Issuu on Google+

Student Handbook Student Rights and Responsibilities Schenectady County Community College

2013-2014


Accreditation Schenectady County Community College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. Schenectady County Community College does not discriminate on the basis race and color, creed, national origin, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, marital status, familial status, military status, domestic violence victim status, arrest or conviction record and predisposing genetic characteristics. This goal reflects the commitment of Schenectady County Community College to provide affirmative action in all areas of admissions, employment, or in any aspect of the business of the College. SCCC is in full compliance with all applicable rules and regulations pertaining to civil rights for students and employees (e.g., Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990). The College reserves the right at any time to make appropriate changes deemed advisable in the policies and procedures contained in this publication. All information in this publication pertains to the 2013-2014 academic year to the extent that information was available at time of printing. For complete information regarding College policies and academic policies, please refer to the College Catalog, www.sunysccc.edu. Complete information regarding the Student Code of Conduct may be obtained in the Student Affairs Division Office, Elston Hall 222. Please forward your comments or suggestions regarding the Student Handbook, to the Office of Planning Accountability and Advancement, (518) 381-1323. Mission Statement Schenectady County Community College provides quality, comprehensive education for transfer, careers, training and workforce development to a diverse population in a student-centered environment. We are committed to accessible and affordable education. Utilizing innovative practices and contemporary technology, SCCC fosters success through excellence in teaching and support services.

ii


Table of Contents Welcome .................................................... iv Academic Calendar ................................... v Important Campus Phone Numbers ..... vi Finals Week Class and Exam Schedule ... 8 College Students Ought to Know............. 9 Tips for Academic Success...................... 11

STUDENT AFFAIRS DIVISION Admissions.....................................14 Academic Advisement and Retention........................................15 Athletics..........................................19 Career and Employment Services.21 SUNY College and Career Counseling Center .................................. 22

Educational Opportunity Program and Access......................................23 Liberty Partnership Program ................. 24 Smart Scholars ......................................... 24

Financial Aid..................................25 Wellness and Support Services.....31 ADA Transition Services ........................ 31 Counseling ............................................... 32 Student Veterans Office........................... 33

Student Activities...........................34 Student Government Association ......... 34 Student Leadership Opportunities ........ 36

CAMPUS LIFE /ACTIVITIES

Add/Drop ................................................. 40 ANGEL ..................................................... 40 Athletic Team Name/Colors .................. 40 Attendance ............................................... 40 Binnekill .................................................... 40 Campus E-mail Account ........................ 41 Canal Side Wi-Fi Café/ Convience Store........................................ 44 Caps and Gowns ...................................... 42 Casola Dining Room ............................... 42 Certificate of Residence .......................... 42 Change of Name/Address ....................... 42 Child Care Center ................................... 42 Class Rings ............................................... 43 College Hour ............................................ 43 College Store (Book Store) ..................... 43 The Commons ......................................... 45 Computer Help Desk .............................. 45 Crime Statistics Availability Statement (Clery Act) ............................. 45 Gateway Montessori ................................ 45

Graduation Application .......................... 46 Immunization Information..................... 46 International Students............................. 46 Lost and Found ........................................ 46 NYS Voter Registration ........................... 46 New York Times Program ....................... 47 Off-Campus Housing .............................. 47 Parking Hangtags..................................... 47 Publicity Off-Campus ............................. 47 SCCC website ........................................... 48 Student Accident/Sickness Insurance ... 48 Student Activity Fee ................................ 48 Student Business Office .......................... 48 Student Center/Activity Forum ............. 48 Student Photo ID/Library Card ............. 48 Student ID Number.................................. 49 Student Lounge ........................................ 49 SUNY NY Alert Emergency Contact Information System .................. 49

ACADEMIC CODE OF CONDUCT........................ 50-74 ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS, HONORS AND AWARDS

Dean’s List ................................................. 75 Phi Theta Kappa ...................................... 75 President’s List ......................................... 75 Special Awards ......................................... 76 SUNY Chancellor’s Awards .................... 76 Who’s Who ............................................... 76

ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES

Academic Computing Lab ..................... 77 ADA Transition Services ........................ 77 Begley Library .......................................... 78 Accounting/Computer Tutor Lab ......... 78 Language Lab ........................................... 79 Learning Center ....................................... 79 Math Lab ................................................... 79 Testing Center .......................................... 79 Tutor Services ........................................... 79 TRIO Program ......................................... 80

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Alcohol and Substance Abuse................. 81 Assistance Services................................... 82 Basic Emergency Procedures.................. 84 Blue Lights................................................. 84 Bias Crimes Prevention Statement......... 85 Building Evacuation ................................ 86 Campus Notification-Threat of Suicide .87 Campus Notification-Disruption on Campus ..................................................... 88 Child Safety .............................................. 88 Cultural Diversity..................................... 89 Computer Use Policy .............................. 90 Violation of Copyright............................. 90 Crime Statistics Availability ................... 90 Emergency Closing ................................. 90 Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act ........ 91 Food and Beverage .................................. 91 Immunization .......................................... 92 Parking Regulations................................. 92 Poster Policy.............................................. 94 Stalking Policy........................................... 94 Resolving Complaints of Sexual Harassment .................................. 96 Section 504/Title IX- Resolving Complaints of Disability/Gender Discrimination ......................................... 98 Tobacco Free Policy ............................... 100 Student Complaint Procedures, Academic/Administrative .................... 102 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) ..................... 103 Workplace Violence Policy ................... 104 Campus Safety......................................... 105

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT ......................... 110-118

iii


Welcome Students, Welcome to Schenectady County Community College! As a student at SCCC, you are embraced into our SCCC Royals community! This 2013-2014 Schenectady County Community College Student Handbook is designed to provide you with information on programs, services, policies, and campus traditions. The purpose of the Student Handbook is to assist you in achieving the most positive experience while helping your ability to navigate your way through Schenectady County Community College in the years ahead. You will find links to the services the College offers, campus resources that can assist you when questions arise, information about campus life and expectations of you as a citizen of the SCCC Royals community. Your faculty and staff are partners with you in building a strong and vibrant campus community that is enriched by each and every student. I am sure you will find the Royals community to be an interesting place, filled with thoughtful, committed students and employees engaged in the best of academic life. You will see much that may change at SCCC over the next few years with regard to technology, the pipeline to education, and the development of new academic programs that further address the ever-changing needs of our community. You will, however, also find a lot that will remain the same: the challenging academic programs for career and transfer students, the high levels of student involvement in the life of the College, and an indelible sense of community, which are the hallmarks of the SCCC experience that are greatly valued. Your voice is welcomed into the conversation as we work continually to fulfill the educational contract we establish with each of our students. Students are held accountable for the information contained in this Handbook. Please review the Student Handbook, and bookmark this as a resource should you have a question or concern about any practice or policy in the future. I encourage you to take full advantage of every opportunity the SCCC community has to offer you. Best wishes for a rewarding and challenging academic year, Martha J. Asselin, Ph.D. Vice President of Student Affairs Elston Hall, Room 222 asselimj@sunysccc.edu (518) 381-1344 and Steve A. Fragale Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs Elston Hall, Room 222 fragalsa@sunysccc.edu (518) 381-1339 iv


Fall Semester 2013

Spring Semester 2014

Summer Session 2014

Faculty Institute Monday, August 26–Friday, August 30

Faculty Institute Monday, January 13–Friday, January 17

Labor Day–College Closed Monday, September 2

Martin Luther King Day–College Closed Monday, January 20

Summer Session I (8 weeks) June 2 – July 24 Late Registration/Add Monday, June 2

Classes Begin Tuesday, September 3

Classes Begin Tuesday, January 21

Late Registration/Add Tuesday, September 3 Monday, September 9

Late Registration/Add Tuesday, January 21 – Monday, January 27

Late Start Classes Begin Monday, September 16 Spring 2014 Online Registration Begins for Continuing Students Friday, November 1 Spring 2014 (In-Person) Registration Begins for Continuing Students Tuesday, November 12 Spring 2014 General Registration Begins Monday, November 18 Last Day to Withdraw from Fall (full-term) Classes Tuesday, November 19 Thursday, November 28– Saturday, November 30 Thanksgiving Recess Finals Week Monday, December 16– Saturday, December 21 (See Finals Week Class Schedule) Final Grades Due Monday, December 23 College Closed December 25 and January 1 Late Start Classes end January 4

Graduation Applications Due Friday, February 7 Spring Break Monday, March 10 – Saturday, March 15 Summer/Fall 2014 Online Registration Begins for Continuing Students Wednesday, March 26 Summer/Fall 2014 (In-Person) Registration Begins for Continuing Students Tuesday, April 1 Last Day to Withdraw from Spring (full-term) Classes Tuesday, April 15 Summer/Fall 2014 General Registration Begins Wednesday, April 16 Final Week Monday, May 12 – Saturday, May 17 (See Final Week Class Schedule) Final Grades Due Monday, May 19 Thursday, May 22* Commencement Memorial Day – College Closed Monday, May 26

July 28 Grades Due for Summer Session I Summer Session II (3 weeks) June 2 – June 19 Late Registration/Add Monday, June 2 June 23 Grades Due for Summer Session II Summer Session III (3 weeks) June 23 – July 10 Late Registration/Add Monday, June 23 July 14 Grades Due for Summer Session III Summer Session IV (6 weeks) June 23 – July 31 Late Registration/Add Monday, June 23 August 4 Grades Due for Summer Session IV July 4 – College Closed Fall Semester 2014 Tuesday, September 2 Classes Begin Note: For a more complete academic calendar, courses offered in a shortened session or a special time frame, registration periods, refund dates, etc. Visit the SCCC website at www.sunysccc.edu

v


Important Campus Phone Numbers Emergency Phone Numbers:

Campus Security: (518) 381-1308 Fire, Paramedics, Police: Dial 911

Name Academic Advisement and Retention (Director) Academic Advisement Center Academic Computing ADA Transition Services Admissions (Director) Admissions Office Assessment And Institutional Effectiveness Athletics (Director) Business/Industry Training Business, Criminal Justice and Law(Dean) Cafeteria Campus Safety Director Career and Employment Services (Director) Casola Dining Room Child Care Center - YWCA CLEP Information College Store Computer Action Line (Helpdesk) Computer Lab (Elston) Computer Room (CST) Vice President of Academic Affairs Associate VP of Academic Affairs Vice President of Administration Assistant VP of Administration Vice President of Student Affairs Assistant VP of Student Affairs Duplicating Center Educational Opportunity Program and Access (Director) Evening/Weekend Coordinator Employment Skills Training Faculty-Student Association Financial Aid (Director) Financial Aid Office Gateway Montessori Preschool Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism (Dean) Human Resources Immunizations and Records

vi

Ext. 381-1340 381-1277 381-1487 381-1345 381-1366 381-1366 381-1300 381-1356 381-1314 381-1386 381-1330 381-1418 381-1365 381-1391 381-1375 381-1293 377-1606, 1332 381-1111 381-1213 381-1264 381-1374 381-1381 381-1210 381-1211 381-1336 381-1339 381-1379 381-1279 381-1399 381-1293 381-1281 381-1353 381-1352 381-1455 381-1390 381-1331 381-1344

Room Elston 222 Elston 222 Elston 530 Elston 222 Stockade 120 Stockade 120 Elston 124 Elston 222 Stockade 120 Elston 307 Elston 020 Elston 220 Elston 222 Elston 018 Gateway Bldg. Elston 427 Elston 109 Elston 530 Elston 530 CST 200, 201 Elston 302 Elston 304 Elston 501 Elston 502 Elston 222 Elston 222 Elston 005 Elston 222 Elston 303 Elston 427 Elston 222 Elston 221 Elston 221 Gateway Bldg. Elston 308 Elston 126 Elston 222


Name Information Technology Division Labs Archaeology Lab (CST) Biology (Elston) Chemistry/Physics (CST) Computer Lab (Elston) Language Lab (Elston) Math Lab (Elston) Learning Center Liberal Arts (Dean) Liberty Partnerships Program Library Circulation Desk Director’s Office Reference Desk Math, Science, Health and Technology (Dean) Music (Dean) Peer Tutor Services Planning, Marketing and Public Relations President’s Office Registrar (Registration and Records) SCCC Foundation, Inc. Schenectady Smart Scholars ECHS Security Student Activities Student Business Office Student Government Association Senate Office (SGA) Student Trustee Student Veterans Office Testing Center Transfer Counseling Travel and Tourism TRIO Program Wellness and Support Services (Director) Workforce Development

Ext. 381-1222

Room Elston 430

381-1263 CST 100 381-1290 Elston 340, 336 381-1262 CST 202, 203 381-1274 Elston 530 381-1373 Elston 520 381-1435 Elston 518 381-1246 Elston 523 381-1387 Elston 309 381-1364 Elston 222 381-1235 Begley 100 381-1240 Begley 118 381-1239 Begley 100 381-1268 CST 305 381-1231 Begley 175 381-1461 Elston 328c 381-1323 Elston 120 381-1304 Elston 114 381-1348 Elston 212, 215 381-1324 Elston 120 381-1364 381-1308 Elston Lobby 381-1313 Elston 222 381-1346 Elston 219 381-1313 Elston 220h 381-1313 Elston 220h 381-1284 Elston 222 381-1293 Elston 427 381-1365 Elston 222 381-1429 Elston 515 381-1465 Elston 328 381-1282 Elston 222 381-1315 Stockade 120

vii


Final Week Class and Exam Schedule FALL - Monday, December 16 - Saturday, December 21, 2013 SPRING – Monday, May 12 – Saturday, May 17, 2014 The Final Week Class and Exam Schedule (daytime) includes a required two hour class session for each course according to the following schedule. Find the time your class meets in the chart below. Use that number to find the time of your final exam or final class in Chart 2 below. NOTE: Exams for Friday only classes will be held on Friday of exam week Fall and Spring Evening and Saturday final exams are scheduled at regular class times during exam week for a two hour period. Any exception to this schedule must be approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Class time

Mon/Wed/Fri

Class time

Tues/Thurs

7:45 / 8:00 a.m.

1

8:00 / 8:35 a.m.

2

9:00 a.m.

3

9:50 a.m.

4

10:00 a.m.

5

11:35 a.m.

6

12:30 p.m.

7

1:00 p.m.

8

1:55 p.m.

9

2:25 / 2:30 p.m.

10

3:15 p.m.

11

4:10 / 4:30 p.m.

12

4:30 / 4:35 p.m.

13

Chart 2

8

Exam Period

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

8:00-10:00 a.m.

1

2

3

4

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

5

6

7

8

1-3:00 p.m.

9

10

11

Make-up

3:30-5:30 p.m.

13

12

combined exams

Friday Make-up Exams


SCCC is tobacco-free. SCCC is committed to providing its employees, students and visitors with a safe and healthy environment. To that end, the use of tobacco products is not permitted at any time on College grounds and in College facilities. To read the entire SCCC Tobacco-Free Policy, please go to page 100.

9


College Students Ought to Know... 1. BEHAVIORS to be encouraged and avoided: • It is important to read introductions in every book in college. • College is very different from high school. • It is your responsibility to question everything, assume nothing. • Another change from high school is the diversity of students - don’t close yourself off from experiences with any students. • Know how to address instructors. • Be polite and respectful to members of the College community. • Know the importance of the first class meeting - you should be ready. • Attendance in class must be carefully considered. • Being late to class can be embarrassing and unacceptable. • It is important to take part in activities on campus. • You must be willing to ask for help as soon as you think you need it. • About time management - “plan your work, and then work your plan.” • Study groups with fellow students is an excellent way to prepare for exams. • Successful students realize the importance of keeping informed about what is happening in the rest of the world. • Faculty are very serious about their academic disciplines. • Take seriousness seriously - work hard to play hard. • Whatever out-of-class obligations you have (clubs, sports), your first priority is grades. 2. PERSONAL SUGGESTIONS to help make the transition to college life: • The Student Center is a great place to meet but be careful not to spend too much time having fun and hiding from academic studies. • You will be exposed to new experiences that aren’t part of the academic schedule. • Wearing a watch is critical. • You may be asked to show your student I.D. Card (given by the College). • Sometimes you can help yourself to get into a more productive or creative mood (e.g., by changing your environment for studying). • It is important to keep track of your personal belongings (keys, books, wallet) at all times. • Learn about campus services and how they can help you succeed - successful students learn where to find the people and services that can help them succeed. 3. KNOWLEDGE OF SELF - Items to help define the individual • You need to know yourself in a way that perhaps you never realized. • Hopefully, you will have had life experiences that will have challenged your senses and beliefs and required you to think about your own position in life in relation to others. • You ought to have some heroes in your life, people who have qualities or attributes that you admire.

10


4. ABILITIES necessary for college success: • There are certain intellectual abilities that are assumed or even required as you begin college level courses . • Good study skills are vital to college success. • Which course materials to read and how to read them. • Nominative distinction is important - realize the differences between what is and what ought to be. • Education is not entertainment - it can be fun and exciting but it is also hard work. • You can practice taking good notes. • Various kinds of tests will be given in different courses (objective vs. essay, unit tests vs. comprehensive final exams). • Know your college campus - starting the first day, orient yourself, explore. • Almost all of a college education is based on reading. 5. DEFINITIONS AND CUSTOMS in college life: • The degree is what it is all about. • Your advisor actually can be helpful. • Definitions to know: Division Department tuition terms registration catalog full time part time withdrawal intro. course academic probation academic dismissal curve grading audit none credit lab networking used books resume tutoring tutors accreditation

discipline FAFSA course no. credit hour drop/add retention incomplete lecture book buy back transfer Code of Conduct

certificate matriculation advisor pre-requisite GPA syllabus pass/fail plagiarism transcript adjunct graduation

6. STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES - Understanding and respecting your rights and the rights of others • Understand basic legal rights and responsibilities regarding individuals as students and as educators. • Know your Student Code of Conduct - found the in the Student Handbook. • Students are responsible for their own lives. 7. TIME LINE - Understand where you’re going, what you’ll need to get there and when. 8.

WHERE STUDENT AFFAIRS IS LOCATED – Student Affairs offers a wide array of services to assist the student in achieving success both in and out of the classroom environment. Know you can come to the Student Affairs Office, located in room 222 Elston Hall, at any time. Staff is always on hand to provide support, present you with new opportunities, and guide you as you fulfill your goals, dreams and aspirations.

11


Two Simple Tips for Academic Success Prepare for Your Classes Success in the classroom goes beyond just attending classes and reading assigned course materials. Learning to take good notes from lectures, readings, and class discussions is essential. The first step to good note-taking is listening carefully to, not just hearing, the professor’s lecture or class discussion. You will be more in tune with the course content if you sit in the front of the class rather than in the back where you can be easily distracted. Don’t try to record the lecture word for word; instead, write down the main ideas and facts. While anything written on the chalkboards or whiteboards or presented in a PowerPoint should be written in your notes, don’t assume that information not written on the board or in the PowerPoint isn’t important. Always ask questions regarding the course, either during class or your professor’s office hours. Manage Your Time (Plan and Prioritize) The key to being successful inside and outside of the classroom largely depends on how you manage your time. Successful students think carefully about the balance among academic, social, personal, and career-related activities. You are encouraged to use a weekly and/or semester planner to write down your academic schedule, including your due dates for tests, quizzes, and papers from your class syllabus; your extracurricular activities, including any work hours, meetings, and personal appointments; your doctor appointments or advisement appointments; and your weekend and holiday trips. Once you have all this written down, you can begin prioritizing and organizing your time. Don’t overload your schedule with too many activities. Prioritize your schedule with coursework and study time first!

12


Student Affairs

STUDENT AFFAIRS DIVISION (518) 381-1344 Dr. Martha Asselin, Vice President of Student Affairs............................................. asselimj@sunysccc.edu Stephen Fragale, Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs...................................fragalsa@sunysccc.edu Elizabeth Napier, Executive Secretary for Vice President....................................... napiereg@sunysccc.edu The Student Affairs Division provides a diverse offering of programs and services focused on assisting SCCC students in successfully fulfilling their dreams and aspirations. Student Affairs fosters the principle that a student’s total educational experience embraces quality instruction shared with valuable opportunities that facilitate intellectual and personal growth, fulfillment, and a sense of community. Our dedicated Student Affairs staff advances our institutional efforts to maintain a safe, positive, respectful and healthy community. The Student Affairs staff encourages students to explore the different aspects of student life while building their own personal and remarkable SCCC experience. The Student Affairs Division is comprised of seven (7) units: • Admissions • Academic Advisement and Retention • Athletics • Career and Employment Services • Educational Opportunity Programs and Access • Financial Aid • Wellness and Support Services This section of the Handbook is presented according to each of the seven units. Each unit has a specific purpose for health and development of the students at SCCC. The committed Student Affairs staff serves as collaborative partners in pursuit of institutional goals and objectives. With tremendous pride and dedication, these individuals pursue the institutional vision, mission, and values. Student Affairs Vision - The Student Affairs Division creates an unparalleled experience where students embrace learning and diversity to become leaders in the service of the global community. Student Affairs Mission - The Student Affairs Division offers opportunities for engagement, learning and discovery in a diverse environment that optimizes the college experience and prepares students to serve a global community. Student Affairs Values - As members of an inclusive community, value is on: excellence; leadership and service; knowledge; critical thinking; respect for self and others; diversity; exploration and communication. Visit SCCC Student Affairs at www.sunysccc.edu/student/student.htm.

13


Admissions Office

Student Affairs: Admissions

Stockade Building, Room 120 (518) 381-1366 Fax: (518) 836-2799 David Sampson, Director of Admissions................................................................sampsodg@sunysccc.edu Kathleen Dowd Freese, Associate Director of Admissions......................................freesekd@sunysccc.edu David Gonzalez, Director of Athletics.....................................................................gonzaldm@sunysccc.edu Walter Simpkins, Admissions Recruiter.................................................................... simpkiw@sunysccc.edu Sheydaya S. McQueen, Admissions Assistant .............................................................keelsss@sunysccc.edu The Office of Admissions is located on the first floor (Room 120) in the Stockade Building. Tours of the campus are provided at admission events. Check the admissions section of our website for a listing of dates. You may also take a virtual walking tour found on the SCCC website at www.sunysccc.edu/news/ tour.html. The Admissions Office is a starting point for all new degree and certificate-seeking students. The Office processes applications for admission, accepts qualified applicants, and assists students in signing up for new student registration programs. Our professional staff is continually traveling, visiting high schools, human service agencies, fairs, and festivals to promote SCCC, its quality programs and dynamic campus life.

14


Elston Hall, Room 222 (518) 381-1277 Michael Mastrella, Director of Academic Advisement and Retention................mastremj@sunysccc.edu Matthew Beebe, Academic Advisor..........................................................................beebemw@sunysccc.edu Heidi Borofsky, Academic Advisor.............................................................................borofshl@sunysccc.edu Mitzi Espinola, Academic Advisor........................................................................... espinoma@sunysccc.edu Amy Hebbard, Part-time Academic Advisor............................................................ hebbaral@sunysccc.edu Jasmine Pinn, Part-time Academic Advisor.................................................................pinnjv@sunysccc.edu Karyn Raney, Part-time Academic Advisor................................................................. raneyk@sunysccc.edu Evelyn Rybaltowski, Part-time Academic Advisor..................................................... rybalte@sunysccc.edu Patrick Smith, Part-time Academic Advisor..............................................................smithjh@sunysccc.edu Justinn Warshawski, Part-time Academic Advisor..................................................warschjn@sunysccc.edu Academic Advisement is integral to student success. Professional academic advisors help students evaluate their educational plans, answer questions about exploring major fields, provide general information about academic policies and procedures, and refer students to appropriate resources. Services are designed to assist students in achieving academic and personal success through informed decisionmaking and academic planning. The Value of Academic Advisement Center The Academic Advisement Center serves as an academic information center for all students attending SCCC, as well as all prospective students needing advising assistance. Advising assistance includes academic/program planning, course scheduling, program changes, withdrawals and referral to appropriate office/individual when necessary. Advising is available in-person on a walk-in basis, through Skype, Ask the Advisor link on the advising homepage and the contact us link on the SCCC website. When meeting with your advisor, come to the meeting prepared. It is best to bring to the meeting: your curriculum worksheet, degree audit and an outline version of your class schedule. Also, to be most successful, know the policies and procedures and be knowledgeable about the various services available on campus. Please remember that the advisor/advisee relationship is one based upon a shared responsibility. • Also…advising is a process in which advisor and advisee enter a dynamic relationship. • Lastly…you are the one individual who will most impact your success, so take an active role in your education and the academic advising process. For more information visit us at www.sunysccc.edu/student/Advisement/advisementhome.htm

15

Student Affairs: Academic Advisement and Retention

Academic Advisement and Retention


Student Affairs: Academic Advisement and Retention

Introduction to Academic Advising at SCCC Academic advising is a structured service on college campuses that guarantees a student interaction with a concerned representative of the institution. It may be viewed as the hub of the wheel, with connecting links to all of the other support services available to students. As a result, it is a critical component of the educational services provided for students and is a key factor in helping students adjust to college life and become integrated into the academic and social systems of our institutions. That integration is directly linked to student success, satisfaction and persistence. The contact with the advisor is a vital step in the process for a successful transition to college. It is important for the advisor to be sure the student is in an appropriate degree program based on the background and interests of the student. It is also helpful to discuss financial aid, immunization and certificate of residency matters. Academic advisement is provided for full-time matriculated students by faculty and professional staff within the academic departments. Part-time students are advised through the Academic Advisement Center. Following initial matriculation (admissions, assessment, advisement, registration), each fulltime student is assigned a member of the faculty as academic advisor. Advisor assignments are made in accordance with the student’s program of study and are intended to be continuous throughout the student’s college career, unless a program change dictates modification of the assignment. Advising services are also provided on a continuous basis throughout the academic year to part-time, new, and non-matriculated students, and as a supplement to individual advisor assignments, by professional staff in the Advisement Center, located in E222. Academic advising is more than scheduling and registration. To be effective, it must be viewed as a developmental process, one that considers a student’s life, career and educational plans. The following steps in O’Banion’s developmental advising model serve as a guide to the advisement session: 1. Exploration of life goals (values) 2. Exploration of educational/career goals 3. Selection of an educational program 4. Selection of courses 5. Scheduling of classes Academic advising is a process in which advisor and advisee enter a dynamic relationship respectful of the student’s concerns. Both the advisor and advisee have certain responsibilities that, when followed, will result in a positive experience for both individuals involved. It is the responsibility of the advisor to: 1. Guide students as an academic mentor. 2. Help students define and develop realistic educational goals. 3. Assist students in defining a program of study consistent with abilities and interests. 4. Monitor students = academic progress. 5. Inform students of academic resources beyond the classroom. 6. Provide accurate information about college policies, procedures and requirements. 7. Facilitate student planning in career options beyond college graduation. 8. Discuss student’s time constraints and other responsibilities. 16


Although students have the ultimate responsibility for satisfying institutional requirements, the advisor also has a responsibility to be the best advisor possible. Advisors should be accessible, provide specific and accurate information, and have a personal and caring relationship with their advisee’s. An effective advisor will know when to refer the student to other professional staff for needs such as personal, transfer or career counseling. The importance of quality Academic Advisement are many, to include: being vital to a student’s longterm success, helping guide students through their educational journey, helping to ensure that educational and career goals are being met, helping students adjust to a new environment, and clarifying expectations. Great Tips for Creating a Semester Class Schedule that Best Meets Your Needs:

• Register during Advance Registration – save seats in the classes you want with no bill payment required until later in the semester. • Be aware that courses are offered during the days, evenings, Saturdays, and online. • Balance your schedule with other obligations in mind, such as family and work. • Don’t overload your schedule – take 12 credits instead of 15 if you are questioning how much time you will have for coursework. • Be prepared for more challenging academic work than you had in high school. • Don’t register for early morning classes if you are not a morning person. The same applies for evening courses. • Take courses in the correct sequence. Be sure to complete any pre-requisites (courses that prepare you for a higher level course) if applicable. • Know the course requirements for your program of study. Enroll in classes that meet your degree requirements. The information is available in the College Catalog, on the SCCC website, and on individual curriculum worksheets located outside of Elston Hall, Room 223. See your academic advisor. • If transfer to a four-year institution is a possibility, be sure to register for courses that will transfer to the institution you have in mind. If you are not sure about the institution, connect with the transfer Counselor (Elston Hall, Room 222) soon.

When To See Your Academic Advisor

1. To discuss problems which affect academic performance. 2. To discuss academic progress. 17

Student Affairs: Academic Advisement and Retention

It is the responsibility of the advisee to: 1. Take responsibility for educational plans while working with an advisor. 2. Clarify personal interests, abilities, values, and goals. 3. Initiate contacts with an advisor when needs and issues arise. 4. Be familiar with college policies, procedures and requirements. 5. Explore career options beyond graduation.


Student Affairs: Academic Advisement and Retention

3. To withdraw from a course or courses. 4. To explore change of major. 5. To explore off-campus learning opportunities (internships, study abroad). 6. To select courses for the upcoming semester.

How To Contact Your Academic Advisor 1. Be familiar with your advisor’s office hours and schedule. 2. Whenever possible, call to make an appointment instead of dropping by without one. 3. If it is necessary to drop by without an appointment, try to do so at a time when your advisor has posted office hours, and allow plenty of time in case you have to wait to see your advisor. 4. Because the first and last two weeks of each semester are the busiest for students and faculty, schedule longer conferences during the middle portion of the semester. 5. You may obtain a “Request for Change in Advisor” form from the Registrar’s Office if you need to change advisors. Academic Advisement: Student Responsibilities Know College Policies And Procedures Students should own and be familiar with the College Catalog and their SCCC Student Handbook. Both contain necessary policies and procedures, as well as requirements and deadlines. Prepare For Academic Advising Conferences Students are expected to obtain class schedules, review possible course options and prepare a trial schedule before meeting with an advisor. Students are expected to schedule and keep advising appointments. Students should also contact advisors with any concerns about academic progress in any class during the course of a semester. Process All Necessary Paperwork Students must obtain all necessary forms and signatures for dropping and adding classes. It is also the student’s responsibility to apply for graduation. Be Knowledgeable About Financial Aid Regulations Students receiving financial aid must be knowledgeable about the consequences of no longer attending or withdrawing from classes in which they are enrolled. Accept Responsibility For Decisions Students are actively responsible for their college experience. Although an advisor may assist in providing advice, encouragement, or support, ultimately each decision rests with the student. As a result, students must accept the consequences of these decisions. Clarify Personal Values And Goals Just as it is a student’s responsibility to make decisions, it is also the student who must clarify personal values and academic and career goals. When students make these decisions, they empower themselves and prepare for post-graduation lives.

18


Elston Hall, Room 222 (518) 381-1356 David Gonzalez, Director of Athletics.....................................................................gonzaldm@sunysccc.edu The Athletics Office seeks to foster an environment that will provide student athletes and other member of the campus community with the opportunity to develop their full potential academically, athletically and physically. Athletics strives to teach such lifelong skills such as discipline, teamwork, sportsmanship, self-control, cooperation, hard work, playing by the rules and respect for authority through athletic competition and recreational activity. Intercollegiate athletics is open to all students meeting the eligibility requirements of the National Junior College of Athletics Association (NJCAA), the College and the Athletics Office. SCCC has varsity teams in basketball (men and women), baseball (men), bowling (men and women) and crew (women). Cheer for the SCCC Royals at all events. Intercollegiate athletics is an integral part of the College’s extracurricular activities. Athletics are open to all students who meet the basic eligibility requirements of the National Junior College of Athletics Association (NJCAA), the College and the SCCC Athletic Office. SCCC is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association, Region III and the Mountain Valley Conference. Competing teams come from New York, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire and Connecticut. For student athletes to maintain high quality academic work, regular attendance at class is required. Absence from class is considered a serious matter. Student athletes are encouraged to complete all assignments and other requirements of each course. If an absence is anticipated due to an athletic event, the student has the responsibility of informing the instructor well in advance of the event. All student athletes must work with their instructors to understand how an absence(s) due to an athletic game will count in the overall grading of each course. All athletes are expected to demonstrate effort in their classes and to conduct themselves in an appropriate manner (both on and off campus). The College has varsity teams in:

• Basketball (Men and Women) • Bowling (Men and Women)

• Crew (Women) • Baseball (Men)

Announcements for tryouts for each team are issued for each sport. For more specific information on each of the SCCC teams, check out the College’s website: www.sunysccc.edu/student/athletics.htm. SCCC Royals Athletic Calendar Visit the SCCC website at www.sunysccc.edu for up-to-date calendars and game schedules. Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act The Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act requires co-educational institutions of postsecondary education that participate in a Title IV, federal student financial assistance program, and have an intercollegiate athletic program, to prepare an annual report to the U.S. Department of Education on athletic participation, staffing, and revenues and expenses, by men’s and women’s teams. The Department will use this information when preparing required reports on gender equity in intercollegiate athletics. 19

Student Affairs: Athletics

Athletics


Student Affairs: Athletics

Schenectady County Community College is in compliance with the Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act. Annually the College reports information about all our intercollegiate athletic programs. Equity in athletics data is now available on the Web at: http://ope.ed.gov/athletics. This site also provides data from thousands of colleges and universities in a convenient searchable format so as to provide for comparisons to be made.

20


Elston Hall, Room 221 (518) 381-1365 Robert Frederick, Director of Career and Employment Services........................... frederrg@sunysccc.edu Dawn Jones, Nontraditional Career Advisor..............................................................jonesda@sunysccc.edu Education alone does not guarantee employment. Employers seek to hire people who have invested time and energy in perfecting their skills, achieving goals, and working successfully with others. Career and Employment Services, located in the Opportunity Zone, helps students navigate the world of work by establishing community partnerships that offer strategies to master talents, behaviors and knowledge. Internships, volunteer opportunities, seasonal work and professional associations are opportunities to further growth as one becomes an expert in his/her field of study. Education by itself, does not guarantee employment. Employers want to hire people who have invested time and energy in honing their skills, accomplishing goals, and working successfully with others in environments that reflect similar working conditions. That’s why our staff has dedicated themselves to helping students navigate the world of work by establishing community partnerships that offer students a chance to master their unique talents, behaviors, and knowledge while at the same time practicing these attributes in settings related to their ultimate goal. Many of our students are hired after successfully participating in internships, volunteer and seasonal work and professional associations. The exploration of work environments is very important when making decisions on future employment or educational attainment. Let us help you become an expert in your field of study by starting early and creating a strategy for success. Career and Employment Services focuses on the following activities: • Coaching students to identify, appreciate, and improve upon their natural strengths • Teaching students how to establish a vision, think “out-of-the-box,” set daily habits, and develop a strategy to achieve their goals • Teaching students how to use research skills and resources that link them to opportunities • Teaching students how to communicate their value to others • Coordinating networking events, experiential learning, and online resources that bring together students, alumni, employers and faculty for the purpose of answering important questions and identifying opportunities related to their field of study Areas of Office Expertise:

Alumni/Employer Relations Internships and Jobs Researching Employers Job Search Strategies Career Event Coordination

Career Exploration Online Resources Business Communications Résumés and Cover Letters Professional Presentations

Career Resources Professional Networking Industry and Employment Data Interviewing Skills Community Partnerships

21

Student Affairs: Career and Employment Services

Career and Employment Services


Student Affairs: Career and Employment Services

Online Services for Students:

• Office website: www.sunysccc.edu/ces • Register to use the College Central Network (CCN) Career Management System. • Gain access to employers, jobs, internships and career information. • Review Career Events and Recruiting Opportunities on-campus and in the Capital Region.

SUNY College and Career Counseling Center (SUNYCCCC) (518) 631-2257 Dr. DeShawn McGarrity, Director....................................... mcgarrdn@sunysccc.edu................... 631-2262 Raphael Tucker, Assistant Director...................................... tuckerrj@sunysccc.edu....................... 631-2261 The SUNY College and Career Counseling Center provides career and educational counseling services to Capital District residents 16 years or older interested in making decisions about their educational and career goals. The center provides referral and placement services to various educational and employment training resources in the Capital District and elsewhere in New York State. The Center offer technical assistance to those persons interested in applying for college admissions, securing financial aid and pursuing employment or training opportunities. The SUNY College and Career Counseling Center is located on the ground floor of Center City, downtown Schenectady. The hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. Services available include: career/life counseling, educational counseling, financial aid counseling, self-assesments, resume assistance, employment and educational referrals, enrichement workshops, computer lab support and community referrals.

22


Elston Hall, Room 221 (518) 381-1279 Angela West-Davis...........................................................................................................westaa@sunysccc.edu Director of Educational Opportunity Programs and Access Lisa Clarke, Educational Specialist..............................................................................clarkelg@sunysccc.edu The Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) and Access Office is located within the Opportunity Zone in Student Affairs. EOP assists talented students whose educational and economic circumstances present a challenge to goal achievement by opening the door to a lifetime of career options, professional advancement and personal enrichment. EOP serves students who have the potential and motivation for academic success by providing aid and academic support services. The Office creates a welcoming, inclusive and supportive environment based on knowledge, acceptance and respect for all. The office teaches and foster understanding and appreciation of different ways of life shared by groups of people through intellectual discourse, leadership and social justice. The SCCC Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) provides academic and financial assistance to disadvantaged New York State residents who show promise for mastering college level work, given assistance. Determination of eligibility is made when a student is first accepted to the College as a freshman. Apply for EOP through the Financial Aid Office, Elston Hall, Room 221 or visit us online at www. sunysccc.edu/adm-fin/admeop.htm. • Academic assistance, tutoring • Mandatory EOP meetings and and support services workshops • Counseling referrals • Monitoring student progress • EOP Orientations • Stipend disbursement • Referral and assistance services The EOP and Access Office supports the belief that the strength of any organization lies in its diversity. It is important to create and maintain a welcoming, supportive environment and to promote acceptance and appreciation for difference. We are committed to making SCCC a campus community that promotes a culture of inclusion in which all feel valued, respected and supported to perform to their full potential.

• Educational and cultural programming • Support services • Workshops and presentations • Student outreach and retention • Admissions and recruitment programs

• • • •

Financial resources Community liaison Referral and assistance Diversity awareness programming

23

Student Affairs: Educational Opportunity Program and Access

Educational Opportunity Program and Access


Student Affairs: Educational Opportunity Program and Access

Liberty Partnerships Program Elston Hall, Room 222 (518) 381-1364 Richard Smith, Director Shannon Popp, Parent Engagement and Program Assessment Liaison The Liberty Partnerships Program is founded on the belief that students will achieve academic success and lead productive lives as adults if they are provided with support, encouragement, information and effective interventions. This program is designed to offer these opportunities to students in fifth through 12th grades in the Schenectady City School District who are at-risk of dropping out of school for many reasons, including unsatisfactory academic performance, inconsistent school attendance and/ or behavioral problems.

Schenectady Smart Scholars Early College High School Schenectady High School 1445 The Plaza, Schenectady, NY 12308 (518) 370-8162 Fax: (518) 881-3923 Valerie Palmieri-Smith, Lead Teacher Schenectady Smart Scholar Early College High School (Schenectady SSECHS) is a partnership among the State University of New York (SUNY), Schenectady County Community College (SCCC) and Schenectady High School (SHS) with the intent to establish a collaborative learning and teaching environment for about 120 ninth grade students beginning September 2010. All partners are committed to facilitating positive, transformational changes that provides for a more successful and wide reaching program for a target student population that is traditionally underrepresented in college. Students enrolled in Smart Scholars will graduate high school with a Regents Diploma and will successfully transition into college with at least 20 credit hours earned and transferred.

24


Elston Hall, Room 222 (518) 381-1352 Brian McGarvey, Director of Financial Aid ............................................................mcgarvbf@sunysccc.edu Cynthia Russell, Associate Director of Financial Aid .............................................. russelca@sunysccc.edu Cynthia Astemborski-Decker, Financial Aid Advisor .............................................astembc@sunysccc.edu The primary purpose of this office is to provide financial assistance within available resources to those students who, without such assistance, would be unable to attend SCCC. Dedicated staff works with students to develop an understanding of financial aid and navigate through the application process. The Office of Financial Aid provides:

• Assistance in applying for all Federal and State grants and scholarships

• General financial aid advisement

• Assistance with financial aid applications

• Assistance with special circumstances

• Tuition or book deferrals

• Emergency loans

• Assistance with student loan applications

• Student Work-study Connections

25

Student Affairs: Financial Aid

Financial Aid Office


Fall 2013 Financial Aid Disbursement Schedule I. Eligible students with a remaining financial aid balance after tuition and fees have been paid will receive credit at the College Store up to the following amounts:

Student Affairs: Financial Aid

Full-Time Students $800.00 Three Quarter Time Students $600.00 Half-Time Students $400.00 Less than Half-Time Students (Pell Only) $200.00

If your financial aid is complete and your tuition bill is processed by Friday 8/16/13, you may be eligible for early bookstore credit beginning on Monday 8/19/13.

**All Financial Aid Credit at The College Store Expires on Friday 9/20/13**

II. All federal financial aid grant and student loan funds remaining after tuition, fees and books have been credited will be disbursed according to the following schedule. THE COLLEGE MAILS ALL REFUND CHECKS TO THE STUDENT’S HOME ADDRESS. IT IS THE STUDENT’S RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE THAT THEIR CORRECT MAILING ADDRESS IS ON FILE IN THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE (ELSTON 212).

Check Mail Date Tuesday 10/15/13

Financial Aid Award Cutoff Date Tuesday 10/1/13 4:00 p.m.

Any student whose federal financial aid grants were awarded or loan promissory notes signed after the cutoff date (10/1/13) will have his/her disbursement mailed according to the Student Accounts Office schedule.

Student loans for the Fall 2013 semester only are required to be split into two disbursements. The Fall 2013 second disbursement will be 10/29/13.

III. IMPORTANT: Any student who drops or withdraws or stops attending his/her classes, may not be eligible for any disbursements of State or Federal financial aid, and may be liable to repay all or part of the financial aid funds that he/she receives. It is the student’s responsibility to determine the potential effect on his/her financial aid eligibility before he/she drops or withdraws from courses.

Any students who are decertified in their classes for non-attendance or receives mid-term warnings of F or FX may be required to document that they are attending classes, and making progress, before being eligible for future disbursements.

IV. Students who are eligible for an EOP stipend will have their EOP checks distributed by the Director of Educational Opportunity Programs and Access on the following dates:

Monday 10/28/13

and

Monday 11/25/13

V. Students who are eligible for a scholarship refund will have their checks mailed on Monday 10/28/13.

26


Student Affairs: Financial Aid

Spring 2014 Financial Aid Disbursement Schedule I. Eligible students with a remaining financial aid balance after tuition and fees have been paid will receive credit at the College Store up to the following amounts:

Full-Time Students $800.00 Three Quarter Time Students $600.00 Half-Time Students $400.00 Less than Half-Time Students (Pell Only) $200.00

If your financial aid is complete and your tuition bill is processed by Friday 1/3/14, you may be eligible for early bookstore credit beginning on Monday 1/6/14.

**All Financial Aid Credit at The College Store Expires On Friday 2/7/14**

II. All federal financial aid grant and student loan funds remaining after tuition, fees and books have been credited will be disbursed according to the following schedule. THE COLLEGE MAILS ALL REFUND CHECKS TO THE STUDENT’S HOME ADDRESS. IT IS THE STUDENT’S RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE THAT THEIR CORRECT MAILING ADDRESS IS ON FILE IN THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE (ELSTON 212).

Check Mail Date Monday 3/3/14

Financial Aid Award Cutoff Date Monday 2/17/14 4:00 p.m.

Any student whose federal financial aid grants were awarded or loan promissory notes signed after the cutoff date (Monday 2/17/14) will have his/her disbursement mailed according to the Student Accounts Office schedule.

Student loans for the Spring 2014 semester only are required to be split into two disbursements. The Spring 2014 second disbursement will be 3/31/14.

III. IMPORTANT: Any student who drops or withdraws, or stops attending his/her classes, may not be eligible for any disbursements of State or Federal financial aid, and may be liable to repay all or part of the financial aid funds that he/she receives. It is the student’s responsibility to determine the potential effect on his/her financial aid eligibility before he/she drops or withdraws from courses.

Any students who are decertified in their classes for non-attendance or receives mid-term warnings of F or FX may be required to document that they are attending classes, and making progress, before being eligible for future disbursements.

IV. Students who are eligible for an EOP stipend will have their EOP checks distributed by the Director of Educational Opportunity Programs and Access on the following dates:

Monday 3/17/14

and

Monday 4/14/14

V. Students who are eligible for a scholarship refund will have their checks mailed on Monday 3/17/14.

27


Financial Literacy College is a time of new found freedom for many students. However, that can spell trouble if that freedom applies to personal finances too. Students need to understand basic money management skills such as living within a budget and handling credit and debt. A solid financial foundation can lead to a lifetime of financial success.

Student Affairs: Financial Aid

Know The Facts To Aid In Your Financial Literacy: •

American children, teens and young adults (ages 8-21) earned about $211 billion in 2003. This group spends at a rate of approximately $172 billion per year and is saving at a rate of $38 billion per year. Harris Interactive, Generation Y Earns $211 Billion and Spends $172 Billion Annually, September 3, 2003

On average, 65.5% of students who participated in a 2004 Jump$tart Coalition survey on Personal Financial Literacy failed the exam! Jump$tart Coalition, Personal Financial Survey, April, 2004

The average undergraduate student loan debt was $18,900 in 2003. Up 66% from 1997. Nellie Mae, College on Credit: How Borrowers Perceive their Education Debt Results of the 2002 National Student Loan Survey, February 6, 2003

55% of college students acquire their first credit card during the first year of college, and 83% of college students have at least one credit card. 45% of college students are in credit card debt, with the average debt over $3,000. Senator Akaka, Credit Card Minimum Payment Warning Act, May 21, 2004

Bankruptcy filings for those in the 18 to 25 age bracket numbered 150,000 in 2000. A ten-fold increase in just five years. Testimony of Dara Duguay, Executive Director Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy, for the Senate Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Financial Management, the Budget, and International Security, March 30, 2004

Consumer debt is now equal to 110% of disposable income. Ten years ago it was 85%, and 20 years ago, it was 65%. Daily Bankruptcy News as excerpted from Senator Akaka, Credit Card Minimum Payment Warning Act, May 21, 2004

For more information on financial literacy, visit the 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy website for a Net Price College Calculator and Basic Financial Calculator for College Students at http:// www.360financialliteracy.org/Life-Stages/College-Students.

28


This table illustrates SUNY’s minimum standards for pursuit of program and satisfactory progress for purposes of determining eligibility for New York State financial aid. To be eligible for state awards, both standards must be satisfied. In addition, the student must be matriculated and in good academic standing as defined by the College, and the student must be taking a minimum of 12 credits per semester in courses that satisfy requirements in the student’s academic program. If a student is repeating a course that was previously completed with a passing grade, that course cannot be counted for purposes of New York State awards. 1 - TAP Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress for 2011-12. Applies to nonremedial Associates Degree students who first received TAP or other NYS Aid in 2010-11 and thereafter. Before Being Certified for This Semester Payment

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

1. For Pursuit of a Program of Study A student must have completed this number of credit hours in the preceding semester*

0

6

6

9

9

12

2. For Satisfactory Progress A student must have earned at least this many credit hours

0

6

15

27

39

51

With at least this grade point average (G.P.A.)

0

1.3

1.5

1.8

2.0

2.0

2 - TAP Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress for Associates Degree Students first receiving TAP in 2007-08 through and including 2009-10 and remedial students first receiving TAP or other NYS Aid in 2007-08 and thereafter** * A grade of “W” or “FX” does not constitute credit completed. Before Being Certified for This Semester Payment

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

1. For Pursuit of a Program of Study A student must have completed this number of credit hours in the preceding semester*

0

6

6

9

9

12

2. For Satisfactory Progress A student must have earned at least this many credit hours

0

3

9

18

30

45

With at least this grade point average (G.P.A.)

0

0.5

0.75

1.3

2.0

2.0

The requirements above are for full time students and would be prorated for part time students eligible for APTS or part time TAP.

29

Student Affairs: Financial Aid

Minimum Academic Eligibility Standards for NYS TAP Awards:


Student Affairs: Financial Aid

* Under certain circumstances, students may qualify for the TAP Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress 2 if they meet the criteria to be considered a “remedial student”. A “remedial student” is defined as a student: (a) whose scores on a recognized college placement exam or nationally recognized standardized exam indicated the need for remediation for at least two semesters, as certified by the College and approved by the State Education Department (SED); or (b) who was enrolled in at least six semester hours of non-credit remedial courses, as approved by SED, in the first term they received a TAP award; or (c) who is or was enrolled in an opportunity program (EOP, HEOP, SEEK). Students who meet the definition of “remedial student” will need to meet the academic standards in chart 2.

Do you receive TAP? Important Notes for TAP (Tuition Assistance Program) Recipients In addition to meeting the financial eligibility requirements for TAP, you must meet the following academic criteria: $

You must be taking a minimum of 12 credits required for your program of study. If you are taking an elective and that requirement has already been met with another course, it will not count.

$

You must be taking a minimum of 12 credits for which you have not already earned credit with a grade of D- or better.

NOTE: You may repeat a course to improve the grade if you register for more than 15 credits, but you must have at least 12 credits that are not repeated.

$

You must continue to make academic progress per the chart in the Financial Aid section of the SCCC College Catalog.

Failure To Follow These Guidelines May Result In Losing Your Tap Eligibility Federal Financial Aid Recipients Please Be Advised The U.S. Department of Education has mandated a refund policy for federal financial aid programs that will impact students for the 2013-2014 semesters. Students who receive a Pell Grant or a Student Loan need to be aware that if they withdraw from or stop attending ALL of their classes prior to the 60% point in the semester (before Thursday 11/7/2013 for Fall and Wednesday 4/2/2014 for Spring) they may be required to repay a portion of the federal grants or loans that they received. Students who are still attending at least one class after these dates will not be affected by this regulation. (Late starting classes have different dates.) If the College needs to refund federal financial aid that was used to pay tuition, fees and books to the U.S. Dept. of Education, the student will be responsible to pay all College charges. The actual percentage that a student will owe will depend upon the last date of class attendance. EXAMPLE: If a student stops attending all classes at the 30% point of the semester, 70% of all federal financial aid must be returned to the U.S. Dept. of Education. If the student=s bill for tuition, fees and books of $1,800 was paid by federal grants or loans, that student would now owe the College $1,260. It is extremely important for students to realize the potential financial impact of withdrawing from all classes before they stop attending!

30


Elston Hall, Room 222 (518) 381-1282 Dr. Ellen Wertlieb, Director for Wellness and Support Services............................. wertliec@sunysccc.edu

ADA Transition Services Elston Hall, Room 222 (518) 381-1345 Susanna Fenlon, Coordinator of ADA Transition Services..................................... fenlonsj@sunysccc.edu ADA Transition Services provides a variety of resources and services for students with permanent and/ or temporary disabilities. Collaborative efforts ensure programs and opportunities are accessible. Those individuals who would benefit from accommodations due to their disabilities must meet with the ADA Transition Coordinator. Accommodations are personalized for each student. Some students, for example, may perform best if they take exams in a distraction-reduced location; others might benefit if educationally relevant information about their disability is communicated to their instructors, or others may require some form of assistance during a fire drill or other times of evacuation. The Office of ADA Transition Services coordinates resources and accommodations on the SCCC campus for students with permanent and/or temporary disabilities. The academic accommodations that are developed are designed in a collaborative manner with students so as to remove barriers and level the academic playing field. Official accommodation notifications are sent to each student’s professors through the ADA Transition Services Office every semester upon the request of the student. Students may visit the Student Affairs Office (Elston 222) Monday through Friday between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. to get additional information about the ADA Transition Services Office. Students are invited to stop by the office to get further information. How To Obtain Academic Accommodations: Students who would like to request academic accommodations should contact the Office of ADA Transition Services and schedule an appointment. It should be noted that accommodations that are provided at previous schools are not automatically transferred to SCCC since guidelines vary from institution to institution. It is best to send documentation describing the disability and its impact in the school setting to the Office of ADA Transition Services prior to scheduling a meeting about accommodations. Those individuals who are enrolling in classes at SCCC immediately after high school are asked to forward their School Psychologist’s Report along with their IEP (Individualized Education Program). Those who are entering college as returning adults should obtain disability documentation from their health care provider (e.g., psychologist, psychiatrist, neurologist, orthopedist, ophthalmologist, audiologist, or other diagnosing health care provider as appropriate to the disability). The Disability Certification Packet available in the Student Affairs Office (Elston Hall 222) provides a guideline regarding the type of information to be included in the documentation. Students should ask their health care provider to complete the Packet or provide a report that includes the key pieces of information outlined in 31

Student Affairs: Wellness and Support Services

Wellness and Support Services


Student Affairs: Wellness and Support Services

the Disability Certification Packet. The disability documentation that each student submits provides an important foundation from which to begin discussion about the kinds of resources and accommodations that might be appropriate. However, these reports give only one small part of the picture. Joint discussion and creative problem solving are emphasized when accommodations are generated. Students are expected to take the lead role in discussion about accommodations and their disability; but, when appropriate, they can invite additional interested parties into the conversation. Where To Submit Disability Documentation: Office of ADA Transition Services Elston Hall, Room 222 Schenectady County Community College 78 Washington Avenue Schenectady, NY 12305 Fax: (518) 381-1477 When To Register With ADA Transition Services: Students are encouraged to register for accommodations with the Office of ADA Transition Services upon admission to SCCC. However, sometimes disability-related barriers are not discovered until after coursework has begun. Students should not hesitate to contact the office to discuss accommodations at any point in time if they begin to realize that accommodations may make their classes more educationally accessible to them. Emergency Evacuation Information: All students who require some form of assistance during fire drills or other times of potential evacuation are strongly encouraged to register with the ADA Transition Services Office even if classroomrelated accommodations are not appropriate for them. SCCC recognizes that there are a variety of situations that can impact safe evacuations, such as orthopedic injuries and a lack of elevator access as well as panic attacks that may lead to confusion about procedure. The ADA Transition Coordinator collaborates with all students registering with the ADA Transition Services Office to determine strategies that can address any likely evacuation issues that a person might confront. This evacuation assistance information is listed on the faculty notification letters along with any other accommodations that may be appropriate for the student. Voter Registration Assistance : Voter registration assistance is offered to students registered with the Office of ADA Transition Services.

Counseling Services Elston Hall, Room 222 (518)381-1365 Bernice Dunn, Counselor IV ......................................................................................dunnbv@sunysccc.edu Robyn Posson, Counselor III ..................................................................................possonrm@sunysccc.edu Counseling Services include career and personal counseling, academic advising, special services and 32


Counseling is available for all students in the following areas:

• Academic concerns • Personal growth and development • Career decision making and planning • Transferring to other colleges and universities • Crisis intervention • Educational decision making and planning • Interpersonal relations, social interaction and family matters • Special issues: relaxation; managing time; returning-to-college issues; goal-setting • Referrals for additional support can be made to further assist with reaching full potential

Student Veterans Office Elston Hall, Room 222 (518) 381-1344 The Student Veterans Office assumes a major responsibility for helping all student Veterans adjust to the campus environment in a way that enhances and supports learning. The quality of student life is significantly affected by the availability, variety, and integrity of services and extra academic support programs on campus. Alliances are built between the classroom and campus life to provide an opportunity for student Veterans to experience the excitement and responsibility that comes from being an active member of a community of higher learning. All persons who served honorably, or who currently serve in the regular U.S. Armed Forces or Reserve, may be eligible for Federal or State Educational benefits. Eligibility for benefits includes children or spouses of an individual who died as a result of a service connected disability or an individual who is disabled. New York state also has programs to aid veterans. These include the Persian Gulf Veterans Tuition Award Supplement, the Vietnam Veterans Tuition Award Supplement and the child of a (disabled) Veteran Award Program. The New York State National Guard also offers up to free tuition at CUNY or SUNY for all its members. Individuals may be eligible for both Federal and State benefits. Questions as to eligibility for Federal Benefits may be answered by contacting the Registrar’s Office, Elston Hall, Room 212. Information on New York State Veterans benefits is available at www.hesc.org. Information on the New York State National Guard Tuition Incentive Program is available at the Financial Aid Office, Elston Hall, Room 221.

33

Student Affairs: Wellness and Support Services

support to special populations (such as part-time students, student-athletes, international students, 24 credit hour students, transfer students). Counselors help students evaluate their educational plans, answer questions about exploring major fields, provide general information about academic policies and procedures, and refer students to appropriate resources. Services are designed to assist students in achieving academic and personal success through informed decision-making and academic planning.


Student Government Association (SGA)

Student Affairs: Student Activities

Elston Hall, Room 220 (518) 381-1313 e-mail address: sga@sunysccc.edu SGA President, Jesse Stewart ............................................................................ sgapresident@sunysccc.edu SGA Vice President, Beth Smith ..................................................................sgavicepresident@sunysccc.edu SGA Treasurer, David Kilpatrick ......................................................................... sgatreasurer@sunysccc.edu Student Trustee, C. Brian Rogers ............................................................................sgatrustee@sunysccc.edu Advisor: Martha Asselin, Ph.D., Vice President of Student Affairs...................... easselimj@sunysccc.edu Advisor: Christopher Del Vecchio............................................................................delveccm@sunysccc.edu SGA Bookkeeper: Jan Libbon .....................................................................................libbonjb@sunysccc.edu The Student Government Association (SGA) is the “voice of the students.” The SGA Senate is the vehicle through which projects, real change and improvement can occur on campus. This doesn’t happen without your involvement. The Senate fulfills the legislative functions of SGA, and includes the President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary, eight Senior Senators, eight Freshman Senators and the Student Trustee. Each week the Senate meets to review and vote on major resolutions concerning the students’ general welfare. Senate meetings are open to everyone. Check in the SGA office for the date and time of the next meeting. SGA committees include: Awards Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Election Board, Athletic Board, Student Organization Board, Constitution and Judicial Committee and Abilities Awareness Committee. SGA is responsible for appropriately disbursing the Student Activity Fees. These funds are used for club programs, Student Activities Board events, athletics and campus improvement projects and programs initiated by SGA, such as your membership to the YMCA. SGA elections will be held in September and April. Anyone interested in running for a seat on the SGA Senate must see any member of the SGA Executive Board (noted above). New members are always welcome. For more information, visit the website at www.sunysccc.edu/student/activities/htm. Student Activities Board (SAB) Student Activities Board (SAB) is the major activities planning organization on campus. SAB plans a variety of events that include cultural, social, educational and recreational activities. Some examples include: • Concerts and comedy showcases • Campus programming events • Novelty acts • Voter registration

• Speakers and lecturers • Spring Week • Theme of the Month Celebrations

Students are always needed to help plan and execute various events. Student Activities Board is an exciting way to spend some of your time.

34


No guests are allowed unless they have a membership or are a student at SCCC w/ valid ID. This membership is only valid during the Fall and Spring semesters. For a small fee, summer memberships for students are available at a minimal fee. For more information, see the Program Office at the YMCA-Downtown Schenectady Branch. In addition, the Student Government Association has agreements with Proctors and CDTA. Such agreements help our students get access to a wide array of activities within our community at large. It Is Now Official! SCCC Students Can Ride CDTA For Free! Schenectady County Community College (SCCC) and Capital District Transportation Authority (CDTA) are offering all enrolled students at SCCC the opportunity to access the entire CDTA route network using their SCCC Student Identification Card. As long as the student is enrolled in a credit bearing class and has paid the student activity fee, they are eligible to ride all CDTA buses anywhere, anytime, and any day of the week (to include weekends) during the 2013-2014 academic year. Effective the first day of classes, SCCC students simply can swipe their student ID cards to ride all trunk bus, neighborhood, shuttle routes and express services, as well as CDTA’s STAR paratransit service and Northway Commuter Express (NX) services. To get a SCCC Student ID Card and a validation sticker, please go to the College Store located in Elston Hall of the main campus. Cards are FREE! The program, using college IDs as bus passes, makes riding CDTA even more accessible, increases transit options, and offers safe, reliable and unlimited travel to those with valid IDs. This partnership will help students with expenses associated with travel, will reduce traffic congestion and parking demand on campus, and is an environmentally friendly way to get around. This program benefits students in the Schenectady Smart Scholars Early College High School Program who are commuting between Schenectady High School and SCCC. It also provides a quick transit for students commuting between the main campus here at 78 Washington Avenue and the new Center City Complex located in downtown Schenectady. Switching to public transit can greatly reduce daily carbon emissions. SCCC students will be playing a vital role in reducing the carbon footprint and helping our environment. This partnership between SCCC and CDTA provides a low cost transportation solution. Students save money while getting a break from the rising costs associated with transportation every time they ride CDTA. Public transit saves money. Have you ever considered how much you pay annually to drive your vehicle? If you commute to work or college by car, figure about $58 in total vehicle expenses per 100 miles. AAA’s 2011 edition of Your Driving Costs reports we are paying over $8500 annually to drive our medium sized sedans (such as a Ford Fusion, Honda Accord, Toyota Camry) 15,000 miles per year. And this does not include loan payments or extensive maintenance repairs one may be making on this vehicle. 35

Student Affairs: Student Activities

Student Government Association Agreement with the YMCA - Schenectady Branch The YMCA of Schenectady offers a membership to currently enrolled SCCC students. To receive a YMCA membership card, bring a photo ID and your SCCC student ID with current validation sticker to the membership desk. Once issued, this membership card will be required every time you wish entrance to the YMCA.


Another exciting aspect about this partnership is how it will enhance student life, growth and development. This partnership is opening our community to SCCC students by providing greater access to social, cultural, educational and recreational opportunities in our greater district. Activities and employment opportunities for our students are now expanded to include anywhere the CDTA bus travels.

Student Affairs: Student Activities

CDTA offers the Students at SCCC a hassle-free, safe, efficient and reliable means of transportation Seven days a week for a full year so long as the student is enrolled at SCCC. In all, about 6000 students at SCCC have an opportunity to save on gas and parking expenses and can contribute to cleaner air simply by opting into this program and riding CDTA during the academic year. Increasing the flow of people on mass transit is an added benefit of this initiative. We look forward to this and many other public benefits that develop from this stronger connection between SCCC and CDTA.

Student Leadership Opportunities Clubs and Organizations The Student Government Association Senate oversees all recognized clubs and organizations at SCCC. All recognized clubs/organizations have an approved constitution on file in Student Affairs. Constitutions define the club or organization, describe the activities and membership of the group, and define the role of all officers of the club/organization. The Student Government Association recognizes clubs and organizations which are formed for one or more of the following purposes: • for special or departmental interests, including those which are established with a common educational purpose,

• for honorary groups where membership is earned as an award for achievement and

• for service learning groups which exist to serve our college and/or community

A.L.A.N.A. (African Latino Asian Native American) - To promote a common bond for AfricanAmerican students and other ethnic groups on a social level based on culture, economics and experience while encouraging social activity with all. Alliance for Students with Disabilities - To increase awareness about disabilities and to create a network of people for friendship, support, and advocacy. American Culinary Federation - To promote, develop and carry out the goals, work and program of the American Culinary Federation; to promote the best interests of the culinary profession generally and the interests and welfare of chefs, cooks and others engaged in the culinary profession. Aviation Club - To promote an appreciation for aviation science and operations, the profession and safety. To further personal development through competition, through networking and through various activities. Business and Law Club - To develop competence, develop character, prepare for useful citizenship, encourage improvement in scholarship and establish standards for entrance into business occupations with support of the national chapter. 36


Criminal Justice Club - To further the knowledge and understanding of the criminal justice field and to enhance the student’s knowledge pertaining to career development. Drama Club - To sponsor trips, locally and in New York City, to provide an arena for both professionals and non-professional companies to express their views through the drama media. Education Club - To use our education and knowledge within the community and to expand our education through community. Hospitality Club - To embark on education activities to promote self-development as well as exploring career opportunities within the hospitality industry The Pride Alliance - To improve and increase awareness, education, self-pride and support for all members of our community through various activities held in a respectful, positive and productive manner. RESTART Club - To provide support for returning adult students in an online format where advice, information and ideas can be shared. RHYTHMS Literary Magazine - Encourage and support creative writing and artistic endeavors of students, faculty and staff and publishes for the community a literary magazine. Science Club - To promote the sciences and encourage the studies in this field through field trips and experiences outside of classroom activities. Slow Food Club - To represent the interests, further the social and personal growth and promote the general welfare of the members. Spanish Club - To band together students involved in or interested in the study of Hispanic cultures, customs and language while promoting an appreciation for Hispanic culture on campus. Student Activities Board (SAB) - The major activities planning organization on campus. The events that SAB plans are many and varied, and they include cultural, social, educational and recreational activities. Student Veterans of America - To establish and develop student veteran support systems advocating for student veteran issues at the state and national level. Student Volunteer Organization - To represent the interests, further the social and personal growth, and promote the general welfare of the members of the organization and to create a positive attitude about community service on campus as well as create a placement system that will connect student and faculty volunteers with agencies in need of their help. Technology Club - To further the knowledge and understanding of the members in the field of technology and electronics while enhancing members experience pertaining to scholastic and career development. Tutor Networking Club - To provide training and support for peer tutors and tutees; to plan activities in order to raise money for two student scholarships 37

Student Affairs: Student Activities

Christian Fellowship Club - To worship God through song, prayer and the study of His word and provide fellowship and spiritual support for other Christians.


*Any club/organization wishing to submit a new constitution or make changes or amendments to an existing constitution must provide a written copy to Student Government Association Senate for review and approval To learn more about the various clubs and organizations at SCCC, visit us on the web at www.sunysccc. edu/student/clubs.htm or visit Student Activities in Elston Room 222.

Student Affairs: Student Activities

Faculty And College Committees One avenue for becoming an involved student leader on our College campus is to become a member of one of our Faculty or College Committees. Student representation on these committees is most important and valued. Students are nominated by faculty to serve on these committees based on leadership skills, matriculation and grade point average. According to the SCCC Faculty By-Laws, no student shall be eligible to serve on more than one faculty committee concurrently. Contact Dr. Martha Asselin, Elston Hall, Room 222, for more information regarding service on any of these committees. To aid in understanding the purpose of each Faculty and College Committee, please read the following descriptions: Academic Policies Committee: A Faculty Committee whose purpose is to receive or initiate recommendations which ensure the orderly conduct of instruction as provided in the Academic Code of the College and to review the criteria used to evaluate student appeals regarding academic status. (Two student representatives are appointed in August for academic year term.) Affirmative Action And Multicultural Committee: Assist the Affirmative Action Officer in monitoring the Affirmative Action Plan. Advise the AAO, as to the College’s performance in meeting program goals and recommend actions to correct any inequities with regard to employment practices. (One student representative is appointed in August for academic year term.) Campus Safety Council: A College Committee whose purpose is to serve as an advisory board for campus critical incident management; to initiate and implement the plan; to assess and review outcomes, and to update campus safety procedures annually. (Two student representatives are appointed in August for academic year term.) Community And Cultural Events Committee: A Faculty Committee whose purpose is to foster the development of the College’s programming of community and cultural events. (Two student representatives are appointed in August for academic year term.) Curriculum Committee: A Faculty Committee whose purpose is to deal with those matters involving the adoption, revision, and review of academic programs, courses and curricular policies. (Two student representatives are appointed in August for academic year term.)

38


Professional Policies, Nominations And Awards Committee: A Faculty Committee whose purpose is to inform Faculty regarding legislation, policies and other matters affecting Faculty welfare; to make recommendations concerning policies for academic rank, appointment, promotion, tenure, sabbatical leave and evaluation of the Faculty; and to solicit nominations for professional awards and for service as officers of the Faculty and for at-large membership on Standing Committees. (Two student representatives are appointed in August for academic year term.) Student Affairs Committee: A Faculty Committee whose purpose is to receive recommendations and make recommendations on matters concerning the College and its community. (Two student representatives are appointed in August for academic year term.)

39

Student Affairs: Student Activities

Faculty-Student Association: A College Committee whose purpose is to promote and sponsor programs for the good and welfare of the entire college community. The committee of faculty, students, and administrators oversees the operations of the Commons and the College Bookstore. (Three student representatives serve on the Board by virtue of their officer position on the Student Government Association Senate and an additional four student representatives are appointed in August for academic year term.)


CAMPUS LIFE AT SCCC Add/Drop

Add/drop occurs when students who have completed registration make changes to their schedule. Students may add available courses through the first week of fall and spring semesters. Students may drop classes without a grade appearing on their transcript during a specific period of time for each term (fall, spring, and summer). For all semesters/sessions, please refer to the appropriate schedule of classes for exact drop/add dates.

ANGEL

Students can utilize ANGEL, a free course management and information system for registered students at SCCC, by going to the SCCC website, www.sunysccc.edu, and clicking on the ANGEL icon on the main page. Log on using your SCCC User Name and Password. Be sure to log out when you are done. For all ANGEL and long distance learning, please contact the SLN Helpdesk at 800-875-6269 or visit http://sln.suny.edu/help/help_overview.shtml

Campus Life

Athletic Team Name and Colors for SCCC

Effective Aug. 1, 1998, the SCCC Board of Trustees approved the recommendation to rename the SCCC athletic teams the ROYALS. The Student Government Association solicited entries from the College community for recommended name changes. From all entries submitted, four were selected to go before the College community for a vote. The name, ROYALS, was recommended as a result of votes received from members of the College community-at-large. Schenectady County Community College colors: Royal Blue and Gold.

Attendance

Regular attendance is essential for successful study. Specific attendance regulations are established by individual instructors and are presented to students at the beginning of the semester as noted on the course syllabus. A poor attendance record can result in failing a course (FX grade), receiving a lower grade, and jeopardizing eligibility for financial aid.

Binnekill - Campus Monthly Newsletter

The Binnekill is a monthly publication produced by the Public Relations Department in the Office of Planning, Accountability and Advancement. It is your source for information about College news, upcoming events, sports, student profiles and faculty/staff news. Hard copies of the Binnekill are available near the Security Desk in Elston Hall and outside the Library in the Begley Building. The online edition of the Binnekill is available by visiting the College website at www.sunysccc.edu, and clicking on News, Calendars and Employment. So why is it called the Binnekill? The Binnekill was a quiet channel of the Mohawk River which ran behind what is now the main campus. The Binnekill was closed at one end when I-890 was built. It was later filled in and adjoining properties were converted for use by SCCC. The College later began producing this newsletter, named after the Binnekill. 40


Campus E-mail Account

All students will have a mandatory SCCC e-mail account through the College at Microsoft’s Live@edu. Your SCCC e-mail is the official way that the College will communicate with you electronically regarding important due dates, events, etc. All students must use this account. Your username and password information can be retrieved securely by following the next few steps:

1. Go to SCCC website at http://www.sunysccc.edu

2. Click on “Student Registration & Records” link on the left hand side of the page

3. Log in to the student registration system (Banner Self-Service)* at https://bweb1.sunysccc.edu:8065/pls/PROD/twbkwbis.P_WWWLogin using your SCCC 9-digit ID and your PIN established upon registration

4. Click on the “User Login Info for E-mail, ANGEL, and Network” link at the bottom of the page

5. When you are finished, please Exit and close your browser to protect your privacy.

*Please note that three unsuccessful login attempts will disable your access. Enter User ID and click “Forgot PIN” button before this happens. Please contact the Registrar’s Office at (518)381-1348 if you disabled your Banner PIN. In order to access your new e-mail account, you can go to: www.sunysccc.edu, and select the Student E-mail Quicklink and enter your SCCC assigned full e-mail address in the format (username@live. sunysccc.edu) as the user ID and the password as retrieved previously. If you encounter difficulties accessing your SCCC e-mail at Live@edu, please call SCCC helpdesk at 381-1487 option 5 or e-mail to helpdesk@sunysccc.edu. Advantages of your new e-mail account: • Student can use e-mail through graduation and beyond • A very large 10 GB inbox and 18 MB attachments • Use instant messaging services with Outlook Live • Use mailbox aggregation to consolidate other personal e-mail accounts within Outlook Live • Get access to e-mail, contacts, and calendar from anywhere including smartphone/tablets • Easily store files and documents online in a password protected environment: Windows Live SkyDrive is available for free and provides you with 25 GB of online storage • Access, view and edit your online documents from any computer connected to the Internet • View and perform basic editing functions on your online documents even from a computer that doesn’t have Microsoft Office installed • Be able to control who has permission to view or edit any one of your documents and simultaneously edit 41

Campus Life

Do you have an idea for a Binnekill story, a question about the Binnekill, or would you like to write or take photos for the Binnekill? If so, please see Public Relations Specialist Heather Meaney in the Stockade Building, Room 108, or call (518) 381-1250.


• When you need to access additional features, it takes just one click from any Office Web App to open the file in the corresponding Microsoft Office program on your desktop • Access and view your files from your mobile device.

Caps and Gowns

Cap and gown orders for those graduating in December or May will be taken at The College Store from mid-February through mid-March. Look for more information on this in the College Store.

Casola Dining Room

The Casola Dining room is adjacent to the Hotel and Restaurant Management laboratories located on the first floor of Elston Hall. Its primary function is to provide opportunities for students to gain experience in a wide range of dining room and banquet service activities, including table side preparation. Students gain practical experience by preparing and serving meals in the Casola Dining Room, which is open to the public for ĂĄ la carte service and banquets.

Campus Life

Certificate of Residence

Students registering for credit courses at SCCC are required to document their county of residence since counties partially fund student enrollment at community colleges in New York state. In order to qualify for resident tuition, you must have resided in New York state for the past 12 months, and you are required to provide county residence documentation for the last six months. The Student Business Office, Elston Hall, Room 517, is responsible for collecting the Certificate of Residence from students. For instructions and a copy of the Application for Certificate of Residence, Form B-80, go to the Certificate of Residence webpage at www.sunysccc.edu/academic/acadser/certresi.htm.

Change of Name and/or Address Notification

It is essential that you notify the Registrar Office (Elston Hall, Room 212) of any legal change in your name (due to marriage, divorce etc.) and/or address. This is important because all correspondence from the College (such as refund payments, midterm warnings and grades) will be mailed directly to your permanent address.

Child Care Center

Gateway Building, (518) 381-1375 An on-campus Child Care Center operated by the YWCA is available for children of students, faculty and staff. The center is in the process of pursuing NAEYC accreditation. Open to children between 6 weeks and five years of age, the Center is licensed by the NYS Office of Children and Family Services. A summer program for children ages 6 through 12 is also available. Space is limited.

Class Rings

Rings can be viewed at The College Store at any time throughout the academic year. They may be ordered when the Art Carved representative is on campus (in September and April), or at any time by 42


“College Hour”

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 11:20 a.m.-12:20 p.m. The SCCC community strongly believes in the value of college life outside of the classroom. Special time is set aside when few classes are scheduled. The College Hour is designed for participation in extra-curricular activities, student clubs or organizational meetings. You will notice a lot going on during this time, so watch the campus news sources (the Binnekill, websites, calendars and bulletin boards) for details on what is happening. College Hours on Mondays and Wednesdays are set aside especially for student clubs and organizations. College Hours on Fridays are set aside especially for College committee meetings and departmental meetings.

The College Store

Elston Hall, first floor, (518) 381-1332 For store hours, online purchasing and more, please visit http://fsacollegestore.com/home.aspx. The College Store provides a complete selection of course books, school supplies, imprinted sportswear, greeting cards, gifts and other items. The College Store strives to provide students with quality products and services at reasonable prices. Hours vary in summer and during registration periods. Photo ID Cards are available through the College Store. These cards are also SCCC Library cards and may be needed for student internships and other specific activities related to your academic program of study. Course Materials. The College Store also carries most course materials such as art supplies, music supplies and all culinary uniforms as well as knives and pastry supplies. Student Account Bookstore Credit may be used to purchase any materials that are required for a course. The College Store now has course materials available online for classes that have requirements for them, and are listed along with that class’s textbooks on the Ordering Textbooks page. Credit at the College Store. This store credit is activated two weeks before the first day of each semester. The Student Accounts credit is available for eligible students only for the first four weeks of fall and spring semesters and the first week of the summer semester. Each time you charge something to your Student Account, you will receive a detailed receipt including your current balance. KEEP ALL RECEIPTS. You will need them for any exchanges or returns. Credit Card Orders. Course materials will be available for online ordering by credit card on the same day registration begins, and available for shipment or in-store pickup within 48 hours of ordering. http://fsacollegestore.com/../storeImages/71-newglow.gif! eBooks. eBooks are now available through The College Store. eBooks are convenient, less expensive than print books, and delivered right to your desktop. Features and capabilities include: printing, note taking, highlighting, searching, underlining, and read-out loud. Minimum Requirements: Windows 98 SE, XP, Vista, or MacOS 10.2.9 or above, High-Speed Internet connection, and FREE reader software (available online). How eBooks work. Purchase the card through the bookstore cashier just as you would purchase a 43

Campus Life

calling 1-800-952-7002.


print textbook. Purchasing an eBook card authorizes the card, but does not activate it. When you’re ready to read your eBook, go to the computer where you’ll use it. Log in or register at http://www. DigitalTextbooks.com/download, and enter the card and receipt numbers. Your eBook is now activated and cannot be returned. Follow the easy on-screen prompts to download your eBook. You will need the latest version of the free reader software to read your eBook. See http://www.DigitalTextbooks.com/ download for additional information. Online Courses. The College Store sells all required textbooks and materials for online courses. Online Purchases. Each semester course materials will be listed in the Order Textbooks section by course number. Orders must be prepaid by Credit Card (Visa, Mastercard, or Discover), or Student Accounts (Financial Aid). Along with course textbooks, required materials such as calculators, culinary uniforms and cutlery, and biology items, are now available online, and appear with the course’s textbooks on the Ordering Textbooks page.

Campus Life

NOTE: Textbook orders with split tenders (part credit card, part Financial Aid, part cash, etc.) can only be processed in store only. Purchasing Textbooks. Textbooks may usually be purchased in-store approximately 1 1/2 months prior to the start of each semester, subject to availability. Students qualifying for Financial Aid Bookstore Credit, may purchase their books and supplies online and in-store beginning two weeks prior to the first day of classes for Fall and Spring semesters. Financial Aid Bookstore Credit will begin for the summer semester two weeks before classes begin. Please bring your course schedule. The Bookstore staff will be happy to locate your books for you. If you forget your schedule, the Registrar’s Office (Elston Hall 215) can print one for you. An SCCC Student Photo ID card is not required for Non-Student Accounts textbook purchases. Student Accounts (Financial Aid) Orders. Student Accounts (Financial Aid) orders are available the first day Student Accounts open, and will be filled within 48 hours after they are placed. Pick up your books at the College Store, or have them shipped via FedEx. See the Order Textbooks page for more information on when the current semester’s Student Accounts open. Student Accounts (Financial Aid) Bookstore Credit. Eligible students may have Student Accounts (Financial Aid) Bookstore Used Textbooks. We obtain as many used books as possible. Used books will save you about 25% of the new book price. When purchasing used books, you will not have the access codes necessary for any Web-enhanced materials.

Canal Side Wi-Fi Café/Convience Store

Located on the first floor of Elston Hall, the café features coffee, lattes, espressos and frappucinos as well as Paninis, soups and grab-and-go selections. The convenience store will feature food staple items (bread, milk, eggs), Radio Shack product line, Boots beauty product line, Proctor and Gamble product line and a variety of other items. Located on the first floor of Elston Hall.

44


Elston Hall, ground level The College Commons is operated by the College’s food service provider, Lessings Food Management. The Faculty-Student Association of Schenectady County Community College, Inc., oversees the vending/food service operation. The Commons provides breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a variety of short-order and snack items. The food service is available from morning through evening when classes are in session, and on a selected basis at other times. Look for daily specials. Vending machines are located in the College Commons, Elston Hall and the CST building lobby. A microwave is available in the College Commons for student use.

Computer Help Desk; username/password

Please contact the SCCC Computer Help Desk at 381-1487 external, internal x1111 or helpdesk@ sunysccc.edu.

Crime Statistics Availability Statement (Clery Act)

In accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (1998), Schenectady County Community College annually provides information relating to campus crime statistics and security measures to the U.S. Department of Education. A copy of Schenectady County Community College’s statistics, as reported annually to the U.S. Department of Education, will be provided upon request by the Office of Planning, Accountability and Advancement. Elston Hall, Room 120, and can be obtained electronically from the U. S. Department of Education website at http://ope.ed.gov/security/.

Gateway Montessori at SCCC

Gateway Montessori at SCCC strives to create an individualized learning environment that promotes positive self-esteem and respect for all participants. Children, 2 1/2 to 6 years of age, of SCCC students, faculty, staff and community at large, are eligible for enrollment in the Gateway Montessori at SCCC. Gateway Montessori operates Mondays through Fridays from 9:00 to 11:30 a.m., as per the SCCC academic calendar. At the Gateway Montessori, the development of the whole child is honored; a child’s social and emotional development is considered as vital as academic readiness. Children are active participants in their education, learning through hands-on exploration with teachers facilitating, modeling and guiding. The Gateway Montessori curriculum focuses on the social, emotional, creative and cognitive development of the child. One-way creative development is promoted through the application of openended art. Music, world studies and diversity are vital components of the classroom. Drama activities and literature experiences are offered daily. Formal instruction is given in the areas of math, literacy and science, as well as informally when children explore these concepts through block and water play, caring for the environment, listening to stories, completing puzzles, being exposed to cultures around the world, designing experiments and exploring topics from botany to zoology. For information please call (518) 381-1295, (518) 381-1402, or E-mail calhout@sunysccc.edu or aholada@sunysccc.edu. 45

Campus Life

The Commons


Graduation: Application for a Degree

The first step to officially graduating is submitting a Graduation Application to the Registrar’s Office. Please see the schedule of classes for the exact date on which this is due. Students wishing to participate in the graduation ceremony will be required to pay a graduation ceremony fee. For specific graduation requirements, students should contact their academic advisor or visit the Registrar’s Office, located in Elston Hall 212.

Immunization Information

Campus Life

New York State Health Law requires all students to provide immunity against measles, mumps and rubella prior to the first day of classes. A response to receipt of information on the meningococcal meningitis disease or a record of vaccine is required of all students. Early Childhood majors must have additional immunization information required prior to participation in field experiences. All this information is confidential and kept in the Student Services Office, Elston Hall 222. To request this information to be sent to another college, stop by the Student Services Office. This service is provided free of charge. For the entire policy and other more specific information, visit www.sunysccc.edu/ student/imreg.htm.

International Students

International students who entered the country with an F-1 visa or who changed their immigration status to F-1 while in the United States must apply for an SCCC SEVIS I-20 (Certificate of Eligibility) prior to registering for classes. Additionally, these students are required to report to the Office of Student Affairs (Elston Hall, Room 222) before the 15th day of each registered semester to maintain status.

Lost and Found

Report any lost or found items to Security. The Security station is located at the main entrance of Elston Hall near the Commons area.

New York State Voter Registration

In accordance with the National Voter Registration Act, Schenectady County Community College has established a voter registration program to ensure the College community understands the importance of voting and that eligible students and staff have the opportunity to vote. Here is some important information about registering to vote: To register to vote you must: • be a citizen of the United States; • be at least 18 years of age by December 31 of the year in which you file the voter registration form (NOTE: you must be 18 years of age by the date of the general, primary or other election in which you want to vote.); • not be in jail or on a parole for a felony conviction and; • not claim the right to vote elsewhere. 46


Need a Registration Form to Vote? You can obtain a voter registration form: • at most state agency offices and post offices and; • at any County Board of Elections office, and on the SCCC campus in the Student Government Association Office (Elston Hall, Room 220) and the Student Affairs Office (Elston Hall, Room 222). ADA Transition Services is available to assist. Individuals requesting assistance with completing the voter registration form are encouraged to stop by ADA Transition Services, located in Elston Hall, Room 222. Questions? Call your County Board of Elections, or call 1-800-FOR-VOTE. Hearing impaired individuals with TDD may call 1-800-533-8683.

The New York Times Readership Program

The Student Government Association and the Faculty-Student Association sponsor a Readership Program at SCCC which provides daily copies of The New York Times weekdays while classes are in session to members of the SCCC community. Free issues are distributed at various locations on campus: Begley Building Lobby; Center for Science and Technology Lobby; Elston Hall Lobby; Gateway Building; Stockade Building Lobby

Off-Campus Housing

All off-campus housing is privately owned and considered separate and independent of the College. Although College officials maintain working relationships with area landlords, the College does not own, operate, or supervise these properties. Information regarding off-campus housing is available through the Student Activities Office, Elston Hall, Room 222, and on the College’s website at www.sunysccc.edu/student/housing.htm.

Parking Hangtag

All motor vehicles parked on campus must be registered with campus security and the appropriate hangtag must be displayed from the car’s rearview mirror. Failure to register your vehicle and properly display the SCCC hangtag will result in ticketing and/or towing of the vehicle at the owner’s expense.

Publicity Off-Campus

The College community may publicize events to off-campus media through the College’s Office of Planning, Accountability and Advancement. Information may be submitted to the Public Relations Specialist, Stockade Building, Room 108, 381-1250. 47

Campus Life

You can register in person at your County Board of Elections office on any business day, except Election Day. If you want to vote in an election you must mail or deliver the registration form to your County Board of Elections no later than 25 days prior to the election in which you want to vote. Your eligibility to vote will be based on the date you file the form and your county board will notify you of your eligibility.


SCCC Website

For up to date and specific information about SCCC check out the College’s website at www.sunysccc.edu.

Student Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan

The College provides an avenue for all students to obtain, at a reasonable cost, accident and sickness insurance. Full-time students are automatically billed for accident insurance (plan is mandatory for all full-time students). An optional sickness medical insurance is available for all full-time and part-time students as well. This insurance plan must be obtained within the first two weeks of the start of classes. Insurance information can be obtained and payment for student insurance can be made in the Student Business Office, Elston Hall, Room 219.

Campus Life

Student Activity Fees (mandatory, non-refundable)

Each semester, student activity fees are collected from enrolled students. The Student Government Association Senate approves and oversees the expenditures of the Student Activity Fee. Student Activity Fees are used to support and enhance programs for the benefit of the campus community to include: cultural, educational, social and recreational programs. Students are encouraged to take full advantage of activities supported by Student Activity Fees. For more information, please stop by the Student Affairs Office, Elston Hall, Room 222.

Student Business Office

Elston Hall, Room 219, 381-1346 The Student Business Office processes student tuition, fees and parking fines. Each semester all students, including those who receive financial aid, are required to process their tuition bill with the Student Business Office. The tuition bill may also include insurance fees, activity fees and any lab fees. In addition, payments such as transcript fees and graduation fees are paid in the Student Business Office. Student Business Office Hours are posted on the College’s website: www.sunysccc.edu.

Student Center, Activity Forum Elston Hall, ground level

The Activity Forum is the glass-enclosed room located next to the Lounge in the Student Center. This room is open at all times for quiet study when not reserved for a function. Food and beverages are permitted in this room. Your help is appreciated to keep the room neat and clean so others can enjoy this space. This room is also used for student activities, programs, discussions and events. The room must be reserved by contacting Student Affairs, Elston Hall, Room 222, at least one week prior to an event.

Student Photo Identification/Library Cards

All students are required to obtain an SCCC Student Photo Identification/Library Card. This photo ID card issued is a permanent card for SCCC students. This card is used for library purposes, access to the computer lab and for admission to athletic events, lectures, student activities and for identification for the CDTA Ridership program and the Schenectady YMCA. The card is initially obtained free of charge 48


• Students who have paid the Student Activity Fee and who wish to utilize the YMCA Downtown Schenectady Branch or ride the CDTA bus must show their current student ID card in order to access these facilities. These privileges are only available as long as the student remains enrolled. • The use of another student’s Card is a violation of the Student Code of Conduct. Properly validated cards are to be carried at all times and must be produced, upon request, to any authorized College authority (administrators, faculty member or security personnel). • Student Photo ID Cards are available through the College Store. These cards may be needed for student internships and other specific activities related to one’s academic program of study. To obtain a photo ID card, students will need to show photo identification (such as a driver’s license).

Student Identification Number

Upon initial registration or application to SCCC, each student is provided an individualized student identification number. This generated number consists of nine digits beginning with the number nine. This number will appear on the student’s schedule and all correspondence from admissions and financial aid.

Student Lounge

Elston Hall, ground level The Student Lounge is a place for students to relax, study, and meet. The lounge is located in the lobby of Elston Hall’s main entrance, next to the Commons and Security/Information Desk. In Spring 2010, the Student Government Association and the Faculty-Student Association renovated this space. The television monitor in the lounge provides information specific about the current week regarding activities and events on campus. Food and beverages are permitted in this area. Your help is needed to keep the lounge looking neat, clutter-free and presentable for all others (to include visitors) on our campus.

SUNY NY Alert Emergency Contact Information System

SUNY NY ALERT is an emergency contact system that enables the College to send out critical information about serious campus emergencies. This information can be disseminated concurrently through e-mail, phone and text messaging to multiple addresses and phone numbers provided to the system by the participants. Members of the College community are provided an opportunity to “opt out” of this emergency notification system during the registration period each semester (please go to the Elston Hall, Room 212 to complete the appropriate paperwork for “opting out”). Participation in SUNY NY Alert is strongly encouraged, but voluntary. The information provided to SUNY NY Alert is completely confidential and this alert system will only be used to send information regarding SERIOUS CAMPUS EMERGENCIES. For more information about SUNY NY Alert, go to www.albany.edu/sunynyalert. 49

Campus Life

at the College Store. Lost cards can be replaced for a charge. Lost cards must be reported to the College Store so a replacement card can be issued.


Academic Code

ACADEMIC CODE ACADEMIC CODE - TABLE OF CONTENTS Preamble .......................................................iv Academic Freedom Statement.....................iv 1.0 Admissions Policies........................................1 1.1 Full Opportunity ............................................1 1.2 Admissions Requirements ............................1 1.3 Early Admissions ...........................................1 2.0 Student Classification ....................................1 2.1 Matriculated ...................................................1 2.2 Non-Matriculated ..........................................3 2.3 Full-Time and Part-Time ..............................3 2.4 Academic Leave .............................................3 3.0 Advisement/Registration ..............................4 3.1 Academic Advisement ..................................4 3.2 Registration for Classes .................................4 3.3 Cross Registration ..........................................4 3.4 Late Registration, Registration Modifications ...........................5 3.5 Limitations on Course Loads .......................6 3.6 Auditing 6 3.7 Waiver of Program Requirement .................7 3.8 Incomplete Courses .......................................7 3.9 Repeating a Course ........................................7 3.10 Withdrawal .....................................................8 3.11 Certification of Status ....................................8 3.12 Prerequisite Failure ........................................8 4.0 Residence Credits ..........................................8 4.1 Residence Requirements - Associate Degree/ Certificate ........................................................9 4.2 Change of Program/Matriculation Status ...9 5.0 Non-residence Credit.....................................9 5.1 External Transfer.............................................9 5.2 Credit by Examination ................................10 5.3 Credit for Previous Experience ..................11 6.0 Classroom Expectations ..............................11 The Right to Learn........................................11 Course Expectations.....................................11 Use of Electronic Devises in the Classroom and other Campus Facilities........................12 Academic Complaint Procedures...............12 50

6.1 Course Requirements ..................................13 6.2 Academic Integrity.......................................13 Violations of Academic Integrity................14 Consequences of Violating Academic Integrity.......................................14 6.3 Attendance Policy ........................................15 6.4 Changes in Schedule ....................................15 6.5 Mid-Term Warnings ....................................15 6.6 Field Trips .....................................................15 6.7 Independent Study .......................................16 6.8 Final Examinations ......................................16 6.9 Experimental Course ...................................17 7.0 Academic Status ...........................................18 7.1 Grading System ............................................18 7.2 Grade-Point Average ...................................19 7.3 Graduation Honors and Awards ................19 7.4 Term Honors ................................................19 7.5 Academic Review .........................................19 7.6 Good Academic Standing ...........................20 Satisfactory Progress ....................................20 Pursuit of Program ......................................21 Academic Probation ....................................21 7.7 Readmission .................................................22 8.0 Graduation Requirements ..........................23 8.1 Application for Graduation ........................23 8.2 Degree Programs .........................................23 8.3 Posthumous Award of Degree or Certificate..................................................23 8.4 Certificate Programs ....................................24 8.5 Discounting Grade Policy ...........................24 8.6 Attendance at Graduation ...........................24 8.7 Additional Degree or Certificate ................25 Appendix A: Synopses of State University of New York and University of the State of New York Policies and Guidelines Cited in the Academic Code, and Other Supplemental Information...............26


The Academic Code expresses those requirements and procedures established by action of the Academic Senate to implement the educational programs of the College. Statements of policy and definitions within the main body of this Code shall appear with the same wording when used in those sections of the College Catalog or the Student Handbook where Academic Policies are officially stated. In cases where supplemental statements are made to introduce a policy, the official policy statement shall be clearly distinguished from the commentary. Individuals may petition the Vice President of Academic Affairs when they believe a provision of the Academic Code should be put aside in their particular circumstance.

Academic Freedom Statement Academic freedom is the freedom to teach, both inside and outside the classroom, to conduct research and other scholarly or creative activities, and to publish or otherwise disseminate the results. Full-time and Part-time Faculty and Professional Staff are entitled to this full freedom, as it pertains to their areas of expertise and as it relates to their disciplines. This freedom applies equally to assigned course material, recommended course material, library material, invited speakers, the fine arts, and the performing arts. Academic freedom also encompasses the freedom to address any matter of institutional policy or action, whether or not as a member of the institutional governance. Full-time and Part-time faculty and Professional Staff have the freedom to address the larger community with regard to any social, political, economic, or other interest. Academic responsibility implies the faithful performance of professional duties and obligations, the recognition of the demands of the scholarly enterprise, and the candor to make it clear that, when one is speaking as a citizen on matters of public interest, one is not speaking for the institution. The freedoms enumerated in this policy apply within institutional discipline or restraint.

51

Academic Code

PREAMBLE


1.0 ADMISSIONS POLICIES 1.1 Full Opportunity

Committed to the State University of New York policy on Full Opportunity for all county residents, Schenectady County Community College guarantees open admission to all high school graduates of the previous June and all veterans returning from service in the previous year. Additionally, the College admits high school graduates from previous years and other counties who can profit from its programs and services, to the limits of the College’s capacity and subject to compliance with any deadlines established by the College in its admission procedures.

1.2 Admissions Requirements

Applicants for degree or certificate programs must posses a high school diploma or its equivalent and meet any additional requirements specified in the College Catalog.

Academic Code

1.2.1

Those applicants who have been accepted and have not met the admission prerequisites of the program for which they have applied will be notified as to the effect this will have on their prescribed program of study.

1.3 Early Admissions

High School students may be admitted to the College under the College’s established Early Admission Program that is in accordance with the State Education Department Guidelines specified in the College Catalog.

2.0 STUDENT CLASSIFICATION 2.1 Matriculated

Individuals who have formally admitted to a degree or certificate program of the College under standard College and State University of New York admissions procedures, who have completed the placement tests in basic skills administered by the College, and who continue to pursue their program successfully, have matriculated status in that program.

2.1.1

Individuals are eligible for matriculation if they are at least eighteen years of age or if they hold a high school diploma or its equivalent. High school students are eligible for matriculation subject to the limitations of the Early Admission Program.

2.1.3

Only matriculated students are eligible for a degree or certificate from the College.

2.1.4

The College is committed to providing academic advisement to all matriculated students.

2.1.5

The placement tests in basic skills must be completed prior to the first day of classes of the term in which the student is matriculated. The results will determine appropriate placement into developmental reading, writing, mathematics, and/or study skills courses which serve as prerequisites to the corresponding program requirements. Exceptions to the placement testing requirement for reading, writing, and mathematics are granted to a student who

52


has passed the English 11R Regents exam with a grade of 75 or better and has also passed any of the following mathematics Regents exams: Course I, Course II, Course A, Algebra, Geometry, or Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry with a grade of 75 or better, or

2)

has presented evidence of transferable credit for both College Composition and for Algebra I or higher, or

3)

has presented evidence of transferable credit for College Composition and also passed the math Regents courses listed in item 1, or

4)

who has scored 450 on all three sections of the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) Reasoning Test: Critical Thinking, Writing, and Math, or

5)

who has comparable scores of 18 verbal and 18 mathematics on the ACT (American College Testing).

An individual may submit a written request for a re-test on the placement test (for the current semester) within 14 days of the original testing based on any one of the following criteria:

• Illness or injury made known to the test administrator during the test.

• Previously undisclosed documented disability (re-test in the ADA Transition Office).

• Irregularity in test situation (e.g. no clock, interruption, missing pages in test booklet) made known to the test administrator at the time of the test.

The request will be reviewed by the Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs. The individual will be notified in writing of the decision within seven days.

Any individual may re-test for admission during scheduled testing for any subsequent semester. Otherwise, placement test scores of high school graduates and GED recipients are valid for three years from the date of testing.

2.2 Non-Matriculated

Individuals enrolled in a course or courses who have not been formally accepted in a degree or certificate program, or who have had their matriculation terminated for any reason are nonmatriculated students.

2.3 Full-Time and Part-Time

A student is considered to be a full-time student if enrolled in a minimum of 12 semester credit hours in day or evening courses, including any taken through cross-registration agreements during a semester. A student is considered to be a part-time student if enrolled in less than 12 semester credit hours during a semester.

2.3.1

Students are classified as having full-time or part-time status on the basis of their current load.

Distance learning courses taken at SCCC are counted toward a student’s full- or part-time

2.3.2

53

Academic Code

1)


enrollment status. Students registered for distance learning courses are subject to all regulations of the Academic Code.

2.4 Academic Leave

Academic Code

Matriculated students in good academic standing who find it necessary to interrupt their program of study at the College are automatically granted an Academic Leave for a period not to exceed two semesters. Such students maintain their matriculated status and, upon return, may choose to pursue program requirements in effect at the time of their matriculation provided that the College continues to offer those courses and/or that program.

2.4.1

Course work completed while on Academic Leave is subject to the policies and procedures governing non-residence credit (see Section 5).

2.4.2

Students who fail to register for the first semester after the Academic Leave has expired will have their matriculation suspended. Such students will, on return, be required to reactivate their status as a matriculated student and complete the program requirements in place at the time of their reactivation.

3.0 ADVISEMENT/REGISTRATION 3.1 Academic Advisement The goal of the academic advisement system is to assist students in planning academic programs | consistent with their degree and/or career objectives. The advisement system is responsible to each student for providing adequate information and for being accessible; however, the individual student is responsible for decisions related to implementation and for satisfying institutional requirements. 3.1.1

During general and new student registration sessions, academic advisement is provided by faculty and professional staff.

3.1.2

Following initial matriculation (admission, assessment, advisement, registration), each full-time student will be assigned to a member of the faculty as academic advisor. Advisor assignments will be made in accordance with the student’s program of study and are intended to be continuous throughout the student’s college career, unless a program change dictates modification of the assignment. It is expected that each student will arrange to meet with his/her academic advisor at least once each semester for individual consultation and program planning.

3.1.3

General advisement services will be provided on a continuous basis throughout the academic year as a service to part-time students, non-matriculated students, and as a supplement to individual advisor assignments. These services will be provided by professional staff members in the Academic Advisement Center in conjunction with the academic divisions and the Registrar’s Office.

All students must have their planned schedules reviewed and signed by an academic

54

3.1.4


advisor prior to registration. Exceptions to this review are granted to non-matriculated students who may opt for self-advisement.

3.2 Registration for Classes

Registration for classes is conducted as described on the College website and in College publications.

3.3 Cross Registration

Through SCCC’s Registrar’s Office, full-time matriculated students may cross register for courses offered at participating colleges and universities, as listed in the College Catalog.

1) Approval in writing must be given on the cross registration form from the student’s academic advisor and the Registrar. 2) Students must have earned at least 12 credits at SCCC with a 2.0 GPA and register for at least 12 credits to be eligible for cross-registration. (Updated 10-31-12)

3) Students must take at least half of their course load each semester at SCCC.

4) Students may cross register only during the Fall and Spring semesters.

5) Cross registered courses are considered resident credit and are entered as such on the student’s permanent record. 6) The student must take the course for a letter grade unless the only option offered by the institution is Pass/Fail. 7) The student is responsible for notifying both campuses when dropping/withdrawing from a cross registered course. Failure to do so may result in an academic F grade from the host institution. 3.4 Late Registration, Registration Modifications 3.4.1

The Late Registration, Add/Drop period for continuing, returning and non-matriculated students for all regular start classes will not exceed one week from the first day of classes in a semester (refer to official Academic Calendar). During this period, students may register for open courses (upon payment of the late registration fee) and may modify a previous registration by adding or dropping courses. Any new, first-time matriculated student not registered by the end of the first day of the semester may enroll only in the Late Start Program. Please refer to 3.4.4 for information about late registration and add/ drop dates for terms less than 15 weeks.

3.4.2

During the second week of a semester, a student may drop a course from his/her schedule. The student is encouraged to discuss this action with the course instructor(s). During this period a student may receive a partial tuition refund.

3.4.3

During the second week of a semester, a student may have a course(s) added to his/her schedule with the approval of the course instructor(s). This approval is based on an assessment of the student’s ability and acceptance of responsibility to complete course requirements.

55

Academic Code


3.4.4

Late Start classes will follow the same add/drop schedule as described in Section 3.4.1 through 3.4.3 in respective week one and two.

3.4.5

Students who withdraw from a course starting at the beginning of the term may not add the same course offered as a Late Start course.

3.4.6

For courses offered in a summer session or in any special time frame, an equivalent late registration and registration modification period will be determined by the Registrar.

3.4.7

Extenuating circumstances may warrant other registration modifications and will be considered individually. Such modifications require the written approval of the Vice President of Academic Affairs and will be based on the recommendation of a Division Dean in conjunction with the course instructor(s).

Academic Code

3.5 Limitations on Course Loads

A student may register for no more than a total of 19 semester credit hours (including day, evening and/or cross-registered courses) during either the Fall or the Spring Semester.

3.5.1

Summer/Special Sessions During summer/special sessions of 12 weeks or less in duration, a student shall be limited to enrollment in courses generating credits at the rate of 1.3 credit hours per week of the session.

3.5.2 Exceptions

A matriculated student, who has completed 12 or more semester credit hours in residence with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher, may request a one-course exception to the above limitation. The request must include: (1) confirmation by the Registrar’s Office regarding the student record requirements, and (2) approval by an academic advisor.

3.6 Auditing 3.6.1 Registration

A student may register as a paid auditor only during late registration period, as indicated in the Academic Calendar, on a space-available basis. Distance learning courses with available seats are available for audit only with the permission of the instructor.

State and County residents 60 years or older may register for a “Senior Citizen Audit,” without a fee or tuition, only during the late registration period as indicated in the Academic Calendar, on a space available basis. Distance learning courses are not available for “Senior Citizen Audit.”

Not all courses are available for audit.

3.6.2 Participation 56

An auditor need not participate in class activities, take tests, or submit homework assignments. The degree to which the auditor may do these things is to be determined by the instructor.


3.6.3

Recording of Grades

Academic Code

All courses audited will be recorded on a student’s transcript as audits. However, if an auditor ceases to attend class without withdrawing from the class, the instructor may indicate that a grade of NR be recorded.

3.7 Waiver of Program Requirement

The waiver of a specific program requirement will be considered on an individual basis by the academic department responsible for the degree or certificate program. Such a waiver must maintain the goals of the program as well as the policies/requirements of the institution, SUNY, and SED.

3.7.1

The waiver of a course requirement does not decrease the number of credit hours required for graduation from a program, and a substitute course is subject to written approval by the corresponding Division Dean.

3.8 Incomplete Courses

Course requirements are expected to be met within the time limits established for the term. An instructor may grant a student an extension not to exceed 60 days from the last day that final grades for the term are due. The temporary grade of I implies that the student has successfully completed a significant portion of the course and that extenuating circumstances have prohibited completion within the established time limits.

3.8.1

A temporary grade of I is automatically converted to a grade of F after 60 days from the date that final grades were due for the term in which the course was offered, if not otherwise changed by the instructor.

3.9 Repeating a Course

A student may repeat a course twice, with no additional credit earned. Only the highest grade will be used in all future cumulative grade point average computations; however, all grades will be retained on the transcript. Once the highest possible grade has been achieved, a student may not repeat the course.

3.10 Withdrawal

The withdrawal period begins with the third week of classes and extends through the end of the eleventh week of classes (specific dates identified in the Academic Calendar). A student may withdraw from a course(s) during this period and a grade of “W” will be assigned.

3.10.1

The student is responsible for completing and submitting the withdrawal form to the Registrar’s Office within the stated period. The student is encouraged to discuss this action with his or her instructor and academic advisor. The student is responsible for determining how this withdrawal may affect his or her financial aid and academic status.

3.10.2 For courses offered in a summer session or in any special time frame, an equivalent withdrawal period will be determined by the Registrar.

3.10.3 A student who does not withdraw from a course will receive the academic grade earned at 57


the completion of that term.

3.10.4 A student who intends to withdraw from all courses and is unable to complete the process in person may submit a withdrawal request in writing to the Registrar’s Office within the withdrawal period. 3.11 Certification of Status

The Registrar’s Office shall certify a student’s status to external agencies in terms of the definitions established by those agencies.

3.11.1 External agencies which do not establish their own definitions of student status shall have the definitions reported in terms established by vote of the Academic Senate. Such definitions will be consistent with other College policies and definitions. 3.12 Prerequisite Failure

Academic Code

Students who have registered for a course and fail the prerequisite for said course will automatically have the course dropped from their schedule. Notification of this change in schedule will be sent to students by the Registrar’s Office.

4.0 RESIDENCE CREDIT 4.0.1 Residence credit is obtained by registering for and successfully completing credit-bearing courses offered by the College. 4.0.2 Residence credit may also be obtained through participation in the College’s cross registration program as outlined in Section 3.3. 4.0.3 Residence credit may also be obtained by registering for and successfully completing distance learning courses offered by SCCC. 4.1 Residence Requirements - Associate Degree

At least 30 semester credit hours in residence applied to the degree program must be successfully completed in order to be eligible for an Associate degree.

4.1.1

Residence Requirements - Certificate At least 15 semester credit hours in residence applied to the degree program must be successfully completed in order to be eligible for a certificate.

4.2 Change of Program/Matriculation Status

58

When students change a program, establish matriculation after having taken courses while nonmatriculated, reactivate, or reestablish matriculation through readmission, all credits (both residence and non-residence) are reevaluated by the Registrar’s Office in consultation with the Division Dean and in accordance with the requirements of the new program if a need for reevaluation is requested or indicated by an advisor. This reevaluation will not change the student’s grade-point average.


Academic Code

5.0 NON-RESIDENCE CREDIT 5.0.1 Non-residence credit is defined as credit earned at other academic institutions or certain non-collegiate organizations (see Section 5.2.3), and as credit earned by examination or for previous experience. 5.0.2 Non-residence credit does not generate grade-points for the purpose of calculating grade-point averages. 5.0.3 The total amount of non-residence credit awarded cannot exceed the limits established under Sections 4.1. 5.1 External Transfer

Transfer credits may be accepted for course work taken at other academic institutions, by correspondence or through distance learning, if approved by the Division Dean. Any coursework older than 10 years will transfer only at the discretion of the Division Dean.

5.1.1

Courses of equivalent quality and content taken at recognized institutions of higher learning accredited by one of the Regional Accrediting Bodies (e.g., Middle States) shall be accepted if passed with a grade of C (2.00) or better, if such courses are applicable to the student’s degree program. Such courses passed with a C-, D+, D, or D- may be approved at the discretion of the Division Dean.

5.1.2

Courses taken at institutions of higher learning lacking such regional accreditation (including degree-granting proprietary institutions) may be accepted if passed with a grade of C (2.00) or better if such courses are applicable to the student’s degree program and are equivalent content and quality as determined by the Division Dean.

5.1.3

Transfer credits may be awarded by the Vice President of Academic Affairs upon recommendation of the Division Dean for course work taken in certain non-collegiate organizations (including non-degree granting proprietary institutions) when published guides are available to evaluate such course work, and the Academic Senate has approved the use of the guides.

5.2 Credit by Examination

Matriculated students may earn credit by examination for individual courses required in their program of study. Credit by examination may be awarded for a passing grade on an externally published proficiency examination or an internally developed challenge examination.

5.2.1

Credit related to externally published proficiency examinations is subject to the approval of the Division Dean, and is based on the examination covering the content of the course offered by the College, applicability to the student’s program of study, and a passing grade as reported by the external agency. A passing grade is defined as a C (2.00) or better on the CPE examination, a 3 or better on an AP examination, and the American Council on Education recommended score or higher on a CLEP or DSST examination. The applicable exams and minimum acceptable scores are listed in the Advisement Guide section of the SCCC Faculty Handbook. 59


Academic Code

5.2.2

The availability of internally developed challenge examinations for selected courses is determined by individual academic departments. The challenge examination is representative in content and emphasis of the course outline, and normally is prepared and graded by the faculty member(s) normally responsible for teaching the course. A passing grade is the equivalent of a C (2.00) or better. The challenge examination request, including a justification statement, must be submitted prior to the end of the seventh week of the student’s final semester preceding graduation. The request must be approved by the faculty member, the Division Dean, and the Vice President of Academic Affairs (application available from the Registrar’s Office), and the test administration fee paid prior to the administration of the challenge examinations. The results of the examination indicating the basis for the awarding of credit are reported to the Registrar’s Office by the faculty member.

5.2.3

Credit earned by examination is not considered as earned in residence (see Residence Requirements - Associate Degree/Certificate). Credit earned by examination will be recorded as “credit” (CR) on transcripts, and will have no effect on a student’s grade-point average. Students must accumulate 12 or more semester hours of residence credit before credit by examination is noted on transcripts.

5.3 Credit for Previous Experience

Matriculated students may earn credit based on previous experience for individual courses required in their program of study. To initiate the process, the student should petition the department responsible for the specific course(s), listing each course and a brief statement justifying its consideration. A faculty review committee, appointed by the Division Dean, will evaluate the student’s proficiencies and make recommendations for credit. The student will be expected to demonstrate proficiencies equal to the performance standards of the course outline. The committee may recommend credit, no credit, or recommend credit contingent upon further demonstration of student proficiencies. The recommendation for credit must be approved by the Division Dean and the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

Credit earned for previous experience is not considered as earned in residence (see Residence Requirements - Associate Degree/Certificate). Credit earned for previous experience will be recorded as “credit” (CR) on transcripts, and will have no effect on a student’s grade-point average. Students must accumulate 12 or more semester hours of residence credit and pay a processing fee before credit for experience is noted on transcripts.

6.0 CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS The Right to Learn

60

The professor in the classroom and in conference will encourage free discussion, inquiry and expression. Student performance will be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards.


The instructor is responsible for distributing a written summary of course content expectations with regard to examinations, special projects, field trips, grading practices, attendance, etc., to each student on the first day of class.

Use of Electronic Devises in the Classroom and other Campus Facilities

Technology use in the classroom is intended to enhance the learning environment for all students, and any use of technology that degrades the learning environment may be prohibited by the instructor. Any use of technology that promotes dishonesty or illegal activities is prohibited. Professional staff members in charge of academic facilities may also make rules concerning appropriate use of electronic devises. Consistent with College policy, it is the course instructor or the professional staff member who determines whether such usage is inappropriate.

Academic Complaint Procedures A student wishing to file a complaint regarding an academic matter should begin the following process within six months after the end of the semester in which the grade for the course was issued.

Consult with the instructor of the course in question. If an understanding or resolution is not achieved, or if this step is not feasible, the student may then:

Consult with the appropriate Division Dean. The Dean will consult with the involved faculty member and with the student and attempt to reach a mutually agreeable resolution. If an understanding or resolution is not achieved, the student may then:

Appeal in writing to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. The written appeal, detailing both the complaint and the results of their consultations with the instructor and with the Division Dean, should be delivered to the office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs. An appointment for consultation with the Vice President may be scheduled at that time. The faculty member involved will be notified that the student has appealed to the Vice President of Academic Affairs, and be given a copy of the student’s written appeal.

Within 15 days of notification via memo from the Vice President, the faculty member may choose to provide a written reply which shall be considered in the disposition of the complaint. The faculty member may also schedule an appointment to consult with the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

Determinations and dispositions of complaints will be made by the Vice President of Academic Affairs of Schenectady County Community College within 30 days of receipt of the written complaint. The Vice President will consult with and notify the President of determinations and dispositions. The student will be notified in writing of the decision.

6.1 Course Requirements

Students will be provided a written statement of all course requirements by their individual instructors during the first class session. This statement shall include a grading policy stating the relative weighting of the course requirements and attendance-related policies used in determining the student’s final grade. If an instructor will not be using the full range of letter grades provided in 61

Academic Code

Course Expectations


section 7.1 this shall be put in writing in the statement of the course requirements.

6.1.1

Students are responsible for meeting course prerequisites and for promptly equipping themselves with such texts or materials as may be required for the course.

6.1.2

Instructors shall adhere to the course content as approved by the Academic Senate and reflected in the course outline supplied by the department responsible for the course.

6.1.3

All students must do their own work; cheating, plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty can result in a failing grade or another penalty as set forth in the code of conduct. Plagiarism is representing another person’s work or ideas from any source as one’s own without attributing credit.

Academic Code

6.2 Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is the foundation of institutions of higher learning, and students will act in accordance with the academic integrity guidelines of the College. The following guidelines apply to all courses offered by the College.

Each student’s work will be her/his own work.

Each student will appropriately identify the work of others when it is incorporated into the writing of her/his papers, examinations, or oral presentations. This includes both direct quotations and paraphrased opinions and ideas.

Each student will follow the directions of the instructor with regard to permissible materials in a room at the times of tests and examinations.

Each student will proceed during examinations without any assistance whatsoever and without communicating in any way with another student while an examination is being conducted.

Each student will refrain from obtaining or disseminating the content of any examination prior to distribution by the instructor.

Except as directed by the instructor, students enrolled in laboratory sections will complete all observations and reports based solely on their own processing of the experiment or demonstration.

Each student will submit her/his work to only one instructor, unless she/he has the prior approval of all instructors involved.

Students will represent data and sources appropriately and honestly.

Violations of Academic Integrity

Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to:

Plagiarism: The intentional or unintentional representation of another person’s work as one’s own. Examples include, but are not limited to:

a)

Quoting, paraphrasing, or summarizing another’s work without appropriately acknowledging the source.

b)

Using another’s research without acknowledging the source.

62


Submitting another’s paper, purchased or otherwise obtained, as one’s own.

Academic Code

c)

Cheating on Examinations: Looking at another’s work, using or bringing materials not permitted by the instructor during the exam, communicating with another student, receiving any kind of assistance including but not limited to assistance from electronic devises, during an examination, and obtaining or disseminating the content of an examination prior to its distribution by the instructor.

Multiple Submission: Submitting any work, even one’s own, to more than one instructor, without the permission of those instructors.

Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: Knowingly allowing another student to use one’s work or cheat from one’s exam.

Fabrication: Falsifying or inventing information in any situation, including but not limited to data for lab or researched project.

Consequences of Violating Academic Integrity:

The following are the College’s guidelines for consequences for violating academic integrity, but the student must consult the course syllabus, since the instructor will determine the consequences for each course. Consequences may include, but are not limited to, one or a combination of the following penalties: • Oral or written warning • Deduction of points, grade of “F” or “O” for the assignment, project, or exam. • Failure of the course • Disciplinary action by the Student Affairs Office. Results of disciplinary actions are outlined in the Student Code of Conduct. 6.3 Attendance Policy

Students are responsible for maintaining prompt and continuous attendance in all classes and continue to be responsible for any assignments or materials presented in their absence.

6.3.1

The degree to which absences and lateness affect a student’s final grade will be determined by the individual instructor and stated in his/her course syllabus.

A grade of FX, attendance-related failure, may be issued to a student who has missed more than 20% of the class hours a course meets in one semester.

6.3.2

6.4 Changes in Schedule

Division Deans may approve changes in class schedules after the end of the add/drop period in any term provided that all members of the class desire the change and the College has facilities to permit the change.

6.5 Mid-Term Warnings

At the end of the seventh week of classes in a regular semester, warning grades are submitted online by all teaching faculty for students performing below the C (2.00) level. 63


6.6 Field Trips (Credit and Non-credit)

Academic Code

Faculty are encouraged to make the most effective possible use of the resources in the community and neighboring areas of the State which supplement the facilities of the College and contribute directly to the instructional program. All field trips must be directly related to the academic program or course-work of the course(s) sponsoring the trip. Since field trips are excursions of the students away from campus for intervals of time which may be in excess of the normal laboratory period, certain side-effects may be incurred such as conflicts with schedules of other courses, use of vehicles and services of other members of the faculty, administrative expense, etc. It is essential, therefore, that such excursions or field trips be carefully planned and supervised by the faculty members/professional staff involved.

6.6.1

Field trips may be taken only as approved in advance by the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

6.6.2

Unless made within the confines of a regular laboratory period, field trips may not be made during the first or last week of a semester.

6.6.3

Notification of the field trip, including a roster of students, must be given to all concerned faculty members and administration one week in advance (two weeks in advance whenever possible).

Students should make provision to make up lost time in other courses.

6.6.4

6.7 Independent Study

An independent study project is an organized experience independently pursued by a student under the direction of a faculty member.

6.7.1

Matriculated students with a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.50 are eligible to request an independent study course through a faculty member willing and able to supervise the project. An independent study proposal must be recommended by the appropriate Division Dean and subsequently approved by the Vice President of Academic Affairs prior to registration for the course by the student.

6.7.2

Independent study may be used to earn credit for a course in the College curriculum. In such cases, the independent study will utilize the current course outlines, and the existing course number and title will be used when the study is documented on the student’s transcript. The study will carry the same number of credits as are assigned to the course in the curriculum. The independent study proposal must include the justification of the student’s need to pursue the course on an independent study basis for the term in which the study is to be undertaken.

6.7.3

Independent study may also be used to earn credit for a course not included in the College curriculum. In such cases a complete course outline must be developed with the supervising faculty member recommending an appropriate credit value (one to four credit hours) for the study. The independent study proposal will include the course outline and will be added to the master file and to the student’s record. The course number will be

64


299, the three-letter alpha prefix will indicate the discipline, and the course title will be the name of the independent study project.

A student is limited to one independent study project per semester.

6.7.4

6.7.5

Completed independent study projects are graded “A” through “F” except for courses in the College curriculum which require a P-F grade.

6.8 Final Examinations

The use of a final examination will be at the discretion of the academic department involved and will be so stated in the course outline.

6.8.1

All final examinations must be held during the final examination period.

6.8.2

Students who are scheduled for more than two final exams in the same day may request that all exams in excess of two be rescheduled. Any student who seeks a rescheduling of final exams must first consult with all instructors involved in an attempt to resolve the exam overload. If the overload cannot be resolved in this manner, the instructors of the student’s third and fourth exams will reschedule their exams. All requests for rescheduling must be made no later than seven calendar days prior to final exam week.

6.8.3

Students performing at the A (4.00) level may be exempt from the final examination if their instructor has so provided in the grading policy for the course.

6.8.4

Students scheduled for more than one examination in a single time period shall be liable for the examination that is listed first on the Examination Schedule. (For each period specified in the Examination Schedule, the order in which examinations are listed shall be determined by a formal randomization process, under the supervision of the Vice President of Academic Affairs.) Examinations in conflict with the one listed first shall be rescheduled at a time and place mutually agreed upon by the student and instructor(s) involved. In no case may a conflict examination be rescheduled to conflict with a regularly scheduled examination; nor may a conflict examination be rescheduled for a day in which two other examinations already have been scheduled for that student, unless he/ she waives the rescheduling provision of Section 6.7.2.

6.9 Experimental Course

An experimental course is credit bearing but is not included in the permanent College curriculum. The course may be taught for no more than two semesters over two consecutive academic years. It enables a department to be innovative in course development, to test student interest in a specific subject area, or to provide for identified special needs.

6.9.1

A complete course outline must be approved by the department, the Curriculum Committee, and by the Vice President of Academic Affairs prior to its inclusion in the schedule for the term in which it is first offered.

6.9.2

For an experimental course to become part of the permanent College curriculum, the department must initiate the ordinary procedure for the approval of new courses at any time following the first offering of the experimental version of the course. Part of the 65

Academic Code


submission to the Curriculum Committee shall be a report on the findings of any experimental offerings held until that time.

7.0 ACADEMIC STATUS 7.1 Grading System

Academic Code

The following grades are determined and assigned by course instructors and carry the grade points indicated: Grade Grade Meaning

Grade-Points per credit hours

A Excellent A- B+ B Good B- C+ C Average/Satisfactory C- D+ D Poor D- F Failure FX Failure - attendance related

4.00 3.67 3.33 3.00 2.67 2.33 2.00 1.67 1.33 1.00 0.67 0.00 0.00

7.1.1

The grade of P-pass indicates that a student has successfully completed the requirements in a course offered specifically on a pass/fail basis. The grade of P--pass-- is comparable to a C (2.00) or better and has no effect on a student’s grade-point average. Likewise, the grade of F-fail assigned by an instructor for a course offered specifically on a pass/fail basis has no effect on a student’s grade-point average.

7.1.2 The grades of:

I - Incomplete” W - Withdrawal AU - Audit CR - Credit for previous experience or by examination T - External transfer

are assigned as previously defined in the Academic Code and have no effect on a student’s grade-point average.

7.1.3

The grade of NC is assigned for all non-credit courses, and the grade of NR is assigned to a course for which a grade has not yet been reported. Both NC and NR have no effect on a student’s grade-point average.

A correction to an error in a final grade assignment is the responsibility of the course

66

7.1.4


instructor and must be submitted in writing by the instructor within the 60 calendar day period from the date that final grades for the term are due. Any corrections after the 60 calendar day period must be approved by the Vice President of Academic Affairs. If it becomes impossible for the instructor to make such corrections to a final grade, any related decision will be based on departmental resolution and approval by the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

7.2 Grade-Point Average

A student’s grade-point average is determined by dividing the total grade-points earned in residence credit-bearing courses by the corresponding total credit hours attempted, with repeated courses counted only once, using the highest grade achieved.

7.3 Graduation Honors and Awards Degree recipients with a cumulative grade-point average of 3.70 or higher graduate with high honors. 7.3.1

Degree recipients with a cumulative grade-point average from 3.20 to less than 3.70 will graduate with honors.

7.3.2

A Certificate of Academic Program Achievement may be given to one graduate in each Degree and Certificate Program as selected by the faculty of each academic department. To be eligible a student must have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.5. Other academic criteria may be established by the faculty of the respective department.

7.4 Term Honors

Only matriculated students are eligible for term honors. Students who receive a grade of “I” will not be considered for term honors in that semester, with the following exception: students who complete the course within three weeks of the end of the final exam period may apply for term honors with the Registrar by the third week of the subsequent semester.

7.4.1

A student’s name is placed on the President’s List for each term in which the student has earned a grade-point average of 3.70 or higher while completing at least 12 credit hours that term.

7.4.2

A student’s name is placed on the Dean’s List each term in which the student has earned a grade-point average from 3.20 to less than 3.70 while completing at least 12 credit hours that term.

7.4.3

A part-time student’s name will be placed on the President’s List or Dean’s List if the student meets the GPA requirements as stated in 7.3.1 and 7.3.2 respectively, while completing 6 to 11 credit hours that term and having a cumulative earned total of at least 12 credit hours.

7.5 Academic Review

Student progress toward meeting graduation requirements in degree or certificate programs will be reviewed at regular intervals. The first review will occur when a student has either attempted 67

Academic Code


Academic Code

twelve credit hours or registered for twelve credit hours. Subsequent reviews will occur at the end of each succeeding term. The cumulative GPA is computed as defined in Section 7.2. It is based on credit hours attempted, that is, credits generated by courses for which one has received a grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F, FX.

7.5.1

Fresh Start Policy

The Fresh Start Policy applies to students who return to SCCC after an absence of five or more years and successfully complete 12 credits with a GPA of at least 2.00. Students may petition the Registrar to have their former academic record before the five-year absence accepted in the same manner as if the credits were transfer credits. That is, earned credits are carried forward for up to 30 hours of credit in which a grade of “C” or higher was earned. The cumulative GPA is based only on credits earned subsequent to the student’s re-entry. The student’s complete record, before and after academic forgiveness, remains on the transcript. This Fresh Start Policy can be made only once during a student’s career at SCCC.

Regulations for federal and state financial aid eligibility require that the credits attempted and GPA from all previous SCCC coursework is included in the calculation of Satisfactory Academic Progress for financial aid eligibility.

7.6 Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

A matriculated student is considered to be in satisfactory academic progress at the end of a term and for the subsequent term if the student maintains a level above the point of dismissal according to the criteria in Sections 7.6.1 and 7.6.2.

7.6.1

Satisfactory Progress

A student is considered to be making satisfactory progress if he/she maintains a cumulative GPA above the level of dismissal as defined in the table below:

Total Credit Hours Attempted

0-11 12-23 24-35 36-47 48-59 60 and above

Dismissal Cumulative GPA 0 Below 1.00 Below 1.50 Below 1.70 Below 1.90 Below 2.00

Total credit hours above include all credit hours attempted in Residence at Schenectady County Community College. In addition, applicable transfer credits are included in the Total Credit Hours Attempted, but they are not included in the calculation of the GPA.

Pursuit of Program

7.6.2

68

Students are considered to be in pursuit of program if they have successfully completed the specified minimum number of hours within each category as indicated in the table below.


Semester hours refers to credit-hours and developmental credit-equivalent hours taken in residence.

Successful completion is defined as receiving a grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, I, or P in any course taken in residence.

Total Semester Hours Registered

Minimum Number of Semester Hours Required to be Successfully Completed

0-22 23-35 36-47 48-59 60-71 72-83 84 and above

0 12 21 30 42 54 66

7.6.3

When a student has not met the requirements for Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), he/she will be notified by the Registrar. Registration does not become official until the College determines whether the student meets the requirements for SAP.

Academic Warning, Dismissal and Probation

7.6.4

1. If a review at the end of a term indicates that the student does not meet the requirements of Satisfactory Academic Progress, the student will be placed on Academic Warning for one term (fall, spring or summer). During the Academic Warning period, the student is limited to enrollment of no more than 13 credits. A student who still does not meet the SAP standards at the end of the warning period will be dismissed from his/her program. 2. A student who is dismissed from his/her program will need to submit an application for readmission and an academic plan for approval by the Readmission Committee. The academic plan must be developed with the assistance of an academic advisor and will outline the process the student will need to complete and return to the status of SAP. Those students readmitted will have the status of Academic Probation for one term (fall or spring).

Such students remain eligible to register for course work but lose eligibility to hold student office, participate in intercollegiate functions or serve as public representative of the College. During the probationary period, these students may be limited to enrollment in 13 credit hours.

3. If the student fails either to return to SAP status or to meet the conditions outlined in the academic plan at the end of the term in which he/she was readmitted, the student will be dismissed from his/her program.

69

Academic Code


7.7 Readmission

Academic Code

Students who have lost their matriculation through Academic Dismissal may apply for readmission to the College no later than December 15 for the spring semester and no later than August 15 for the fall semester.

7.7.1

In cases where students are dismissed based on pursuit of program requirements, application for readmission may be allowed after the December/August 15 deadline in which case the application process must be completed at least ten days before the start of the term in which readmission is to take place.

7.7.2

In cases where students are dismissed after a term with a semester GPA of 3.0 or higher, application for readmission may be allowed after the December/August 15 deadline in which case the application process must be completed at least ten days before the start of the term in which readmission is to take place.

7.7.3

Students initiate the process by completing the application form provided by the Registrar’s Office.

7.7.4

Readmission must be approved by the Vice President of Academic Affairs. This approval is based on the decision of an ad hoc committee appointed by the Vice President (whose membership is kept confidential). The committee is responsible for: (1) reviewing each applicant’s academic progress and (2) evaluating each applicant’s potential for successful continuation and program completion, and (3) making a determination to grant or deny the student’s readmission. The committee may also determine conditions to serve as a guide for successful continuation as well as a basis for future readmission decisions. The Vice President of Academic Affairs will notify the student as to the action on the application for readmission and, if granted, any conditions to be met.

7.7.5

Readmitted students will be subject to the program requirements in effect at the time they are reinstated as matriculated students. Any change in the program requirements resulting from the readmission process is subject to evaluation by the Department Dean as specified in Section 4.2.

7.7.6

After the student has received the readmission decision, a written appeal regarding that decision may be submitted to the Vice President not later than ten days after the decision has been made. Students may appeal if they possess additional evidence which was not presented to the Readmission Committee or new evidence has come to light. The Vice President of Academic Affairs will review the readmission application, documentation, any other pertinent data, and an oral statement from the student and will then render a decision. The student and the Registrar will be notified of the decision. The decision of the Vice President will be final.

7.7.7

Dismissed students pre-registered for the upcoming term will be dropped per Section 7.6.3 of the Academic Code.

70


Academic Code

8.0 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 8.1 Application for Graduation

In order to establish eligibility for graduation from either a certificate or degree program, each student must complete an application for graduation prior to or during registration for the spring semester immediately preceding the date of graduation.

8.2 Degree Programs Students must meet each of the following academic requirements to be eligible for an Associate Degree. 1) Candidates must meet the program requirements in effect at the time of their matriculation and earn a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00.

2) Candidates must hold a high school diploma or its equivalent.

3) Candidates must be matriculated in the program from which they wish to graduate at least one semester prior to graduation and meet the residence requirements for degree programs. 4) Candidates must be recommended for graduation by vote of the Academic Senate, or be approved by the President of the College when the vote is based on incorrect information.

8.2.1

Certain requirements may have been waived as provided for elsewhere in this Code.

8.3 A student who dies prior to the completion of requirements will be eligible for a posthumous awarding of the degree or certificate if at the time of death all requirements had been met or he/she was enrolled in the appropriate courses for completion at the time of death and the overall grade point average was 2.00 or higher. 8.4 Certificate Programs

Students must meet each of the following academic requirements to be eligible for a certificate:

1) Candidates must meet the program requirements in effect at the time of their matriculation and earn a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 2) Candidates must be matriculated in the program for which they wish to graduate at least one semester prior to graduation, and meet the residence requirements for certificate programs. 3) A student who dies prior to the completion of requirements will be eligible for a posthumous awarding of the degree or certificate if at the time of death all requirements had been met or he/ she was enrolled in the appropriate courses for completion at the time of death and the overall grade point average was 2.00 or higher. 4) Candidates must be recommended for graduation by vote of the Academic Senate, or be approved by the President of the College when the Academic Senate vote is based on incorrect information. 8.5 Discounting Grade Policy

For the purpose of meeting the minimum graduation grade-point average requirement, a student may petition the Vice President of Academic Affairs to discount grades of C- or lower from the 71


cumulative grade-point average. For the petition to be considered, the courses must not be required in the program in which the student is matriculated for graduation. Any courses which may serve as specific electives in the program of matriculation cannot be discounted. Petition for discount must be made in writing during the semester of graduation and requires the recommendation of the appropriate Division Dean. Petitions will be considered at the time of final graduation audit and may be granted at the sound discretion of the Vice President of Academic Affairs whose decision shall be final. The student’s cumulative GPA on the transcript will remain unchanged. The Registrar will report to the Academic Senate each year the number of proposed graduates who have been affected by the implementation of this policy.

Academic Code

8.6 Attendance at Graduation

Candidates for degrees and certificates can participate in SCCC’s Commencement ceremony if they have applied to graduate and are expected to complete their degree and/or certificate program requirements in August, December or May of the current academic year. Final clearance for degrees and certificates will be completed after Commencement when final grades are submitted. Identification of Honors candidates at the Commencement ceremony will be based on the student’s cumulative grade point averages excluding the final spring semester grades. Official honors and Academic Program Achievement winners will be determined after submission of final grades. | Participation in the Commencement ceremony does not ensure the degree or certificate will actually be awarded.

8.6.1

Candidates will be allowed to participate in SCCC=s commencement ceremony if they are within six credits of program completion, have registered for the required courses during the subsequent summer term, and can achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 at the end of the summer term.

Commencement Exercises will be conducted annually after the spring semester with the actual date specified in the official Academic Calendar. The responsibility of preparation for the ceremony rests with the Student Affairs Committee of the Academic Senate with supportive assistance by the appropriate administrative staff.

All members of the professional staff, designated as members of the Academic Senate, assume a professional obligation to participate in Commencement Exercises.

8.7 Additional Degree or Certificate

Students may earn an additional degree or certificate provided that the secondary program is essentially different from the primary program (i.e., the secondary program includes at least 15 credit hours of requirements not in common with the primary program), and that all degree or certificate requirements for both programs have been met.

8.7.1

Courses applied to the primary program may be applied to the secondary program; however, a minimum of 15 credit hours (residence credit) above the total credit hour requirements of the primary program must be completed.

8.7.2

An additional degree or certificate may be pursued in one of two ways: (1) subsequent to the completion of the primary program requiring readmission and

72


matriculation into the secondary program, or (2) simultaneously with the primary program (in which the student is matriculated) allowing for application to graduate from both programs at the same time.

Academic Code

Rev. 05/20/2013 APPENDIX A: Synopses of State University of New York and University of the State of New York Policies and Guidelines Cited in the Academic Code, and Other Supplemental Information. A1. Full Opportunity

Under the State University of New York Policy on Full Opportunity, the College is obligated to provide automatic acceptance to residents of Schenectady County who, during the previous year, graduated from high school or returned from service in the armed forces. This obligation is subject to appropriate deadlines established by the College in its admissions procedures.

Applications for admission are processed in the order received with preferential selection based on previous academic performance. Space is reserved, however, only for those applicants who pay the deposit established for that purpose.

The College agrees to provide such testing and evaluation as it finds necessary to determine the academic needs of its applicants and to provide, to the best of its ability, those developmental and ancillary services necessary to give its students a full opportunity for academic success.

The Full Opportunity concept does not prevent the College from establishing programs based on special arrangements with other institutions and placing restrictions on admission to such programs based on the terms of those arrangements.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 requires all colleges and universities to provide appropriate academic accommodations for all qualified students with a disability.

A2. General Equivalency Diploma The State Education Department will grant, upon application, a general equivalency diploma to a matriculated student who successfully completes 24 college level semester credits distributed as follows: • six credits in English language arts including writing, speaking and reading (literature) • six credits in mathematics • three credits in natural science • three credits in social science • three credits in humanities • three credits in career and technical education and/or foreign languages A3. Degree Distribution Requirements

73


The State Education Department provides that associate degrees may be granted for the completion of 60 semester credit hours of credits. The nature of the degree awarded depends upon the distribution of courses taken in three main areas: the humanities, the natural sciences or mathematics, and the social sciences.

An associate in arts degree program must contain at least 48 semester credit hours with reasonable distribution among the three areas and depth in some.

An associate in science degree program must contain at least 30 semester credit hours in the three areas with reasonable distribution and depth in one.

An associate in applied science degree must contain at least 20 semester credit hours balanced among the three areas.

Academic Code

A4. Credit Hour Definitions

State University of New York definitions indicate that a semester credit hour of credit is awarded for the equivalent of (1) fifteen class periods with a normal expectation of two hours of outside study for each class period, or (2) forty-five practicum periods with little or no outside preparation expected, or (3) thirty practicum periods with substantial outside preparation required, or (4) forty-five 50 minute sessions of student academic activity given initial guidance, review, criticism, and final evaluation.

A class period is a fifty minute period in which a group teaching method is employed, including recitations, lectures, discussion, demonstrations, or combinations of these.

A practicum period is a fifty minute period devoted to the direction and guidance of student application and/or development of principles and concepts in a particular physical environment. Included are laboratory, studio periods, drafting work, and field trips.

Guidelines are also provided for awarding credit by examination and for experimental learning.

A5. Approved Guides

Guides which have been approved for evaluating transfer credits for course work taken in noncollegiate institutions include:

“A Guide to Educational Programs in Non-Collegiate Organizations” published by the State Education Department.

“A Guide to Educational Experiences in the Armed Forces” published by the American Council on Education.

74


SCCC administers a number of scholarships provided through the Schenectady County Community College Foundation, Inc. as well as by community members, service organizations and the Student Government Association. These scholarships and awards vary in amount and are based on a variety of factors, including grade point average, financial need, academic program, number of earned credits and participation in campus life and activities. Applications for most of these scholarships are made available during early spring, beginning in the month of March through the Financial Aid Office. For additional information about these scholarships and awards visit the College’s website at www.sunysccc.edu/adm-fin/finschol. There are a number of departmental and special awards given to students in recognition of their academic achievement and service to the College and the community. These are listed in the College Catalog and are awarded generally to graduating students.

Dean’s List A full-time student’s name is placed on the Dean’s List each term in which the student has earned a G.P.A. from 3.20 to up to 3.70 while completing at least 12 credit hours that term. Part-time students completing six credit hours in a term and having accumulated 12 credit hours are also eligible.

President’s List A full-time student’s name is placed on the President’s List for each term in which the student has earned a G.P.A. of 3.70 or higher while completing at least 12 credit hours for that term. Part-time students completing six credit hours in a term and having accumulated 12 credit hours are also eligible.

National Honor Society - Phi Theta Kappa SCCC’s Alpha Zeta Upsilon chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the national honor society for two-year colleges, recognizes and rewards student academic achievement. The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa is to recognize and encourage scholarship among community/junior college students. Opportunities are provided for the development of leadership and service, for a stimulating intellectual climate, for exchange of ideas and ideals, for the lively fellowship for scholars and for students continuing their academic excellence. Phi Theta Kappa promotes high academic standards and scholarship, prepares future leaders, and promotes the good name and image of SCCC. Students invited to join this prestigious group have achieved a grade point average of 3.5 or higher and have taken a minimum of 30 credits while matriculated in one of the College’s Associate’s degree programs. They are entitled to wear a distinctive gold tassel at Commencement; their degree bears a special seal; and their transcripts note the honor. They are also eligible for special scholarships at 500 four-year colleges throughout the world and may be nominated for the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society All-New York Academic Team for Community Colleges. For more information on Phi Theta Kappa, see Carol DeFries, Professor/Chair, Humanities and Social Sciences Department, Elston Hall, Room 311.

75

Academic Scholarships, Honors & Awards

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS, HONORS AND AWARDS


Academic Scholarships, Honors & Awards

Special Awards The Student Affairs Committee selects graduating students for the following three awards which are announced at the Annual Honors Convocation held in May: • President’s Award: presented to a graduating student who has achieved at least a 3.0 grade-point average and has demonstrated excellence in community and or College service. • College Service Award: presented to a graduating student who has contributed most to the general welfare of the College through support of its activities and programs. • Community Service Award: presented to a graduating student who has contributed most to the general welfare of the off-campus community. In addition, the Student Affairs Committee selects a graduating student to be a speaker at the College’s Commencement. This process (announced in early Spring) provides students the chance to apply for this opportunity.

State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Student Excellence The most gifted and talented students attending the State University of New York are honored annually with the Chancellor’s Award for Student Excellence. Each student honored receives a framed certificate and a medallion, which may be worn at Commencement. Each campus President establishes a selection process to nominate exemplary members of their college community who are graduating. Campus Presidents nominate graduating students.

Who’s Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges Who’s Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges is a nationwide annual directory of outstanding students at two-year colleges. Students are nominated for this honor on the basis of academic achievement, extracurricular endeavors, and service to the community. For information, contact Student Affairs, Elston Hall, Room 222.

76


Academic Computing Lab Elston Hall, Rooms 529 and 530, 381-1487 Outer lab computers are available for use starting at 8:00 a.m., Monday through Friday. The Academic Computing Lab provides state-of-the-art computers with the latest Windows and Microsoft Office software in a user friendly environment. Through the lab, students have access to the Internet and may establish their own e-mail accounts. Lab assistants are on duty during all available lab hours to answer students’ hardware and software questions. In addition, workshops are provided to orient new students to the operations of the computer facilities and equipment. Additional academic computer facilities are available in the Library, departmental labs, the hallway outside the main computer lab and in the Learning Center. SCCC’s wireless network provides access to the Internet from personal laptop computers. The locations of access are as follows: the Main Computer Lab in Elston Hall, the first and second floors of the Begley Library, the Begley Building Lobby, the Commons in Elston Hall, the Lobby of the Center for Science and Technology, and the Math Science and Technology lobby located on the third floor of the Center for Science and Technology. For information about our wireless network, including access instructions, go to www.sunysccc.edu/academic/ acns/wireless. To log on to any of the SCCC Computers to access College storage space: Press Ctrl Alt Del - The Log On to windows screen will appear. Type your SCCC User ID (first six letters of your last name, plus your first initial and your middle initial; i.e., Christopher F. Columbus would be columbcf) and Password (your date of birth; i.e. MMDDYY@sccc) into the boxes and make sure the Log On box says SCCC. Make sure to log out when you are done. If you have any problems using our computers, please see the lab monitor/staff person who is on duty.

ADA Transition Services Elston Hall, Room 222, 381-1345 The ADA Transition Services Office provides information and referral to programs and services that may be appropriate for students with disabilities. In addition, the ADA Transition Services Office serves as liaison with community agencies that sponsor students with disabilities. See the ADA Transition Services listing under the previous Student Affairs section for information about how to register with this office to obtain academic accommodations. To register with the ADA Transition Services and obtain more information about its services, please call (518) 381-1345 or visit Elston Hall, Room 222. Visit the College’s website for more specific information about ADA Transition Services at www. sunysccc.edu/student/sds.htm

77

Academic Support Services

ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES


Begley Library Begley Building, Reference Desk, 381-1239

Monday-Thursday

8:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Friday

8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Saturday

11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Academic Support Services

Hours of operation are posted on the Web page, ANGEL, and in the library. Begley Library offers a selection of resources and services including: • Ask Us - Chat online or e-mail questions to a network of college librarians, including SCCC’s librarians. • Books - Borrow from our collection of over 87,000 print volumes. • E-Books: - Use books, even when the Library is closed. • E-Reserves - Access Library reserve material online, via ANGEL, from on-or off-campus. • Find Articles - Search our online collection of thousands of licensed periodical titles, any time of night or day, from on- or off-campus; or access our print collection of magazines, journals and newspapers during Library hours. • Individual Reference Consultations - Work individually with a Librarian on your research. • E-Interlibrary Loan - Make online requests for items not owned by our Library, including e-desktop delivery of articles. • Library Computers - Research, write papers, or access the Internet during Library hours. • Library Laptops - Borrow one of our wireless laptops for use in a comfortable spot in the Library. • Reference - Ask our friendly Reference Librarians for assistance in using the Library. • Wireless Access - Access the Internet and Library materials on your own laptop using the College’s wireless network, available in the Library or in the lobby seating outside the Library. • Work or relax in a comfortable building with a variety of seating and study spaces, plus technology, information and assistance at your fingertips.

Other Valuable Resources for Students Accounting/Computer Tutor Lab Elston Hall, Room 427, 381-1246 These tutor labs are designed for short-term, drop-in assistance in accounting and computer-related courses. Students can stop in during the hours scheduled for help with a particular class to receive tutorial assistance without an appointment.

78


The Language Laboratory provides academic support in the learning of languages other than English. Audio, video and computer equipment assist students in the learning and mastering of three languages: Spanish, French and Italian. Use of the Language Laboratory is required for all students taking these languages. Learning Center/Writing Lab Elston Hall, Room 523, 381-1246 Contact Siu Ng, Director of Academic Services, at 381-1249 or ngst@sunysccc.edu. The Learning Center provides academic assistance to students who need extra help with reading, writing or study skills. Assistance is available through individualized instruction by professional and peer tutors, computerassisted instruction, study groups in content areas and workshops. The Learning Center also serves as a writing lab to all students who need assistance in written assignments including research papers. Computers are available for word processing and using educational software. Adaptive computer technology is available for students with disabilities. Free workshops are scheduled throughout the semester for all students. Math Lab Elston Hall, Room 518 or 519, 381-1435 or 381-1398 The Math Lab offers individualized tutoring on a drop-in basis in most mathematics courses. Professional tutors assist students who have problems with homework, who need to refresh their mathematics skills or who want help going over material not clearly understood in class. In addition to tutors, computer-software tutorials are available. Testing Center Elston Hall, Room 427, 381-1293 Contact Michelle Aydinian, Testing Center Coordinator, at 381-1293 or testingcenter@sunysccc.edu. Tutor Services Elston Hall, Room 328, 381-1461 Contact Ronalyn Wilson, Tutor Services Coordinator, at 381-1461 or wilsonrg@sunysccc.edu. Tutor Services provides weekly tutoring sessions in most courses as scheduled by the Tutor Coordinator, Ms. Ronalyn Wilson. Tutoring is FREE to students enrolled in the College. Faculty-approved peer tutors are trained in effective tutoring techniques. Applications are available in Elston Hall, Rooms 328, 400, 518 and 523. Individuals can apply online at www.sunysccc.edu. In addition, if you would like to become a tutor, please contact Ms. Wilson at 381-1461. NOTE: Schedules for the Computer Tutor Lab and Accounting Tutor Lab will be posted around campus at the start of each semester, and online at www.sunysccc.edu/academic/devstudy/acc_cis_labs. html.

79

Academic Support Services

Language Lab Elston Hall, Room 520, 381-1373


TRIO Student Support Services Elston Hall, Room 328, 381-1465

Academic Support Services

Mr. Daniel McCrea, Director The TRIO Student Support Services Program offers individualized services to give students an extra edge in their college studies. TRIO provides personal attention through academic counseling, career guidance, tutoring skills building and personal development workshops, use of a computer lab and cultural activities. An additional service is educational consulting for students with learning difficulties. Admission to the program is by application only and all services and activities are free. You are invited to any of our activities to find out more about the TRIO program. Workshops and programs will be offered throughout the year. Please stop by the TRIO Office for details. Services provided include: tutorial services; academic, financial, or personal counseling; resources for students with learning disabilities; assistance in securing admission and financial aid for enrollment in four-year institutions; information about career options; mentoring, and direct financial assistance (grant aid) to a limited number of current TRIO SSS participants who are receiving Federal Pell Grants.

80


Alcohol And Drug: Substance Abuse Substance abuse has a harmful and often devastating effect upon individuals, families and our communities. Consequently, Schenectady County Community College has developed a substance abuse program to assist our students. This section was developed to provide you with a greater awareness and understanding of the health risks and some of the legal sanctions under local, state and federal laws that are associated with substance abuse. In addition, information is provided to identify various local agencies where assistance services are available to those individuals with substance abuse concerns. During the academic year many programs and activities will be presented to help you to learn more about and deal with substance abuse. College Drug and Alcohol Policy • Alcoholic Beverage. Except for appropriate classroom activities or approved student activities, the possession and/or consumption of any alcoholic beverage is a violation of the Student Code of Conduct. Possession and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages by students participating in a college club or college sponsored trip or an off-campus activity is also prohibited. • Drugs And/Or Drug Paraphernalia. Possession or use of any illegal controlled substance, drug, or drug paraphernalia is prohibited and will be reported to local and state authorities and will also be subject to disciplinary action by the College. The College will cooperate with local and state authorities on any cases of suspected illegal use, possession or distribution of state controlled drugs. Overview of Local, State and Federal Alcohol and Drug Laws Schenectady County Community College believes that it is important for you to know about the laws against illegal drugs and alcohol. Therefore, the following is a brief overview of local, state and federal laws governing the possession, use and distribution of alcohol and illegal drugs. It is not intended as a complete listing of every applicable drug and alcohol statute. Alcohol Laws: Open Container Law The City of Schenectady, like many other cities, towns and villages, has an ordinance prohibiting the consumption of or possession of an open container with the intent to consume an alcoholic beverage in any public place or in any vehicle. Violation of this law is punishable by a fine of up to $250 or imprisonment up to 15 days. Second offenses warrant a fine of up to $500 and up to 30 days of imprisonment. New York Alcoholic Beverage Control Law New York prohibits selling or giving any alcoholic beverage to a minor (anyone under 21) or to a person already intoxicated. A violation of this law can be punished by a fine of up to $200, five days in jail, or both. Any minor using false identification to purchase alcohol faces a maximum fine of $100; or up to 30 hours of community service; or participation in an alcohol awareness program. If the I.D. used is a New York state driver’s license, the minor faces a 90-day suspension.

81

Policies and Procedures

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES


New York Vehicle and Traffic Law It is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of at least $350 and/or imprisonment for up to one year, plus suspension and/or revocation of your driver’s license, to operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content of 0.8%. Multiple convictions result in more serious penalties. Drug Laws:

Policies and Procedures

New York Public Health Law It is a violation of this law to:

a. sell or possess a hypodermic needle without a doctor’s written prescription;

b. grow marijuana or allow it to be grown;

c. manufacture or sell an imitation controlled substance;

d. inhale any glue that produces vapors;

e. sell glue for this purpose.

The above are Class A misdemeanors punishable by up to one year in a local penitentiary. Any private vehicle, boat or plane used to transport an illegal substance can be seized and forfeited under the law. New York Vehicle and Traffic Law The rules and penalties for drinking and driving also apply to driving while impaired by the use of a drug. New York Penal Law Most crimes involving the unlawful possession and distribution of drugs are defined under the New York state Penal Law. The Penal Law contains exhaustive lists of various controlled substances, specific types of offenses, and sanctions ranging from a fine of not more than $100 to imprisonment for life. Examples of crimes under New York state law include loitering with the intent to use drugs, using or possessing drug paraphernalia, and selling or possessing actual controlled substances. A person with no previous drug or marijuana convictions in three years who is found guilty of possessing less than 25 grams (about 9/10 of an ounce) of marijuana for private use may be fined up to a maximum of $100, whereas conviction of possessing even one gram of a controlled narcotic substance can result in imprisonment for up to one year. The criminal sanctions become more serious depending on the amount possessed and whether or not it is possessed with the intent to distribute. For example, possession of even one gram of a narcotic drug with the intent to sell it is a Class B felony punishable by up to 25 years in prison. A person who is convicted of the sale of more than two ounces of a controlled narcotic substance in New York state can be sentenced to a term of imprisonment for life. However, the Penal Law also provides for a variety of sanctions depending on the offense.

Assistance Services Counseling and Treatment Services Self-Help Information Alcoholics Anonymous 82


Policies and Procedures

Schenectady (518) 463-0906 Alcoholism Treatment Center Saratoga Springs (518) 587-8800 302 State Street Schenectady, NY 12305

(518) 346-4436

Carver Community Counseling Services 846 State Street Schenectady, NY 12307 (518) 382-7838 Treatment Centers/Residential Bridge Center 72 Union Avenue Schenectady, NY 12308 (518) 346-1277 Conifer Park 79 Glenridge Road Glenville, NY 12302

(518) 399-6446

Hope House Adult Residential Program 261 North Pearl Street Albany, NY 12207 (518) 465-2441 Comprehensive Alcoholism Services Cocaine Helpline/Substance Abuse Treatment The Cocaine Helpline is an around-the-clock information and referral service staffed by trained counselors who are also recovering cocaine abusers. 1-800-662-HELP or 1-800-662-4357 County of Schenectady Joint Labor-Management Employee Assistance Program Jack Cadalso, Community Services (518) 356-4272

83


Basic Emergency Procedures for Safety and Medical Purposes (For medical or other type of emergency) 1. Call Security at 381-1308 or pick up a red emergency phone. Tell Security: • the nature of the emergency, • the location, and • whether or not Emergency Medical Services are needed. (Someone should stay with the injured or ill person. Tell him/her that help is being called.)

Policies and Procedures

2. The College has installed emergency phones in the parking lots. 3. If you need EMS, dial 911. (Note: To access an outside line from any campus telephone, you must first dial 9* and listen for a dial tone. Then proceed with dialing 911.) Say that you are calling from SCCC and describe the emergency and the exact location in the building. If possible, arrange to meet them at the building entrance and escort them to the scene of the emergency.

Blue Lights – Rath Emergency Telephone User Instructions Emergency telephones have been strategically installed throughout the College’s parking areas. The emergency telephones have a blue light to assist users with identifying the location of the phone at night. Instructions are on the emergency phone directly above the call button. Instructions are also provided in Braille. Using the emergency telephone is simple: 1. Press call button. Once the button is depressed, the blue strobe light atop the unit will flash. The call is answered by campus security who will immediately be able to identify the emergency telephone that has been activated. 2. State the emergency. Security will assist the caller in gaining as much information as possible in order to assist in the emergency. Security will stay in contact with the caller continuously until the appropriate responders (Police, paramedics, Security) arrive to the scene. 3. Responder is sent to the scene. Responders will be sent to the aid of the caller and/or individual(s) in need of care. Once the responders are at the scene, Security will end the call. The blue flashing light will remain active until the call is ended and responders are present. 4. An incident report is filed. Follow up on the incident will be done as appropriate to the specific incident. For more information visit SCCC’s website and view the demonstration of how to use these “Blue Lights” in the event of an emergency.

84


Hate Crimes and the Law It is a Schenectady County Community College and Police mandate to protect all members of the Schenectady County Community College community by preventing and prosecuting bias or hate crimes that occur within the campus’s jurisdiction. Hate crimes, also called bias crimes or bias-related crimes, are criminal activity motivated by the perpetrator’s bias or attitude against an individual victim or group based on perceived or actual personal characteristics, such as their race, religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or student activities disability. Hate/bias crimes have received renewed attention in recent years, particularly since the passage of the federal Hate/Bias Crime Reporting Act of 1990 and the New York State Hate Crimes Act of 2000 (Penal Law Article 485). Copies of the New York Law are available from the Director of Campus Safety, 220 Elston Hall. Penalties for bias-related crimes are very serious and range from fines to imprisonment for lengthy periods, depending on the nature of the underlying criminal offense, the use of violence or previous convictions of the offender. Perpetrators who are students will also be subject to campus disciplinary procedures where sanctions including dismissal are possible. In addition to preventing and prosecuting hate/bias crimes, Schenectady County Community College’s Student Affairs Office, Human Resources Office and Security also assist in addressing bias-related activities that do not rise to the level of a crime. These activities, referred to as bias incidents and defined by the State University of New York as acts of bigotry, harassment, or intimidation directed at a member or group within the College community based on national origin, ethnicity, race, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, student activities disability, veteran status, color, creed, or marital status, may be addressed through the College’s discrimination complaint procedure or the campus Code of Conduct. Bias incidents can be reported to Campus Security as well as to the Human Resources Office, which is located in Elston Hall, Room 121. If you are a victim of, or witness to, a hate/bias crime on campus, report it to Campus Security, either in person or by dialing extension 1308 on campus or using a Red Emergency Phone located throughout our campus. Security will investigate and follow the appropriate adjudication procedures. Victims of bias crime or bias incidents can avail themselves of counseling and support services from the campus through Student Affairs, located in Elston Hall, Room 222. Counselors are available to assist. More information about bias-related crimes, including up-to-date statistics on bias crimes is available. For more information, contact the Director of Campus Safety, at (518) 381-1418.

85

Policies and Procedures

Bias Crimes Prevention Statement


Campus Notification Procedures in the Event of Building Evacuation

1. The signal for evacuation will be the continuous sounding of the fire alarm system.

2. All faculty, staff and students shall evacuate the building. (Faculty and staff should inspect the area for which they have responsibility to insure that everyone has promptly evacuated the area.)

3. In the event of fire:

a. Activate the nearest emergency fire pull station. b. Do not attempt to extinguish the fire. c. Do not use elevators. Use fire tower stairwells.

Policies and Procedures

d. Assemble outside at designated assembly areas. e. Individuals physically unable to use the stairway can remain in a fire tower/area of refuge. Use red phone to alert security of your location Officials will aid in safely evacuating these individuals in areas of refuge. f. If heavy smoke prevents you from reaching a fire exit:

• go to the nearest classroom or office;

• close the door and open the windows;

• seal the cracks around the door to keep smoke out;

• stay near the window until firefighters can reach you.

All information concerning the emergency should be directed to Security. Dial extension 381-1308 or use the red emergency phones to report your location and/or any additional information. Dialing 911 is also an option.

86


Policies and Procedures

Campus Notification Procedures in the Event of Concern or Threat of Suicide All suicide threats/attempts must be taken seriously. Warning signals include: • recent dramatic personality change; • psychosocial stressor (trouble with family, friends, or disciplinary crisis); • writing, thinking, or talking about death or dying; • altered mental status (agitation, hearing voices, delusions, violence, and intoxication). These steps are to be followed should the individual make the threat in person: 1. The individual is to be kept under observation during the time of the immediate threat and will be supervised at all times.

2 Security is to be contacted immediately (extension 1308) and directed to either:

a. respond to the scene immediately so as to assist with supervision of the individual while police are called (911) OR b. call the Schenectady Police (911) immediately and then respond to the scene to assist with supervision of the individual. 3. If the individual is a student, the student will be provided contact information of a College administrator or SCCC Counselor. The student will be encouraged to share this information with the paramedics/hospital. The student also will be encouraged to contact this individual should s/he be out of classes for a period of time and upon his/her return to campus. 4. The situation will be turned over to the police, the paramedics, and or the hospital for the necessary medical attention. 5. A complete incident report is to be filed by all parties involved in addressing the situation. Incident reports will be collected by Security. 6. Should the individual return to campus, a longer term monitoring of the student by an SCCC Counselor may need to be arranged. 7. The Vice President of Student Affairs will work with the appropriate campus staff to determine if any additional notification or action is appropriate. These steps are to be followed should the individual make the threat by phone: 1. Keep the person on the telephone by encouraging the person to talk while simultaneously gathering as much information as possible. 2. While the person is on the telephone try to enlist help, if possible, from someone else (written notes). Have person contact police (911) if the situation is extremely critical (examples: person has a weapon, person has taken pills). 3. If not possible to keep the person on the phone, and/or no one else is available to assist, make contact with the police (911). 4. The Vice President of Student Affairs will work with the appropriate campus staff to determine if any additional notification or action is appropriate. 87


Campus Notification Procedures in the Event of a Disruption on Campus

1. Security is to be notified immediately. (Dial ext. 1308 or use an emergency phone.)

2. Security will respond to the scene and will relocate the individual(s) involved.

3. The Security Desk Guard will contact the appropriate offices and/or the Schenectady Police depending on the severity of the disruption and individuals involved (e.g., student, non-student, employee).

Policies and Procedures

4. The College administrator will establish contact with the appropriate staff to address the issue and restore campus order. 5. Security and the College administrator will collect statements from all parties involved (to include any witnesses). An Incident Report will be initiated by and filed with Security. 6. Recognizing that each situation is unique, potential actions could include (but are not limited to):

• Situation is resolved at the scene.

• Deans/Vice Presidents meet with individual and all parties involved. Possible actions include (but not limited to): behavioral contract, reprimand with warning, mediation or counseling, disciplinary action, referral to an outside agency.

• Individual (particularly if not a student) is escorted off campus by College Security.

• Depending on the severity of the disruption, Schenectady City Police are called to take appropriate action based on the information collected/witnessed by Security or College staff. • Student is excluded and summarily suspended from campus (as per The College’s Student Code of Conduct). • Student is referred to the Student Affairs Committee on Discipline and a hearing is scheduled. 7. Following the situation, the appropriate Dean/Vice President will work with the staff involved and with Security to evaluate the response to the situation, to review the actions taken, and, where appropriate, make recommendations for responding to future situations.

Child Safety Procedures For the safety of children and to maintain an academic environment, children are not permitted in any instructional areas, to include classrooms, laboratories and library, and children are not to be left unattended in any area of the College. Parents will be asked to accompany their children off campus under these circumstances. Photographing children while in the Child Care Center or while on campus is permitted only with consent by the Child Care Center and the parents of the child(ren). Information regarding child care may be obtained from the campus Child Care Center, 381-1375. 88


Schenectady County Community College seeks to achieve a culturally diverse environment where the contributions of all individuals are recognized and valued. It is our goal to work toward achieving an appreciation for cultures and contemporary issues related to the inclusion of multicultural experiences. The College continues to strengthen avenues for better understanding and appreciation of individual differences. Schenectady County Community College affirms that bias-related incidents related to race, creed, gender, national origin, age, student activities disability, sexual orientation, veteran status, or marital status will not be tolerated on campus. Every effort is made to provide opportunities for prevention and awareness programs to the College community that foster a climate inclusive of all people and to minimize bias-related incidents. The College Affirmative Action Officer can answer questions or concerns related to cultural diversity and affirmative action.

89

Policies and Procedures

Commitment to Cultural Diversity


Computer Use Policy Registered students are encouraged to apply for a campus E-mail account by contacting the Academic Computing Office, Elston Hall, Room 530. Users of College computer accounts and systems are required to abide by the SCCC Computer Policies and Procedures, copies of which are available in the Academic Computing Lab, Begley Library and on the SCCC website. This policy outlines both appropriate and unacceptable uses of the College’s E-mail system, responsibilities of users and privacy policies relating to SCCC’s website. E-mail accounts remain valid during the period of enrollment at SCCC.

Policies and Procedures

For complete Computer Use Policies and Procedures, visit the College website, www.sunysccc.edu/academic/acns/polproc.html.

Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal authority, one or more of the exclusive rights granted to the copyright owner under section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code). These rights include the right to reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context, downloading or uploading substantial parts of a copyrighted work without authority constitutes an infringement. Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505. Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense. For more information, please see the website of the U.S. Copyright Office at www.copyright.gov.

Crime Statistics Availability Statement (Clery Statement) In accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (1998), Schenectady County Community College annually provides information relating to campus crime statistics and security measures to the U.S. Department of Education. A copy of Schenectady County Community College’s statistics, as reported annually to the U.S. Department of Education, will be provided upon request by the Office of Planning and Development, Elston Hall, Room 120, and can be obtained electronically from the U. S. Department of Education website at http://ope. ed.gov/security/. Approved by the Board of Trustees - Resolution #08-78, July 21, 2008

Emergency Closing Procedures In the event that it is necessary to cancel or delay classes due to weather or other conditions concerning safety, the College notifies the School Closing Network. The decision to cancel DAYTIME classes is made by 6 a.m. The decision to cancel EVENING classes is made by 2 p.m. However, if the weather 90


AM WROW-AM 590 WGY-AM 810 WOFX-AM 980

FM WFLY-FM 92.3 WYJB-FM 95.5 JAMZ-FM 96.3 WTRY-FM 98.3 WRVE-FM 99.5 MAGIC-FM 100.9 WKKS-FM 102.3 WHRL-FM 103.1 WPYX-FM 106.5 WGNA-FM 107.7

TELEVISION

WRGB-TV Channel 6 CAPITAL NEWS 9-TV Channel 9 WTEN-TV Channel 10 WNYT-TV Channel 13 WXXA-TV FOX 23

The stations are asked to read the following: “Classes at Schenectady County Community College are cancelled/delayed. The College is open for the conduct of other business.” If classes are delayed a specific start time will be announced. An announcement regarding class cancellation and delays is also provided on the College phone system, (518) 381-1200 and the College website: www.sunysccc.edu. SCCC utilizes NYAlert for notification of emergency situations to include class cancellations due to inclement weather.

Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act The Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act requires co-educational institutions of postsecondary education that participate in a Title IV, federal student financial assistance program, and have an intercollegiate athletic program, to prepare an annual report to the U.S. Department of Education on athletic participation, staffing, and revenues and expenses, by men’s and women’s teams. The Department will use this information in preparing its required report to the Congress on gender equity in intercollegiate athletics. Schenectady County Community College is in compliance with the Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act. Annually the College reports information about all our intercollegiate athletic programs. Equity in athletics data is now available on the Web at: http://ope.ed.gov/athletics. This also site provides data from thousands of colleges and universities in a convenient searchable format so as to provide for comparisons to be made.

Food and Beverage Policy One of the issues of primary concern at Schenectady County Community College has been the attractiveness and cleanliness of campus facilities. This issue is also one which has been identified in the College Directions with a goal as follows: “To provide a quality educational environment including 91

Policies and Procedures

worsens between 2 and 4 p.m. the College will reassess conditions and cancel EVENING classes by 4 p.m.


well-maintained facilities of sufficient capacity to support the teaching/learning/service offerings; an atmosphere of safety, security and cleanliness; and a campus which generates a pride of association among students employees, and the community.” In an effort to maintain facilities, reduce maintenance costs and provide an attractive environment which is conducive to the educational purposes of the College, the following policy has been adopted by the Board of Trustees:

Policies and Procedures

Consumption of food and/or beverages will not be permitted in the following areas of the College campus:

• Classrooms/Lecture Halls • Carl B. Taylor Community Auditorium • Laboratories

Individuals are encouraged to use the Commons area located in Elston Hall which provides facilities for dining. Should there be a need to transport food/beverages from that area, containers must be properly covered. Exceptions to this policy may be granted by the College President or his/her designee for programs, events or activities sponsored by the College (or one of its units), or per the Policy on Use of Facilities by Outside Groups. Approved by the Board of Trustees - Resolution #92-22, August 16, 2004

Immunization Procedure New York State Public Health Law requires that all students, whose birth date is on or after January 1, 1957, MUST provide official documentation of immunizations prior to the first day of classes. A student NOT in compliance with the law within 30 days of the beginning of the semester WILL be withdrawn from the College with loss of the semester’s course credit and no tuition refund, and will not be permitted to register for an ensuing semester until proof of immunity is provided. For the College’s Procedures for Implementation of NYS Public Health Laws on Immunizations and Meningococcal Meningitis, visit www.sunysccc.edu/student/imreg.htm or contact the Student Affairs Office, Elston Hall, Room 222. Phone: (518) 381-1344, OR Fax: (518) 381-1477. NOTE: To assist with your needs, Schenectady County Public Health Services offers immunization clinics for Schenectady County residents. Call 346-2187 to schedule an appointment.

Parking Regulations Campus Security will enforce these regulations. Violators of these regulations will be subject to disciplinary action. 1. All motor vehicles parked on campus by students, faculty or staff (full- and part-time, day or evening students) must be registered with campus security and the appropriate College issued parking tag displayed. Motorcycles must be registered with security. Failure to register your 92


Policies and Procedures

vehicle and properly display your College issued parking tag will result in the ticketing and/or towing of your vehicle (at owner’s expense). 2. Unregistered vehicles driven on a temporary basis must be registered upon arrival with security. Security will issue the appropriate parking tag and/or a temporary pass to park in the proper area. Students, faculty/staff driving an unregistered vehicle may not park in the visitor’s spaces. 3. The campus speed limit is 15 mph. Speeding, reckless driving or other moving violations are grounds for disciplinary action. 4. Students, faculty, and staff will be ticketed, and/or towed (at owner’s expense) if they park in the following areas: • Fire and emergency lanes • Loading zones and service entrances • Visitor parking area • In roadways • In two or more parking places • On campus lawns • Disabled parking spaces (unless the vehicle is properly labeled with an SCCC “Special” parking tag. A New York State Disabled Parking Permit must be accompanied by an SCCC “Special” parking tag.) 5. Failure to obey verbal parking instructions from College security will result in the issuing of a parking violation. First violation: $10; second violation: $20; unauthorized disabled parking: $50. 6. Failure to pay parking fines will result in the student’s name being placed on the College hold and obligation list, which will prevent the issuing of grades and transcripts to that student as well as prohibiting him/her from registering for additional classes. 7. Individuals who accumulate three or more unpaid parking violations will be advised, by certified letter, to pay those outstanding violations within ten (10) class days. Individuals whose parking violations remain unpaid after those ten days have elapsed will have their parking permit revoked; a vehicle with a revoked parking permit will be subject to towing (at owner’s expense) from the campus. 8. Tickets are issued to students in violation of parking regulations. Students who have questions regarding a ticket should contact Campus Security. An appeal form can be found on the College’s website. An appeal of a parking ticket must be forwarded in writing to the Office of the Vice President of Administration within five (5) class days of when the ticket was issued; the appeal should enclose a copy of the ticket and the reasons the student believes the ticket is invalid. The student will receive an e-mail response to their campus e-mail address regarding the disposition of the appeal within five (5) class days of when the appeal was received.

93


Poster Policy • All posters, to include information for posting on the computer, must be approved by Student Affairs. The poster will be stamped and initialed if approved for posting. • All publicity must bear the name of the sponsoring group. Please have the sponsoring group name stand out on each poster.

• The sponsoring group must be affiliated with SCCC.

Policies and Procedures

• Posters are to be placed on designated bulletin boards only — not on windows, doors, walls or pillars. • Publicity must be removed by the sponsoring group within 24 hours after the conclusion of the advertised event. Failure to do so can result in a fine of $1 per sign left posted.

• The neatness of material and the maintenance thereof are the responsibility of the sponsoring group. Posters must be no larger than 8 1/2”x 11”, unless approved otherwise by Student Affairs.

Stalking Policy Statement of Purpose Schenectady County Community College (SCCC) is committed to providing a hostile-free environment for all members of the campus community. For this reason, SCCC does not tolerate stalking, and will pursue the perpetrators of such acts to the fullest extent possible. SCCC is also committed to supporting victims of stalking through the appropriate provision of safety and support services. This policy applies to all SCCC students, faculty, staff and all visitors to the SCCC community. This policy should be used as an authoritative guide and mechanism for student conduct as well as an addendum to the College’s Campus Critical Incident Management Plan in compliance with the Higher Education Act, the Clery Act and the 2013 Violence Against Women Act. Stalking incidents are occurring at an alarming rate on the nation’s college campuses. It is a crime that happens to men and women of all races/ethnicities, religions, ages, abilities, sexual orientations, and sexual identity. It is a crime that can affect every aspect of a victim’s life. Stalking often begins with phone calls, e-mails, social networking posts and/or letters, and can sometimes escalate to violence. Definition Stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. Course of conduct is defined as “a pattern of actions composed of more than one act over a period of time, however short, evidencing a continuity of conduct.” The term “stalking” means (SUNY, 2013) engaging in any behaviors or activities composed of more than one act over a period of time directed as a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to—

a. fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or

b. suffer substantial emotional distress.

Stalking behaviors may include, but are not limited to, the following: 94


• Use of online, electronic, or digital technologies, including: posting of pictures or information in chat rooms or on websites, or installing spyware or GPS to monitor a victim. • Pursuing, following, waiting, or showing up uninvited at or near a residence, workplace, classroom, or other places frequented by the victim.

• Trespassing in the context of stalking

• Vandalism in the context of stalking

• Non-consensual touching

• Direct verbal or physical threats

• Defamation of victims character

Reproting Procedures SCCC encourages reporting of all incidents of stalking to Campus Security and respects that whether or not to report to the police is a decision that the victim needs to make. In certain instances, SCCC may need to report an incident to law enforcement authorities. Such circumstances include any incidents that warrant the undertaking of additional safety and security measures for the protection of the victim and the campus community or other situations in which there is clear and imminent danger, and when a weapon may be involved. Personal safety concerns are often very important for stalking victims. Crisis intervention and victim safety concerns will take precedence. Safety Accommodations for Victims Schenectady County Community College is committed to supporting victims by providing the necessary safety accommodations and support services. Victims of stalking are entitled to reasonable accommodations. Due to the complex nature of this problem, the victim may need additional assistance in obtaining one or more of the following:

• No-contact order

• Services of a student victim advocate

• Witness impact statement

• Chance in an academic schedule

• The imposition of an interim suspension on the accused

• The provision of resources for medical and/or psychological support

For assistance obtaining these safety accommodations, please contact either the Vice President of Student Affairs or the Director of Human Resources.

95

Policies and Procedures

• Non-consensual communication, including face-to-face communication, telephone calls, voice messages, e-mails, text messages, pictures, written letters, gifts, or any other communications that are undesired and place another person in fear.


Procedures for Resolving Complaints of Sexual Harassment Introduction In order to comply with federal and state requirements proscribing sexual harassment, the following policy is to provide for the processing of claims alleging sexual harassment. Definitions Sexual harassment is unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

Policies and Procedures

1. Submission to such conduct is made (either explicitly or implicitly) a term or condition of an individual’s employment or enrollment; 2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions affecting such individual; 3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or academic environment; 4. Expressed or implied requests or demands are made in exchange for keeping or advancing in a job or receiving a higher grade. Hostile Environment It is recognized that supervisors and faculty members, by the nature of their positions, necessarily embody unequal power relationships with their subordinates and students respectively. Because of the inherent power differences in these relationships, the potential exists for the less powerful to perceive a coercive element in suggestions of activities outside those appropriate to the professional relationship. In light of this, all members of the College community are urged to be conscientious in evaluating their own behavior. A hostile environment may include, but is not limited to, such actions as:

1. Sex-oriented humor or abuse that includes derogatory or dehumanizing gender reference;

2. Physical contacts such as patting, pinching or frequently and intentionally brushing against another’s body;

3. Subtle or overt pressure for sexual activity.

Retaliation is any adverse action taken to try to threaten or penalize someone for reporting or opposing a claimed discriminatory act or practice or to prevent the complainant from participating in a discrimination proceeding. Retaliation against anyone who has filed a sexual harassment complaint whether the complaint is found to be valid or invalid is prohibited under this Policy and will be processed as a separate, independent complaint whether the retaliation is initiated by the harasser or anyone participating in or involved in the discrimination or the investigation of the discrimination complaint. Encouraging or promoting retaliation against a complainant also violates this Policy. Examples of retaliation include, but are not limited to, unfair grading, unfair performance evaluations, unfair assignments, the withholding of or delay in providing necessary information, ridicule, oral or written threats, 96


In addition to the protections against retaliation identified herein, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) also protects individuals from coercion, intimidation, threats, harassment, or interference in the exercise of rights granted to him/her by the ADA. Anyone intentionally filing a complaint in retaliation or bad faith to penalize or threaten a student, employee, contractor or intern or who encourages another to file such a complaint will be subject to formal action under this Policy and/or the SCCC Student Code of Conduct. Procedures for Resolving Complaints of Sexual Harassment 1. Any student or employee at Schenectady County Community College who alleges that an act of discrimination based upon sex has been committed shall notify the Affirmative Action Officer and complete the complaint forms provided by the College within ten (10) business days after the alleged event occurred. Forms are available in the Personnel/Affirmative Action Office, which is located in Elston Hall, Room 126. The complainant will be provided with information regarding alternate dispute resolution procedures. 2. Within 20 days after receipt of the complaint, the Affirmative Action Officer will investigate the reported complaint of sexual harassment. The goal of this informal phase is to resolve the issues to the satisfaction of all concerned. Every effort will be made to resolve complaints on an informal basis among the parties involved. Only those individuals with a need to know will be made aware of the complaint. 3. The Affirmative Action Officer will render a written decision and forward the decision to the President. The complainant will be notified in writing of the Affirmative Action Officer’s decision. Appeal Process: 1. Appeals shall be initiated in writing by the complainant and must be submitted to the President or designee within five (5) business days of receipt of the decision. a. The President of the College will review the file of the complaint and render a decision in writing within ten (10) business days. b. The complainant will be notified in writing and provided a copy of the President’s decision.

2. Contractual obligations will be complied with throughout these procedures.

Approved by the Schenectady County Community College Board of Trustees, Resolution #91-62, June 17, 1991 Amended by the Schenectady County Community College Board of Trustees Resolution 08-59, June 16, 2008 and Resolution #09-25, March 16, 2009

97

Policies and Procedures

bribes, the unfair increase or decrease of work loads, the arbitrary denial of leave, or the cancellation of classes.


Section 504/Title IX Procedures for Resolving Complaints of Disability and Gender Discrimination

Policies and Procedures

Commitment to Cultural Diversity Schenectady County Community College seeks to achieve a culturally diverse environment where the contributions of all individuals are recognized and valued. It is our goal to work toward achieving an appreciation for cultures and contemporary issues related to the inclusion of multicultural experiences. The College continues to strengthen avenues for better understanding and appreciation of individual differences. Schenectady County Community College affirms that bias-related incidents related to race, creed, gender, national origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, veteran status, or marital status will not be tolerated on campus. Every effort is made to provide opportunities for prevention and awareness programs to the College community that foster a climate inclusive of all people and to minimize bias-related incidents. The College Affirmative Action Officer can answer questions or concerns related to cultural diversity and affirmative action. Retaliation is any adverse action taken to try to threaten or penalize someone for reporting or opposing a claimed discriminatory act or practice or to prevent the complainant from participating in a discrimination proceeding. Retaliation against anyone who has filed a sexual harassment complaint whether the complaint is found to be valid or invalid is prohibited under this Policy and will be processed as a separate, independent complaint whether the retaliation is initiated by the harasser or anyone participating in or involved in the discrimination or the investigation of the discrimination complaint. Encouraging or promoting retaliation against a complainant also violates this Policy. Examples of retaliation include, but are not limited to, unfair grading, unfair performance evaluations, unfair assignments, the withholding of or delay in providing necessary information, ridicule, oral or written threats, bribes, the unfair increase or decrease of work loads, the arbitrary denial of leave, or the cancellation of classes. In addition to the protections against retaliation identified herein, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) also protects individuals from coercion, intimidation, threats, harassment, or interference in the exercise of rights granted to him/her by the ADA. Anyone intentionally filing a complaint in retaliation or bad faith to penalize or threaten a student, employee, contractor or intern or who encourages another to file such a complaint will be subject to formal action under this Policy and/or the SCCC Student Code of Conduct Procedures for Resolving Complaints of Disability and Gender Discrimination (Section 504/Title IX) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination on the basis of physical or mental disability in every federally-assisted program or activity. Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities by recipients of federal financial assistance. Qualified persons with a disability are also protected under the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA). 98


2. Within 20 business days after receipt of the complaint, the Affirmative Action Officer will investigate the reported complaint of disability or gender discrimination. The goal of this informal phase is to resolve the issues to the satisfaction of all concerned. Every effort will be made to resolve complaints on an informal basis among the parties involved. Only those individuals with a need to know will be made aware of the complaint. 3. The Affirmative Action Officer will render a written decision and forward the decision to the President. The complainant will be notified in writing of the Affirmative Action Officer’s decision. Appeal Process: 1. Appeals shall be initiated in writing by the complainant and must be submitted to the President or designee within five (5) business days of receipt of the decision. a. The President of the College will review the file of the complaint and render a decision in writing within ten (10) business days. b. The complainant will be notified in writing and provided a copy of the President’s decision.

2. Contractual obligations will be complied with throughout these procedures.

*The College’s Affirmative Action Officer also serves as the 504/ADA Compliance Officer. Approved by the Schenectady County Community College Board of Trustees Resolution #92-135, November 16, 1992 Amended by the Schenectady County Community College Board of Trustees Resolution #08-59, June 16, 2008 and Resolution #09-25, March 16, 2009 The following is a list of agencies with which students and employees may file complaints alleging discrimination based on disability or gender. Each agency has specific rules and deadlines for filing complaints. It is recommended that the particular agency be contacted for additional information regarding agency procedures. Schenectady County Commission of Human Rights 612 State Street Schenectady, NY 12305 (518) 388-4290

99

Policies and Procedures

1. Any student or employee at Schenectady County Community College who wishes to file a complaint alleging discrimination based upon disability or gender shall notify the Affirmative Action Officer* and complete the complaint form provided by the College within ten (10) business days after the alleged event occurred. The form is available in the Personnel/Affirmative Action Office which is located in Elston Hall, Room 126. The complainant will be provided with information regarding alternate dispute resolution agencies.


Policies and Procedures

New York State Division of Human Rights Corning Tower, 25th Floor Albany, NY 12220 (518) 474-2705 Mailing Address: PO Box 2049 Albany, NY 12220-0049 U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 6 Fountain Plaza, Suite 350 Buffalo, NY 14202 (716) 551-4441 TTY (716) 551-5923 FAX (716) 551-4381 New York Office Office for Civil Rights U.S. Department of Education 32 Old Slip, 26th Floor New York, NY 10005-2500 (646) 428-3900 FAX: (646) 428-3843 TDD: (877) 521-2172 E-mail: OCR.New York@ed.gov Human Resources Office Elston Hall, Room 126 Schenectady County Community College 78 Washington Avenue Schenectady, NY 12305 (518) 381-1331

Tobacco-Free Campus Policy I. Policy The Board of Trustees of the Schenectady County Community College, Schenectady, New York, in the interest of providing a safe work environment and a healthy, productive work force, does adopt the following Tobacco-Free Policy. The Tobacco-Free Policy will go into effect on September 1, 2013 on the SCCC campus and supports the resolution passed by the State University of New York Board of Trustees on June 12, 2012. SCCC is committed to providing its employees, students and visitors with a safe and healthy environment. The College recognizes that the use of tobacco products on the College premises is detrimental to the health and safety of all. To that end, the use of tobacco products will not be permitted at any time on College grounds and facilities and in vehicles owned, leased or controlled by the College. This 100


II. Definitions a. Tobacco products include cigarettes, cigars, cigarillos, blunts, pipes, bidis, hookahs, chewing tobacco, dip, smokeless tobacco, snuff, or any other items containing or reasonably resembling tobacco or tobacco products.

b. Tobacco use includes smoking, chewing, dipping, or any other use of tobacco products.

c. College premises includes any property in use by the College; property leased or owned (including all grounds, buildings, facilities, vehicles, parking lots); property used for official functions sponsored by the College; and property used by the College in the conduct of any of its courses. III. Regulations a. Students, employees, visitors, volunteers, contractors or other persons performing services on behalf of the College shall not be permitted to use any tobacco product at any time while on College premises. b. The sale or free distribution of tobacco products or merchandise on College premises shall be prohibited. c. Tobacco advertisements shall be prohibited in College-run publications and on College premises. IV. Compliance

a. It shall be the responsibility of all SCCC employees and students to comply fully with the policy.

b. Students who repeatedly violate this policy will be handled through the student disciplinary process. c. Employees who repeatedly violate this policy will be referred to their supervisor. Repeated violations by employees will be handled through the appropriate employee disciplinary process. d. Visitors, volunteers, contractors or other service providers who repeatedly violate this policy shall be asked to leave campus. V. Procedures a. Communication Signage and other forms of communication will be posted in a manner and location that adequately notify students, employees, visitors, volunteers, contractors or other persons performing services on behalf of the College about this policy. b. Education SCCC will consult with appropriate health organizations and resources to identify and provide programs and opportunities for students and employees to gain a greater understanding of the health hazards of tobacco use. 101

Policies and Procedures

policy shall be implemented with an emphasis given towards positive methods of ensuring compliance whenever possible.


c. Cessation SCCC will consult with appropriate health organizations and resources to identify and provide programs and opportunities for students and employees to access support systems, programs, and services that encourage them to abstain from the use of tobacco products.

Student Complaint Procedures for Academic and Administrative Matters A student wishing to file a complaint regarding an academic matter should complete the following steps:

Policies and Procedures

• Consult with the instructor of the course in question. If an understanding or resolution is not achieved, or if this step is not feasible, the student may then…

• Consult with the appropriate Dean. The Dean will consult with the involved faculty member and with the student and attempt to reach a mutually agreeable resolution. If an understanding or resolution is not achieved, the student may then… • Appeal in writing to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. The written appeal, detailing both the complaint and the results of the consultations with the instructor and with the department chairperson, should be delivered to the Office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs. An appointment for consultation with the Vice President may be scheduled at that time. The faculty member involved will be notified that the student has appealed to the Vice President of Academic Affairs, and be given a copy of the student’s written appeal. A student wishing to file a complaint regarding an administrative matter should complete the following steps:

• Consult with the staff member who has responsibility for the matter in question. If an understanding or resolution is not achieved, the student may then…

• Consult with the supervisor of the office or unit for a resolution of the complaint. If a resolution is to be appealed, the student may then…

• Appeal in writing to the Vice President of the division which has administrative responsibility for that office or unit. The written appeal, detailing both the complaint and the results of the consultations with the staff member and supervisor should be delivered to the Office of the Vice President. An appointment for consultation with the Vice President may be scheduled at that time. Determination and Disposition of a Complaint. The Vice President will respond to a written complaint within 30 days of receipt. The Vice President will consult with and notify the President of determinations and dispositions. The student will be notified in writing of the decision. Complaint Resolution for Distance Education Students. Students taking courses through a distance learning format may also file a complaint with their home state agency. The State Higher Education Executive Office (SHEEO) has provided a directory of Student Complaint Information by State and Agency at the following link: http://www.sheeo.org/stateauth/Complaint%20Process%20Links_October%202011.pdf All Other Matters. A student who wishes to file a complaint regarding a College matter but is uncertain 102


Student Notification of Rights Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are: 1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Registrar a written request that identifies the record(s) that they wish to inspect. The College official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the College official to whom the request was submitted, the College official will advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the College to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write to the College official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the College decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the College will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position; a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee (such as a disciplinary or grievance committee). 4. The right to file a complaint with the US Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 600 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605 For more information about the “Release of Student Information” refer to the Schenectady County Community College Catalog. 103

Policies and Procedures

where to begin the process should begin with the Office of the Vice President of Student Affairs for referral to the appropriate office.


Workplace Violence Policy

Policies and Procedures

In 2006, the New York State Legislature mandated that all public employers establish and implement programs to prevent violence in the workplace. In response to the mandate, the following workplace violence policy and procedure has been approved by the Schenectady County Community College Board of Trustees on March 16, 2009 (Resolution #09-26). Policy Statement Schenectady County Community College prohibits workplace violence. Violence, threats of violence, intimidation, harassment, coercion, or other threatening behavior toward people or property will not be tolerated. This includes violent actions and harassment by College employees directed against supervisors, directed against other employees, by employees against students or visitors, or by visitors directed against College employees or students. The workplace violence policy pertains to all individuals employed by the College, and to all individuals who do business with the College or attend any function or participate in any activity sponsored or held on College property, including but not limited to, employees, visitors, students, and contractors. Individuals violating this policy may be removed from College property and are subject to disciplinary action which may include termination, consistent with College policies, rules and collective bargaining agreements, and/or referral to law enforcement authorities for criminal prosecution. Scope The workplace violence policy applies to students employed by the College, as do the Schenectady County Community College Student Code of Conduct and Campus Safety policy/procedures. The Schenectady County Community College Student Code of Conduct and Campus Safety policy/procedures are applicable to all students and are available to students through the Student Affairs Office, Elston Hall, Room 222. If you observe or experience violent, threatening, harassing, intimidating, or other disruptive behavior by anyone on SCCC premises, whether he or she is an SCCC employee or not, report it immediately to your supervisor, Personnel/AAO office, security guard or another manager or official. All reports will be taken seriously and will be dealt with appropriately. If you have any questions about this policy, please contact Christine Pirri, Executive Director of Human Resources, (518) 381-1331 or pirricm@sunyscc.edu.

104


At Schenectady County Community College, the safety and well-being of our students, faculty, staff and visitors is a high priority. Historically, SCCC has been a safe campus with few major incidents; however, a safe and secure environment can only be maintained through the cooperation of all members of the campus community. All individuals must assume responsibility for their own personal safety and the security of their personal belongings by taking common sense precautions. Providing this information is part of our effort to ensure that this collaborative endeavor is effective. We hope that you will read it carefully and use the information to help foster a safe environment for yourself and others. Access to Campus Facilities Schenectady County Community College is a public institution with an “open access” campus. College buildings and grounds are open to the public for individual use during College business hours. Building entrance doors are opened on a varying schedule depending on the activities occurring on campus. At night and during the times that the campus is officially closed, College buildings are locked and only authorized faculty and staff are admitted. Awareness Programs The College Safety Council meets regularly throughout the academic year to review safety and security concerns and issues. Recommendations to improve and strengthen the safety and security of the campus are submitted by the Committee to the President of the College. If you have any concerns or ideas regarding campus safety and security, please contact Dr. Martha Asselin, Committee Chairperson, Elston Hall, Room 222, telephone 381-1344. The Division of Student Affairs presents several programs concerning sexual assault and information about campus safety during each academic year. All new students receive information about campus safety at orientation, and returning students obtain the information at registration and in the Office of Student Affairs during the year. Safety programming for students includes presentations on crime prevention, personal safety and selfdefense. These programs are designed to help develop assertiveness skills and to enhance logical thinking during emergencies. Look for notices of upcoming programs and workshops on campus. College Response Team (CRT) The College Response Team (CRT) meets regularly to address situations in an organized, forthright and professional manner. Although it may be impossible to be prepared to address every situation which is unknown, it is prudent to develop a process and response strategy enabling the College’s leadership to take the necessary steps to deal with any unfamiliar, novel or emergency situation. On an annual basis, at least, the CRT guidelines are updated, revised and distributed. Additional copies of the College’s Critical Incident Management Plan(the College’s guidelines for addressing various critical incidents) can be requested by contacting the Student Affairs Office, Elston Hall, Room 222. Description of Campus Security SCCC maintains a contract with a private security firm to provide security services on a 24-hour basis. The security force consists of both part-time and full-time security officers. The number of officers is 105

Policies and Procedures

Campus Safety


adjusted periodically, depending on the numbers of persons on campus. There is one site supervisor working an 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. shift. The shift supervisor is required to be certified in CPR and community first aid. Security officers may be reached at 381-1308.

Policies and Procedures

Security officers are the first responders to an emergency. Officers who are assigned to the College are empowered by the College to enforce the institution’s rules and regulations. One of their primary responsibilities is the prevention of all forms of loss. Security officers serve as escorts from campus buildings to the parking lots in the evening hours. Another primary responsibility of security officers is to serve as campus resource persons, providing information to the College community. Security officers are knowledgeable about the campus and are able to relay information in a courteous and professional manner. The campus security force works closely with the College administration and local law enforcement agencies both in the investigation of crimes and in crime prevention. Campus security has the authority to take whatever steps are necessary to resolve situations and ensure the safety and security of all involved. Security officers may investigate incidents, question victims and witnesses, ask persons for identification, ask persons to explain their actions, and acquire as much information as necessary to provide the College with a complete report of the situation. A security officer has the authority to contact local law enforcement agencies, EMT services, or the fire department, if warranted. If an individual refuses to present identification, the security officer has the authority to have that person to immediately leave the College campus. Security officers are required to complete an incident report upon receiving a complaint or a report of a criminal act or emergency. All incident reports are delivered to the Office of the Vice President of Administration for review, appropriate action, and compilation of statistical reports. According to the Student Code of Conduct, failure to respond to the directions of a security officer constitutes grounds for disciplinary action. All security officers are certified in first response aid. How to Access the Campus Escort Service If you need an escort to your vehicle, please contact the security desk, located at the ground floor main entrance to Elston Hall, or call 381-1308. How to Report a Criminal Incident Emergency calls to report a crime or an unusual incident can be made to the security office by calling 381-1308. If you are unable to contact the security office, dial “0” for the College telephone operator, who will contact security. Reports of campus crime incidents can be made in person at the security desk at the ground floor main entrance of Elston Hall. The red emergency phones located throughout the campus are linked to the campus communications area, and may also be used. How to Report an Emergency Concerning Suspicious Activity or Threat to Personal Safety Students, faculty, and staff should report any suspicious persons or unusual incidents that are observed to College security. Also, if you feel that your or another person’s personal safety is threatened, call security at 381-1308, or access the campus communication center by using the red emergency phones. If you are unable to contact the security office, dial “0” for the College telephone operator, who will 106


How to Report a Fire or Other Facility Emergency The signal for evacuation will be the continuous sounding of the alarm system (horns and strobe lights). In case of a power failure or a failure of the main system, an auxiliary system will be activated automatically. Maps showing the location of fire towers and exits are posted prominently on each floor of every campus building. Please read these maps and learn the location of the nearest exit. The Security Desk is the designated control point during an evacuation. All information concerning the emergency should be directed to the switchboard. An individual who discovers a fire should immediately advise others in their immediate area and activate the closest fire alarm pull station. This will alert other areas of the building, the security / maintenance departments and the City Fire Department. Under no circumstances should an attempt be made to extinguish the fire; firefighting will be left to Fire Department personnel. In case of fire or other facility emergency, for example a power failure, there are emergency lights installed throughout SCCC facilities that will activate automatically. These emergency lights operate on auxiliary battery power. All areas have evacuation floor plans posted prominently. These floor plans indicate the primary evacuation routes that will lead to a designated fire tower or exit. Faculty, staff, and students should familiarize themselves with the primary evacuation route from their assigned areas. Elevators are not to be used. All faculty, staff, students and visitors shall evacuate the building. (Faculty and staff should inspect the area for which they have responsibility to insure that everyone has Promptly evacuated the area.) Evacuate using designated primary and alternate evacuation routes. Close classroom/office doors when you leave. Leave building in an orderly fashion. Report to a designated assembly area. If heavy smoke or fire prevents you from reaching your primary fire tower:

• Attempt to use alternative exiting routes / fire towers.

• If unable to reach a Fire tower, go to the nearest classroom or office;

• close the door and open the windows;

• seal the cracks around the door to keep smoke out;

• Hang clothing or other obvious indicator from and stay near the open window until firefighters can reach you. • If there is a telephone in the room, contact security at 1308 or 1309 or call 911 and advise them of your location. Mobility Impaired individuals who are not able to leave by using the stairs should go directly to a designated Fire Tower Area of Refuge. Please wait for others to clear the floor before you move into the stairwell. If you are in a Fire Tower with a Red Emergency Call box or phone, push the button to 107

Policies and Procedures

contact security. Advise security or the College operator of the nature of the emergency and the location of the problem. Security will investigate the situation, make appropriate contacts, file an incident report and follow up as warranted.


activate it so that Campus Security can identify you and your location. If you are carrying a cell phone, please call 381-1308 immediately to alert Campus Security to your location and situation. If you have neither of these, call 911. Staff, faculty, and other students should be alerted to your situation. They shall notify security and emergency personnel of your location and need for assistance. In the event of fire, the individual detecting the fire will immediately activate the nearest emergency fire alarm box, thus notifying the fire department and activating the alarm system. Under no circumstances should an attempt be made to extinguish the fire; firefighting will be left to trained personnel.

Policies and Procedures

All faculty, staff and students are to evacuate the building. Elevators are NOT to be used. Everyone will use the fire towers for evacuation. Faculty and staff should inspect the area for which they have responsibility to ensure that everyone has promptly evacuated the area. Staff in the administrative offices should lock office doors prior to evacuating the building. If heavy smoke prevents you from reaching a fire exit:

1 Do not panic.

2. Return to your classroom or office.

3. Close the door and open the windows.

4. If possible, seal the cracks around the door to keep the smoke out.

5. Stay near the window and wait for firefighters to reach you.

It is the responsibility of each instructor to make arrangements for the evacuation of disabled students. The assignment of this responsibility should be made at the first session of the class. Instructors will remain with the disabled students in the corner of the fire tower until fire officials arrive. Fire officials will be notified upon their arrival of the evacuation location for disabled students; this information will be obtained at the beginning of each semester by the Coordinator of ADA Transition Services, and be available to fire officials upon their arrival on campus. Individuals may return to the building upon notification by a College official. How to Report a Medical Emergency The following procedure is to be used when an individual is injured or ill and emergency medical service (EMS) is required: Contact security via telephone 381-1308. If you are unable to contact the security office, dial “0� for the College telephone operator, who will contact security. Reports of medical emergencies can also be made in person at the security desk at the main entrance of Elston Hall. You may also use the red emergency phones located throughout the campus, which are linked directly to the campus communications area. Advise security or the College operator of the nature of the emergency, the location, and whether or not EMS is required. Security will: 1 Contact EMT or request that a paramedic unit (EMS) be sent immediately to the College. An ambulance, as necessary, will be dispatched by the EMS. 2. Advise the Office of Student Affairs so that a staff member may proceed to the location of the emergency. The staff member will remain with the injured or ill person. 108


1. Contact Campus Security or request that a paramedic unit (EMS) be sent immediately to the College. An ambulance, as necessary, will be dispatched by the EMS. 2. Advise the Office of Student Development Services so that a staff member may proceed to the location of the emergency. 3. Arrange for a staff member to meet the EMS and accompany them to the scene of the emergency. The College operator will notify security or the Vice President of Administration of the emergency as soon as possible, and of the action that has been taken. In the event that neither security nor the College operator can be contacted during an emergency, contact EMS directly (telephone 911); give your name, indicate you are calling from Schenectady County Community College and advise them of the nature and location of the emergency. Arrange for the EMS to be met upon their arrival at the campus and escorted to the scene of the emergency. Advise the Vice President of Administration or security of the emergency as soon as possible and inform them of the action that has been taken. Note: To access an outside line from any campus telephone, you must first dial 9* and listen for a dial tone. Then proceed with dialing 911. The staff or faculty member involved will file an incident report with security within one work day of the incident. Response to an Emergency, Criminal or Threatening Incident Upon receipt of a call, security officers are dispatched to the location of incident. Simultaneously, the appropriate College officials are directed to the scene. If the incident involves a student, the security officer will contact Student Affairs, who will take appropriate action. All reported incidents are investigated by the College and appropriate action is initiated, which may include referral to local law enforcement agencies or implementation of the Student Code of Conduct. Further, the campus community is notified of situations that pose a threat to the safety and well-being of our community through special notices or meetings called by the College President.

109

Policies and Procedures

The College operator (if security cannot be contacted initially) will:


STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT I. Policy Statement

Student Code of Conduct

Students enrolling at SCCC assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner compatible with the college’s academic standards, policies, procedures, rules and regulations of the college and its entities. The SCCC Student Code of Conduct (The Code) defines the expectations, rights and responsibilities of all members of the student body. Students are members of the College community and are expected to act responsibly and to not interfere with the rights, comfort, or safety of other members of the College community. All students are held accountable for their actions. Behavior, which adversely affects the student’s responsible membership in the academic community, shall result in appropriate disciplinary action.

II. Purpose Of The Code

The Student Code of Conduct and the accompanying student disciplinary processes are intended to assist students in their personal development by providing a fair conduct review procedure that issues consistent penalties for behaviors that are incongruent with the College’s expectations. In furthering the educational aims of the college and maintaining compliance with the provisions of Article129-A of the Education Law of the State of New York, the Code outlines the practices to be utilized in administering the student disciplinary system at SCCC.

III. Philosophy

The Code embraces several core philosophies: preservation of the freedom of speech and the rights of peaceable assembly; respect for academic freedom and constructive criticism; a conviction that honesty and integrity are key values to the College community; and the belief that all members of the institution should be part of a campus environment that respects and appreciates differences. Procedures used to enforce standards contribute to teaching appropriate individual and group behaviors as well as protecting the rights of individuals and the campus community from disruption and/or harm.

The disciplinary experience is intended to make clear to students the limits of acceptable behavior and to provide students who violate the Code an opportunity to more fully understand the rules and incorporate the experience into his/her personal growth and development. The disciplinary experience is designed to be both educational and corrective.

IV. Jurisdiction

The College will have jurisdiction over misconduct that occurs on College premises and/or at College sponsored activities but may also address off campus behavior if the College determines that the behavior, or the continued presence of the student, impairs, obstructs, interferes with or adversely affects the mission, processes or functions of the College.

V. Violations

110

The behaviors (listed in Item B) are subject to disciplinary action under the Schenectady County Community College Student Code of Conduct, but are not limited to the infractions contained therein.


A. Referrals

Complaints, incidents or referrals regarding student behavior as hereinafter described in paragraph “B” should be reported to the Division of Student Affairs (Room 222, Elston Hall). The Vice President of Student Affairs or the his/her designee, will investigate each report and determine the action to be taken.

B. Behavior Subject To Discipline

All of the following behaviors are a violation of the SCCC Student Code of Conduct and may subject a student to disciplinary action as set forth below.

1. ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT. Commission of an act which violates the academic integrity of Schenectady County Community College, including, but not limited to, academic cheating; plagiarism; the sale, purchase or exchange of papers, or research; or theft of another’s work from any source is a violation of the Code. The developments of intelligence and strengthening of moral responsibility are two of the most important aims of education. Essential to the accomplishment of these purposes is the duty of the student to perform all of his or her required work without illegal or unethical help.

2. ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE. Except for appropriate classroom activities or approved student activities, the possession and/or consumption of any alcoholic beverage is a violation of this Code. Possession and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages by students participating in a college club or college sponsored trip or an off-campus activity is also prohibited.

3. COMPUTER MISUSE. Engaging in any unauthorized use of the College’s hardware, software or network systems is prohibited, including:

• unauthorized access, entry, or use of the computer, computer system, network, software, password, account or data, • unauthorized alteration or tampering with computer equipment, software, network, or data • unauthorized copying or distribution of computer software or data • use of computer facilities of equipment to send obscene, harassing, threatening or abusive messages • use of computers to falsify records, tamper with records or commit any act of academic dishonesty. • Any other act in violation of the law and/or the College policies and guidelines regulating computer-related use. 4. CRIMINAL ACTS. Any alleged criminal act committed by a student off campus, which is of such serious nature that it threatens the health or safety of the College community, is a violation of this Code. 5. DEMONSTRATIONS. A demonstration which endangers life, public or private property or violates local, state or federal law is a violation of the Code. 6. DISHONESTY. The falsification of information which includes any form of providing false or misleading information in writing, orally, or electronically in a manner which has the intent or 111

Student Code of Conduct


effect of deceiving college personnel, or altering or falsifying official College records or documents; and/or the misrepresentation of oneself as an agent of the College is a violation of the Code. 7. DISRUPTIVE CONDUCT. Any disruptive conduct which substantially threatens, harms, or interferes with the peace and good order of the College community, students, visitors, personnel and/or other College processes and functions, including but not limited to, lewd, indecent or obscene conduct or expression; unreasonable and disruptive noise; public intoxication; or prohibited athletic activity on College owned or controlled property or at a College sponsored or supervised function is a violation of the Code.

Student Code of Conduct

8. DRUGS AND/OR DRUG PARAPHERNALIA. Possession or use of any illegal controlled substance, drug, or drug paraphernalia is prohibited and will be reported to local and state authorities and will also be subject to disciplinary action by the College. The College will cooperate with local and state authorities on any cases of suspected illegal use, possession or distribution of state- controlled drugs. 9. FAILURE TO COMPLY. The willful obstruction and/or the failure to comply with the directions of an authorized College official acting in performance of his/her prescribed duty; failure to provide valid student identification upon request of a College official; failure to comply with all regulations regarding student conduct on campus, and/or any violation of a College policy or procedure is a violation of the Code. 10. FIRE SAFETY. Violation of campus safety regulations, including but not limited to, setting unauthorized fires, tampering with fire safety and/or firefighting equipment or rendering such equipment inoperable, turning in a false fire alarm, tampering or improper use of campus emergency phones, or failure to evacuate facilities upon the sounding of a fire alarm or drill is a violation of the Code. 11. GAMBLING. Gambling is prohibited on College owned or controlled property and at any College sponsored or supervised function and is a violation of the Code. 12. IDENTIFICATION CARDS. Photo student identification cards are validated each semester. Properly validated cards should be carried at all times and must be produced, upon request, to any authorized College authority-administrator, faculty member or security personnel. The use of a another student’s identification card by anyone else other than the rightful owner is a violation of the Code. 13. REMOVAL OF BOO KS AND MATERIALS. Removal of books and other materials from a College library in violation of the normal checkout procedures is a violation of the Code. Students with such materials and books in their possession will be considered as knowingly participating in the use of stolen materials. 14. SANCTION VIOLATION. Violations of a College judicial sanction including, but not limited to, failing to meet the terms of the sanction, failure to complete a specified condition or assignment of a sanction, or violating the Student Code of Conduct when on disciplinary probation is a violation of the Code. 112


16. SOLICITING. The advertisement, solicitation or sale of any item or service on College property is a violation of the Code unless the prior approval of the Vice President of Student Affairs, Vice President of Administration or College President has been secured. 17. THEFT. Theft or attempted theft of the property or services of the College, any organization, or any individual by means of taking, selling, deceiving, misappropriating, or misusing, as well as receiving and or possessing such stolen property is a violation of the Code. 18. THREAT OF HARM. Conveyance of threats or the commission of any act which results in, or which may result in, harm to any person or the damage to College property or the property of others by willful and deliberate means is a violation of the Code. This offense includes any form of harassment, stalking, physical assault, verbal abuse, threatening or attempting physical assault upon any person, or threats to destroy College property or the property of others. Any action or behavior that endangers the health, safety or welfare of any member of the College community or visitors is a violation of this Code. 19. TRESPASSING. Unauthorized entry, use or occupancy of any building, structure, facility or college grounds is a violation of the Code. 20. VANDALISM. The intentional and/or reckless, but not accidental, destruction of property; damaging, destroying, defacing, tampering, misuse, or abuse of student, staff or College property, including rentals or leased facilities, is a violation of the Code. 21. WEAPONS. The possession, storage, use or threat of use of any weapon on campus is strictly prohibited and will be reported to local and/or state authorities. For purposes of this provision, a weapon is defined as:

• anything within the definition of a weapon set forth in Penal Law 265.00;

• any instrument, device, or object designed or specifically adapted for the purpose of inflicting physical harm or death;

• any instrument, device or object possessed, carried, or used for the purpose of inflicting or threatening physical harm or death.

22. EXPLOSIVES. The possession, storage, or use of firecrackers or other explosive device of any description for any purpose is a violation of this Code. 23. PETS. With the exception of service animals registered with Campus Security and ADA Transition Services Office, pets are not permitted in campus buildings. 24. OTHER ACTS OF MISCONDUCT (Not Specifically Listed Above). Any act not specifically listed above which willfully, knowingly, or negligently endangers the health, safety or welfare 113

Student Code of Conduct

15. SEXUAL MISCONDUCT/HARASSMENT. Any sexual act that occurs without the consent of the other person or occurs when the other person is unable to give consent is a violation of the Code. This offense includes any conduct of a sexual nature that creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment for another person; such as unwelcome sexual advances or requests for sexual favors, inappropriate sexual or gender-based activities, comments or gestures, or other forms of verbal or physical conduct or communications constituting sexual harassment.


Student Code of Conduct

of any member of the College community or visitors is a violation of the Code. 25. VIOLATION OF LAW. A violation of any municipal, state or federal criminal law or engaging in behavior that is a civil offense, or a violation of any policy, procedure, rule, regulation or directive of the College or any of its affiliated entities is a violation of this Code, even if the specific conduct is not listed as a prohibited act in the Code. The College regards criminal conduct/civil offense as a violation of the Code regardless of whether the criminal violation/civil offense are pursued in a court of law. The College may, to the extent permitted by law (including without limitation to FERPA), inform law enforcement agencies of perceived criminal violations and may elect to defer internal disciplinary action until prosecution of the criminal violation has been completed. Proceedings under the Code may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off campus at the discretion of the College. VI. Disciplinary Procedure A. NOTIFICATION 1. All charges of misconduct shall be reported to the Vice President of Student Affairs. The Vice President of Student Affairs or his/her designee, will seek documentation, testimony and information that is relevant to the alleged violation to determine the relevance of information presented. Should the investigation support an alleged code violation and no individual(s) have accepted full responsibility for the violation, then the Vice President of Student Affairs or his/her designee will submitted in writing, via the Student Affairs Office, to the Chairperson of the College’s Student Affairs Committee setting forth the circumstances of such misconduct, including time and place of the incident.

The Chairperson shall refer a case to a Student Affairs Subcommittee on Discipline within five (5) business days (“business day” is defined as any day between Monday through Friday with the exception of legal holidays) after receipt of said charges.

At the beginning of each academic year, the Chairperson of the College’s Student Affairs Committee shall designate two (2) sitting Subcommittees on Discipline each containing three members, from the members of the Student Affairs Committee one of whom on each subcommittee will be a student. The two Subcommittees may alternate hearing any matters referred. One member of the Subcommittee on Discipline will serve as the hearing officer in all disciplinary proceedings.

2. The student(s) against whom charge(s) is being made shall be notified in writing by the Chairperson of the Subcommittee of the charge(s), the time, date and place of the hearing, the procedures to be followed, and the student’s right to be represented at the hearing by a person of his/her choice. Written notification of the charges and hearing notice will be served on the student by personal delivery or by certified mail to the address last provided to the Registrar of the College by the student. 3. If an incident results in a charge against more than one student, then the Vice President of Student Affairs may, at his/her sole and sound discretion, combine the hearings. A student may 114


4. If the students (whether the complaining party or the accused) elects to be have one (1) advisor and/or witnesses present at the hearing with them, the Chairperson of the Subcommittee must be notified in writing by the student two (2) business days prior to the scheduled hearing. The written notification must include the identity of his/her advisor and any witnesses he/she intends to have present at the hearing. Advisors do not participate in the hearing. The hearing officer shall have complete and absolute discretion to determine the extent to which advisors may contribute at the conclusion of the hearing. The advisor serves merely as an observer and/or a source of advice to the student without directly addressing the meeting.

B. THE HEARING 1. The complaining party, accused student and their advisors, if any, shall be allowed to attend the entire portion of the hearing at which information is received (excluding deliberations). Admission of any other person to the meeting shall be at the discretion of the hearing officer. The hearing officer may remove and prohibit the participation of anyone disrupting the hearing. 2. All questions regarding whether potential information will be admissible in the hearing and all procedural questions with respect to the hearing, shall be resolved in the discretion of the hearing officer. Formal rules of process, procedure, and/or technical rules of evidence, such as are applied in criminal or civil court, are not used in the hearing. 3. The hearing officer will be responsible for maintaining a disciplinary procedure that makes reasonable efforts to accommodate concerns for the personal safety, well-being and/or fears of confrontation of the complaining party, the accused, and/or witnesses during the hearing by providing security present at the hearing, permitting participation by telephone or other web-based access, permitting witnesses to submit written statements, or other Student Affairs means as determined in the sole judgment of the hearing officer to be appropriate. 4. Hearings will convene as scheduled unless the hearing officer has been notified of and approves a request to reschedule. The hearing will proceed even if the accused student, advisor, and/or witness do not attend. 5. Both the complaining party and the student charged with misconduct may be present at the hearing. Each party may present and cross-examine witnesses. The Subcommittee may, in its discretion, limit the testimony to information relevant to the disposition of the charge(s) and prohibit repetitious or redundant testimony. 6. A record of the hearing will be made. The record of the hearing will be confidential, except as otherwise provided herein. 7. Hearings will not be public. Publicity and public statements about the case by anyone involved will be avoided. 8. The Subcommittee on Discipline may consider mitigating and aggravating circumstances 115

Student Code of Conduct

request a separate hearing, which the Vice President of Student Affairs may grant if good cause is shown.


Student Code of Conduct

when choosing whether or not to impose a sanction and the severity of the sanction, including without limitation any or all of the following:

• Nature of the offense;

• Severity of the damage, injury, or harm resulting from the offense;

• Whether the student promptly took responsibility for his/her actions;

• Present demeanor of the student;

• Past disciplinary history of the student, which includes, without limitation, completion of or pending disciplinary sanctions from past cases;

• the student’s honesty, or lack thereof, and the cooperation demonstrated during the investigation of the complaint and subsequent disciplinary proceeding;

• Whether the charge involved an action directed at another based upon his/her race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, gender, age, physical ability, or sexual orientation;

• The recommendation of associated victims or parties to the incident; and

• Any other factor deemed relevant by the Subcommittee.

9. Within five (5) business days of the conclusion of the hearing, the Subcommittee will submit its written hearing summary to the Vice President of Student Affairs. This hearing summary will state the findings of fact considered in determining the final decision as to the alleged misconduct. If the student is found to be responsible for committing the violation, the summary includes a recommendation for any applicable sanctions to be imposed consistent with the penalties provided for in this Code. 10. The record, including the documents entered into evidence, will be transmitted to the Student Affairs Office along with the Subcommittee’s report and recommendation.

C. PENALTIES AND SANCTIONS 1. The Vice President of Student Affairs may, following review of the record, accept or reject the Subcommittee’s findings of fact and the penalty recommendation. The Vice President of Student Affairs reserves the right to review and amend any decision of the Subcommittee. If the report and recommendation of the Subcommittee is accepted, the Vice President of Students Affairs may impose one or more the penalties listed hereinafter. 2. Within five (5) business days of the receipt of the Subcommittee’s written report and recommendation, the Vice President of Student Affairs will notify the student. The student will be notified in writing of said determination by delivering a copy of same personally to the student or by mailing a copy of same by certified mail at the last address provided to the College by the student. If the student is found to be responsible for committing the violation, the written notification will include any applicable sanctions and instruction on the student’s right to appeal. a. No action;

116

b. Reprimand: written reprimand with warning that continuation or repetition of


c. Restitution: compensation for loss or injury, reimbursement for damages to or the misappropriation of property; or other payment for expenses incurred as a result of the student’s actions;

d. Mediation and/or counseling referral;

e. Disciplinary Probation: suspension of a student from any or all College programs or activities that do not relate directly to the student’s academic performance; f. Suspension: discontinuance from classes and other designated privileges or activities for a definite period of time;

g. Expulsion: termination as a student of the College for an indefinite period;

h. Degree Revocation: The College reserves the right to revoke a degree when upon conclusion of an investigatory process it is determined that the degree was obtained by fraud; i. Other Secondary Sanctions: such sanctions may be imposed instead of or in addition to those specified above: 1. Community Service: may include performance of no more than fifty (50) hours of unpaid work assignments per semester either on or off campus as specified. Assignments are assigned and supervised by an administrative officer of the College and may not be combined or in conjunction with any other volunteer or court ordered requirement. 2. Educational Activities: such sanctions may include a formal apology in writing and/or in person; a behavioral contract specifying the behavioral requirements to be followed, a reflective writing assignment or attendance at an event directly related to the violation committed. 3. Restrictions: temporary or permanent loss of privileges or the use of a College facility or service. 4. Counseling Assessments: professional assessments may be imposed at the expense of the student. 5. The decision of the Vice President of Student Affairs or his/her designee shall take effect immediately unless otherwise provided for in the student notification, and such decision shall be final except as provided for in the appeal process.

D. APPEAL PROCESS 1. Any student found guilty of a violation of the Code may appeal the written disciplinary hearing decision based on any of the following reasons only:

• A procedural error that unfairly affected the outcome of the disciplinary hearing;

• New, ‘after acquired’ information that was discovered only after the conclusion of the disciplinary hearing and is relevant to the alleged violation and would have had a 117

Student Code of Conduct

misconduct may result in further disciplinary action;


significant bearing on the outcome of the disciplinary hearing if it had been previously known;

• A violation of due process occurred; or

• A sanction that is unreasonably severe in light of the offense(s) committed.

2. Appeals shall be initiated in writing by the appellant and submitted to the Vice President of Student Affairs Office. 3. The written appeal must be submitted to the Vice President of Students Affairs within five (5) business days of receipt of the written disciplinary hearing decision.

Student Code of Conduct

4. The written appeal and the record of the hearing, along with the written decision rendered, will be transmitted to the President of the College within two (2) business days of receipt of the Appeal Form. The President of the College shall review the record of the appeal. Within ten (10) business days, the College President will render a decision. That written decision will be mailed to the student by certified mail at the last address provided to the College by the student. A copy of the decision will also be sent to the Vice President of Student Affairs to be shared with the Subcommittee. The decision of the College President is final and will become part of the record of the proceedings maintained in the file established pursuant to the hearing procedures of this Code. E. SUMMARY SUSPENSION

A student who is summarily suspended will have a discontinuance from classes and other privileges set forth in the notice of suspension for a defined period of time. A student may be excluded and summarily suspended from campus and participation in any or all programs (including academic programs) and activities sponsored by the college, by the Vice President of Students Affairs his/her designee, in consultation with the President of the College, when the acts alleged represent a potential danger to the health, welfare, and safety of the College community. Such exclusion or summary suspension may begin at or prior to the formal filing of charge(s) as provided for in this Code.

VII. STUDENT DISCIPLINARY FILES AND RECORDS

118

The Vice President of Student Affairs will establish a student disciplinary file whenever a case is referred for investigation of a possible conduct code violation. A student’s file will be destroyed if the investigation indicates that no violation occurred. The file of a student found to have violated the Code will be retained for four years from the date of the disciplinary hearing decision; however, records may be retained longer or permanently if the student was suspended or permanently dismissed or if there is reason to believe the case could result in future litigation. The case summary will be retained on the campus database indefinitely. The record shall be maintained separate and apart from the student’s permanent record by the Student Affairs Office.


Canal Side Wi-fi Café/ Convenience Store Café features include coffee, lattes, espressos and frappucinos as well as Paninis, soups and grab-and-go selections. Café Hours Monday - Thursday: 7:30 a.m.-8:00 p.m. Friday: 7:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Enjoy indoor and outdoor seating!

The convenience store will feature food staple items (bread, milk, eggs), Radio Shack product line, Boots beauty product line, Proctor and Gamble product line and a variety of other items. Hours TBD. Located on the first floor of Elston Hall.

MBER

TE LATE SEP G N I N E P O


Schenectady County Community College 78 Washington Avenue Schenectady, NY 12305 www.sunysccc.edu


SCCC Student Handbook 2013 2014