__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Magazine for young vanguard fashion & art photography • www.superior-mag.com

MEET CREATIVE PEOPLE

DIGITAL

#MAY 2015


DIGITAL

GET YOUR PRINTED ISSUE...

-2-


MAY 2015

...and meet creative people from the scenes of fashion, design, lifestyle, art & culture


www.premiumexhibitions.com


JULY 8–10 STATIONBERLIN


DIGITAL

-6-


MAY 2015

C O NTE MP O R A RY FA S H I ON T R A D E S H OW

S P R IN G/ S U M M E R 2016 A R EN A B ER L IN

JUL Y 8 TH - 10 TH , 2015

EI CHE NS TR A S S E 4

W W W.SE E K E X H I B I T I O N S . C O M

-7-

12435 B E R LI N


„Für Menschen, die sonst nicht zu stoppen sind...“

International brands for contemporary jewellery and watches – www.schmuckraeume-berlin.de


Kerala Flyback, Automatic Ø40mm Limitierte Auflage 250 Stück


ONLINE

MEET CREATIVE PEOPLE

-6-


Click it and do good!


FEBRUARY 2015

-17-


#  I m p r i n t

SUPERIOR MAGAZINE Lychener Strasse 76, 10437 Berlin www.superior-mag.com connection@superior-mag.com Publisher 

SUPERIOR Publishing UG (haftungsbeschränkt) Lychener Strasse 76, 10437 Berlin

Chief Editor V.i.S.d.P.  Tom Felber / tom@superior-mag.com CREATIVE Director  Marc Huth / marc@superior-mag.com fashion Consultant  Simon Heeger / simon@superior-mag.com Graphic editor  Franziska Raue  / franziska@superior-mag.com Graphic editor  Melina Dieckgräber  / melina@superior-mag.net EDITOR  Catalina Campos / catalina@superior-mag.net EDITOR  Lola Fröbe / lola@superior-mag.net Editorial Department  editor@superior-mag.com Advertising  advertising@superior-mag.com PR Management  press@superior-mag.com

Superior Magazine accepts no liability for any unsolicited material whatsoever. Opinions contained in the editorial content are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of the publisher of Superior Magazine. Despite careful control Superior Magazine accepts no liability for the content of external links. Any reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited

COVER: Photo by Guido Martirani


IF YOU

DO IT RIGHT 8 – 10 July 2015 Berlin Postbahnhof

IT WILL LAST FOREVER


IT WILL

LAST FOR EVER IF YOU DO IT RIGHT

8 – 10 July 2015 Berlin Postbahnhof


#  Editorial Dear readers, For us May is a month full of artistic impressions. Some of them we present in this issue. And some will follow during this month. It was a great honor to meet the Japanese artist Koki Tanaka together with Britta Färber, Chief Curator Deutsche Bank Art, at Deutsche Bank KunstHalle for an interview. Koki Tanaka recently received the prestigious Deutsche Bank “Artist of the Year” award and has a solo exhibition at Deutsche Bank KunstHalle with works of his contemporary visual installations and photography. In this issue we show nine exclusive editorials coming from all across the world. We tried to find some with a special artistic twist. One of them is our cover editorial, made by Guido Martirani. But of course we hope you find all of them inspiring. Enjoy our May issue... Best, Tom, Marc and the whole SUPERIOR team


DIGITAL

#

MAY 2015

PEOPLE

50 #

INTERVIEW: KOKI TANAKA 

VISUAL ARTS

22

Christine Lipski

»L'OMBRE ET LA LUMIÈRE« 

36 Jae Eun Seok

Guido Martirani

»BOSSY« 

»RED FINGER NAIL« 

58 Thanh Nguyen

»TEENAGE COLOR« 

64


DIGITAL

#

MAY 2015

VISUAL ARTS

76

Marie Schmidt

»SHAPE ME UP« 

88 Nadya Filatova

»The Redhead dream« 

Kari Jaroszynska

»INNER INDIGO« 

98

EDITORIALS APRIL 

Sarah Monrose

»RUBIS« 

114

110


Fashion magazines? We’ve got a million free ones. Issuu.com

-19-


DIGITAL

l'ombre et la lumière

photography by Christine Lipski styling by Caroline Haak hair & make up by Yasmin Farman assistant Radoslaw Polgesek

models Lin Song & Gabriel Hendrixx @ PMA & Vincent Wagenmann @ Modelwerk

overall Finders Keepers shoes Zara jewelry COS -22-


MAY 2015

shirt H&M pants stylist's own handkerchief COS

-23-

shirt Pierre Balmain pants H&M boots Cole Haan NYC


DIGITAL

-24-


MAY 2015

shirt H&M pants Scotch&Soda shoes Nike belt stylist'S own

-25-


DIGITAL

shirt H&M handkerchief COS

-26-


MAY 2015

-27-

overall Finders Keepers


DIGITAL

-28-


MAY 2015

skirt & jewelry H&M blouse COS shoes Zara

-29-


DIGITAL

shirt Scotch&Soda sweater stylist'S own pants Levi'S shoes Montecatini

-30-


MAY 2015

shirt H&M pants Levi'S shoes Nike

-31-


DIGITAL

-32-


MAY 2015

-33-

skirt & jewelry H&M blouse COS shoes Zara


DIGITAL

shirt H&M pants stylist's own handkerchief COS

-34-


MAY 2015

overall Finders Keepers shoes Zara jewelry COS

-35-

shirt Pierre Balmain pants H&M boots Cole Haan NYC


DIGITAL

-36-


MAY 2015

Bossy photography by Guido Martirani wardrobe by Kim shui hair & make up by Daniela Maio model Beatrice Simion

-37-


DIGITAL

-38-


MAY 2015

-39-


DIGITAL

-40-


MAY 2015

-41-


DIGITAL

-42-


MAY 2015

-43-


DIGITAL

-44-


MAY 2015

-45-


DIGITAL

-46-


MAY 2015

-47-


DIGITAL

-48-


MAY 2015

-49-


DIGITAL

KOKI TANAKA – A VULNERABLE NARRATOR The prestigious DEUTSCHE BANK “Artist of the Year” award recipients have come from all corners of the world such as, Pakistan, the United States, Kenya, and Romania to name a few. This year Japanese artist, KOKI TANAKA, earned the impressive honor of Artist of the Year 2015. Although the artist hails from Tochigi, Japan, he currently resides in Los Angeles, California, and continues to work on his contemporary visual installations and photography.

interview with KOKI TANAKA & BRITTA FÄRBER by Tom Felber, Catalina Campos text Lola Fröbe, Catalina Campos -50-

photo © Shota Matsumo


MAY 2015

Britta Färber, Chief Curator Deutsche Bank Art, worked with Tanaka’s exhibition, “The Vulnerable Narrator”, for the past year, witnessing a subtle change from his prior work consisting of simple daily objects in action into an ingenius visual and photographic emphasis on a psychological reflection within our contemporary society. Tanaka plays with participants’ mentally and emotionally as he allows them to perform simple tasks, which in the end, speak profoundly on an individual’s innate nature. Koki Tanaka’s usage of video installations and photography as a medium to document society leaves a perfect combination of wit and intellect for the exhibition. Tom Felber and Catalina Campos from SUPERIOR MAGAZINE met Koki Tanaka and Britta Färber at the exhibition opening to discuss his views on Berlin, his first solo exhibition, and his influences.

#  It’s a great honor to be the DEUTSCHE BANK “Artist of the Year” for 2015 and it’s your first huge solo exhibition in Europe. How do you feel about this recognition? KT: First of all it’s an honor to get the “Artist of the Year” prize and it’s a great opportunity to make an exhibition, and at the same time I really appreciated having the catalogue. This catalogue gives a wider perspective on my practice from 1998 to the present. #  Your exhibition is called “A Vulnerable Narrator”. Assuming that you are our narrator: What stories do you tell us? In which context do you see yourself as “vulnerable” and what’s the danger of your stories? KT: Most of my recent projects are about organizing an event or situation with the

photo Mathias Schormann Koki Tanaka / Deutsche Bank KunstHalle © -51-


DIGITAL

participants. There is a certain difference and distance between participating in an event and seeing the documentation of it. This is quite similar to the two phases of a person who is involved an accident and a person who sees it in a newspaper. The participant and the audience. Narration deals with those two phases. I try to narrate what happened with the participants to the audiences.

way deal with this moment; so talking about the ‘experience’ gives us an uneasy position. You might feel that they cannot understand you. I think we are sometimes sensitive about others’ unsympathetic response. In this sense we are all “A Vulnerable Narrator”.

However I am not the only narrator. The situation above is in our everyday life. We sometimes are involved and see an event, an accident, a disaster, and we later try to tell the story to someone else who didn’t experience it. So we are all narrators of our own experiences. In my projects the participants are facing unusual situations like five pianists collaborating together by playing the piano. They experience an uneasy state because of the absurdity of the situation. We literally can explain such a situation. If you are a participant, you could say, “I played a piano with ten other hands and it was difficult, but fun,” but once you try to explain what was really happening in your mind, you feel uneasy to explain it because your experience is difficult to share with others. Experience is beyond linguistic explanation. For instance, when you cut your finger you can say to your mother, “I got hurt,” but it’s difficult to really share your feeling. You can explain how you are hurt, but you cannot transfer your pain to the other. So we really are not sure how others feel the pain. If you experience a catastrophe in your life, you feel like you are the only one who really experienced it and you cannot share this, this is the uneasy moment. You completely feel alone to tell your experience, your story, and you know already how difficult it is to explain it. Most of my recent projects in a -52-

#  At DEUTSCHE BANK KunstHalle, you are showing a documentation of your works from the last decade. How has your view on things and your motivation changed during that period? KT: Yes, There’s a gap between my previous and recent projects because my previous ones focused more on daily objects and you can see daily objects in action. However, my recent ones involve more people. When I got the opportunity to do the solo exhibition


MAY 2015

for Deutsche Bank I wanted to find a bridge between these two different practices. In this show, it is not a chronological set-up to show my development, but rather I tried to overlap all different times and contexts from the last decade to find a connection between

photo Mathias Schormann Koki Tanaka / Deutsche Bank KunstHalle ©

the two. I could probably say my path and connection between the two developed from my surroundings where I can reach by hand, to breaking through to a society that I cannot grasp yet. Involving people is uncontrollable, chaotic, but also curiosity for my involvement and that’s something that I can appreciate.

-53-

#  How did you define the works for this project? How do you select them? BF: This is something that Koki had a very clear idea about from the very beginning. He had the idea on how he would present his early works into the creation of his new projects for us; which I found out how this would convincingly all relate. It’s interesting how this developed with the idea of the catalogue and with the design in Japan. When you see the catalogue you see the layers, it has something that you’ve never seen before. Even at the printers they would ask if we’ve made a mistake. It’s transparent but it’s not and you have typography going into the images that are overlapping. Everything is relating to everything in a way or to things that have happened before. KT: Daishiro Mori, the graphic designer of the catalogue, even gave me the original InDesign files in the process of adding and erasing some images on the layout. He understood my practice and he tried to emphasize it by including the process of our communication through the creation of this catalogue. This is quite an unusual book-making process. We had worked together before, so trusted each other this time for the collaboration and these layering and overlapping images gave me the idea of the whole installation plan of the show. In my show you can see my drawings on photographs, the monitor is also on other photograph, and the two projected videos juxtapose each other. All those projects are from different times so the audience may confuse this idea of installation, but I think the exhibition’s experience in general is always dealing with a fragmental moment because we cannot see all the detail of works. Rather, I make my show even more fragmented, releasing the audience’s obsession of seeing everything, but instead seeing a bit by bit and connecting and stitching fragmented things in the show in their own way.


DIGITAL

photo Mathias Schormann Koki Tanaka / Deutsche Bank KunstHalle ©

BF: What I found to be interesting are the overdimensional photographs, which really develop their own aesthetics and draw you in with their beauty. I’ve been participating, listening, seeing, and experiencing this project. You see the image at the very end and you just see the hand; its one particular moment of this precarious task which lasted a daylong. Yet this photo is still living for itself in this room and this room takes out a moment of the whole day and it works. It has its own life, its own esthetics and connotations. Say somebody is working with performances and you see the documentation, it has a certain distance because you don’t experience it. I had a chance to experience this project so certainly I have a special relationship to it. I think these photographs develop their own life and draw you into them even on a -54-

emotional level, like in the photograph where the people are sleeping and sharing their dreams, and it even gives it another, very poetic layer. #  What advantages do you see? KT: I would say I’m not pretty strict about the mediums I would use. Videos, photographs, drawings and paintings, those depend on each project. I am interested in documenting aspects of those mediums. As I said, sharing the experience with others is quite difficult so the documentation of an event is always a challenge. Each opportunity to do so is my experiment.


MAY 2015

#  Talking about your collaborative projects (where nine hair dressers have to work together on one haircut or five pianists on one piano piece), which are comparable to Joseph Beuys ‘social sculpture’: Are they about the result of teamwork in a selfish society? Or are you zooming in on the collective walk? KT: It’s reflecting our society. We’re always facing the idea of working together and of course collaboration always sounds ideal because that’s one of many goals of our society. At the same time collaboration shows us an ugly side of ourselves, like you might say, ‘selfishness.’ At some point, in the framework of the collaborative moment, everyone wants to show their ego. These egos create a conflict and collapse an idealistic consensus as result. However I’m not interested much in the result, I like to document the process of how people work together. I think Beuys was trying to tell us a vision of ‘social sculpture’ as an ideal future of our society. I am trying to show a process of how we try and fail at creating such an ideal democratic society. Even if we do thousand times of trial and error – mostly fail - , that what we do, what we should do. #  What role does humor play in your work? The piece where you try to sell the palm trees is pretty humorous. KT: There are different definitions of what humor, irony, or cynicism is. I, of course, admire humor because humor isn’t about putting people down. Humor is for the both side of who say and who was said to release both position’s narrow minds. The project of me selling palm fronds was not a irony to bring extremely useless things to the system of flea market. I try to open up different relationships between people, generate a communication and question of the economical system that we are all related. -55-

#  Currently you are working in Los Angeles. Does this city affect your work or are you still highly influenced by Japan? KT: Japan is still influenced by the US because of the post-war situation. The US army occupied Japan from ‘45-‘52 as you know. I’m surprised that when I moved to LA, I found snacks in a L.A. grocery store that reminded me of my childhood. I remember the taste of the snacks. It sounds strange but I am sure it used to be imported from the US to Japan but not anymore. So my nostalgia of my childhood disappeared in Japan, but still exists in US. It’s difficult to distinguish what influence me based on nations. I’m not only influenced by Japanese contemporary art. I was definitely influenced by conceptual art history in the US and Europe when I was at art school in Japan. Like everyone, we are influenced by different cultures since we are all living in the global age. Actually I’m more curious about post-war Japanese contemporary art after moving to Los Angeles. I started to study it and found a connection between my practice and post-war art history in Japan. It was a detour to find my connection to Japan… #  I know LA is a predominantly Hispanic city. Do you get inspiration from Hispanic art because of a similar dynamic? KT: Somehow in the last couple of years, I received invitations from Mexican curators in California. I guess there is a similarity between my practice and Latin American contemporary art. Their ideas are from their everyday lives, it’s concrete but abstract, and is universal like geometrical patterns or humor.


DIGITAL

#  Is this your first time in Berlin? KT: This is my fifth or sixth time. #  What do you think about Berlin? KT: My first visit to Berlin was in 1999. Of course it’s totally different from now, most of the city was under construction but now it all seems done. However, there is still some construction going on and when I see it, I feel like I’m really in Berlin. When I went to the Mitte district in ’99, it was all under construction and all the upcoming galleries were there in a hidden space. Now the Mitte district became like a Soho in New York. Maybe the city government tries to get Berlin back to an ‘under-construction’ atmosphere since the scene of ‘under-construction’ seems to be a signature of Berlin. I think this atmosphere gives artists a feeling to open up their projects in the city. In a city like Tokyo or London, I feel like I can’t do anything in a street because it’s so clean, precise, and covered by so many rules. In Berlin, I feel freer which is very good. #  Do you have contact to the Berlin art scene? KT: Not really, but I know many Japanese artists also live here. I don’t know much of them yet, but it could be a good start to learn something from them about Berlin later on. Koki Tanaka’s compelling exhibition is a beautiful addition to the DEUTSCHE BANK KunstHalle. His cultural background brings a new identity into Berlin’s growing multi-ethnic art community and his installations provide a modern approach to examining social interactions in society. The “A Vulnerable Narrator” exhibition is on display until May 25th. -56-


MAY 2015

photo Mathias Schormann

Š Koki Tanaka / Deutsche Bank KunstHalle

-57-


DIGITAL

direction by Jae Eun Seok art department Jimin Sara Woo Baik wardrobe by Chong Hee Pak music by levelclearer -58-

models Jimin Sara Woo Baik & Marilena Stavrakidi


MAY 2015

-59-


DIGITAL

-60-


MAY 2015

-61-


DIGITAL

-62-


MAY 2015

-63-


shirt Pepe Jeans dungarees Mango

DIGITAL

photography by Thanh Nguyen styling by Julia Albracht hair & make up by Alina Klingel assistant Andrea Gabrisch models Anka @ NO TOYS Modelagency & Hannah V @ M4 Models

-64-


MAY 2015

-65-

blouse Seven for all Mankind pants H&M Trend shoes Converse


DIGITAL

vest Mavi top H&M Trend jeans Esprit

-66-

jacket Gang jeans Mavi shoes Humanic


MAY 2015

shirt Pepe Jeans dungarees Mango boots DR. MartEns

-67-


DIGITAL

-68-

blouse Seven for all Mankind shirt Pepe Jeans jeans Levi's boots DR. MartEns


MAY 2015

overall Zara shoes Converse

-69-


DIGITAL

vest Mavi top H&M Trend jeans Esprit

-70-

jeans Diesel Black top H&M Trend jacket Gang bracelet We Positive


MAY 2015

-71-


DIGITAL

shirt Pepe Jeans dungarees Mango boots DR. MartEns

-72-


MAY 2015

-73-

blouse Seven for all Mankind pants H&M Trend shoes Converse


DIGITAL

-74-


MAY 2015

dungarees Gang top H&M shoes Converse watch Casio

-75-


sports bra NIKE

DIGITAL

photography by Marie Schmidt hair by Milko Grieger make up by Eva Mittmann assistant Arya Shirazi model Victoria D端ngen @ tfm MODELS -76-


MAY 2015

-77-

body VICTORIA SECRET cap IN4MATION - NEW ERA 59FIFTY


DIGITAL

-78-

dress ZARA


MAY 2015

sports bra & shorts NIKE -79-


DIGITAL

-80-

top AMERICAN APPAREL shorts NIKE


MAY 2015

-81-

shoes ADIDAS Y3 string VICTORIA SECRET


DIGITAL

-82-

bikini ROXY sports bra NIKE


MAY 2015

bikini top ROXY -83-


DIGITAL

-84-

string AMERICAN APPAREL


MAY 2015

-85-

shoes ADIDAS - JEREMY SCOTT socks COS


DIGITAL DIGITAL

ONLINE

DIGITAL

PRINT

-60-72-


March 2014 FEBRUARY 2015

SUBMIT

Y O U R EDITORIAL -61-73-


DIGITAL

photography by Kari Jaroszynska styling by Jahwanna Berglund hair & make up by Johanna Salomonsson model Sanna Backstrom @ Elite MODEL

-88-


MAY 2015

-89-

jacket Levi's jeans Calvin Klein Jeans


DIGITAL

-90-

vest Hilfiger Denim piercing Trine Tuxen


MAY 2015

-91-

jeans Dr.Denim hat & bangle by Malene Birger shirt Levi's


DIGITAL

jeans Levi's dark denim shirt Hilfiger Denim light denim shirt 157 shoes Filippa K.

-92-


MAY 2015

shirt Levi's underwear Calvin Klein -93-


DIGITAL

-94-

jeans Hunkydory Shirt Levi's necklace Efva Attling


MAY 2015

-95-

vest Hilfiger Denim piercing Trine Tuxen


DIGITAL

-96-

jumpsuit & belt Hunkydory hat by Malene Birger


MAY 2015

-97-

jeans & jacket Hilfiger Denim scarf Levi's shirt 157


DIGITAL

the

redhead dream photography by Nadya Filatova styling by Ira Grazhdankina hair & make up by Anna Zakhozhaya @ the agenT -98-

model Alina @ STARSYSTEM


MAY 2015

-99-

shirt Bruuns Bazaar sandals THE C.O.C


DIGITAL

-100-


MAY 2015

-101-

dress BZR by Bruuns Bazaar shoes BEAT


DIGITAL

-102-

blouse & skirt Bruuns Bazaar shoes BEAT


MAY 2015

-103-


DIGITAL

-104-


MAY 2015

-105-

leggings & blouse Bruuns Bazaar shoes THE C.O.C.


DIGITAL

-106-

blouse & shorts BZR by Bruuns Bazaar shoes THE C.O.C. jewelry stylist’s own


MAY 2015

-107-


DIGITAL

-108-


MAY 2015

-109-

skirt BZR BY Bruuns Bazaar sweater model’s own


DIGITAL

editorials from APRIL @ Superior online I Sarah Monrose

»RUBIS« 

Mehdy Nasser

»WILD CHILD« 

Shelby Goldstein

Click on the image to view full editorial

»DENIM DECONSTRUCT«  Thanh Tran

»OF MODERN METTLE«  Kari Jaroszynska

»WEST OF THE MOON«  Ira Bordo

»HOW TO DISAPPEAR COMPLETELY« 


MAY 2015

Janina Alff

»DARKSIDE / LIGHTSIDE« 

Pernilla Strand

»SWEDISH GRACE« 

Maike Banger

»ABOUT A GIRL« 

Alex Schier

»IT'S AS SIMPLE AS THAT« 

Amílcar Lusinchi

»N°2« 

Julia Keltsch

»LONG-LASTING« 

Nyema Droma

»A CRAZY DAY IN A SHOP« 


DIGITAL

editorials from APRIL @ Superior online II Jae Eun Seok

»LABYRINTH« 

Jon Cottam

»THE ROOFTOP« 

Maiken Staak

Click on the image to view full editorial

»1914« 

Christine Lutz

»TSRL« 

Joey Carrapichano

»FREE YOUTH« 

MAGDEBURSKY


MAY 2015

MILA

»NAUSICAA« 

Stephanie Pistel

»AUREUM« 

Hyunjin Park

»RAFAEL PEREZ« 

Kuan

»STRESS« 

Whohang

»EXPOSE« 

Wolfgang Pohn

»GIRL MEETS BOY« 


DIGITAL

-114-

wool cape Andrew Stewart


MAY 2015

Rubis photography & hair by Sarah Monrose make up by Ioannis Tsangaris model Claudia Devlin @ Nevs Models

-115-


DIGITAL

-116-


MAY 2015

jacket Bee by Beth Caterer -117-


DIGITAL

top Guerisold Paris -118-


MAY 2015

-119-


Magazine for young vanguard fashion & art photography • www.superior-mag.com

MEET CREATIVE PEOPLE

coming out on May 29th 2015

DIGITAL

#JUNE 2015

Profile for Superior Magazine

SUPERIOR Magazine # May 2015  

Exclusive FASHION EDITORIALS from across the world and an exclusive interview with the renowned artist KOKI TANAKA | SUPERIOR is an internat...

SUPERIOR Magazine # May 2015  

Exclusive FASHION EDITORIALS from across the world and an exclusive interview with the renowned artist KOKI TANAKA | SUPERIOR is an internat...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded