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Magazine for young vanguard fashion & art photography • www.superior-mag.com

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#JULY 2015


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#  I m p r i n t

SUPERIOR MAGAZINE Lychener Strasse 76, 10437 Berlin www.superior-mag.com connection@superior-mag.com Publisher 

SUPERIOR Publishing UG (haftungsbeschränkt) Lychener Strasse 76, 10437 Berlin

Chief Editor V.i.S.d.P.  Tom Felber / tom@superior-mag.com CREATIVE Director  Marc Huth / marc@superior-mag.com fashion Consultant  Simon Heeger / simon@superior-mag.com Graphic editor  Franziska Raue  / franziska@superior-mag.com EDITOR  Catalina Campos / catalina@superior-mag.net EDITOR  Lola Fröbe / lola@superior-mag.net Editorial Department  editor@superior-mag.com Advertising  advertising@superior-mag.com PR Management  press@superior-mag.com

Superior Magazine accepts no liability for any unsolicited material whatsoever. Opinions contained in the editorial content are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of the publisher of Superior Magazine. Despite careful control Superior Magazine accepts no liability for the content of external links. Any reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited

COVER: Photo by Evgeniy Kuznetsov


IF YOU

DO IT RIGHT 8 – 10 July 2015 Berlin Postbahnhof

IT WILL LAST FOREVER


IT WILL

LAST FOR EVER IF YOU DO IT RIGHT

8 – 10 July 2015 Berlin Postbahnhof


#  Editorial Dear readers, Next week Berlin will turn into a fashion metropolis again. At BERLIN FASHION WEEK designers from across the world will present their Spring/Summer 2016 collections at MERCEDES-BENZ FASHION WEEK BERLIN, at trade fairs like PREMIUM, SEEK, GREENSHOWROOM, ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN and many more as well as at plenty of other events. Read our show reports online and in our social media channels. In our # SELECTION we present on more than 40 pages some of our favorite SUSTAINABLE FASHION labels. Designers and representatives of fourteen brands answered our questions and give you a lot of insights into sustainable fashion. Additionally read the interview with the organizers of GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN. We are always happy to work with amazing photographers from around the world. Every issue is packed with creativity from different minds. This time we like to present you a diversity of summer looks. Enjoy our July issue … Best, Tom, Marc and the whole SUPERIOR team


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#

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SELECTION

48 #

Sustainable Fashion S/S 16 

VISUAL ARTS

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Paul Thatcher

»MARYSE«  Evgeniy Kuznetsov

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»SALE OF SYNTHETIC SOULS« 

Rujia Wang

»DREAMING IN THE WHITE WORLD« 

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Shelby Goldstein

»VALENTINA« 

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VISUAL ARTS

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Julin Athalia Lee

»EMILIE X SCHAI« 

154 EDITORIALS JUNE

Yannick Schuette

»THUNDER &LIGHTNING« 

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Ewa Zylinska & Adam Slowikowski

»THE SPRING TO COME« 

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photography by Paul Thatcher styling by Tiahna Marks hair & make up by Anja Anthony Prather model Maryse @ Ursula Wiedmann Models

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bikini American Apparel


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swimsuit Kenneth Cole

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swimsuit Donna Karen Swim


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swimsuit AMERICAN APPAREL

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swimsuit AMERICAN APPAREL

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SALE OF SYNTHETIC SOULS photography by Evgeniy Kuznetsov styling & wardrobe by Valentina Khan hair & make up by Julia Butorina model Lisa @ IMG MODELS

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#SELECTION SUSTAINABLE FASHION S/S 16 Magdalena Schaffrin, Creative Director of GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN, and Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies of MESSE FRANKFURT which organizes both exhibitions, talked to Tom Felber from SUPERIOR MAGAZINE about the highlights this season.

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#  For the second time GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN are together in one location, the POSTBAHNHOF. Is that concept one of the reasons why you experienced a new record number of exhibitors this season? OS: In terms of the number of exhibitors, we are at the same level as we were in January. However, the exhibitor space is bigger than ever before. We think the strong demand is due on the one hand to the successful concept, as combining the two local trade fairs has made the platform much more attractive and appealing. On the other hand, many labels have expanded their collections and are therefore coming here with a bigger offer and therefore also require a bigger stand at the trade fair. #  Some exhibitors present their collections for the first time at one of the two fairs. Would you like to mention some? MS: We are welcoming Armedangels on the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin. They will be presenting their comprehensive range at the Postbahnhof for the first time. A further wellknown newcomer is from Spain: El Naturalista exhibits airily light leather sandals. Also there for the first time are Jersey Company, from Portugal, providing high-quality knitwear, Re Verdir, from South Korea, with handbags made from recycled leather, ThokkThokk, from Germany, with prints by artists from all over the world and Wonderlands, from Switzerland, with men’s underwear. At Greenshowroom we are looking forward to the premiere of Clara Waldburg from Germany with feminine, ankle-length dresses in pastel shades and the knit label Rudolph from Austria. Carpasus is also a new arrival. The Swiss label makes classic shirts and will thus extend the range for men at the trade fair.

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Olaf Schmidt

The exhibitor space is bigger than ever before « »


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#  Although the joined location was already successful last time, are there any changes or developments in the shows?

Magdalena Schaffrin

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OS: For the first time, we have a joint ticket that permits entry to our two trade fairs and the Bright, Premium, Seek and Show&Order – this definitely makes it much easier for visitors to Fashion Week. In terms of show developments and labels, we have seen a very positive development on the part of the exhibitors for a long time now: labels are increasingly being able to make strong ripples in the fashion world. Our trade fairs are rooted in sustainability, but the fashion aspects are of course very much in the foreground. The labels present first-rate designs and current trends. At Greenshowroom, for example, you’ll be able to see elegant cuts, wide silhouettes and strong contrasts this time round. At the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin, it will be mainly urban classics and we’ll see – as at the Greenshowroom – leanings towards the 1970s. These looks appeal thanks to new proportions and cool styles. Also in the fringe programme we will focus more strongly on current on-trend themes and offer zeitgeist topics.


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#  Which themes are very important from your point of view at this season’s GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN?

#  Additionally to the Salonshow you are presenting a second show “Ethical Fashion on Stage“. Could you tell us more about this show?

MS: As Olaf said, the summer 2016 collections will be influenced by the seventies: Love is in the air! The new season is dispersing a retro haze. Established silhouettes such as that of skinny jeans are gradually being replaced by seventies’ touches. The emphasis on the waist is creating new proportions. Wide flares, warm colours and ethnic prints are taking us back to the days of hippies. We will see light long dresses, open sandals, wide trousers. Especially in the high fashion sector, differing trends run in parallel, mutually influence each other in certain respects or set themselves apart from each other. At the same time, high fashion is playing on sporty motifs to create a casual, uncomplicated look.

OS: The new fashion show “Ethical Fashion on Stage” will bring selected street and casualwear to the catwalk for the first time. This means that in addition to our renowned “Salonshow” displaying high fashions from the Greenshowroom, we will also have another event highlight. We expect an exciting selection of contemporary eco fashion from international designers. The premiere will be on the second day of the trade fair, 9 July, at 6 p.m. at the Postbahnhof Club.

The summer 2016 collections will be influenced by the seventies « »

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#  Is there anything else visitors definitely should not miss at GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN this time? MS: There are several very interesting topics on our event programme. We are having a spotlight on vegan fashion, presenting several brands in a showcase, such as Avesu, Freivon, Lovjoi, Opificio V Milano and Simon Ese. On top we will discuss vegan fashion and sustainability on our panel discussion on Friday, 10 July with Marion Kracht, Julia Akra-Laurien of the Noveaux Magazine, Holger Brodkorb from Ragwear and Hendrik Haase, a food activist and blogger. Another spotlight is on wearable technologies. We will have a lecture held by Thomas Gnahm, the founder of the Wear-it Festival, who will give us an overview on the current development of wearables in fashion. It will be exciting days!


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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © AMALLGAMM

AMALLGAMM New to the eco fashion scene, AMALLGAMM will feature their first collection this year at Berlin Fashion Week S/S ’16 showcasing hand printed patterns with ecologically friendly paint and materials. The label is based in Belgium as the designer Irina Pertcova moved from Russia to Belgium due to her love for Belgium design and craftsmanship. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to her.

#  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it?

#  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus?

#  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment?

There are several factors that have influenced me to start the sustainable brand. I think it all started with the move from Russia to Belgium. Local habits and lifestyles helped me to understand that the beauty of the universe is not infinite without our support and assistance. After an internship with a Belgian sustainable designer and getting work experience with up-cycled fashion, I decided to start my own sustainable brand. It is also my passion and love for manual craftsmanship, already making the ways of sustainable manufacturing.

Most of all just the usual things that, I hope, almost everyone else does as well; going by bicycle or public transport whenever possible, 'up-cycle' things that can be useful at home instead of throwing them away and making sure the things that I do throw away end up in the right container to be recycled.

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For me, sustainability is not only about ethical and environmental standards, but it's about the way we live, it's something within us, as well as with our behavior and attitude towards things.


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#  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? Design is more important for me, but I think if you do something with love, respect, and interest, you will eventually get a sustainable product. #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? We are a based in Belgium near Brussels and we are founded in 2015. After studying fashion design at the Ural Academy of Architecture and Art in Russia, I was inspired by the work and style of Belgian designers and decided to move to Belgium. After an internship at a Belgian designer in Antwerp and getting work experience in up-cycling fashion, I decided to start my own brand. To create a unique fabric I use an old oriental woodblock printing method with self-made stamps. All textures are stamped by hand with ecological paint. This gives the garment a special personality and a one-of-a-kind look.

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#  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We use ecological materials, manufactured and painted according to The Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). Everything is manufactured locally, it lets us to follow up and check if this is done according to ecological standards. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? This will actually be our first big collection. It was sort of an experiment for us to make almost every piece with hand-printed cotton.

www.amallgamm.com | visit at GREENSHOWROOM


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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © AMAZONA SECRETS

AMAZONA SECRETS The first to focus solely on designing BioJewelry, Brazilian label AMAZONA SECRETS, uses leaves found on the floor after the Brazilian rains in November and crafts them into beautiful gold-plated jewelry. For the S/S ’16 collection, Amazona Secrets uses ecologically friendly leather, rings made out of Amethyst Druze, and new, different shapes of leaves. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to the label. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? The world has changed. Everyday new ways to preserve nature are revealed. We saw an opportunity to bring together shapes, lightness, beauty, timelessness, and sustainability. Leaves are collected from the floor after the Brazilian rains in November, avoiding the damage of the specimen. Through a social work compound, mostly with women after their 50th birthdays, the leaves are collected, cleaned, and send to the factory where the magic begins. We are focused in bringing to this world a new concept of jewelry, the -56-

Bio-Jewelry. Plated in gold 18k, 15 micrometer of plating, we preserve nature and give to the world a new way to see a leaf. #  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? Sustainability means, after all, preservation. After a research, what we saw in the market was the same accessories, without any changing. What we do is bring a fresh air of this market, presenting a single leaf and turning it into wonderful pieces, with different shapes and using gold to preserve it. #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? Our factory, based in Brazil, has a very good program of recycling. It all starts with the leafs on the floor. After this, the water used to clean and remove the chlorophyll, manually avoiding the waste of raw material, are treated and reused. A certified company


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in Brazil collects our gold, which after the gold is collected, it uses bulldozers to cover the area and reforest it. The gold is taken to a special chamber to test the purity and in a normal way release toxic fumes. But in this chamber, all the fumes are trapped inside to not flow back into the atmosphere. #  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? I must say that is 50/50. A beautiful piece full of design and not sustainable would sell but would not help or change our ways to see the nature. We would continue where we are. A sustainable piece without design wouldn’t sell and the purpose would be lost. So design and sustainability must walk hand in hand.

shapes. We are well established in Brazil since then and decided in 2011 to bring the idea to Europe. Today, we have targeted the countries with the most interest for sustainable issues, such as Germany, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and also France. #  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? With a high control in our systems to avoid waste of raw material and to not damage our Brazilian biosphere, our cooperators are well trained to make their jobs and we all are moved by a common sense of “if the tree disappears, we will disappear too”.

#  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group?

#  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection?

In 2007 we had a vision of what could be a very good business. These green concepts are well funded in Brazil and we decided to make what no one had done before: plate in gold a leaf, preserving their veins and

The collection is stunning. We included ecological leather, different shapes in our leaves, and we have a marvelous ring, made only with the Amethyst Druze, plated half in gold. No metal, only the stone.

www.amazonasecrets.com | visit at GREENSHOWROOM

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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © BLEED

BLEED Sustainability meets athletic functionality with fashion label BLEED. Since 2008, Bleed prides its sports and street wear with production without the hazardous costs against the environment or being. With its original location of Helmbrechts, Bleed draws inspiration from nature and incorporates it into their clothing for their new Spring/Summer collection featuring earth tones and their new Tencel fabrics. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to the Bleed founder Michael Spitzbarth. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? At first I came from the world of professional sports such as surfing, skateboarding, and snowboarding and it was obvious that we as “natural sportsmen” have to protect our playground! In the beginning of 2008 we developed eco fashion combined with functionality for sportive use.

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#  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? Especially for me, sustainability is one important thing: to learn! After many years in the textile industry I learned how to use new interesting and sustainable materials, or even how to develop new ones for our needs at Bleed.. Year after year, I learned totally new experiences about sustainability and the eco materials that we work with. This year for us there are three key facts about eco fashion: it has to be fair, ecological, and animal free (vegan) in order for there to be no harm towards mankind, animals and nature! #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? I try to buy only regional, organic products and I don’t support big companies. I also use a long-board in the city.


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#  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? For me, both are important. After 8 years in the fashion industry, I can say that only a few customers buy only because of the “eco thing”. The most important reason to buy is still the image and the lifestyle you project out with your brand, but at the moment it has been changing a little bit more to sustainability! #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? The name says it all – Bleed, because for our entire product line, no human, animal, or aspect of Mother Nature has had to suffer, a claim as simple as it could be. No harm, no poison, no murder; that’s the only, even if unwritten law here at Bleed, and therefore is part of everything we do, anchored within the production of our goods through the entire supply-chain. Ecological, vegan, and fairly produced, GOTS certified sports- and street wear straight from the heart of Upper Franconia, Germany. The brand sticks to its roots, located in the beautiful countryside of Helmbrechts where it all began 6 years ago. Meanwhile the team grew with five dedicated employees, who not only design and sell all these great products, but are also their toughest judges, ensuring they test every new piece for themselves in order to provide their customers with the best products. Besides the ecological lifestyle that bonds the whole team, they all share a great passion for sports. It doesn’t matter whether it´s skating, surfing, snowboarding, cycling, climbing or running, you can be sure we´ve done it and already have

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plans for more sports in the evening! From the beautiful skate spots around Helmbrechts, to the mountains in the Franconia Alps or the waves all over the world, nature serves as our favorite playground. And no matter where we are or what we do, the bleed products are our permanent companion facing all kinds of challenges and at times, the worst possible weather conditions. How does the saying go, “there is no such thing as bad weather, if you are wearing the right clothes”! #  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? Of course for us the social AND the ecological issues are extremely important and animal harming should be completely avoided in terms of producing clothes! We assure everything together with the GOTS Standard, frequent visits at our suppliers (with a familiar relationship with all of them) and a production mainly with EU countries. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? The Spring/Summer collection ‘16 has the name “Deep Desert” and works with earth colors and fluffy new cooling fabrics like a 100% TENCEL® woven material that is breathable and very light. We also invented sand colored half zip jackets made out of a mixture of Hemp and recycled polyester to get the best function of every material. We will have new organic cotton shorts with a laser engraving at the bottom of the legs.


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www.bleed-clothing.com | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © CARPASUS

CARPASUS CARPASUS embodies modernity for male customers who desire to not only appear elegant but also value the environment and the producers of their dress shirts. Omitting toxic chemicals and replacing them for organic cotton, CARPASUS’ dress shirts are timeless in design, long-lasting, and allow fair pay to the manufacturers. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to the Co-Founders Rene Gruenenfelder and Michael Zaech. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? We both became very sensitive about sustainable business making in general and the environmental and social challenges of the textile industry more specifically during our studies. We were shocked to learn in which conditions some of our clothes were actually produced. Of course, we wanted to dress more consciously and started to choose our clothing based on sustainability criteria. However, we realized that the choice for sustainably made men's clothes is still limited. In fact, we could not find any dress shirt that -64-

combined the elegance, quality and the holistic sustainability approach we were looking for. So we decided to go about it and create CARPASUS, a brand for elegant, high quality dress shirts made from organic cotton under fair and humane conditions for cotton farmers and textile workers. Sustainability is our guiding principle. With our dress shirts we want to create value not only for our customers but also for the environment and the people who make the shirts. #  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? Using our environmental and social resources to meet our current needs without compromising the opportunity of future generations to meet their own needs - this is our understanding of sustainability. Our sustainability approach encompasses the concept of timeless designs and longlasting manufacturing quality, the use fabrics and yarns that were dyed and woven without using toxic chemicals, the use of organic


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cotton, the collaboration with partners who pay fair salaries to textile workers and cotton farmers and a fully traceable production chain that allows the customer to trace back the origins of his shirts. #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? We both live and work in Zurich, a city that is pretty advanced when it comes to environmental protection. It offers citizens a broad range of opportunities to live more sustainable lifestyles. We try to reduce our consumption. We ask ourselves, if we really need something or whether we could repair it or lend it from somebody else, rather than buying it new. We ride bicycles and use public transports as much as we can. Food consumption is another major driver of climate change and contributor to soil erosion, water and air pollution. At the same time the access to food is still unequally distributed in the world. Millions still suffer from hunger while tons of food are thrown away daily. We try to reduce our food waste to a minimal. We both have reduced our meat consumption significantly in the last year and eat meat less frequently.

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#  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? It is not a question whether one is more important than the other. We want to show that style, quality and sustainability can be combined. In fact, great design and quality, in our view, are the basis of every sustainable dress shirt we offer. Great design is timeless, classic and hence sustainable. We want our shirts to be pieces that never go out of fashion and which can be worn for a long time thanks to their high quality manufacturing. #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? CARPASUS combines style, quality and sustainability in an elegant way. We offer classic, high-quality men's dress shirts that are made from organic cotton under fair and humane working conditions for cotton farmers and textile workers. The CARPASUS shirts make our customers look great and also benefit the environment and the people who make them. We bring the wearer and makers of the shirts closer together again through our traceability tool. Every shirt carries a sewn-in code that allows our customers to learn more about the people behind his shirts. Our target group are men who want to dress elegantly but not on the cost of the environment, textile workers and cotton farmers. Our vision is that CARPASUS is recognized globally as a successful combination of style, quality and sustainability within in the industry.


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#  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We maintain close relations with our partners and visit them regularly. We know the conditions on the cotton fields and the factories where our yarn, fabric and shirts are made. All of our partners are also certified according to established environmental and social standards and controlled by third party institutions. We use cotton, for example, that is grown and certified according to the GOTS standard. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? We aim to offer a collection of men's shirts that do not depend on seasonal changes but which are timeless classics. At the moment our classic collection includes four colors: white, light blue, rose and blue and white stripes. The shirts are tailored in a slim fit cut. We use a soft and easy to iron twill fabric made from organic cotton. The shirts come with a modern Kent collar and slightly rounded cuffs. We have put a lot of effort in finding the right natural materials for the buttons and collar stays. The collar stays are made from Galalith, a material that is based on milk. The buttons are produced from corozo. In the future we want to broaden the range of colors and fabric designs within our CARPASUS ‘Classic’ collection.

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www.carpasus.com | visit at GREENSHOWROOM


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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © CLARAWALDBURG

CLARAWALDBURG Focusing on creating ready-to-wear casual and formal dresses, CLARAWALDBURG Smart Couture label radiates elegance and intelligence through its usage of sustainable materials and a drive to avert from the perils of “fast fashion”. Made in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, CLARAWALDBURG’s Spring/Summer ’16 will feature an easy to wear design combined with soft colors perfect for summer. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to the co-founders Clara Schönburg and Franziska Altenrath. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? We love nature and its aesthetics. Living in Berlin, we embrace a vibrant city life but still long for fresh air, walks in the green, and picking ripe strawberries straight from a field. Living naturally for us it is a way of life more than a business opportunity. Implementing and executing a sustainable business strategy is therefore an integral part of our entrepreneurial responsibility more than a business focus. It allows us to be as close -68-

to nature as possible. We focus on wearability, and use sustainable materials and production methods, but we are also obsessive about good design: we started this business with the idea of creating the perfect dress. We created a dress that can accompany our customers day and night. A dress that is beautiful, easy to wear, easy to take care of, comfortable and sustainable. #  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? For us, sustainability is a commitment to make entrepreneurial decisions focused on the preservation of our ecosystem as well as the adoption of the highest possible ethical standards. It is not only about leaving the smallest ecological footprint, but also about producing better products instead of more products. It is about promoting an idea. We want to make products that offer a real alternative to harmful materials and poor working conditions. Sustainability for us is a lifestyle that goes far beyond our business. We want


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to see cities and rural areas move towards each other. Cities are fortunately becoming more and more green due to the increasing demands of its citizens. Today, we can have it all: urban vibes, bio food, electric cars and rooftop gardens. Only fashion is still lagging behind. So sustainability for us is also a mission. A mission to increase awareness, deliver real alternatives to ‘fast-fashion’ and to become truly customer-orientated rather than getting stuck in frenetic fashion cycles driven by the industry more than by customer demand. #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? Every single decision that you take in daily life might have a negative impact on the environment. A consciousness about this fact changes not only lifestyles but also the world. Macro changes are the result of millions of individual changes. We love nature and we consequently eat untreated food, save water and energy, avoid plastic bags and separate what we waste. Most important for us is to develop a growing awareness of all the small things that can be done to preserve the environment and to work on doing a better job every single day.

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#  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? Our business is to design beautiful and wearable dresses. Sustainability is our entrepreneurial responsibility. Design and Sustainability thus play on different levels. We see good design as the key to promote sustainable fashion all over the world. #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? CLARAWALDBURG Smart Couture is a ready-to-wear label with a focus on both everyday and special occasion dresses. Natural, Elegant and Smart are the key elements of our brand. Elegance in design, smart in functionality and wearability and natural materials that create a conscious bound with nature. We address women with limited time, who are looking for that one brand that will always have something easy to wear that they love. The dress they need for a party, for an important business meeting or just to refresh their wardrobe. We want to offer the perfect dress, for day and night. Elegant, comfortable and sustainable.


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#  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? Sustainability must be lived in a responsible and transparent way. We see it as our responsibility to check every single step of production and our finished products for their impact on the environment. Sustainability is both a personal and a communal journey. By clearly acknowledging the need for sustainability, explaining our production methods and working hand-in-hand with our partners we dedicate ourselves to transparency. Our products are produced in Switzerland, Austria and Germany only. Our partners do not only fulfill highest quality and environmental standards but also pay at least the countries’ minimum wage. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? Our Spring/Summer ‘16 collection emphasizes our brand elements: natural, elegant and smart. We designed a collection of easy-to-wear cuts, combined them with the soft colors of the summer and used Modal, a sustainable cellulose-based fabric which feels and falls like silk but is as easy to handle as cotton. There will be some perfect dresses.

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www.clarawaldburg.com | visit at GREENSHOWROOM


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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © CUS

CUS An awareness of the impact from the potentially devastating long-term effects of mistreating the environment inspired the founder to produce a ready-to-wear collection consciously. CUS will feature a colorful, playful, and classy Spring Summer ’16 collection. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to Adriana Zalacain. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? As an academic formation, I studied Political Science, but slowly went into fashion design. As a fashion designer, I enjoyed my job but felt a certain discomfort. I thought that it would all personally make more sense if my every day tasks were committed to certain values. This is why I decided to design following what I thought it was doing it the "right way", a win-win way.

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#  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? It means to take decisions, taking into account the real impact of them and their consequences. In other words, it is to think communally, including the planet as an actor of the process. It means to ask yourself questions of what is going to happen to others with the decisions that you are taking, and to act responsibly to reach a balance that satisfies all the parts, and doesn't leave aside actors that have been part of the process. #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? For example, recycle, consume organic and proximity products, use eco-materials at home, use as less plastic as possible, and grow a sustainable garden with droughtfriendly plants and rocks instead of grass. I like to learn to respect the environment every day to day, and transmit this respect to my children. We do not have a planet B.


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#  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? I am really attracted to pure beauty and design is very important for me. But often by itself it is empty and it becomes meaningless. On the other hand, sustainability by itself is often unattractive and beauty is careless. What is interesting is to reach a balance between both. Then, what you have achieved is beautiful from the outside and from the inside. #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? We have slowly learned that we share values with our customers. The added value of sourcing fabrics sustainably, producing consciously and designing delicately is really appreciated by them. This is one of the aspects that I feel more satisfied with my job, because we speak a same language in this sense. We respect and appreciate the job that they are doing in their shops, as much as they appreciate ours.

#  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We work with trustful suppliers, most of which we have worked with for several campaigns. We like to build a chain of trust and confidence with them. It is important for us to know as much as possible about the whole process of production of the fabrics: spinning, weaving and finishing. All our organic cotton is certified, our tencel is Lenzing tencel and we work with hemp spun and weaved in Italy. In terms of production, all our garments are made in Barcelona in workshops that meet all social and working legal standards. They are well known by us because we visit them regularly to check the quality of production. We care about the people who make our clothes and also about the people who make the fabrics of our clothes. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? It is going to be a very colorful collection, including eight different colors selected from a manual dyeing test-process. It will be playful, easy, and classy.

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www.cus.cat | visit at GREENSHOWROOM

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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © ELEMENTUM BY DANIELA PAÍS

ELEMENTUM BY DANIELA PAÍS From the Netherlands, ELEMENTUM BY DANIELA PAÍS holds strong values towards sustainability through innovation. Their un-dyed, organic cotton or Alpaca natural fibers deplete waste in consumption and promote a healthy mentality of exploring individual expression. Their Spring/ Summer 2016 collection will have timeless designs and will, for the first time, include a children’s collection. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to Daniela Pais. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? Elementum emerged from research with a sustainable focus. After graduating from fashion school, I established a Design brand, Krv Kurva, and I encountered some production issues that lead me to find more sustainable alternatives. I realized the importance of sustainable practices and the opportunities that lay in this field. Later, I undertook a Master’s degree in Humanitarian Design

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& Sustainable Living at the Design Academy Eindhoven where I researched about clothing production and consumption. Concerned about how wasteful the current main clothing system is, I looked into developing alternatives to reduce waste both on production and consumption levels. This research was titled, “Clothing species turned into Elementum”. #  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? For me sustainability means wellbeing without the cost of others’ wellbeing in short and long term perspectives. It’s about living in the present without compromising the future. It’s about circular thinking, connecting things, and people.


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#  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? Sustainability is not a religion. I do what I can do. I try to be conscious on what I consume. When I wish for a product or service, I try to think first if I really need it and for how long, could I borrow it, share it? If I have to buy it, then I check where it’s made and what it is made of. I try to minimize the amount of things I use and own, but it’s hard. I buy second hand and try to reuse by giving new purpose or by sharing. When the previous solutions fail, I recycle it. #  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? They are both important and inseparable. Designing within sustainability, it gives me the opportunity to innovate constantly. #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? Elementum is a concept of sustainable principles applied to clothing. It is developed around the idea and wish that people become active participants of their own daily dressing rituals. Elementum initially resulted from research into industrialized models and behaviors and from a study into new models of consumption, both prompted by the magnitude of the waste from products that characterizes our society. Elementum as a brand is built “bottom up” around a strong concept and product emphasizing product usability through multi-functionality. Sustainable principles are then applied through the design process with a strong focus on simplicity, innovation, and quality.Elementum clothing collections are based on the total use of a piece of a cloth in tubular dimension where minimum cuts provide maximum -78-

use. It consists from 8-15 different timeless designs with each functioning as scarf, dress, top, vest, and more. VALUE CREATION EXPLORATION > INDIVIDUALITY > ACTIVE AWARENESS > CARE > COMMITMENT Elementum aims to fulfill people's need for change and individuality, to provide more opportunities for individual expression and style, and to create less waste both in the production process and through clothing consumption. It invites people to develop new perspectives about your body, identity expression and well-being. I believe that Elementum clothes provide the opportunity for people to explore, to play. By doing that, people will become more individual and conscious of themselves. This consciousness will lead to an active awareness; people will care and finally be committed to a conscious well-being. This value that we provide to the consumer is very important because that will allow us to continue working in terms of design and production in a sustainable way. We challenge the consumers to be challenged back by them. #  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? In Elementum there are many layers that makes it sustainable. The first layer is the design itself. Its shape allows multi-functionality, but also fits many different people. This allows them to explore their body and expression for a long time, therefore preventing fast consumption. The second layer is the production process that creates no waste. The third layer is the material from which the pieces are made. Elementum is made with natural fibers like baby Alpaca, mostly in un-dyed colors, reused or certified


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organic cotton. The collection is made in the Netherlands between our studio and a small family-knitting factory with whom we share craftsmanship and the joy of making. We develop fashion in context. It’s not only about organic materials or the working conditions of those who make them, but it’s also about what we are creating. I mean in terms of process but also in terms of meaning and usefulness for us as individuals and as a society. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? Elementum continues to believe that the most important things in life, the real luxuries, are the simple things. We will continue to present high quality, easy to wear and timeless products; full of real opportunities like the chance to wear and style the clothes in multiple ways. Elementum sustainable clothing collection is composed by 8-15 designs that function as new basics or new archetypes of clothing. For these timeless designs, we developed several prints and laser cut patterns that change in color or shape every season. For the upcoming SS16 collection we introduced natural dyed prints and fabrics. For the first time we will also present a kids collection for the Spring/Summer season.

www.luxuryistohavesimplethings.com | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © JAN ‘N JUNE

JAN 'N JUNE Transparency is a necessary asset that JAN ‘N JUNE allows their customers to have, complete knowledge on how every garment of clothing is produced and the material composition. JAN ‘N JUNE is a versatile label at affordable prices with a Spring/ Summer ’16 collection influenced by masculine and feminine elements in sleek, neutral colors. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to JAN ‘N JUNE’s co-founder Anna Katharina Bronowski. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? We've established JAN 'N JUNE out of our own need. Studying fashion management we knew about the circumstances in which garments are produced but still we loved fashion and the idea of expressing yourself without having to speak. Moreover, we studied so that our budget for fashion wasn't huge. The idea is simple: affordable prices combined with sustainability and high fashion. And if you never try - you'll never know. So we just started doing it. -80-

#  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? When it comes to our materials we only use certified organic cotton because organic could mean different things. Next to organic fabrics we try to focus on recycled materials to save more resources. What's also really important for us is the holistic view. There is no point in using non-toxic dying methods on the one hand but packing all garments in conventional plastic bags on the other - for example. For us sustainability is connected to transparency. The customer should know where the garment is coming from and what steps are included. Therefore we have a little QRCode in every garment. When scanning it the customer can see the item's 'ECO-ID' with all production details.


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#  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? GOLDEN RULES 1. Choose well, only buy what you really need. 2. ALWAYS take a reusable bag for your grocery shopping. 3. Don't over care your garments. Cold wash or 30 degrees are almost always enough. Do not tumble dry. Let your clothes hang. #  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? Both. We believe one can't go without the other anymore. #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? A JAN 'N JUNE customer can be 20 or 60 years old and everything in between. She is open-minded, interested, and curious for new things. A typical JAN 'N JUNE woman values good quality in her hectic lifestyle and knows that less is more when it comes to her style and needs. Our vision is to be the leading sustainable apparel company for high fashion with affordable prices - a real alternative to fast fashion companies.

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#  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? It was not easy to find supplier that meet our criteria. With raw materials we work closely with the supplier who are certified. This has the advantage of external audits and strict rules concerning ethics and ecology. Our natural fibers are either GOTS or IVN-Best certified while recycled fibers have GRS-certification. The production is a very small family owned factory in the heart of Wroclaw, Poland. We closely work together, visiting at least twice a year and Skyping on almost a daily basis. The women sewing for us are employed at this place for many years. One of them has been already working at the production for over 20 years. Sometimes during the design process we have to cancel a piece we really love - simply because there are no sustainable fabrics that are adequate for this piece. In those situations we are very strict. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? Spring/Summer '16 in a few words? We play with masculine and feminine elements. Influences: Some pieces are rather static and sleek while others flow. As usually we're very reduced in colors, black, white, and grey around shades of blue and navy, as well as a light yellow are dominating 'Simple Plan' that's the collection's name.


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www.jannjune.com | visit at GREENSHOWROOM

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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © LANIUS

LANIUS Exemplifying the modern woman, LANIUS’ feminine and sustainable collection thrives successfully by the usage of high-end natural fabrics such as silk. With headquarters located in Cologne, LANIUS spreads awareness about the importance of sustainable fashion and proves that eco-fashion can be as beautiful as the fabrics the label uses. For the S/S ’16 collection, LANIUS romantically takes inspiration from India and South Africa, using light fruity tones with soft falling drapery. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to Claudia Lanius. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? I established my first company, “The Hanf Company,” with my former husband at the age of 24. Our first collection has been a great success at the Colognes Fair ‘Interjeans’. I adapted the enormous and high quality standards of the dispatcher ‘Hess Natur’ to my own. Driven by the idea of creating a modern-feminine and sustainable womenswear label, LANIUS was born. A -84-

collection made by high-end nature fabrics, like wool, cotton and silk. #  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? For me, sustainability means to protect our resources. To ask yourself: Where does it come from and how do I work with it? At LANIUS it starts with the seeds and ends with the product. With every step of the production we think about improvement. How can we optimize and exchange things? We are always working in cooperation with our producers. #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? To protect the environment means to develop the awareness of sustainability. To integrate little things in your daily life and take it step by step: To use green electricity, have a bank-account at a sustainable bank,


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avoid unnecessary garbage – precisely in the office -, use ecological soap or go to the office by bike. We practice this “ecological awareness” together in our LANIUS team. When more people keeps that in mind, there are always new ideas to improve on. Our newest purchase is a ‘tap water filter system’. #  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? I love beautiful fabrics that have a good touch. To create feminine fashion with highminded cuts und clear lines in relation to biological materials and fair work conditions – that’s my demand and my inducement for over 15 years now. Of course we do make concessions for fashion. For the A/W 15 collection we wanted to have a pleated skirt in the collection. Therefore we needed to use a small amount of recycled polyester. #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? Love Fashion. Think Organic. Be Responsible. Our claim describes our vision in short terms. We, the women in my team and I, love fashion. Twice a year new collections are developed in our studio in cologne – for women who share our love for fashion and who ask themselves: Where do my clothes come from? LANIUS focus on sustainability. We don’t want green fashion to be an exception and we’re on a good way.

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#  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We are fully certified, which means that we’re primarily working with GOTS-certified companies and as a label are GOTS-certified as well. We have one employee who is exclusively working on this theme. Furthermore I trust in long-term relationships. Every producer we’re working with, I know in person. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? The upcoming S/S 16 collection, which we’re going to present at the Ethical Fashion Show in Berlin, combines natural pureness, relaxed realism, foreign cultures and a sense of romance. Inspired by the cultures of India and South Africa we used fruity-light sorbet tones and milky powder tones, which meet clear color structures. Moving surfaces, waffle piqué structures, transparent layering, three dimensional pixel patterns and softfalling drapery are the main elements in this collection.


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www.lanius-koeln.de | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © LINDA MAI PHUNG

LINDA MAI PHUNG A stunning result of a blending between Western and Eastern design, LINDA MAI PHUNG represents the timeless sophistication of the Vietnamese and French cultures through her feminine and minimal readyto-wear. With a highly reputable history in eco fashion, Linda Mai Phung holds awards and media recognition to both Ho Chi Minh City based designer, Phung and co-owner, Florence Bacin. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to the owners. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? Linda Mai Phung is a French fashion designer based in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, where she founded her eponymous label in 2010. Phung always wanted to create clothes while respecting people and the environment. In 2012, Florence Bacin, who shares the same values as Phung, joined the company as co-owner. We work closely with our tailors and suppliers and choose natural and organic fabrics. We create, source, and produce our garments in Vietnam thus controlling all the supply chain. -88-

#  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? We believe that beautiful products should be designed and made by talented people while respecting mankind and the workers. That is why we are determined to look for the best materials made in the best possible conditions. Everyday, we include this ethic in our work and we wish to grow in order to be able to improve even more and lessen our impact on the planet. #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? Most of our communication tools, for everyday work and operations as well as for marketing, are online based. #  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? For us there’s no choice to be made between design and sustainability; both come together in our brand DNA.


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#  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? Linda Mai Phung is a ready-to-wear fashion label for high range, eco-friendly, and responsible women. The company was founded in April 2010 in Ho Chi Minh. It was born from the will to offer ecological clothing with a unique style, while promoting the traditional Vietnamese savoir-faire. Taking inspirations from her travels, the designer defines her style through elegant, contemporary cuts at a meeting point between the West and the East. Truly inspired by art, Linda Mai Phung often works with illustrators or artists, which gives a strong exclusive feel to her designs. With a background in business, Florence Bacin joined the company in 2012 as a coowner. Linda Mai Phung then starts to develop the brand as it began to receive international attention and buyers in the ethical fashion market, first in France and Vietnam where both Linda and Florence went back to reconnect with their roots, and also in Germany and Japan. Today, Linda Mai Phung is well-known in the ethical fashion field: the label was rewarded with the Young designer in Ethical Fashion in Neoplanete magazine in 2011 in France, then with the Creativity Prize at the Ethical Fashion Show in Paris the same year. Later, Linda Mai Phung won the Innovation Source Award from the Ethical Fashion Forum in London. Our aim is to follow the example of Stella Mc Cartney, and influence the whole fashion industry in doing better: meaning producing responsibly, by taking into account the limited resources of our planet and people’s living and working conditions. Linda Mai Phung customers are women aged between 25 and 55 years old, who like to travel and look for high quality clothing with unique details.

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#  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? Since we are still a small company, we monitor these standards by working directly with all our suppliers. We know everything about our fabrics and also about the people who make or sew them. When we will grow bigger, we will probably need to have monitoring tools to do so, but having a bigger business would also allow us to get better eco-friendly textiles (with more important quantities to order), packaging and create employment. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? Linda Mai Phung new collection’s theme is about a cruise in the Mekong Delta, from Cambodia to Vietnam; exploring maritime styles with outfits composed of bold, breezy organic cotton items combined with hand-woven textiles made by the Thai ethnic group. For this hand-woven jacquard, the designer decided to bridge my French heritage with theirs, by creating a new textile based on their traditional pattern: mariniere stripes intricately woven with their ancestral motif.

www.lindamaiphung.com | visit at GREENSHOWROOM


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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © M OF COPENHAGEN models Stéphanie Perez & Patrick Ziebell Thøgersen

M OF COPENHAGEN With Finnish roots, M OF COPENHAGEN clothing embodies a warm love for nature with a passion for sustainability. The design’s wholesome minimal appeal develops from upcycling, such as with their eco silver (100% recycled silver particles) jewelry line, and proves that sustainability is not limited to clothing. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to the designer Marie Sjölund. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? Growing up on an island in a very rural part of Southern Finland, nature was always a big part of my childhood. I think coming from a family with a father who had an engineering background who always tried to fix things himself, I learned early on that there are possibilities all around us to help solve our problems – and the more natural they are, the better it is for the environment. Growing up on the countryside, I have more memories of making clay pots from the ditch in our yard and looking for worms in the closest compost to go fishing with, than playing with dolls or daydreaming over glossy -92-

magazines. I got to learn early on how to enjoy nature and that is why it is only natural to me that I want to good care of it, so my future children as well will have that amazing playground too, and their hearts in the right places for the life ahead of them. I would call this the part of my life where the sustainability seed was planted. I didn’t think about how much nature meant to me until years later when someone asked me to describe the best parts my childhood, where I found myself circling back to the words “nature” and “environment” all the time. What got this sustainability seed to then start growing even more was when I was accepted to start my fashion studies at Novia University of Applied Sciences in Turku, Finland in 2008. My 4 year long journey had a sustainability focus from day one, as all projects we did in furniture design, interior design and lastly fashion design had to have a sustainable aspect and reasonable motivation behind them. For my thesis I decided to really give it my all and even got rewarded for producing the super-sustainable, convertible women’s jacket made from old upcycled clothes, and that could convert into 22 different styles


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including a handbag and a unisex cape. After this I knew I had found my calling, and that my identity as a designer was to be green. After graduating with a Bachelor’s Degree in Arts and Culture in 2011, I decided to start my journey towards building my own eco empire and that dream is finally become reality this summer when I debut my first official eco collection of garments and Ecosilver jewelry at the Ethical Fashion Fair. On my journey to get to this point, I have discovered that for me it is far more important to make a difference rather than personal gain – which is why I also have chosen to donate to charity for each order placed at M of Copenhagen, so the brand can be so much more than what is expected of it. #  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? Sustainability to me is not about being organic. The world already seems cluttered with organic, but by only making your product organic, you are not helping the “bigger picture”. In fact, you are more or less just as bad as your non-organic competitors. In order to really achieve ultimate sustainability, you need to “zoom out” from your product and take a long, hard look at what your business, as a whole, is actually costing the environment. My design philosophy looks way beyond that and is based on 2 years of research and trial and error to come up with the most reasonable ways of conduct, fair methods and the most sustainable products, that not only look good and feel good but also do good – today, tomorrow, forever. I feel it is in the hands of designers to educate the masses and to take responsibility, when it is we who fill the shelves and give them the options in their daily consumption.

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#  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? To implement upcycling into my fashion production cycle, I use old bed sheets, both purchased at flea markets and privately owned, to make my prototypes out of. In my jewelry business, I recycle all my Ecosilver scraps and old prototypes back to its manufacturer so they can re-melt it once more and make new solid Ecosilver that jewelers then buy again. In addition to this I am also an avid glass jar collector and I wish more people were, as they make fantastic storage for little pieces of silver, paper clips and work great as candle holders. I also love cutting up old clothes, especially hand towels, to use for cleaning as they are softened enough by wear to be kind to wooden furniture and don’t cost a penny to make! One of my greatest discoveries was how an old toothbrush is your best friend when it comes to cleaning really small parts, whether it be inside a sewing machine or on when cleaning silver – beats the store bought, double priced items by a mile and it doesn’t cost the environment anything extra. #  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? Definitely sustainability. Anyone can be a designer, but only a truly brilliant one will take on the sustainability challenges at hand and not give up when the going gets tough. To me, choosing the harder right over the easier wrong and still managing to come out on top is what design should be all about, and also what we all as designers should strive toward. All throughout my design studies I struggled to see the beauty and magic in the fashion industry, and I also began to question why I am voluntarily going into an industry that is doing so much harm. I then made a deal


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with myself to become the ultimate green designer, because the only way I can justify being a fashion designer in this day and age is either do this right or then not do it at all. Out of this, M of Copenhagen was born. #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? M of Copenhagen entwines effortless minimalism with eco, creating the perfect balance between uniqueness and “feel-good”. The brand speaks to those looking for something unique, modern and guilt-free, which will stand the test of time both in design and quality. The brand's honest devotion to sustainability manifests itself in the choice in every fiber, hangtag, button and box associated with its name. It comprises of ecosilver jewelry and a sustainable, casual clothing range for men and women, and the goal is to further expand into other genres such as home ware, shoes and accessories in the future. Not only is everything in the M of Copenhagen collections produced from sustainable materials such as Ecosilver (100% recycled silver particles) and pure, luxurious Austrian linen, but all materials involved in the wrapping and shipping have been carefully selected due to their sustainability factor and individual contribution to lowering the impact on the environment. All eco jewelry is handmade by me in my studio and shipped straight to the customer, leaving no ends untied. Almost all aspects of the garments are produced in Europe, where the garments are also sewn. All the brand’s products are and forever will be made with the highest concentrate of sustainability achievable at that point in time, and it is my personal pledge as a designer to never produce a single product that hasn’t been put under the microscope to fulfill those needs the brand so proudly stands for. M of Copenhagen stands for justice for the environment and a brand for the -95-

people – fighting for your right to a cleaner environment and a brighter future for all of us. #  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? The philosophy behind M of Copenhagen is to only use carefully selected, sustainably derived materials and choose to work with other like-minded eco-businesses to help put eco on the map. Every aspect, down to the very sticker and string associated with the products, is purposefully chosen to be part of the brand – nothing is selected at random. In addition, all products are shipped with a certified green delivery service, and each order donates to a variety of charities. Both the garment and the jewelry production take place in Europe, and so do the majority of materials to make them. The only things not sourced from Europe are the mailing bags and the shirt buttons – but the bags make up for it by being 100% bio-degradable and the buttons, by being made with 60% recycled material. Careful research is carried out before deciding to trade with other businesses, and those who cannot live up to the harsh ethical and sustainable standards of the brand sadly do not get to be a part of this amazing journey. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? The collection is built around crisp, luxurious Austrian linen and come in sizes ranging from XS to Large for both men and women. The design channels a unique new take on modernized classics to reinvent your everyday look.

www.mofcopenhagen.com | visit at GREENSHOWROOM


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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © PEOPLE TREE

PEOPLE TREE Celebrating their 25th anniversary this year, PEOPLE TREE was among the first eco fashion labels originating after the controversial exploitation of garment factory workers by large fashion companies in the early 90s. The quirky, vintage label will feature for the S/S ’16 new fabrics including organic cotton denim, denim melange fleece, and soft organic cotton. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to Safia Minney, CEO and Founder of People Tree. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? Fashion as it’s done today is completely unsustainable. I got mad about the exploitation of garment factory workers’ rights by large fashion companies in the early 1990s and that’s when I started People Tree. I was one of the original ‘ethical consumers’ wanting to change the world by supporting companies with good ethics. Back then there weren’t any ethical, Fair Trade, or sustainable fashion companies, so I ended up starting one.

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#  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? Organic fibers and fabrics reduce the use of oil-based pesticides, water usage, and the spread of GMO seeds. We need to consume more sustainably as well as produce more sustainably. We currently consume two and half planets worth of resources and with fast fashion being the second largest polluter after the oil industry – we need to redesign the fashion industry. #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? I’m vegetarian and I cook at home – even my lunches! I only eat organic food. I buy ethical, Fair Trade, and pick renewable energy whenever there’s an option. I don’t own a car! I buy lots of second hand clothes and furniture too; I even invest ethically!


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#  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? Both! For me bringing design and sustainability together is a fun challenge! As Creative Director of People Tree, I have two equally committed design teams in London and Tokyo who are as passionate as me about the product and the producer, the aesthetics and ethics! That’s the way we roll! #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? The story of People Tree is about the respect for the people who make it, the customer and the planet. Our ethics run throughout our business. People Tree is the first ever fashion company to get World Fair Trade Organization certification throughout our manufacturing process. Our core customer is 25-45 years old, but age is a silly way of describing people these days! She’s ethical, caring, into style not the latest trend and she loves vintage, quirky and craft. She buys good design, quality and style. Our customer believes in the ethics of People Tree and spreading the word about environmentally sustainable fashion. She is really excited to watch and screen The True Cost movie too! #  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We have contributed to the most important social and environmental standards covering fair wages, working conditions, transparency, capacity building, environmental best practice, gender equality and setting standards for conventional fashion

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companies to improve their supply chains. We developed Fair Trade supply chain with our cotton farmers in India and the manufacture stages to process cotton through growing, ginning, weaving or knitting the cloth, printing and tailoring. This is a big challenge but if a little fashion company like People Tree can do it, so can large companies! Social and environmental standards mustn’t be a barrier for the very people that they are supposed to help, the poorest of the poor. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? We’re going to celebrate the 25th anniversary of People Tree and Fair Trade fashion. We have reflected all our key craft skills and pulled inspiration from the archive too. We will put organic cotton on the handlooms for the first time in Bangladesh. People Tree’s SS16 collection ‘Urban Craft’ will introduce exciting new fabrics including organic cotton denim, denim melange fleece and soft organic cotton jerseys. To commemorate the brands 25-year reign, we have partnered with our Japan-based family to create a unique capsule collection which will be available to view online as soon as we launch SS16 pre-order! I’ll also launch my new book ‘Slow Fashion’ that will document this growing international sustainable and ethical fashion movement.


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www.peopletree.co.uk | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos Š SKUNKFUNK

SKUNKFUNK The eccentric label, SKUNKFUNK, boldly combines contrast and geometric design influenced by street and contemporary art. The Skunkfunk woman is not afraid to constantly evolve in style but retain femininity while remaining comfortable. The label has quickly spread in popularity across Europe and neighboring countries all while maintaining production levels without any environmental harm. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to Mikel Feijoo Elzo. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? Actually we did not establish Skunkfunk as a sustainable brand. We started from scratch in a farmhouse in the hills near Bilbao. As we grew we moved from small atelier doing small quantities with all European materials to bigger units where they could take care of many side activities, like taking the cut pieces from one factory to the printer and from there to the workshop to sew them. Finally, in the middle of the mass textile closures of the late nineties we were somehow -100-

forced to move to Morocco first and then Turkey and China as our quantities were also growing. It was more this than the price what moved us. Once in China we realized the impact of our activity in a country with little regulations in this matter and out of shock we decided to act. So you can say we turned our focus to sustainability out of an ethical need that we did not have before manufacturing in Europe. Believe me, this makes a hell of a difference to start changing focuses and processes once you are up and running at a certain speed and volume. It would have been much easier to start as a sustainable brand from day one as you set it all up based on this. Today I believe there is just a handful of brands doing such range of different products, fabrics, and materials and with our geographical extension that have such a certified commitment as Skunkfunk does. Also, I have to mention that this affects your margins and prices. We could not move them once they have been out there for a while. We were scared of a market backlash so we took all the impact in our margin. Surely, in


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a way this made for some financial trouble that we had a few years ago but our commitment goes this far. #  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? Sustainability is to try to minimize the negative impacts of our production activity. We call it like this, sustainable fashion and not green or eco fashion, since to be honest; no one needs more garments in this planet. The only green fashion that can be is one that stays in the computer screen. As for your second question, we do it to feel good about what it is that we do because we love designing, making, and selling our clothes. It’s a feel-good must-have factor really. #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? Each one of us makes different things I suppose. Personally, I try to apply this principle of balancing our negative impacts in my personal life and I think I do it except for the traveling. We are somehow nomads and have this quest that so much fits this business too (In fact, I am in fashion as a way of continuing my traveling thirst but adding an economical sustainable way). Problem is that these days instead of walking, we fly and drive releasing tons of emissions. As a company we do act holistically; it is not about the fibers or a green line in the collection but rather about the whole activity. We do ship by sea; we use as much elements from cardboard to fabric, we use recycled materials and do the packing in compostable bio plastic, and we communicate to create a conscience, even if we have a long way to go. We get certified by third party organizations in the use of materials, processes, and social responsibilities and we are a GOTS certified company where it stands as the -101-


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toughest certification amidst the 500 different ones existing, the only fashion company in Spain actually. But possibly the biggest of our impacts is that we have , and took a long time and many karaokes, believe me, made several of our suppliers get certified so the positive impact is there for all of us. #  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? We are a fashion brand and design is basic and uncompromising. We design it all in our headquarters, even the trims and often the fabrics; all the prints, the styles. This is a massive asset that we have. Our design team takes a lot of resources from the company comparing to other companies but it is our core and we are really proud of them. Back in the days we decided to go our way and not follow trends and create something for our generation that was different. Obviously this has evolved as our other focuses as well, we have changed and matured and now we are more feminine and commercial. In this process we have learned a few things and that we can blend such a polluting industry as the fashion one with a more eco approach; that not only is this possible, but mostly necessary. Our next challenge is to make the design of our collections more sustainable and we have the ZERO WASTE collection; to make also fully recyclable garments and so many other exciting things that make this voyage so exciting while being so challenging.

www.skunkfunk.com | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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#  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? When I created the brand, after being for a while in the festival circuit, I envisioned a street wear brand with a Star Trek from the Far East touch. I wanted to dress these people that were like me. It struck with a segment of the market and we grew exponentially also thanks to my travel addiction. We were soon, by ourselves, in three continents, then four, and then ultimately in forty countries. We touched something to some people, the same people that we were. Our communication was our product, we did not spend almost anything ever in publicity, and with us it evolved. We have been a very open brand where the input of customers from shop owners to commercial network to end consumers has been there. I see a brand as a small kid of whom you are the parents but as it evolves it becomes something, someone on its own. To keep this live entity evolving is the key of a brand. We can see so many fake brands, marketing products or projects that do not bring any value to a saturated market that somehow it’s a miracle they are alive trying to do your thing. Moreover so in a market dominated by vertical monsters like the big main street firms that cannibalize others design while excelling in real estate or logistics, which is the true nature of their businesses. They have the goal of taking over the market and they are succeeding it. This is why we must have strong core values and design. Only these ones will survive. Our collection is for the independent and the bold. Each design is a fusion of geometry, clean lines, and striking contrast, drawing inspiration from contemporary art and urban-chic style. We target authentic women that are constantly renewing themselves and urban women that want to feel comfortable and feminine.


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#  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We started to focus on sustainability back in 2003, the first time we went to China. We started randomly and out of an impulse but we had no guidance. We made many mistakes such as using bamboo fibers believing it was very green. Later we realized we needed to go hand in hand with experts to change and improve things and to get the certifications for it that would give us credibility and success in this activity. Today we know it is not where you manufacture but instead, how you manufacture and design. Skunkfunk is already a leader in this emerging market. All organic products are certified either to GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standard) or OCS (Organic Content Standard). The Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) is recognized as the world's leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibers. It defines high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well. In 2007 Organic Exchange developed the OE 100 and OE Blended standards to verify the organic cotton content claims on products. The standards established a system for tracking and documenting the purchase and the handling and use of certified organic cotton fiber. Since then there has been a need for a broader organic standard that would support content claims for all organic inputs, not just cotton. To meet this need, Textile Exchange has developed the Organic Content Standard (OCS), based on the generic chain of custody requirements of the Content Claim Standard (CCS). 50% of SS16 styles use environmentally preferred fabrics. 65% of the cotton we use in SS16 Collection is organic.

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#  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? For summer 2016, the theme our collection is HIDEAWAY from the city, in your dreams, in a forest, live in a tree, go on a road trip, or loose yourself. We worked with many new fabrics this season, particularly thin and fluid cotton organics and linens, all printed with our own artworks, many stripes and small textures. We wanted a fresh range colorful but minimal, authentic but feminine. We worked on each piece with a concern on producing an authentic design. We increased the Eco fibers as 50% of the range that is now sustainable, although we do work it as a whole. We developed zero waste concept designs and this was a challenge, using the full width of a fabric with absolutely NO wastage of fabric, it’s a new way of designing! Zero waste design is about respect, to the environment and to the people, and the makers. Simplicity and minimal seen construction are incorporated to keep the raw materials and human labor in absolute minimum. As the English saying goes “I shall cut my cote after my cloth” (John Heywood, 1546) sometimes written “cut my coat according to my cloth”, our actions should suit circumstances or resources. In zero waste fashion design the designer creates a garment through the pattern, taking into consideration the fabric width in order to increase the fabric usage, referred as fabric efficiency, to target 100%. Also we created a raincoat category in our casual line, which is the line that is growing the most inside the collection. We introduced recycle leather in our wallets and organic cottons in our range of accessories for the first time also. And last but not the least, we are very proud to present our second NSK collection which is a special accessories capsule with its own web and diffusion, apart from the main collection (www.nskexperience.com) done out of Tyvek paper.


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interview Tom Felber text Catalina Campos photos © THOKKTHOKK

THOKKTHOKK Originally working as a freelance carpenter and furniture designer, founder, Vinzenz, established THOKKTHOKK as a way to experiment with environmentally friendly textiles and graphic designs. Besides a beautiful Spring/Summer 16 collection encompassing the liberation of a Capri holiday along the beach, ThokkThokk partners with an NGO called SAVE, specializing in the Indian textile industry and giving an education to children of textile workers. SUPERIOR MAGAZINE talked to Florian Wegerer from ThokkThokk. #  How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable fashion focus? Clothing is one of the most important assets of our time. Many people express their individuality through them and it is not always easy to find exactly what we are looking for and what we have in mind. For us, this was often difficult because we have an addition to good design and a claim to high quality, environmental awareness, and fair production. -104-

#  What does sustainability mean to you, how do you define it? For us it is very important to take care of the whole planet. That also includes all creatures on our planet. For us equity is the core of sustainability and the idea behind it. #  What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment? We only use organic cotton for all our products and we are using water-based colors for all of our printing systems. We try to reduce the waste in our daily business as much as we can and find ways to re- and upcycle products from ours and other productions. For example, we are going to use envelopes made out of remains from the textile industry. We know that cotton is a very water intense fiber, so at the moment we are trying to find new textile fabrics that are made out of natural materials and are not that water intense in their production process.


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#  What is more important for you as a fashion designer - design or sustainability? We think design has to be sustainable, it has to be long-lasting, and made from humans. We should always have an eye on the idea behind sustainability when we are creating things and don’t see it as a marketing instrument. As a designer we have the responsibility to implement design in a sustainable way but it is always a challenge to combine both in the best way. #  Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? After his apprenticeship, Vinzenz, the founder of ThokkThokk, became a freelance carpenter and furniture designer but he realized very quickly that he doesn’t; only want to work with wood and he started in 2005 to experiment with different materials, such as textiles. With this background, the artisan production was always very important for ThokkThokk and so Vinzenz started to print his own very basic and graphically orientated designs with silkscreen printing in his own workshop under very simple conditions. The first design was called "Squared" and we still use it from time to time.  In the last years more and more people are interested in sustainable fashion and so we could increase our range of products. Besides t-shirts, we are offering underwear, socks, sweater, shorts, sweatpants, and dresses. For us, it is very important to find ways to

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produce not only in a sustainable way, but to make it affordable for everybody. It is always hard to combine both ways but we think we are in a good way to connect these both aspirations. Our target group is young people with a propensity to fresh, unconventional design elements and a fair and sustainable value chain. #  Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? All our partners are certified by independent organizations for ecological and social aspects, such as GOTS or Fairtrade. We also try to visit our partners as often as possible and have close relations with them. In India, we also work together with an NGO called SAVE that specializes in the Indian textile industry. We support their work in terms of giving the kids an alternative education so that they don’t have to work in the textile factories and we are happy to have a local contact who could get in touch with our local partners if there are any charges against them. #  Can you already tell us a little bit about your upcoming Spring/Summer 2016 collection? It's about the desire for the south, holidays on Capri in the fifties, old fishing boats, stranded goods, and endless beach walks.


JULY 2015

www.thokkthokkmarket.com | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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PRINT

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March 2014 FEBRUARY 2015

SUBMIT

Y O U R EDITORIAL -61-73-


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photography by RUJIA WANG styling by Hequn ZHOU & Xueping LIU hair & make up by Rita Chang models Lola Cerise Maupouet @ Up Models & Klara Blanc @ Women Management

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all clothes HeaunZHOU


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all clothes HeaunZHOU

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coat & headgear Blank Swan shoes C'M PARIS


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shirt dress & vest HeaunZHOU

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coat HeaunZHOU shoes MONKI


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coat & headgear Blank Swan shoes C'M PARIS

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top, pants & headgear Blank Swan shoes C'M PARIS -118-


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coat & headgear Blank Swan shoes C'M PARIS

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top, pants & headgear Blank Swan shoes C'M PARIS

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shirt dress & vest HeaunZHOU shoes MONKI


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shirt dress & vest HeaunZHOU shoes MONKI


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all clothes HeaunZHOU

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all clothes HeaunZHOU

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shirt dress & vest HeaunZHOU shoes MONKI

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coat HeaunZHOU

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shirt dress & vest HeaunZHOU shoes MONKI

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photography by Shelby Goldstein styling by Mandy Mitchell hair by Hailey Adickes @ Celestine agency make up by Alexis Swain @ Celestine agency model Valentina @ next models

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sweater VintagE pants Valley City shoes Adidas earrings MAU Jewelry necklace (worn as a bracelet) & ring Tom Tom septum & ring Amarilo hair bow Patricia Morales


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top Sandro skirt Valley City rings Amarilo


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sweater Six Crisp Days earrings Tom Tom ring MAU Jewelry fuck rings Amarilo


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top Ashish shorts Six Crisp Days bracelet MAU Jewelry


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jacket NSF top Iro septum ring Amarilo earrings MAU Jewelry hair bow Patricia Morales


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jacket Lakers Vintage top Six Crisp Days skirt Current / Elliot lips pin Emma Holland Denvir earrings & necklace Stylist’s OWN septum & fuck rings Amarilo ring Tom Tom


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tank top Private Party skirt Six Crisp Days earrings & necklace MAU Jewelry septum & fuck rings Amarilo shoes Adidas


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bra Private Party overall The Great bracelet Tom Tom earrings Artelier hair bow Patricia Morales


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shoes Saint Laurent


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photography by Julin Athalia Lee @ The W Portraiture styling by KIM BROOKS designer SCHAI hair by NATASHA NADVORNA make up by Cris Pompa model Emilie Evander -142-

jacket & pants SCHAI shoes Zara


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coat SCHAI      tunic The Ragged Priest        skirt Stylist's own        shoes ZARA

Emilie x Schai -143-


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earrings Stylist's own sweater SCHAI hair wrap ASOS -144-


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shirt Caslon    jacket SCHAI       shorts Bobeau       socks Stylist's own       shoes Zara

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coat SCHAI      tunic The Ragged Priest        skirt Stylist's own        shoes ZARA


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top SCHAI bag Zara

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skirt SCHAI jacket BCBG shoes Qupid -151-


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earrings Stylist's own sweater SCHAI hair wrap ASOS -152-


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THUNDER

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vest & pants tigha shirt stylist's own shoes cesare paciotti

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LIGHTNING

photography by Yannick Schuette styling by Heike Held grooming by Anne-Lena Cox @ 21 Agency using MAC Cosmetics and Davines assistants Zeliha Cambaz & Mudjacka Mvunuku film by Laura Kaczmarek models Dennis Yeboah @ IMM Europe & Boris Dikelo @ Albi X Management

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cropped sweater sopopular shirt soulland pants uniqlo shoes tretorn

sweater sopopular pants herr von eden shoes dr. martens


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hoodie tigha

shirt uniqlo vest sopopular


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sweate

r fun time pants tigha

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day r week e t a e sw frisur pants

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sweater wood wood pants uniqlo shoes adidas

shirt trinitas pants tigha sunglasses vava shoes nike


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cape sopopular shirt cos pants uniqlo


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shirt weekday pants tiger of sweden shoes cesare paciotti

jacket tiger of sweden shirt h&m pants sopopular


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shirt h&m jacket sopopular pants wood wood

suit herr von eden shirt weekday


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coat franziska michael pants wood wood shirt h&m shoes velt


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editorials from JUNE @ Superior online I

Ewa Zylinska & Adam Slowikowski

»THE SPRING TO COME« 

Julia Keltsch

»TRANSLUCID« 

Elliot Baker

»GREY GARDENS«  Daniel Cavanaugh

»SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER«  Suzana Holtgrave

»MARIE« 

Click on the image to view full editorial


JULY 2015

Camilla Camaglia

»BURGUNDY CORE« 

Adam Marc Williams

»SPECTRUM« 

Alexander Zuber

»TRANSLUCENT« 

Gabriela Lindner

»LOST« 

Magda Pietruszka

»LET'S PLAY POP« 


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editorials from JUNE @ Superior online II

Erika Rozsa

»BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR« 

Alexandra Rymsinova

Click on the image to view full editorial

»BOUNDLESS« 

Shahaf Margalit

»RIVERSIDE DR STORY« 

Surreflections

»CORRODED« 

Elena Grishkova

»SCENT OF INNOCENT« 


JULY 2015

Veronika Wurfbaum

»HANG OUT IN STYLE« 

Sebastian Stöhr

»CANDIED PLASTIC«  Shelby Goldstein

»BEESLEY & DALLAS« 

Edward Fernandez

»HIGH TIDE« 

Steven Vella

»FAKING LOVE« 


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The Spring to come photography by Ewa ZyliNska & Adam Słowikowski photography assistant Piotr Szewc production & styling by Marta Małyska hair by Łukasz Jach make up by Monika Kropat Zyzy designers Karolina Wójcik, Natalia StEplewska, Kamila Kos & Joanna Mach retouch by Maria Bieluszko models Gabriela Mach @ 8fi Model Management & Anna Włodarczyk

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top H&M


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necklace Joanna Mach


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lingerie Kamila Kos dress Natalia StEplewska -175-

lingerie & dress

Kamila Kos


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tunic Karolina W贸jcik

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body & lingerie Kamila Kos rings Joanna Mach shoes Centro

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lingerie & vest Kamila Kos ring Joanna Mach

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lingerie Kamila Kos dress Natalia Stęplewska ring Joanna Mach

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dress Natalia StEplewska shoes Mohito necklace & ring Joanna Mach

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clothes Karolina W贸jcik shoes Zara necklace & ring Joanna Mach

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lingerie & vest Kamila Kos glasses stylist’S own

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Magazine for young vanguard fashion & art photography • www.superior-mag.com

MEET CREATIVE PEOPLE

coming out on July 31st 2015

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#AUGUST 2015

SUPERIOR Magazine # July 2015  

Exclusive INTERVIEWS, SUSTAINABLE FASHION and FASHION EDITORIALS from across the world | SUPERIOR is an international MAGAZINE featuring the...

SUPERIOR Magazine # July 2015  

Exclusive INTERVIEWS, SUSTAINABLE FASHION and FASHION EDITORIALS from across the world | SUPERIOR is an international MAGAZINE featuring the...