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Grande Panama Ø 40mm Ruthenium Zifferblatt mit Roségold plattierten Applikationen.

International brands for contemporary jewellery and watches – www.schmuckraeume-berlin.de


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E ditorial

HELLO!

Next round for S U P E R I O R E D I T I O N #2 , the printed S U P E R I O R Magazine. This time you’ll discover a selection comprising T H E C A L M , C O O L & C O L L E C T E D . In nine exclusive editorials, photographers from Europe and the USA present spring/summer fashion in their personal style. Their interpretations range from mysterious to cold as ice to sweet as candy to just beautiful. Or they play pingpong with their photography, like the Italian-Serbian photographer-duo Federico Ferrari & Marija Radosavljevic. We also take you on a tour visiting the Fashion Weeks in New York, Berlin and Tokyo. Since the borders between fashion, design and art are fluent, we have refined our visual approach. Sandy, our Illustrator, has created unique illustrations for a few selected brands and labels; and Jesse, our Art Director, has designed a new typeface exclusively for S U P E R I O R E D I T I O N #2 . Furthermore our interview with the artist Osman Balkan grants space to explain why the absence of failure doesn’t necessarily mean winning. And the statement by A R T I S T S A N O N Y M O U S outlines what it takes to be an artist nowadays. Connecting the best from the various media is one thing that has characterized our publications from the beginning. Hence the printed S U P E R I O R E D I T I O N #2 is complemented by digital content like videos, additional photo-series and text, which are conveniently linked to the respective print content via QR-Codes *. With this combination you get the best from both worlds in one magazine, the sophisticated design of an exclusive print magazine and responsive digital content.

Also view  S U P E R I O R A P P !

* Visit  w w w . i - n i g m a . m o b i , select your mobile device and get the free download link for your QR-Code-Reader. Point your smart-phone or tablet’s camera at the QRCode and it will scan the graphic and show you the connected content.

Enjoy the issue. Tom & Marc

e di t or-i n- c h i e f :

pho t o gr a ph y di r e c t or :

Tom Felber

Marc Huth

a rt di r e c t or :

j u n ior a rt di r e c t or :

i l l u s t r at or :

Jesse Benjamin

Jule Escherhaus

Sandy van Helden


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C O N TE N T

• PING-PONG by

Federico Ferrari & Marija Radosavljevic

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Q & A with

Fabian Altmann

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GRETA by

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Osman Balkan

Lauretta Suter

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ICE & SUN by

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by

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cov er - pho t o by Lauretta Suter model greta bonn @ modelwerk

Christoph Köstlin

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WILD at heart by

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Anita Bresser

deep-dye by

New York, Berlin & Tokyo

IMPRINT

Zona de bandera

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Artists Anonymous

by

Marc Huth

Fashion week feature from

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Claudius Holzmann

glucose couture

COLLECTED

by

Keith Major

Simone Lezzi


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F  

F & M are Federico Ferrari and Marija Radosavljevic — hailing from Italy and Serbia, respectively. Two photographers who, among other things, play abstract visual ping-pong on their mutual blog f--m.tumblr.com. Enjoy their back and forth throughout our magazine. Serve!


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SUPER IOR BLOG S U P E R I O R Magazine on the W E B .


SUPER IOR APP The M O B I L E way to read S U P E R I O R Magazine.


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Frosch ha m mer & Rosenvogel

Jewellery Designers & Artists: Katrin Detmers | feinwerkk | Giulia Frigerio | Theresa Gräfe Silke Knetsch & Christian Streit | Stefanie Kölbel MATERIA PRIMA | Beate Pfefferkorn | Ruth Tomlinson vaporetta berlin | Miriam von Versen | Kirsten Wittstruck

Address: Auguststr. 85 10117 Berlin-Mitte Germany www.froschhammer-rosenvogel.com

Karl Wunderlich | etc.

Opening Hours: Tuesday - Friday 13:00 - 19:00 Saturday 12:00 - 19:00 and on appointment.


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Froschhammer &  ROsenvogel Ga ler ie f ü r Sch muck


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101 and 7th

copper spik e r i ng lillian crowe dou bl e r i ng  &  m e ta l r i ng nicole meng


b y:

Fabian Altmann


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sw i ng cu t - ou t j um per again


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dr e s s factory by erik hart n eck l ace gucci choker gl ov e s guess j ew el ry nicole meng


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dr e s s again l e at h er c a pe kill city j ew el ry nicole meng


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dr e s s factory by erik hart jack e t kill city e a r r i ngs givenchy br acel e t  &  j ew el ry lillian crowe


dr e s s factory by erik hart n eck l ace gucci choker gl ov e s guess j ew el ry nicole meng


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photogr a ph y:

Fabian Altmann st y ling :

Sophia Phonsavahn m a k e -u p:

Maddie North More  P H O T O G R A P H Y !

h air :

Anthony Promije model s :

Maggimae @ Nous

shirt marc jacobs n eck l ace nicole meng br acel e t maria francesca pepe l e at h er pa n t s helmut lang shoe s guess


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THE ABSENCE OF FAILure DOESN ’ T MEAN YOU WIN

argues O S M A N B A L K A N , Berlin-based photographer in this interview with S U P E R I O R Magazine discussing contemporary trends in photography.

Q Hi Osman. Are you an artist or a craftsman? A Definitely an artist. To me that is only a matter of distinction between the two though, like do I provide a service or am I doing my own thing. I used to take it as a compliment, but it’s not anymore actually. It’s a designation, based on how you work and what you work on, if you have a personal creed and so forth. That’s why by now I put ›artist‹ on all my websites, slash photographer. In Germany you are a craftsman first anyway, because of the positive connotation here.

NEW YORK 2012


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Q What defines a good contemporary photographer? A Understanding photography as a means. You want to say something and you have to say something. Sto I tried to write — can’t do it. I tried to sing — can’t do that either. I tried photography — that worked. That is the best way for me to express myself. That is the basis. Additionally you have to discuss current developments and maybe try to disconnect from them. As a contemporary photographer you have to try to be self-sufficient. Do something nobody else can because they are not you. Q Your photographs seem serious, deliberate, never absurd. What is serious photography? A So you have something you want to say, not a sentence nor a word. That’s what I work and grow at. That is serious, not jumping from theme to theme, mode of expression or aesthetics. Doing new things now and then, like ambrotypes from the 19th century that employ 30 second shutter speeds in full daylight — but it has to suit your topic.

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Q You usually portrait people, and it’d be hard to say you don’t know your craft. One of your more recent street-series from New York was overwhelming though. Doesn’t street-photography share a lot with current trends in photography, like the aesthetics of the snapshot? A It’s about choosing the moment, Henry Cartier-Bressons’ ›decisive moment‹, and that is for me to do and me alone. In New York there are whole self-contained groups of people that for example dress like they are from the early eighties, but it doesn’t look like vintage-shopping. I have travelled quite a bit and was never the guy to be like »Sweet, pyramids!« but in New York I was. But portrait- and street-photography go together for me. It’s always about people, and my portraits might be a lot more melancholic, serious stories; but the thought exists in both. Street-photography is a way for me to practice and a possibility to be spontaneous and pushy. Put the camera twenty centimeters in front of somebody’s face. But both disciplines envelop each other.

HADAR PITCHON 2012


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Q In private it all can be fine and dandy, I personally use

one-way-cameras on vacation all the time…

Q Being swamped by images is old news. For a while now

we’ve been confronted with the presence of a vague style in photography, whose pictures usually share only a few common distinctions —like noise, analogue-visuals or high-key flashes — even in the professional field. Is that a legitimate development?

A Definitely not. I would call that garbage, or unimportant background noise rather; forming on Tumblr or Instagram. I mean there are people like Terry Richardson, who have their style and it’s all good, but that’s for Terry to use. Especially here in Berlin there are loads of photographers that just use their 35mm-film-cameras and flash their models on colorfilm and great, we’re done. But that is unimportant to me, a sign that someone has a camera and has not figured out how to express oneself with that — only that is what’s legitimate about it. That you develop your approach further from it. It is hard though because by now you have to work just to keep an overview of what is going on, but deliberately copying someone? That is not only boring — you just shouldn’t do it.

A That’s fine, but when you go out into the open…you know, when you talk with professionals from the photography industry, when they choose a photographer, they first weed out based on the number of likes they have on Facebook, because the client can see what kind of audience you will reach and how big it is. And then it’s on to the uniqueness of the individuals’ style. But because of the sheer mass of the photographers in let’s say Berlin you could go on and get 30 images for free instead of two good ones. On a higher level that is irrelevant though, because if you want to work for magazines it’s not enough to have a room you call your studio where you flash everybody. But the actual topic is the democratization of art. What has changed dramatically is the process of selection, what makes a good photographer. Not long ago photographers had to work hard, not everyone could afford a dark room. That first obstacle made so many people stop and be like »Oh I can’t afford that, well I’ll do something different then.« Today it’s »I have a computer and I have the internet. That’s all I need. In Photoshop I have a tool that replaces development-experience that would have taken years to attain.« But if you take that experience away, that changes everything. Towards mediocrity. Talent might exist, but it has to crystalize through work and failure.


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NEW YORK 2012


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MAX 2012


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Q Doesn’t the democratization also have some positive ef-

Q Because it is easier to express your talent than before,

A I would argue that awareness has become weak. When someone deals with photography and wonders »What is a good photo?« that person might just make that decision based on likes on Facebook. Forming an opinion suffers because of the masses. Let’s compare it to movies: you used to get three movies, that were developed over months because color-grading or editing took so much time. So you can actually compare those three movies to each other. Now you get 25 movies in a month, and even if you had the time to watch them all how are you supposed to analyze and compare them? So after a while you are pretty much like »well, that’s the way it is« and it becomes insignificant. But it can have positive aspects. Bon Iver was able to produce his album on his own in some remote cabin because technology allowed him to. That album would have turned out differently if there were another 20 producers on it. So there are positive sides, but they are rare.

A Not necessarily in a personal or financial sense. If it doesn’t work out you just delete your facebook-page and nobody cares, you disappear anyway. If you don’t work or publicize for two months you are gone, there isn’t really that much you can do about it. It’s important to find out how to handle that. When TIME Magazine declared ›You‹ to be the Person of the Year 2006 they were relatively early in describing the development of everyone being an artist, and that’s what the current development in photography is at its core. So anybody that can buy a camera and use photoshop is an artist — that is not something I would consider positive. To me this ›everyone is an artist‹ is just a global circle jerk, we all dig each other but nobody is actually doing anything. You used to have to work hard to get a publicist and to develop your film, which was expensive. In the sixties you had geometry, in the seventies whatever, and in the eighties you had neon-colors. There were always clear stylistic features for a decade, but since 2000 I just don’t see that anymore. You get this intertwining of things that have been there before but you don’t see anything new, not as a distinct stylistic quality. You don’t have to like it, and maybe you shouldn’t. But you should definitely pay attention to what happens around you and reflect on that. If you can’t see that Nan Goldin already did what you’re doing 30 years ago…that’s boring.

fects? Hasn't awareness for photography increased?

but it also increases the potential cost?

NEW YORK 2012


NEW YORK 2012


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Q In design there is the old life-savior-saying ›form follows

function‹. Is there something like that in photography?

A Yes: ›Quit.‹ [laughs] I mean it’s great that cameras have gotten so affordable and technology is easy to get and everything — there are good sides. But is it good? No. We are becoming unable to determine what’s good anymore, artists have become their own authority. It doesn’t depend on a gallery-owner discovering and exhibiting your work anymore, because you do it yourself. The controlling authority has disappeared. It’s good to overcome authorities, but when a photographer is his or her own authority…I mean you have to know where the authority lies in order to overcome it. That's what’s important. Not the disrespectful way stuff is published on Tumblr or Instagram where they don't even credit photos anymore and when you write ›by Richard Avedon‹ under a link people might not know who that is anymore. If you do fashion-photography you have to know him, not like him, but know him. And work with that.


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Q So what can an aspiring photographer make of all this? A I think it’s really important to be able to say »Nope, I think that’s crap, I don't have to like everything.« Because you don’t, that would be unaspiring and shallow. A lot of people don’t dare to do that anymore. This democratization, a positive development in many fields, is mainly negative in art — because of possible loss of the process of selection and the way of finding your own audience. That’s why there is so much insignificant garbage. You have to be able to see that there are talented people and there are those who are not, maybe you are good at flipping cheeseburgers and that is great. You don’t have to have that one talent and go out and run to casting shows and what not. It’s likely you can’t do it anyway, but that’s ok. Sadly, a lot of people think that they have to be a photographer or a designer, because they want to. But they can’t. And the resulting mediocrity is something the general public gets used to. People are then going to be unable to differentiate between mediocrity and art. We are going to get used to mediocrity.

interview by Jesse Benjamin

NEW YORK 2012


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More  P H O T O G R A P H Y !

NEW YORK 2012


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Porcelain Jeweller y Collection by:

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More  P H O T O G R A P H Y !

photogr a ph y:

Lauretta Suter

model : Greta Bonn @ Modelwerk

h air  &  m a k e - u p :

st y list :

Lena Fleischer @ Style Council

Moe Meier @ Style Council

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Tex ti le Jewel ler y by:

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k ex spit z en ku lt u r


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red+21

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Keith Major

t o ta l l ook JOANNA MASTROIANNI


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t o ta l l ook JOANNA MASTROIANNI


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sh e a r dr e s s JOANNA MASTROIANNI


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photogr a ph y:

Keith Major s t y li ng:

Jay Johnson h air :

Elin Nyberg Glogauer @ Saints Row Agency m a k e -u p:

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AN ART STATEMENT Art is always an A [grade ], otherwise it’s no art; you are either very, very good, or you fail. There are no shades of grey in Art, no ›acceptable‹. Art doesn’t need to be painting, it can be anything. But also, a painting doesn’t have to be Art. It can be technically brilliant, amazingly beautiful and impressive, and still not be Art. To consider painting as art it needs to be more than it was before. In sculpture for example, if one is doing Beuysian-style installations, or puts another toilet basin on a fair — what a waste of material. These artists had a reason to do these things and were taking a risk to show realizations, thoughts; and they had to do a thousand other things to be taken seriously. One can’t do the black square again, it’s done. You have to find something new, and that doesn’t happen once a year, maybe once a decade, more likely once in a lifetime, whatever that means. And if you do, you find out it’s not yourself, the great artist, you are just the person that discovered it and now has to serve it. And if you don’t, you agree to just make beautiful paintings, that are not art, because you still like to paint. Or you don’t and become something different. As painters, we traced back art history, we started with people from our time, our contemporaries, and we went on and on. Every painter has to meet the others and face the old masters in the end. That it was magic, not explicable, unreachable, impossible what these people did is a lie. But just claiming that everyone can paint like Rembrandt is a lie as well. If you start dealing with old master techniques you find a lot of secrets, a lot of tricks; you might find out it‘s not all there is, and not all you want to achieve in painting, and that it is mainly a lot of work and effort... like everything worth doing. But you won’t get around it. Someone said to us recently, that we »made painting cool again«... I really hope that we did...

Pg. 74/75 Blade Runner oil on c a n va s 190×150 c m 2012 Blade Runner a f t er i m age 190×150 c m 2012


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I NTERVI EW &   MORE ART!

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Solo-Exhibition at Kunsthaus Essen i ns ta l l ation »Die Welt braucht das, sonst geht sie unter«

[ t h e wor l d n eeds it, o t h erw ise it g oe s u n der ]

2013


& SUN

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SUN & ICE

photogr a ph y:

st y ling :

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cr eativ e dir ection :

h air  &  m a k e - u p :

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model s :

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p h o t o g r a p h y:

m a k e-u p:

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Anna Czilinsky

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WILD AT HEART

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Sammler Berlin

st y ling :

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mara hoffmann

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mara hoffmann

  NEW YORK Over eight days in February, hundreds of designers revealed their collections during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in New York. The trends in the Fall 2013 collections were a mix of recycled fashions from previous seasons and contemporary design visions. Redolent to seasons past, leather items, fur accents, and a nod to 90’s grunge-wear were runway repeats and seen at A lexander W ang , B C B G , and C harlotte R onson among others. However, we saw minor tweaks to each trend. Lea-ther partnered with unexpected silk and satin fabrics, bir-thed a new trend of fabric blocking, fur was doused in colorful dyes, and the 90’s redolence looked less grunge and more grandiose. Outerwear got a refreshing update with the influence of the cape, notable at runway shows of C atherine M alan drino , D erek L am , and others. Sequins commanded our attention on maxi dresses by R achel Z oe , tank tops at Vera W ang , and tops at C zar by C esar G alindo . Geometric lines and shapes appeared to be the pattern trend of the season, appearing in M ara H offman , M illy , and H elmut L ang ’ s collection among numerous others.This upcoming season sees a sharp and contemporary update.

fashion photographer Semant Jain, Ph.D. article editor Brooke-Ashley Peterson fashion writer Shannon Ryan

FA S H I O N W E E K S P E C I A L N . Y.


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VErA WANG

RACHEL zoE

MILLY

zang toi


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Augustin teboul

FA S H I O N W E E K SPECIAL BERLIN

Augustin teboul

Sebastian ellrich


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photography Robin Kater text Marcel Debong

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  BERLIN Four days and more than fifty designers presented their collections during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin. Most of them showed minimalistic shapes and purist designs — a very characteristic look for Berlin’s fashion. But there were especially two presentations which were outstanding in their setting, their dramatic art and their fashion. Between oversized feather fans and artistic dancers, designer S ebastian E llrich staged a fantastic show in a wonderful setting that inspired the audience to dream and let them immerse themselves in another world — or more precisely, in a surreal circus world. Ellrich is already known for extraordinary presentations. For him it is a direct allusion to his second profession: the theatre. Sebastian Ellrich has been working for years as a costume designer for some of the most prestigious theatres in Germany. But while he creates dramatic robes in theatre, his collections are characterized by clarity, graphic elements and premium materials. The German-French designer duo A ugustin T eboul invited to a journey into a distant, surreal world. The designers called their collection an aimless, intuitive journey through the world. In a cinematic scenery they showed their dreamy and sometimes absurd visions of fashion. With different materials from leather to crochet work, they realize different shades of black. The designers state that they are very inspired by absurd coincidences and that they also like to react intuitively, along with the subconscious.

Sebastian ellrich


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Yasutoshi Ezumi

Atsushi Nakashima


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G.V.G.V.

With Tokyo being one of the latest cities to host the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, many up-and-coming designers presented their collections for autumn and winter in late March. In this respect, especially the mix between Eastern and Western ideas proved to generate some exciting collections. Analogies to traditional kimonos and yukatas were made by H I R O K O K O S H I N O , J O T A R O S A I T O and Y A S U T O S H I E Z U M I who incorporated the typical sleek geometric shapes of Japanese dresses into their own works. On the other hand, brands like B E A U T I F U L P E O P L E and G . V . G . V . adapted Retro-Western styles and put pencil skirts and houndstooth patterns on the runway. A T S U S H I N A K A S H I M A created cool and understated looks with clean cuts and a limited color palette. A D E G R E E F A H R E N H E I T ’ s most surprising piece had to be the black cut-out body combined with a black fur coat inducing a not so subtle sexiness — for the rest of the show the label presented more tasteful items like flowing gowns in darker hues. For next season, Tokyo’s designers proposed an elegant but nonchalant look composed of clear shapes and crisp cuts mixed with black pieces.

photographies Courtesy of Designers’ text Saskia Ibrom

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CONTRIBUTORS photogr a ph er s:

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Fabian Altmann

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Lauretta Suter

Simone Lezzi

Semant Jain, Ph.D. Fashion Photographer

Brooke-Ashley Peterson Article Editor

Shannon Ryan Fashion Writer

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Osman Balkan

Robin Kater Photographer

Marcel Debong

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a rt i s t f e at u r e :

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Artists Anonymous

Saskia Ibrom

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SUPERIOR Magazine #2 - THE CALM, COOL & COLLECTED  

SUPERIOR Magazine #2 comes with a refined visual approach, e.g. with a new exclusive typeface and with 150 pages full of exciting fashion &...

SUPERIOR Magazine #2 - THE CALM, COOL & COLLECTED  

SUPERIOR Magazine #2 comes with a refined visual approach, e.g. with a new exclusive typeface and with 150 pages full of exciting fashion &...