, there is a brightness in the wood, yet it has enough color and warmth and depth that it does not bleach out if you look at it from a distance, like a dark oak would,” says Gayley. To create a more intimate experience between the musicians and the audience, the stage is a part of the room, rather than being set behind a proscenium arch, which allows the audience to wrap around the performers at eye-level. Also, the side-wall balconies look across at each other rather than facing forward, so instead of staring at the backs of peoples’ heads, members of the audience are

Q:

the low-frequency sounds from escaping the room,” says Gayley. “High frequency sounds will stay in a room with very light cladding, but a solid box is necessary to keep all the sound in the room.” n

Harmony Each unique performing arts center is created to meet the specific needs of the artists and the audiences. Yet they all share the common objectives of enhancing performances and connecting community. In many applications exotic wood materials, with their sophisticated aesthetic, reflective resonance and versatility play an integral role in creating concert halls that sing. IW

aware of each other’s reactions to the music. “We’ve taken the beech and put it in the most visible places, all of the trim elements and balcony edges, so that no matter where the audience is looking, the wood is always a part of the pictures. It adds a universal element to the experience,” says Gayley. Acousticians often refer to the hall as an instrument itself, one that can be tuned. Lawrence Kirkegaard is an expert in the field. He employed materials and shapes to fine-tune the acoustic properties of the unamplified 1400-seat Green Music Hall. The tall, rectangular “shoebox” shape of the hall allows the acoustics to build up and resonate in an appropriate way. “It is designed to keep

Our EPA award-winning PureBond® formaldehyde-free technology in our veneer core plywood panels exceeds CARB P2 requirements for formaldehyde emissions. And we offer many options with FSC® certification for LEED® and other green building applications as well!

What company offers you one-stop global shopping for your green hardwood plywood and veneer needs?

www.cfpwood.com 800.808.9080

A:

Columbia Forest Products, North America’s largest green manufacturer of decorative hardwood plywood and veneer.

Contact our International Division to help you engineer an optimized product mix from our selection of plywood and veneer products.

© Columbia Forest Products. All rights reserved.

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i n tIWPA e r n3rd a tHi o nal w AD.indd 1ood

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CHALLENGE US DON’T GIVE US YOUR BUSINESS . . . LET

US SHOW YOU HOW WE’LL EARN IT

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IW2010.indd 61

We’ve

INQUIRY@ALUMBER.COM

/

WWW.ALUMBER.COM

8/13/10 9:19 PM


K PH O TO © IS TO C

.C O M /O

e D

N D ER ST EE LO F VA N

i n sig

d o o G r o f ng

Different Designs, Creating Impact Where it Counts Architects, designers and specifiers have clients flirting with plans to build new houses, office buildings, renovate kitchens, baths, or simply adding decks. With budgets ranging from frugal to lavish, these clients look to the architect and design (A&D) community to earn the best return on investment. The choices are endless for specifying and designing, but there’s only one choice that fits the bill for durability, sustainability and beauty – wood. Wood is the undisputed best “green” choice on the market. The question then is not whether to use wood, but how best to incorporate it into your project. Which species? Which grade? Knowledge of what is available leads to innovation and maximizes the impact of your creativity. Very often, the best choice may be a species grown outside the USA. Imported wood species can meet or exceed any design requirement. But one of the most striking reasons to specify imported wood may surprise you: It is a choice that has positive implications far beyond the wood. COLLABORATIVE BENEFITS

Forestry plays a leading role in sustaining forests and providing economic enrichment. There is growing evidence that the best way to protect tropical forests is to encourage international trade in wood products. The A&D community can help ensure that international forests are sustainably managed by specifying imported wood in their projects. Specifying imported wood not only provides your customers with exciting colors and unique patterns, it maximizes the positive impact that trade brings to forest dependent communities. The World Bank noted, “More than 90 percent of the 1.2 billion people living in extreme poverty [are] dependent on forests for some part of their livelihoods.” When communities and coun62

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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IT’S OK TO BE DIFFERENT

’S

BU

RGER

ST

D

TIN AU S S TEXA

N

Armed with the positive facts about imports, you can now find the perfect wood species for any project. There is virtually an imported species and product for every application at various price points. Importers, woodworkers and suppliers stand ready to assist you in finding the best wood species for a project. Becoming knowledgeable of a wood species attributes, availability and workability ensures your project’s success from the start. Begin by seeking out suppliers who are affi liated with a trade association. In the U.S., the International Wood Products Association (IWPA) is the only trade group that represents importers and their supply chain. IWPA members also conduct pro-active due diligence on their suppliers to ensure legal and sustainable requirements are met, and have very specific

information on the precise origin of wood. (A list of IWPA members is located in the back pages of this magazine.) Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good when it comes to selecting grades. Sometimes buying the top of the line is necessary, but “perfect” may be found in lower grades in terms of character. The right look and feel can often be found in mid-range grades of imported wood. Their beauty is often enhanced by knots and growth marks. Proof of this is the growing market for reclaimed wood. Grades signal the number of natural characteristics in a board, not the board’s total quality. Using more random lengths and a wider grade range mimics what naturally comes from a tree and the forest at large. Using a wider grade range in your project not only differentiates your designs from others, but it is the environmentally conscious approach to design.

A

Given all of the new federal regulations such as the Lacey Act in the United States and similar legislation in the European Union, wood producers overseas pay great attention to legality requirements and sustainable forest management. Importers are doing the same. They use a range of tools such as audits, certification and other due diligence methods to ensure their wood was legally procured. Operating under the requirements of the Lacey Act, legislation which forbids trade in illegal material, imports have acquired additional credibility from the U.S. government and the marketplace. As an added benefit, architects and specifiers have access to a significant number of different certification systems in the marketplace. All of these programs share a common denominator: To certify and verify legality and sustainability. Some consider the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) the “gold” standard primarily because LEED only accepts forest products certified by the FSC. That may soon change as the U.S. Green Building Council is currently reviewing their rating system. The FSC is not widespread in community forest operations and in developing countries in general. If your clients are demanding certified, take the time to educate them and bring your supplier partner to the table as there are likely a whole host of certification programs that may fit the bill. For example, other leading certification programs on the market today include an alphabet soup of options. The Malaysian Timber Certification Council (MTCC), Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC), Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI), Timber Legality & Traceability Verification (TLTV), Verified Legal Origin (VLO), the Tropical Forest Foundation’s (TFF) Legal Verified with Chain of Custody® (CoC),

Tropical Forest Trust (TFT), GREENGUARD, among many others. And don’t forget, there is also plenty of non-third party certified wood that is legal and sustainable. U.S. hardwoods also fall into this category.

RY

“GREEN” MEANS “GO” FOR IMPORTED SPECIES

Using more random lengths and a wider grade range mimics what naturally comes from a tree and the forest at large. Using a wider grade range in your project not only differentiates your designs from others, but it is the environmentally conscious approach to design.

P. T E R

tries value their forests for commercial trade, they won’t cut them down to grow soybeans, cocoa or palm oil trees. There is a proven link between trade, poverty alleviation and sustainable forest management. Trade in wood products is an important component that has helped cut world poverty in half since 1981. Less poverty translates into emerging economies with improved quality of life, health care and education. You can expand your designs with imported wood species confident in the knowledge that you are making a great difference for these at risk communities.

P. TERRY’S BURGER JOINT IN AUSTIN, TEXAS MAKES EXTENSIVE USE OF GARAPA (APULEIA LEIOCARPA)

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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M O U L D I N G S / M I L LW O R K

Hura, Acacu, Catahua, Ochoo (Hura crepitans) Pale yellowish brown to pale olive gray with a high luster. Machines easily, finishes well, and is easy to glue and nail.

FLOORING

Red Mandioqueira, Mandio (Qualea spp.) Pinkish brown to reddish brown with golden luster in some species. Texture medium to coarse. Glues satisfactorily.

UNIQUE SPECIES, REMARK ABLE PROJECTS

The remarkable projects that come from the creative minds of the A&D community are made real when combined with the perfect material – wood. The forest gives us thousands of species globally, yet many remain underutilized. Using a lesser-known species (LKS) brings freshness to design and has the added benefit of relieving the strain on the more popular species such as oak, maple, ipé, teak, and mahogany. Breaking away from the herd and using unique LKS, or “alternative species,” also generates increased economic returns to forest dependent communities and further advances sustainable forest management. LKS are being incorporated into modern and traditional designs with great success. One remarkable project that melded the use of garapa (Apuleia leiocarpa) into a modern design was implemented for P. Terry’s burger joint in Austin, Texas. Lead architect Micah Land said, “The harsh Texas weather demanded a durable, appealing wood product. Garapa was chosen for its very rich, distinctive tone and high strength characteristics. Mesh budgetary concerns and performance data, it was an ideal addition to P. Terry’s palette.” Choosing wood with more character gives value to the client, sustainability to the resource and creates impact to the design. Using alternative species helps promote sustainable forest management in developing countries and increases the return that forest dependent communities receive. Your design does make a difference, but in more ways than you originally thought. ■

64

ALTERNATIVE

species

The International Wood Products Association has identified several lesser known species (LKS) from around the world that have significant potential in the U.S. market. LKS represent interesting alternatives to wellknown species for applications such as decking, flooring, moulding and millwork. Because of their suitable physical characteristics, the following LKS species were selected by a panel of IWPA experts as having both the technical qualities and availability to meet the needs of architects, designers, manufacturers and consumers. Technical information on LKS can be found at the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin (www.fpl.fs.fed.us). The full list of LKS species identified by IWPA for U.S. market can be found at www.iwpawood.org.

P LY W O O D/ F U R N I T U R E COMPONENTS

Sande (Brosimum utile) Color is yellowish white to yellowish to light brown. The wood stains, finishes and glues with ease. Used in plywood, furniture components and moulding.

DECKING

Garapa (Apuleia leiocarpa) Garapa is in the yellow-beige to yellowbrown spectrum. Will age to a silver gray without sealer. Very dense and rot resistent. Very good workablity. Most valued for exterior applications.

The full list of LKS species identified by IWPA for U.S. market can be found at www.iwpawood.org.

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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P. TER RY'S PHOTOS COURTESY OF E AST TE A K / PHOTOG R A PHER: M AT T ML A D ENK A

MICHAEL HSU AND HIS COLLABORATIVE TEAM. THE HSU DESIGN OFFICE IS LOCATED IN AUSTIN, TEXAS.

ALTERNATIVE SPECIES AT HOME IN TEXAS

A

rchitect Michael Hsu’s firm has been described as the leader of the “Texas Modern Movement.” An array of commercial and private projects incorporate his vision. Mr. Hsu’s firm crafted a bike shop for Lance Armstrong, a restaurant for Sandra Bullock and, not last or least, a burger stand for Patrick Terry called P. Terry’s. P. Terry’s has become an Austin institution, showcasing locally-grown organic and sustainable food. As such, it needed its newest burger stand to assume landmark status. Michael Hsu and his team delivered a fun, futuristic design that has clean, bold lines. The most eye-catching feature is the garapa (Apuleia leiocarpa) wood that flows from indoors to outside.

LAND: For its regional success, ease of craft, durability, and sustainability. It’s something very primitive, tactile, and visually appealing.

International Wood interviewed the lead architect, Micah Land.

LAND: Yes. Using garapa and other “lesser-

IW: Give us your view on the Texas Modern

IW: Walk us through your thought process

Movement and the role wood plays within the Movement.

when it came time to narrow down the various woods available and how you ultimately decided to select garapa.

known-species” can often trigger unique, new design direction. At the same time, it helps manage sustainable and ethical forestation. Be mindful of sources and understand each wood’s unique characteristics as many of these species come from many different parts of the globe. IW

ER

P. T

Y’

URGE S B R

AUSTIN TEXAS

ND

LAND: Wood seemed very fitting here, similar to the restaurant concept in that it is organic, sustainable, very natural, and can be manipulated in many ways, in many different types of applications.

R

TA

IW: How was the choice of wood use important for the modernistic style shown by P. Terry’s?

LAND: Climatic influences of the often times harsh Texas weather demand a durable, appealing wood product such as garapa, which has a very rich, distinctive tone and high strength characteristics. Mesh budgetary concerns and performance data, it was an ideal addition to the P. Terry’s palette.

that responsible specification and design can play in advancing sustainable building practices? Any words of advice to the A&D community on using different species?

S

LAND: One way the Texas Modern Movement may be described is as a modern response to the regional and cultural influences on its buildings, spaces and practices. This modern approach recognizes previous forms and their materiality, both for their practicality and historical significance. It is interesting to address some of these more lucrative concepts in contemporary architecture through the specification of natural materials and the design of their inherent qualities using modern construction technology. One of these important materials is wood – something that may easily be salvaged, re-used. It is organic and natural, and may be milled in many ways for many different types of applications.

IW: Any final words of wisdom on the role

IW: Did you receive feedback on the workability of the garapa from the builders? LAND: Yes, we quickly learned of its hardness from our millworker, particularly its ability to stay straight/true, and hold form, as opposed to other wood selections which tend to move, cup and bow. IW: Looks like you love working with a variety of woods. Why? INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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www.baconveneer.com info@baconveneer.ca

Bacon Veneer Company

www.bozovich.com infobtp@bozovichtimber.com www.bridgewellresources.com info@bridgewellres.com www.veneers.com info@brooksideveneers.com www.veneers.com bvsouth@bellsouth.net

Bridgewell Resources LLC

Brookside Veneers Ltd.

Brookside Veneers Ltd.

www.columbiaforestproducts.com jhedin@columbiaforestproducts.com

Columbia Forest Products

Tualatin, Oregon

Dansu International

Lexington, North Carolina

Dan K. Moore Lumber Company, Inc.

Greensboro, North Carolina

www.dansuintl.com disales@dansuintl.com

866-625-9033 Fax: 503-625-7753

336-248-8319 Fax: 336-248-8338

336-605-0429 Fax: 336-662-0373

www.clarkeveneers.com info@clarkeveneers.com

Clarke Veneers and Plywood

Jackson, Mississippi

dmoorelumber@lexcominc.net

601-366-0331 Fax: 601-366-0334

www.cikel.com gceltrick@cikel.com.br

Miami, Florida

Cikel America LLC

800-971-7896 Fax: 305-742-2220

604-687-2254 Fax: 604-682-4691

www.canusawoodproducts.com canusa@canusawoodproducts.com

Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

Canusa Wood Products Ltd.

610-759-2837 Fax: 610-759-5757

www.martinguitar.com woodmgt@martinguitar.com

336-852-7721 Fax: 336-808-1330

609-409-1311 Fax: 609-409-1322

800-570-3566 Fax: 503-238-2671

251-578-4604 Fax: 251-578-6844

716-649-2850 Fax: 716-648-6107

403-250-3757 Fax: 403-291-5668

305-694-5195 Fax: 305-694-5198

504-828-0943 Fax: 504-828-0946

805-688-7919 Fax: 805-688-2956

662-252-1862 Fax: 662-252-1888

Nazareth, Pennsylvania

C.F. Martin & Co.

Greensboro, North Carolina

Cranbury, New Jersey

Tigard, Oregon

Evergreen, Alabama

Bozovich Timber Products, Inc.

Hamburg, New York

Baillie Lumber Co.

Calgary, Alberta (Canada) www.baillie.com jbach@baillie.com

www.arimarwood.com mmarin@arimarwood.com

Arimar International Corp.

Miami, Florida

Metairie, Louisiana

www.argofineimports.com argo@argofineimports.com

appiwood@silcom.com

www.americanpac.com smb@americanpac.com

919-619-7475 Fax: 919-869-1689

800-351-9736 Fax: 901-853-5028

www.amazonmillworks.com andrewsloop@amazonmillworks.com

Argo Fine Imports, Inc.

Solvang, California

American Pacific Plywood Inc.

Holly Springs, Mississippi

American Pacific Inc.

Raleigh, North Carolina

Amazon Millworks LLC

Medley, Florida

Aljoma Lumber, Inc.

Collierville, Tennessee 305-556-8003 Fax: 305-828-3055

www.craiglumber.com geninfo@craiglumber.com

AHC Craig Imports

704-471-9991 Fax: 704-471-9949

PHONE/FAX

Hardwood

FLOORING

DECKING

• • •

MOULDINGS

Softwood

CABINETS AND/OR COMPONENTS

FURNITURE AND/OR COMPONENTS

DOORS/WINDOWS

• • •

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

• • •

• •

MANUFACTURER

• •

• •

• •

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• •

• •

• •

• • • • •

WHOLESALERS

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

• •

• • • •

• •

• •

• •

OTHER PANEL PRODUCTS

• • • • • • • •

• •

• • • • •

• •

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• • • • • • • •

• • •

• •

• • •

OTHER LUMBER PRODUCTS

• • • • • • •

Hardwood

• • • •

Softwood

• • • • •

Softwood

PLYWOOD

Hardboard

VENEERS

MDF

LUMBER

OSB

BUSINESS ACTIVITY

V O T I N G

www.aljoma.com grubin@ufpi.com

www.advantagelumber.com chris@advantagelumber.com

Advantage Trim & Lumber

Grover, North Carolina

WEB SITE/EMAIL

COMPANY NAME

North American Importers, Users, Distributors Particleboard

PRODUCTS

IMPORTER

IW2010.indd 66 AGENT/SALES REP

66 Other

I W P A M E M B E R S

JAT O B A

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www.darlingtonveneer.com rhubbard@darlingtonveneer.com

Darlington Veneer Co., Inc.

www.frosthardwood.com bhf@frosthardwood.com www.gwv.com gwvmtl@aol.com www.globalplywoodandlumber.com kpeabody@globalplywoodandlumber.com

Frost Hardwood Lumber Co.

General Woods & Veneers Ltd.

Global Plywood & Lumber, Inc.

www.iketrading.com cj@iketrading.com

Ike Trading Company, Ltd.

Beaverton, Oregon

Center, Texas

503-643-6688 Fax: 503-641-7335

936-598-2491 Fax: 936-598-8146

706-624-3272 Fax: 706-624-3276

www.homelegend.com officemanager@homelegend.com www.ihlo.com ihlo@ihlo.com

713-644-1966 Fax: 713-644-7223

336-883-0196 Fax: 336-886-1366

231-347-7040 Fax: 231-347-1369

858-486-8700 Fax: 858-486-8702

450-674-4957 Fax: 450-674-3494

858-455-9060 Fax: 858-455-0455

305-635-9222 Fax: 305-635-8383

www.hollandsw.com info@hollandsw.com

www.grossveneer.com robgross@grossveneer.com

Ihlo Sales & Import Company

Adairsville, Georgia

Home Legend LLC

Houston, Texas

Holland Southwest International

High Point, North Carolina

Gross Veneer Sales, Inc.

Petoskey, Michigan

Global Wood Solutions LLC

Poway, California

Longueuil, Quebec (Canada)

San Diego, California

globalwoodsolutions@charter.net

www.foreverwoodinc.com tom@foreverwoodinc.com

Miami, Florida

770-614-7896 Fax: 770-614-1942

310-822-7771 Fax: 310-822-2920

Foreverwood, Inc.

Los Angeles, California

Far East American, Inc.

Renton, Washington

Evergreen Hardwoods Inc.

Suwanee, Georgia

360-793-3754 Fax: 360-793-7835

www.feaco.com info@feaco.com

www.elofhansson.com romel.bezerra@us.elofhansson.com

Elof Hansson Inc.

Sultan, Washington

425-271-9292 Fax: 425-271-6969

www.eastteak.com rick@eastteak.com

East Teak Fine Hardwoods, Inc.

800-788-5568 Fax: 781-344-7110

www.eghardwoods.com info@eghardwoods.com

www.downesandreader.com williamv@downesandreader.com

Stoughton, Massachusetts

336-852-8341 Fax: 336-852-1933

843-416-8036 Fax: 843-416-8037

www.directsourceimports.com chris@directsourceimports.com www.dlhusa.com dlhusa@dlh-group.com

732-635-0739 Fax: 732-635-9738

877-430-0883 Fax: 910-763-3748

843-393-3861 Fax: 843-393-8243

www.diamonddecking.com sales@diamonddecking.com

Downes & Reader Hardwood Co., Inc.

Greensboro, North Carolina

DLH Nordisk, Inc.

Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

Direct Source Imports LLC

Metuchen, New Jersey

Diamond Hardwoods, Inc.

Leland, North Carolina

Dean Hardwoods, Inc.

Darlington, South Carolina

305-828-9666 Fax: 305-828-2501

PHONE/FAX

MOULDINGS

FLOORING

DECKING

Softwood

Hardwood

• • • • • • •

• • • • • •

FURNITURE AND/OR COMPONENTS

OTHER LUMBER PRODUCTS

CABINETS AND/OR COMPONENTS

• • • •

Hardwood

DOORS/WINDOWS

• •

• •

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

Hardwood

Softwood

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• • • •

• •

• • • •

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• •

• •

• • • • •

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• •

• • • •

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• • • •

• • • •

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• •

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

• •

• • • •

MANUFACTURER

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

• • • •

• •

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

• • •

• • • • •

Softwood

OTHER PANEL PRODUCTS

Hardboard

PLYWOOD

MDF

VENEERS

OSB

LUMBER

V O T I N G

www.deanwood.com mdean@deanwood.com

www.dantzler1865.com agodinez@dantzler1865.com

Dantzler Inc. / Dantzler Trade

Miami Lakes, Florida

WEB SITE/EMAIL

COMPANY NAME

North American Importers, Users, Distributors Particleboard

BUSINESS ACTIVITY

IMPORTER

PRODUCTS

WHOLESALERS

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

AGENT/SALES REP

IW2010.indd 67 Other

I W P A M E M B E R S

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www.ifpcorp.com jamesh@ifpcorp.com www.intlspecialties.com twilson16@aol.com www.lsvlumber.com jackgriede@lsvlumber.com www.backyarddiscovery.com scripsick@backyarddiscovery.com www.libertywoods.com info@libertywoods.com www.lumberliquidators.com asecter@lumberliquidators.com

International Forest Products Corp.

International Specialties, Inc.

Lane Stanton Vance Lumber Company

Leisure Time Products

Liberty Woods International, Inc.

Lumber Liquidators Inc.

610-485-6600 Fax: 610-485-0471

www.alanmcilvain.com sales@alanmcilvain.com

Alan McIlvain Company www.mcilvain.com info@mcilvain.com www.medallionfp.com pgallagher@medallionfp.com www.medleyhardwoods.net alfredoh@medleyhardwoods.net www.metrofloors.com kpramhus@metrofloors.com www.morelandcompany.com jasonn@morelandcompany.com www.moxontimbers.com shaynelachlan@moxontimbers.net www.newmanlumber.com info@newmanlumber.com

Medallion Forest Products

Medley Hardwoods Inc.

Metropolitan Hardwood Flooring USA

Moreland Co., USA

Moxon Timbers, Inc.

Newman Lumber Company

McMurray, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh Forest Products Co.

www.pittsburghforest.com troyhalo@pittsburghforest.com

724-969-5000 Fax: 724-969-1100

757-498-0186 Fax: 757-498-1075

www.thepenrodcompany.com penrod@thepenrodcompany.com

Virginia Beach, Virginia

The Penrod Company

336-299-7755 Fax: 336-299-4050

askus@patriottimber.com

228-832-1899 Fax: 228-831-1149

800-662-9665 Fax: 540-869-5656

800-397-7769 Fax: 941-953-5180

253-479-3900 Fax: 253-479-3911

305-887-1115 Fax: 305-887-5706

503-288-5002 Fax: 503-288-5511

Greensboro, North Carolina

Patriot Timber Products International, Inc. www.patriottimber.com

Gulfport, Mississippi

Winchester, Virginia

Sarasota, Florida

Kent, Washington

Medley, Florida

Portland, Oregon

White Marsh, Maryland

J. Gibson McIlvain Company

Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania 410-335-9600 Fax: 410-335-3574

586-294-9663 Fax: 586-294-1505

www.mccauseylumber.com heleen@mccauseylumber.com

Roseville, Michigan

800-683-6337 Fax: 773-227-6767

McCausey Lumber Company

Chicago, Illinois

www.mccathaytimber.com info@mccathaytimber.com

702-565-7756 Fax: 702-565-3264

757-566-7128 Fax: 757-259-4286

800-367-7054 Fax: 760-438-8018

620-232-2400 Fax: 620-232-5516

619-442-0821 Fax: 619-442-9192

901-853-4620 Fax: 901-221-0057

530-790-7808 Fax: 530-790-7812

McCathay Timber, Inc.

Henderson, Nevada

Lynn-Nusantara Inc.

Toano, Virginia

Carlsbad, California

Pittsburgh, Kansas

El Cajon, California

Collierville, Tennessee

Yuba City, California

910-283-9960 Fax: 910-283-9964

PHONE/FAX

Hardwood

FLOORING

DECKING

MOULDINGS

Softwood

• •

• • • • • •

• • • •

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

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• • • •

• •

• • • • • •

• • •

• • • • •

• •

• • • •

• •

MANUFACTURER

• • • •

• • • • •

Softwood

OTHER PANEL PRODUCTS

WHOLESALERS

• • • • •

• • • • •

• •

• •

• •

Hardwood

• • • •

• •

• • •

• • • • •

• • •

• • •

• •

• •

• • •

DOORS/WINDOWS

• • • • •

FURNITURE AND/OR COMPONENTS

• • • •

CABINETS AND/OR COMPONENTS

• • • • •

OTHER LUMBER PRODUCTS

• •

Hardwood

• • • •

Softwood

PLYWOOD

Hardboard

VENEERS

MDF

LUMBER

OSB

BUSINESS ACTIVITY

V O T I N G

john@rplinternational.com

www.ichardwoods.com info@ichardwoods.com

Inter-Continental Hardwoods, Inc.

Currie, North Carolina

WEB SITE/EMAIL

COMPANY NAME

North American Importers, Users, Distributors Particleboard

PRODUCTS

IMPORTER

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www.planetchina.com sally@chinaply.com

Planet China LLC

www.pollmeier.com usa@pollmeier.com

Pollmeier Inc.

www.robertweedplywood.com websitemail@robertwoodplywood.com www.getwood.com scottree@aol.com

Robert Weed Plywood Corp.

Roberts Plywood

602-200-5630 Fax: 602-200-5631

www.samlingusa.com annb@samlingusa.com

Phoenix, Arizona

www.sitco.com sales@sitco.com www.solbuilding.com info@solbuilding.com www.sply.net deh@sply.net www.stangelohardwoods.com steve@stangelohardwoods.com www.swanerhardwood.com gary@swanerhardwood.com www.taracapacific.com taraca@taracapacific.com

Sitco Lumber Company

Sol Building Materials Corp.

Southwest Plyboard / Sim*Ply

St. Angelo Hardwoods, Inc.

Swaner Hardwood Company

Taraca Pacific, Inc.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Thompson Mahogany Company

Virginia Beach, Virginia

Taraca Pacific, Inc.

San Francisco, California

Burbank, California

Tiverton, Rhode Island

San Antonio, Texas

El Paso, Texas

Desoto, Texas

www.thompsonmahogany.com info@thomahog.com

www.taracapacific.com woztaraca@yahoo.com

www.shamrockbm.com dwohler@shamrockbm.com

Portland, Oregon

Shamrock Trading

Samling USA

Sabra International

215-624-1866 Fax: 215-338-1060

757-491-0468 Fax: 757-491-0723

415-765-0422 Fax: 415-765-0447

818-953-5350 Fax: 818-846-3662

401-624-3900 Fax: 401-624-3940

210-491-0491 Fax: 210-490-9695

915-771-6500 Fax: 915-771-6552

972-225-4283 Fax: 972-228-5987

503-643-8800 Fax: 503-643-6642

305-868-3663 Fax: 305-868-5447

www.sabrainternational.com brette@sabrainternational.com

Miami Beach, Florida

New Orleans, Louisiana

504-895-6377 Fax: 504-897-0820

631-586-7700 Fax: 631-586-7009

574-848-7631 Fax: 574-848-5679

800-767-0111 Fax: 804-747-8884

978-263-0055 Fax: 978-263-9806

443-248-0611 Fax: 856-467-5510

443-248-0611 Fax: 856-467-5510

503-452-5800 Fax: 503-452-5801

908-687-7890 Fax: 908-687-5750

www.roblumco.com info@roblumco.com

Robinson Lumber Company, Inc.

Deer Park, New York

Bristol, Indiana

Glen Allen, Virginia

www.rifp.com ken.nelson@rifp.com

www.rexlumber.com salesinfo@rexlumber.com

www.reitzhardwoods.com hreitz@reitzhardwoods.com

Richmond International Forest Products

Acton, Massachusetts

Rex Lumber Company

Wilmington, Delaware

Reitz Hardwoods LLC

Stevensville, Maryland

PRS Guitars Ltd.

Portland, Oregon www.prsguitars.com hreitz@prsguitars.com

www.pdusa.com plywood@pdusa.com

Union, New Jersey

314-517-5080 Fax: 314-480-7034

PHONE/FAX

Hardwood

CABINETS AND/OR COMPONENTS

FURNITURE AND/OR COMPONENTS

DOORS/WINDOWS

MOULDINGS

FLOORING

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

• •

• •

• • • • •

• •

• • • • •

• • •

• • •

• • • • •

• •

• •

• • • •

• •

• •

• • • •

• • • •

• • •

• •

• • • • •

• •

• • • • • • •

• • • •

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

• •

• •

• • • •

• •

• • • •

• • • • •

• •

• • • •

• •

• • • • •

• • • • •

• • •

Softwood

• • • • •

DECKING

• • • •

OTHER LUMBER PRODUCTS

• • •

• •

Hardwood

• • • • •

Softwood

• •

• • • •

Hardwood

• •

MANUFACTURER

Softwood

OTHER PANEL PRODUCTS

Hardboard

PLYWOOD

MDF

VENEERS

OSB

LUMBER

V O T I N G

Plywood & Door Mfrs. Corp.

St. Louis, Missouri

WEB SITE/EMAIL

COMPANY NAME

North American Importers, Users, Distributors Particleboard

BUSINESS ACTIVITY

IMPORTER

PRODUCTS

WHOLESALERS

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

AGENT/SALES REP

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www.ironwoods.com info@ironwoods.com www.timberwolfusa.com info@timberwolfusa.com www.totemfp.com lbrittner@totemsteel.com www.tradeleaf.com info@tradeleaf.com

Timber Holdings International

Timberwolf Tropical Hardwoods

Totem Forest Products

TradeLeaf LLC www.tradelink-group.com usa@tradelink-group.com www.tradelink-group.com uk@tradelink-group.com www.troutriverlumber.com johnbarber@troutriverlumber.com inquiries@tumac.com www.tumac.com www.ucsforestgroup.com info@ucsforestgroup.com

Tradelink Wood Products Ltd.

Trout River Lumber LLC

Tumac Lumber Company

UCS Forest Group

www.upm-kymmene.com freek.peijs@upm-kymmene.com www.usply.net raddick@aol.com www.veneertech.com jvarner@veneertech.com www.vintageflooring.com emachado@vintagefloooring.com

UPM-Kymmene, Inc.

USPly Trading Company

Veneer Technologies, Inc.

Vintage Hardwood Flooring

http://home.earthlink.new/~welcoth tom_h@nilco.net

West Elizabeth Lumber

www.woodbrokerage.com connelly@woodbrokerage.com

Wood Brokerage International

Inverness, Florida

Worldwide Building Products Corp.

Savannah, Georgia

Wood Products International

Elkhart, Indiana

Wood Parts International

Lake Oswego, Oregon

574-293-0566 Fax: 574-294-4694

800-453-3554 Fax: 503-906-2520

866-870-3040 Fax: 503-277-2631

412-384-3900 Fax: 412-384-3955

336-288-2027

416-252-4182 Fax: 416-252-3487

252-223-6359 Fax: 252-223-3511

305-722-6622 Fax: 305-722-6623

630-850-4992 Fax: 630-850-3512

905-593-9918 Fax: 905-814-0090

905-814-8000 Fax: 905-814-8788

503-226-6661 Fax: 503-273-2653

434-645-2600 Fax: 434-645-2603

jeff.barnes@worldwidebuilding.com

352-341-5500 Fax: 352-341-1500

www.caribbeanheartpine.com 912-231-0909 rdavis@woodproductsinternationalinc.com Fax: 912-234-2575

woodparts@aol.com

www.wy.com/hip karen.andrus-hughes@weyerhaeuser.com

Beaverton, Oregon

Weyerhaeuser Hardwoods

Elizabeth, Pennsylvania

cmengel@live.com

Greensboro, North Carolina

VM International LLC

Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

Newport, North Carolina

Medley, Florida

Westmont, Illinois

sales@ucsglobal.com

Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

UCS Global - Toronto and Shenzhen, China www.ucsglobal.com

Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

Portland, Oregon

Crewe, Virginia

44 (0) 20-7460-7788 Fax: 44 (0) 20-7460-7799

336-292-1500 Fax: 336-292-1155

212-595-1371 Fax: 212-202-3542

877-467-7808 Fax: 503-467-7808

OKOUME

London (United Kingdom)

Greensboro, North Carolina

Tradelink Wood Products Inc.

New York, New York

Portland, Oregon

410-770-4435 Fax: 410-770-9553

414-445-8989 Fax: 414-445-9155

PHONE/FAX

CABINETS AND/OR COMPONENTS

FURNITURE AND/OR COMPONENTS

Hardwood

• • •

• • • •

• •

• • • •

MANUFACTURER

• •

• •

• •

• • •

• •

• •

• •

• • •

• •

• • • •

• • •

• • •

• •

• •

• •

• •

WHOLESALERS

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

• •

• • •

• • • • • •

• • •

• • • • •

• •

• • • • • • •

• •

OTHER PANEL PRODUCTS

• • • • •

• • •

• • • •

• • • •

• •

• •

• • •

Softwood

• • • • •

• •

DOORS/WINDOWS

OTHER LUMBER PRODUCTS

• • •

Hardwood

• • •

• • •

• • •

• • •

• •

• • •

• • • •

• •

• •

• •

Hardwood

Softwood

• • •

DECKING

FLOORING

• • •

MOULDINGS

Softwood

PLYWOOD

Hardboard

VENEERS

MDF

LUMBER

OSB

BUSINESS ACTIVITY

V O T I N G

Easton, Maryland

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

WEB SITE/EMAIL

COMPANY NAME

North American Importers, Users, Distributors Particleboard

PRODUCTS

IMPORTER

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INTERNATIONAL WOOD

8/13/10 9:24 PM


IW2010.indd 71

8/13/10 9:24 PM

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org


bkstar@singnet.com.sg www.boa-franc.com lumberbuyers@boa-franc.com

Singapore (Singapore)

Boa-Franc

Dongguan Sundart Timber Products Co. Ltd.

593-2-268-8806 Fax: 593-2-268-3680

www.sandeplywood.com sebastian@endesabotrosa.com

Focus Lumber

www.ghanatimber.org info@tidd.fcghana.com

jianguo_lu@hotmail.com

www.fpdmcguy.org director@fpdmcguy.org

1-305-600-2387 Fax: 1-305-437-8045

www.holz-international.com ingryd.taracena@holz-international.com

Panama City (Panama)

Holz International

44-208-906-9560 Fax: 44-208-906-9570

tiddlondon@ghanatimber.co.uk

233-21-221315 Fax: 233-21-220818

86-21-54893839 Fax: 86-21-54893837

592-223-5135 Fax: 592-227-5595

592-226-9848 Fax: 592-226-2832

London (England)

Ghana Forestry Commission (London Office) www.ghanatimber.org

Accra (Ghana)

Ghana Forestry Commission

Shanghai (China)

Future (Timber) Trading Company Ltd.

Georgetown (Guyana)

Forest Products Dev. & Mktg. Council of Guyana

Kingston (Guyana)

Forest Products Association of Guyana

Quito (Ecuador) www.fpaguyana.org fpasect@guyana.net.gy

593-2-268-8806 Fax: 593-2-268-3680

www.sandeplywood.com sebastian@endesabotrosa.com

ENDESA - BOTROSA

Quito (Ecuador)

305-828-4390 Fax: 305-828-4315

www.durablewoods.com calixto@durablewoods.com

Durable Wood Products USA, Inc.

Miami Lakes, Florida (USA)

592-227-0549 Fax: 592-227-2996

www.durablewoods.com rafeek@durablewoods.com

Georgetown (Guyana)

Durable Wood Products

Kwun Tong (Hong Kong)

852-2114-2133 Fax: 852-2114-2166

60-89-612233 Fax: 60-89-613907

www.cymao.com cymao@cymao.com

Cymao Plywood Sdn. Bhd.

Sandakan, Sabah (Malaysia) SIL@sundartimber.com

86-21-5228-3475 Fax: 86-21-5228-3472

www.chinapwi.com jho@chinaply.com

Shanghai (China)

55-11-5112-1088 Fax: 55-11-5505-4597

China Phoenix Woods Internatioanl

Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

www.brascompdobrasil.com.br lavrasul@lavrasul.com.br

418-227-1181 Fax: 418-227-1188

Brascomp Compensados do Brasil S.A.

St. Georges, Quebec (Canada)

BK Starwood Pte. Ltd.

F.W. Barth Co. GmbH 656-534-1226 Fax: 656-535-3137

4940-280-1440 Fax: 4940-280-14427

www.fwbarth.com info@barthshamburg.de

Hamburg (Germany)

Paris (France)

331-4342-4200 Fax: 331-4342-5522

62-2157-11290 Fax: 62-2157-33017

5541-3225-4358 Fax: 5541-3225-4358

PHONE/FAX

www.atibt.com sec@atibt.com

sekretariat@apkindo.org

www.abimci.com.br abimci@abimci.com.br

WEB SITE/EMAIL

Softwood

Hardwood

MOULDINGS

• •

DOORS/WINDOWS

DECKING

CABINETS AND/OR COMPONENTS

Hardwood

• •

• • • •

• •

• •

Softwood

• •

OTHER LUMBER PRODUCTS

Hardwood

Softwood

• •

OTHER PANEL PRODUCTS

Hardboard

MANUFACTURER

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• • •

• • •

• •

• •

WHOLESALERS

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

• • • • • •

• • • • •

• • • • • •

FURNITURE AND/OR COMPONENTS

• • •

• • • • • •

• •

FLOORING

PLYWOOD

MDF

BUSINESS ACTIVITY

O V E R S E A S

ATIBT (Assn Technique Int’l des Bois Tropicaux)

Subroto, Jakarta (Indonesia)

APKINDO (Indonesian Wood Panel Assn)

Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

ABIMCI (Brazilian Assn of Mech Processed Timber)

COMPANY NAME

Overseas Members

VENEERS

OSB

LUMBER

Particleboard

PRODUCTS

IMPORTER

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I W P A M E M B E R S

OKOUME

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

8/13/10 9:25 PM


4141-767-0303 Fax: 4141-767-0372

www.interholco.ch ulrich.grauert@interholco.ch

Westport, Connecticut (USA)

Baar, Zurich (Switzerland)

55-11-3595-9926 Fax: 55-11-3064-0176

www.braber.com dbernier@braber.com

IPA Wood Flooring

603-4043-8869 Fax: 603-4043-8857

www.kaochuanwoodwork.com kaochuan@kaochuanwoodwork.com www.lionex.biz info@lionex.biz

Jiaxing Kaochuan Woodwork Co., Ltd.

www.vulcano.com.pe gerencia@vulcano.com.pe www.mtc.com.my council@mtc.com.my www.mtib.gov.my info@mtib.gov.my

Malaysian Timber Council

Malaysian Timber Industry Board

502-2384-9491/92 Fax: 502-2384-9400

www.megamaderas.com rios@megamaderas.com

Guatemala (Guatemala) www.mpveneers.com mpveneer@airtelmail.in www.nhgtimber.co.uk sales@nhgtimber.co.uk

NHG Timber Ltd. www.novafp.com.br john@novafp.com.br www.novausawood.com steve.getsiv@comcast.net www.olamonline.com timber@olameurope.com www.patelwoodsyndicate.com bhpatel@vsnl.com www.kligroups.com buniadi@kligroups.com

Nova USA Wood Products LLC

Olam International Ltd.

Patel Wood Syndicate

PT. Kayu Lapis Indonesia

Jakarta (Indonesia)

Mumbai (India)

Singapore (Singapore)

Portland, Oregon (USA)

Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

Nova USA Wood Products LLC

Surrey (United Kingdom)

Bhopal, MP (India)

MP Veneers Pvt. Ltd.

Mega Maderas, S.A.

6221-5306448 Fax: 6221-5301575

91-22-2683-3377 Fax: 91-22-2684-2660

65-63394100 Fax: 65-63399755

503-419-6407 Fax: 216-373-4931

206-501-4432 Fax:55-41-3288-1115

44 (0) 208-651-4030 Fax: 44 (0) 208-651-0913

91-755-2461243 Fax: 91-755-2468197

60-88-517030 Fax: 60-88-538620

www.mccorry.com info@mccorry.com

Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

McCorry & Co. Ltd.

41-22-300-5258 Fax: 41-22-300-5355

thomas@mbs-trading.com

603-9282-2235 Fax: 603-9200-3769

603-9281-1999 Fax: 603-9282-8999

Geneva (Switzerland)

MBS Trading

Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

Lima (Peru)

Maderera Vulcano S.A.C.

Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

Lionex (M) Sdn. Bhd.

Zhejiang Province (China)

51-1-430-3753 Fax: 51-1-430-3387

86-573-84646168 Fax: 86-573-84646038

www.jayatiasa.net sales@jayatiasa.net

Sibu, Sarawak (Malaysia)

Jaya Tiasa Timber Products Sdn. Bhd.

Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

AFRICAN MAHOGANY

6084-213255 Fax: 6084-213855/212084

919-303-8027 Fax: 919-303-8040

www.kligroups.com oppinc@aol.com

International Wood Products, Inc.

Apex, North Carolina (USA)

81-45-223-1110 Fax: 81-45-223-1121

itto@itto.or.jp

Yokohama, Minato-Mirai (Japan)

MOULDINGS

FLOORING

DECKING

FURNITURE AND/OR COMPONENTS

DOORS/WINDOWS

Softwood

Hardwood

• •

Softwood

• • • •

Hardboard

• •

• •

• •

• • •

• •

• •

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

• • •

• • • •

• •

• • • •

• • • •

• •

• •

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

• • • • • • • •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• • • •

• •

• •

• • • • •

Softwood

MDF

• • • •

Hardwood

OTHER PANEL PRODUCTS

OSB

• •

• •

• • • • • • •

PLYWOOD

MANUFACTURER

• •

CABINETS AND/OR COMPONENTS

OTHER LUMBER PRODUCTS

Hardwood

• • • •

VENEERS

O V E R S E A S

International Tropical Timber Organization www.itto.or.jp

Interholco AG

203-254-7030 Fax: 203-259-4480

www.theodor-nagel.com taranko@huntertrading.com

Hunter Trading Corp.

PHONE/FAX

WEB SITE/EMAIL

COMPANY NAME

Overseas Members

LUMBER

Particleboard

BUSINESS ACTIVITY

IMPORTER

PRODUCTS

WHOLESALERS

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

AGENT/SALES REP

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0039 0415629811 Fax: 0039 0415629810

www.romealegnami.com info@romealegnami.com

Romea Legnami S.P.A. www.rougier.fr auguin@rougier.fr www.sta.org.my sta@sta.org.my

Sarawak Timber Association

www.sgknordic.com sergei.kotov@sgknordic.com

SGK Nordic, SIA

41-91-911-6801

www.technowood.us.com info@technowood.us.com

Tortola (British Virgin Islands)

3902-344-684 Fax: 3902-331-4270 852-2543-1943 Fax: 852-2854-1728 31-38-331-6444 Fax: 31-38-332-2040 45-33-913888 Fax: 45-33-913788

www.braswood.com schille@braswood.com.br www.tropicalwoods.com.br tropicalwoods@tropicalwoods.com.br www.vastolegno.com info@vastolegno.com www.vicwoodtimber.com.cn vicwood@vicwood.com www.wijma.com g.burgman@wijma.com www.woodbois.dk info@woodbois.dk

Triunfo Amazonia

Tropical Woods International Ltda.

Vasto Legno SpA

Central Hong Kong (China)

AE Kampen (The Netherlands)

Frederiksberg (Denmark)

www.rusexportles.ru info@rusexportles.ru www.zenova.com.my kk@zenova.com.my

Zenova (M) Sdn. Bhd.

Sabah (Malaysia)

Moscow (Russia)

Woodbridge International Ltd.

WoodBois International

Wijma Trading

Vicwood Development Ltd.

Milan (Italy)

Belém, Pará (Brazil)

Itajai, SC (Brazil)

6088-249050 Fax: 6088-247050

74-956-603462 Fax: 74-956-287197

55-91-4009-0280 Fax: 55-91-3236-2742

55-47-99692444

www.theodor-nagel.com u.schick@theodor-nagel.com

Hamburg (Germany)

Theodor Nagel GmbH

Technowood Ltd.

49-40-781-10069 Fax: 49-40-781-10024

7-495-783-0035 Fax: 7-495-783-0034

www.sveza.com overseas@sveza.com

Moscow (Russia)

Sveza-Les Ltd.

86-0512-56118881 Fax: 86-0512-88835392

516-431-1395 Fax: 011-516-432-8181

541-285-5563 Fax: 591-3-923-2925

zhengda.gm@gmail.com

stordco@yahoo.com

www.slvbolivia.com steve.reister@slvbolivia.com

6085-604599 Fax: 6085-604555

Zhangiiagang, Jiangsu Sheng (China)

Suzhou Zhengxing International

Tema (Ghana)

Stordco International

Warnes (Bolivia)

Southern Lumber & Veneer (SLV)

Miri, Sarawak (Malaysia)

Shin Yang Plywood Sdn. Bhd.

Riga (Latvia) alvinyii@shinyang.com.my

www.timber.sca.com michael.wicklund@sca.com

SCA Forest Products AB 371-29372621 Fax: 371-67277520

250-717-5990 Fax: 250-717-5707

stidc@pusaka.gov.my

Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

Sundsvalla (Sweden)

6082-443477 Fax: 6082-442691

Sarawak Timber Industry Dev. Corp. (STIDC) www.sarawaktimber.org.my

6082-332-222 Fax: 6082-487-888 / 999

IPE

Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

Paris (France)

Rougier International S.A.

Gambarare di Mira (30034) Venice (Italy)

MOULDINGS

FLOORING

DECKING

Softwood

Hardwood

• • • • • • •

• ���

• • • •

• •

• •

• • •

• •

• • • •

• •

WHOLESALERS

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

• •

• •

• • • •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

Softwood

• •

• •

• • •

• •

• • •

• • •

• •

• •

• • •

• • •

MANUFACTURER

• •

Softwood

• • • • • • •

• • • •

Hardwood

OTHER PANEL PRODUCTS

Hardboard

• • • • • •

• • •

• •

DOORS/WINDOWS

FURNITURE AND/OR COMPONENTS

• • •

CABINETS AND/OR COMPONENTS

OTHER LUMBER PRODUCTS

• • • • • • • •

Hardwood

PLYWOOD

MDF

BUSINESS ACTIVITY

O V E R S E A S

331-5377-7546 Fax: 331-5377-7554

6221-5270577 Fax: 6221-5270578

www.tasply.com tasply@gmail.com

Jakarta (Indonesia)

PT. Tanjung Selatan Makmur Jaya

PHONE/FAX

WEB SITE/EMAIL

COMPANY NAME

Overseas Members

VENEERS

OSB

LUMBER

Particleboard

PRODUCTS

IMPORTER

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74 Other

I W P A M E M B E R S

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To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

I W P A

A S S O C I A T E

M E M B E R S ANGELIM

Transportation, Logistics and other Service Providers American Transport Paulsboro, New Jersey (USA) Tel: 856-423-4220 Fax: 856-423-7061 Email: hrbess@thetii.com www.thetii.com

Fr. Meyer’s Sohn North America LLC Newport Beach, California (USA) Tel: 949-732-7120 Fax: 949-732-7140 Email: carlos.garcia@fms-logistics.com www.fms-logistics.com

Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. New York, New York (USA) Tel: 212-493-7819 Fax: 212-493-7280 Email: chris.dietrich@bbh.com www.bbh.com

Georgia Ports Authority Savannah, Georgia (USA) Tel: 912-964-3958 Fax: 912-964-3869 Email: mtroughton@gaports.com www.gaports.com

Canaveral Port Authority Cape Canaveral, Florida (USA) Tel: 321-783-7831 ext. 211 Fax: 321-783-3748 Email: cpa.cargo@portcanaveral.com www.portcanaveral.org

Hyundai America Shipping Agency, Inc. Ridgefield, New Jersey (USA) Tel: 201-373-3540 Fax: 201-373-3501 Email: jeonghun.lee@hmm21.com www.hmm21.com

Chaffin and Associates, Inc. San Marcos, California (USA) Tel: 760-591-9957 Fax: 760-591-9754 Email: johnc@chaffin-law.com www.chaffin-law.com

Hyundai Merchant Marine (China) Co., Ltd. Shanghai (China) Tel: 86-21-61227205 Fax: 86-21-61227292 Email: wy.so@hmm21.com www.hmm21.com

Coastal Cargo Company, Inc. New Orleans, Louisiana (USA) Tel: 504-587-1100 Fax: 504-587-1116 Email: dhw@jkgroup.com www.jkgroup.com Delaware River Stevedores, Inc. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA) Tel: 215-440-4100 Fax: 215-925-8895 Email: ryoungren@d-r-s.com www.d-r-s.com Dix Shipping Company, Inc. Brownsville, Texas (USA) Tel: 956-831-4228 Fax: 956-831-2559 Email: raostos@dixshipping.com www.dixshipping.com E.C. Colley Warehouse Corp. New Orleans, Louisiana (USA) Tel: 504-581-7733 Fax: 504-581-6688 Email: eccolley@colleywarehouse.com www.colleywarehouse.com

Hyundai Merchant Marine Co., Ltd. Jongro-Ku, Seoul (South Korea) Tel: 82-2-3706-5750 Fax: 82-2-734-8497 Email: johnny.park@hmm21.com www.hmm21.com

H Y U N D A I M E R C H A N T M A R I N E C O . , LT D .

Hyundai has provided quality service for carrying plywood and other wooden products from East Asia to North America and Latin America since 1981. Operating vessels on a monthly basis.

HMM21

• High Quality • More Intelligent • Most Preferred ISO 14001, ISM CODE and ISO 9002

Hyundai Merchant Marine Co., Ltd. Jakarta (Indonesia) Tel: 62-21-350-5450 Fax: 62-21-374-0674 Email: chris.jeon@hmm21.com www.hmm21.com Import/Export Wood Purchasing Memphis, Tennessee (USA) Tel: 901-372-8280 Fax: 901-373-6180 Email: editor@millerpublishing.com www.millerpublishing.com Intersure Insurance Brokers Limited Sechelt, British Columbia (Canada) Tel: 604-740-0116 Fax: 604-740-0135 Email: davidac@dccnet.com

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

MV “Pacific Royal”, Dec/1995 Built, 43, 176DWT Hyundai has recently launched newly built vessels for carrying plywood from S.E. Asia and China

www.hmm21.com INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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I W P A

A S S O C I A T E

M E M B E R S ANGELIM

Transportation, Logistics and other Service Providers John A. Steer Co. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA) Tel: 215-922-6610 Fax: 215-922-0784 Email: dwack@jasteer.com www.jasteer.com

DRS FLYER FINAL:Layout 1

5/7/10

10:20 AM

Lambert’s Point Docks, Inc. Norfolk, Virginia (USA) Tel: 757-446-1200 Fax: 757-446-1256 Email: corine.barbour@nscorp.com www.lambertspointdocks.com

Manifest Journals Washington, DC (USA) Tel: 202-465-4680 Fax: 360-230-5705 Email: arossa@manifestjournals.com www.manifestjournals.com National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Association of America, Inc. Washington, DC (USA) Tel: 202-466-0222 Fax: 202-466-0226 Email: staff@ncbfaa.org www.ncbfaa.org

Page 1

OHL Global Freight Management and Logistics Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA) Tel: 267-570-2612 Fax: 267-570-2635 Email: jemallough@ohl.com www.ohl.com Peruvian Amazon Line c/o Agencia Naviera Maynas S.A. Lima (Peru) Tel: 511-475-2033 Fax: 511-475-9670/9680 Email: lima@navieramaynas.com.pe www.peruvianamazonline.com.pe PFS Corporation Cottage Grove, Wisconsin (USA) Tel: 608-839-1013 Fax: 608-839-1014 Email: mslifka@pfscorporation.com www.pfscorporation.com

Delaware River Stevedores, Inc.

Providing stevedoring and terminal services exceeding the high expectations of the people and businesses we serve.

Visit www.d-r-s.com Corporate Offices 441 North 5th Street, Suite 101 | Philadelphia, PA 19123 USA Phone: 215-440-4100

PFS Corporation Mentone, Alabama (USA) Tel: 256-634-4071 Fax: 256-634-4910 Email: akuehl@pfscorporation.com www.pfscorporation.com Port of New Orleans New Orleans, Louisiana (USA) Tel: 504-528-3319 or 800-776-6652 Fax: 504-528-3390 Email: landryb@portno.com www.portno.com Port of Port Arthur Port Arthur, Texas (USA) Tel: 409-983-2011 Fax: 409-985-9312 Email: orlando@portofportarthur www.portofportarthur.com Port of Stockton Stockton, California (USA) Tel: 209-946-0246 Fax: 209-466-5986 Email: portmail@stocktonport.com www.portofstockton.com Premiere Finishing & Coating LLC Reidsville, North Carolina (USA) Tel: 336-349-1994 Fax: 336-349-6376 Email: jbeach@prefinishfloors.com www.prefinishfloors.com Professional Service Industries, Inc. (PSI) Eugene, Oregon (USA) Tel: 541-484-9212 Fax: 541-344-2735 Email: travis.snapp@psiusa.com www.psiusa.com To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

76

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION ISO 9002 – ISM CODE QUALITY ASSURED

GLOBAL REACH • PERSONAL TOUCH

Unrivaled Experience • Worldwide Reliable Service • Large Modern Fleet • Personalized Customer Service • Loss Prevention Management •

www.stxpanocean.com • (201) 507-9952 shoh@stxpanocean.com

SOUTH JERSEY PORT CORPORATION We are not your ordinary port authority. The South Jersey Port Corporation has over 75 years as a leader in handling breakbulk cargo and is one of the leading U.S. ports handling wood products. We provide outstanding terminal services, short and long term warehousing, inventory control, and logistics services. So if you are looking for excellence, look no further than the Port of Camden.

EXPERIENCE EXCELLENCE…. EXPERIENCE THE PORT OF CAMDEN ADVANTAGE South Jersey Port Corporation An agency of the State of New Jersey

P.O. Box 129 Camden, New Jersey 08101

www.SOUTHJERSEYPORT.com

Tel: 856.757.4927 Fax: 856.757.4903 INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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I W P A

A S S O C I A T E

M E M B E R S TAUA R I

Transportation, Logistics and other Service Providers Rukert Terminals Corporation Baltimore, Maryland (USA) Tel: 410-276-1013 Fax: 410-327-2315 Email: jason@rukert.com www.rukert.com

South Jersey Port Corporation Camden, New Jersey (USA) Tel: 856-757-4927 Fax: 856-966-1838 Email: kcastagnola@southjerseyport.com www.southjerseyport.com

Safmarine Antwerpen (Belgium) Tel: 32-3-2444637 Fax: 32-3-2444693 Email: sclmpvmng@safmarine.com www.safmarine.com

STX Pan Ocean Co., Ltd. Seoul (Korea) Tel : 82-2-316-5313 Fax : 82-2-316-5056/5057 Email : tjkim2@stxpanocean.com www.stxpanocean.com

Shorepoint Insurance Services Costa Mesa, California (USA) Tel: 714-430-0035 Fax: 714-430-0036 Email: rmarkley@shorepointinsurance.com www.shorepointinsurance.com

STX Pan Ocean Co., Ltd. Jakarta (Indonesia) Tel: 6221-798-6128 Fax: 6221-798-6089 Email: jakarta@stxpanocean.com www.stxpanocean.com

STX Pan Ocean Co., Ltd. Shanghai (China) Tel: 86-21-5237-3001~9 Fax: 86-21-5237-3010 Email: shanghai@stxpanocean.com www.stxpanocean.com

Tampa Port Authority Tampa, Florida (USA) Tel: 813-905-5122 Fax: 813-204-2662 Email: jpyburn@tampaport.com www.tampaport.com

STX Pan Ocean Singapore Pte. Ltd. Singapore Tel: 65-6461-6210 Fax: 65-6461-6219 Email: singapore@stxpanocean.com www.stxpanocean.com

U*C Coatings Corporation Buffalo, New York (USA) Tel: 716-833-9366 Fax: 716-833-0120 Email: iwpa@uccoatings.com www.uccoatings.com

STX Pan Ocean USA Co., Ltd. Rutherford, New Jersey (USA) Tel: 201-507-9952 Fax: 201-507-9951 Email: shoh@stxpanoceanusa.com www.stxpanocean.com

Westfal-Larsen Shipping Alpharetta, Georgia (USA) Tel: 770-569-5822 Fax: 770-569-5823 Email: mike.hawe@wlshipping.com www.wlshipping.com

To search for more specific species, products or services, visit www.iwpawood.org

Number one in the U.S. for imported forest products. marylandports.com • 800.638.7519 Governor Martin O’Malley MDOT Secretary Beverley K. Swaim-Staley MPA Executive Director James J. White

Dundalk Marine Terminal

78

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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Your Gulf Coast Port Connection

You Need it! We Got it... ■ Cargo Scanning ■ Inventory Management ■ EDI Interface ■ Competitive Rates ■ 24/7 On-site Customs and Border Protection ■ 19 Miles to Gulf of Mexico ■ 55 acres of recently purchased waterfront property adjacent to our present terminal ■ Plus many more Value-Added Services

CONTACT:

Floyd or Orlando

PHONE:

409-983-2011

E-MAIL:

orlando@portofportarthur.com

P.O. Box 1428 Port Arthur, Texas USA 77641 Phone: 409-983-2011 Fax: 409-985-9312 e-mail: info@portofportarthur.com www.portofportarthur.com

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Guide to the Advertisers COMPANY

WEBSITE

Aljoma Lumber, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-556-8003 . . . . . www.aljoma.com

51

Amazon Millworks LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 919-619-7475 . . . . . . www.amazonmillworks.com

61

American Lumber Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-438-7888 . . . . . www.alumber.com

BC

Argo Fine Imports, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504-828-0943 . . . . . www.argofineimports.com

11

Baillie Lumber Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 716-649-2850. . . . . . www.baillie.com

31

Bozovich Timber Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 251-578-4604 . . . . . . www.bozovich.com Bridgewell Resources LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-570-3566 . . . . . www.bridgewellres.com

59

Brookside Veneers Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 609-409-1311 . . . . . . www.veneers.com

44

Buchanan Lumber Mobile, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251-433-9567 . . . . . . www.buchananlumbermobile.com

29 IFC 60 3

Cikel America LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-971-7896 . . . . . . www.cikel.com

Columbia Forest Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-808-9080

. www.cfpwood.com

Dean Hardwoods, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-430-0883 . . . . . www.deanwood.com Del Valle, Kahman & Company, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 714-522-3100 . . . . . . www.dvkco.com

76

Delaware River Stevedores, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 215-440-4100 . . . . . . www.d-r-s.com

34

Diamond Hardwoods, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732-635-0739 . . . . . www.diamonddecking.com

23

DLH Nordisk, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336-852-8341. . . . . . www.dlhusa.com

55

Durable Wood Products USA, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 305-828-4390 . . . . . www.durablewoods.com

27

Elemental Hardwood Flooring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-419-6407. . . . . . www.novausawood.com

82

Elof Hansson, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-614-7896 . . . . . . www.elofhansson.com

32

Forest Products Association of Guyana. . . . . . . 592-226-9848. . . . . . www.fpaguyana.org

81

Georgia Ports Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 912-964-3958. . . . . . www.gaports.com

45

Ghana Forestry Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44-208-906-9560 . . www.ghanatimber.org

21

Holland Southwest International. . . . . . . . . . . . 713-644-1966 . . . . . . www.hollandsw.com

75

Hyundai Merchant Marine Co., Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . 201-373-3540 . . . . . . www.hmm21.com

58

Inter-Continental Hardwoods, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . 910-283-9960. . . . . . www.ichardwoods.com

43

Interholco AG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4141-767-0303 . . . . . www.interholco.ch

42

International Specialties, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 901-853-4620. . . . . . www.intlspecialties.com

22

Jiaxing Kaochuan Woodwork Co., Ltd. . . . . . . . 86-573-84646168 . . www.kaochuanwoodwork.com

5

Liberty Woods International, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 800-367-7054 . . . . . . www.libertywoods.com Malaysian Timber Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-9281-1999 . . . . . www.mtc.com.my

48

Alan McIlvain Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610-485-6600 . . . . . www.alanmcilvain.com

37

J. Gibson McIlvain Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410-335-9600 . . . . . www.mcilvain.com

4

Medley Hardwoods Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-887-1115 . . . . . . www.medleyhardwoods.net

49

Newman Lumber Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228-832-1899 . . . . . . www.newmanlumber.com

33

Nova USA Wood Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-419-6407. . . . . . www.novausawood.com

8-9

Pollmeier Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503-452-5800 . . . . . www.pollmeier.com

78

Port of Baltimore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410-385-4453. . . . . . www.marylandports.com

79

Port of Port Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409-983-2011 . . . . . . www.portofportarthur.com

28

Premiere Finishing & Coating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336-349-1994. . . . . . www.prefinishfloors.com

15

Rex Lumber Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-263-0055 . . . . . www.rexlumber.com

36

Shorepoint Insurance Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714-430-0035 . . . . . www.shorepointinsurance.com

77

South Jersey Port Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 856-757-4927 . . . . . . www.southjerseyport.com

77

STX Pan Ocean Co., Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201-507-9952 . . . . . . www.stxpanocean.com

35

Swaner Hardwood Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 818-953-5350. . . . . . www.swanerhardwood.com

39

Thompson Mahogany Company . . . . . . . . . . . . 215-624-1866 . . . . . . www.thompsonmahogany.com

26

Timber Holdings International . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414-445-8989. . . . . . www.ironwoods.com

19

TradeLeaf LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212-595-1371 . . . . . . www.tradeleaf.com

IBC

Please start/ continue my free subscription to International Wood.

Clarke Veneers and Plywood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601-366-0331. . . . . . www.clarkeveneers.com

20

71

Keep Up with IWPA and International Wood

American Pacific Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 662-252-1862 . . . . . . www.americanpac.com

17

7

Tradelink Wood Products Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336-230-2220 . . . . . www.tradelink-group.com

38

U*C Coatings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 716-833-9366 . . . . . www.uccoatings.com

50

Vicwood Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 852-2543-1943 . . . . . www.vicwoodtimber.com.cn

BC = Back Cover

80

PHONE

30

IBC = Inside Back Cover

IFC = Inside Front Cover

© ISTO CK PH OTO.COM / LISE G AG NE

PAGE

NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

COUNTRY PHONE FAX: EMAIL

If you currently receive International Wood and need to make corrections to your mailing address, please drop us an email: info@iwpawood.org or fax: 703/820-8550.

Subscribe online: www.iwpawood.org Or, mail to: IWPA • 4214 King Street, West • Alexandria, VA 22302

Check [ ] if you would like information on IWPA’s next convention. Check [ ] if you would like to be contacted about membership. Membership Voting Members ($1,890) are companies domiciled in North America that are actively engaged in the sale of imported wood products, whether for own account, as commissioned agent, or other sales capacity. These include North American importers and manufacturers, distributors, wholesalers, panel processors, etc. Associate Members ($1,365) are companies providing goods or services to the industry. These include, but not limited to: transportation companies (steamship lines, freight forwarders, trucking, railroad), customs brokers, port authorities, warehouse terminal operators, insurance brokers, consultants, etc. Overseas Members ($1,130) are companies that manufacture and/ or export wood products, or offshore associations, organizations, and governmental agencies related to the forest products industry. Membership applications may be downloaded from the “About Us” link at www.iwpawood.org. phone: 703/820-6696 • fax: 703/820-8550

INTERNATIONAL WOOD

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GA013


PORTS OF SAVANNAH AND BRUNSWICK

Make Your Move. We’re Ready. Years of forest products experience, ample open and covered storage, available berthing. Find all this and more at the Ports of Savannah and Brunswick. With a strategic Southeast location at the center of America’s forest products production, Georgia’s ports make every breakbulk move seamless. + Dedicated forest products team. + Close proximity to major interstates. + Quick in and out saves time and money. + Flexible scheduling for loading and unloading to truck. Only a few days by road or rail to all major U.S. and Canadian hubs

+ Two Class I rail options: Norfolk Southern and CSX Transportation. + On-dock rail for the immediate loading and unloading of cargo.

BREAKBULK. SAVANNAH AND BRUNSWICK. SMART MOVE. For more information on how the Ports of Savannah and Brunswick can expedite your forest products moves, contact Mark Troughton, Global Accounts Executive, at 912.964.3958 or mtroughton@gaports.com.

breakbulk.gaports.com

GA01307_Forest Products Ad_0810.indd 1 IW2010.indd 81

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BEAUTIFUL, EXOTIC HARDWOODS • • • • • •

by ELOF HANSSON

CERTIFIED - SUSTAINABLE - ECO-FRIENDLY! FACTORY COATED FOR EXTRA PROTECTION AND DURABILITY. EASY TO INSTALL. NO DRILLING! ANTI-SLIP - COOLER TO BARE FEET. FOUR COLORS TO CHOOSE. NATIONWIDE DISTRIBUTION.

I PA N E M A D E C K I N G D I S T R I B U TO R S : Romel Bezerra TEL: (954) 450-4668 Rex Lumber Company • Acton, MA • www.rexlumber.com E-MAIL: rbezerra@ipanemadecking.com Upper Canada Forest Products • Toronto, ONT • www.ucfp.com WEBSITE: www.ipanemadecking.com Austin Wholesale Decking Supply • Austin, TX • www.AustinWholesaleDecking.com CONTACT:

CALL YOUR EXPERT TRADERS FOR DOM E S TIC HAR DWOODS :

FOR SOF T WOODS :

Red/White Oak • Poplar • Walnut • Cherry • Maple • Alder • Basswood

S. Y. Pine • Douglas Fir • Hemlock/Fir • Pinus Elliottii • Pinus Taeda • Radiata Pine

robert.maynard@us.elofhansson.com Robert: (678) 288-1608 nirian.ordonez@us.elofhansson.com Nirian: (678) 288-1603

joel.osterloh@us.elofhansson.com Joel: (678) 288-1607 bill.white@us.elofhansson.com Bill: (678) 288-1595

FOR IM POR TE D HAR DWOODS : Mahogany • Khaya • Sapelli • Spanish Cedar • Ipè (Decking) • Jatoba (Flooring) • Teak • Tigerwood • Cumala • Eucalyptus

FOR PAN E L PROD UC TS :

romel.bezerra@us.elofhansson.com Romel: (954) 450-4668

mel.lundberg@us.elofhansson.com Mel: (678) 288-1605

niklas.karlsson@us.elofhansson.com Niklas: (678) 288-1609

olga.dayneko@us.elofhansson.com Olga: (678) 288-1600

IW2010.indd 82

Hardwood Plywood • Pine Plywood • MDF • Particle Board • Hardboard • Tileboard • OSB • Edge-Glued Panels

ELOF HANSSON, INC.

Global. Strong. 970 Peachtree Industrial Blvd. Suwanee, GA 30024 TEL: (770) 614-7896 FAX: (770) 614-1942 WEBSITE: www.elofhansson.com

8/13/10 9:32 PM


Tradelink I M P O R T

&

NORTH AMERICA

E X P O R T

Imported Lumber & Dimension from South America, West Africa and S.E. Asia

American Hardwoods for Export and Domestic Sale in Rough Sawn Lumber and Dimension

Direct Importers and Manufacturers of Hardwood Flooring from South America

Direct Importers of Hardwood Decking from South America

w w w. t r a d e l i n k- g r o u p . c o m TRADELINK USA

TEL:

4180 MORRIS DRIVE #2

GREENSBORO, NC 27406

BURLINGTON, ON L7L 5L6

336.230.2220 E.MAIL:

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TRADELINK CANADA

215- B INDUSTRIAL AVENUE FAX:

336.230.2207

USA@Tradelink-Group.com

TEL:

905.333.5111

E.MAIL:

FAX:

905.333.5171

Canada@Tradelink-Group.com

9/3/10 1:22 PM


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International Wood