Issuu on Google+

Schenectady County Community College Catalog 2009-2011

Also see the 2010-2011 Catalog Updates beginning on page 130 of this pdf file.


Telephone Directory Schenectady County Community College 78 Washington Avenue Schenectady, NY 12305-2215 www.sunysccc.edu General Information................ 381-1200 Academic Advisement...........................381-1277 Academic Computing............................381-1487 Academic Dean....................................381-1374 Administrative Services..........................381-1210 Admissions...........................................381-1366 Athletics...............................................381-1356 Bookstore (College Store).......................377-1606 Business and Law, Dept. of.....................381-1386 Business Office, Student Accounts...........381-1346 Cafeteria..............................................381-1330 Career and Employment Services...........381-1365 Casola Dining Room..............................381-1391 College Store, (Bookstore)......................377-1606 CLEP Exams..........................................381-1340 Computer Lab.......................................381-1213 Continuing Education/ Evening & Summer Courses, Business Training...............................381-1315 Counseling...........................................381-1365 Daycare Center, YWCA.........................381-1375 Developmental Studies, Dept. of.............381-1398 Disabled Student Services (Voice/TDD)...381-1344 Educational Opportunity Program..........381-1279 Faculty Student Association....................381-1281

Financial Aid........................................381-1352 Foundation, Alumni...............................381-1323 Gateway Montessori Preschool...............381-1455 Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism, Dept. of............................................381-1325 Humanities and Social Sciences, Dept. of............................................381-1387 Immunization........................................381-1344 Learning Center....................................381-1246 Library.................................................381-1240 Mathematics, Science and Technology, Dept. of............................................381-1267 Music, Dept. of.....................................381-1231 Peer Tutoring.........................................381-1461 Personnel Office....................................381-1218 Public Relations.....................................381-1250 Registration and Records.......................381-1348 Security and Parking Information............381-1309 Student Activities...................................381-1335 SUNY College Career Counseling Center.............................370-2654 Transfer/Advanced Placement Credit......381-1366 TRIO Program.......................................381-1465 Vendor Accounts...................................381-1212 Veterans Affairs....................................381-1351

Be sure to visit the College’s Web site at www.sunysccc.edu for the latest information on programs, courses and schedules.


2009-2011 Catalog

Schenectady County Community College A Community College Operated Under the Programs of the State University of New York Schenectady County Community College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education 3624 Market Street • Philadelphia, PA 19104 • (267) 284-5000 The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

How to Use this Catalog This publication is a guide for students about the programs, courses, services, policies and procedures at Schenectady County Community College (SCCC). If you are considering applying to SCCC, you will need to read about admissions requirements and financial aid as well as the instructions for applying to the College. You will also want to review the program and course information to learn about the offerings at the College. You may refer to these sections as you apply for admission, meet with your academic advisor and make decisions about your program and course selections.

As an SCCC student, you are responsible for knowing and complying with College policies. Keep this Catalog as a reference for College policies and procedures, to learn how to drop a course, transfer to a four-year institution, or apply for graduation or readmission, for example. Finally, we recommend you read the sections about services, student activities, clubs and athletics which will tell you how to get the most out of your college education. We encourage you to learn more about SCCC by contacting the Office of Admissions directly for more information at (518) 381-1366.


Student Consumer Information. The dissemination of general information regarding academic and financial aid programs as required under Title I of the Education Amendment of 1976, Public Law 94-482, is provided for in the appropriate sections of this Catalog. A Programs and Courses Directory listing all credit and non-credit day and evening courses, along with registration information, is published regularly and mailed to homes in the College’s primary sponsorship area. Prospective and enrolled students who wish more specific data regarding academic and placement information may contact the Admissions Office, (518) 381-1366, or the Student Development Center, (518) 381-1365. Detailed information regarding financial aid is available from the Financial Aid Office at (518) 381-1352 or 381-1354. Information is also available on the College’s Web site at www.sunysccc.edu. Student Obligations. All Schenectady County Community College students have the responsibility for being fully aware of College policies and regulations affecting students. Upon acceptance and/or registration, each student becomes a member of the academic community at Schenectady County Community College. Participation in this community is dependent upon the student’s understanding of rights, privileges, and responsibilities. It is understood that each student accepts the obligations of this relationship. In addition to this Catalog, students should consult the SCCC Handbook, Planner and Campus Resource Guide for complete documentation of the Student Code of Conduct, discrimination complaint procedures, and rules and regulations that relate to students. This document makes reference to current policies and practices of the College. The Handbook is available in the Student Affairs Division, at the Security Desk, in the Student Government Association Office and is distributed at Orientation. Students are responsible for familiarity with and observance of this Code. The Student Code of Conduct is found in its entirety on the SCCC Web site: www.sunysccc.edu.

Commitment to Cultural Diversity. Schenectady County Community College seeks to achieve a culturally diverse environment where the contributions of all individuals are recognized and valued. It is our goal to work toward achieving an appreciation for cultures and contemporary issues related to the inclusion of multicultural experiences. The College continues to strengthen avenues for better understanding and appreciation of individual differences. Schenectady County Community College affirms that bias-related incidents related to race, creed, gender, national origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, veteran status, or marital status will not be tolerated on campus. Every effort is made to provide opportunities for prevention and awareness programs to the College community that foster a climate inclusive of all people and to minimize bias-related incidents. The College’s Affirmative Action Officer/Title IX Coordinator can answer questions or concerns related to cultural diversity, affirmative action and sexual discrimination. The office location and telephone number of the Affirmative Action Officer/Title IX Coordinator may be found in the Special Appointments section of the College Administration, Faculty and Staff listing in this catalog Organization and Support. The College receives operating funds from three primary sources: student tuition and fees, the county in which the student resides and the State of New York. The College is governed by a 10-member Board of Trustees. Five are appointed by the Schenectady County Legislature and four by the Governor of New York. One trustee is elected by the student body each year.


Table of Contents Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Note:

General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

The College reserves the right at any time to make appropriate changes deemed advisable in the policies and procedures contained in this publication. This Catalog is not intended as a listing of course offerings, but rather as a reference document containing approved curricula, programs and courses which may be offered. Updated information can be found on the College’s Web site at www.sunysccc.edu.

Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Tuition and Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Tuition and Fee Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Student Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Academic Policies and Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Curricula/Programs Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Curricula and Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Credit Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Faculty and Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 SCCC Trustees, Foundation, Advisory Committees . . . . . . . . . 121 State University of New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

The College reserves the right to limit registration for courses, to discontinue courses for which there is insufficient enrollment and to change times and/or instructor assignments. Students who matriculated prior to Fall 2009 should refer to the Catalog of the year in which they enrolled for program requirements. The College will publish a supplement to this Catalog prior to the Fall 2010 semester. Schenectady County Community College does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, creed, color, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, veteran status, religion, or marital status in admissions, employment, or in any aspect of the business of the College. For more information, contact: Carolyn Pinn, Affirmative Action Officer (Title IX and Section 504 Coordinator), Elston Hall, Room 128, Schenectady County Community College, 78 Washington Avenue, Schenectady, N.Y., 12305, Phone: (518) 381-1331, E-mail: pinnct@sunysccc.edu 78 Washington Avenue Schenectady, New York 12305 (518) 381-1200 www.sunysccc.edu


2009-2010

A c a d e mic C a l e nd a r Revised July 23, 2009

Fall Semester 2009

Spring Semester 2010

Summer Session 2010

Monday, July 6 General Registration Begins

Thursday, December 3 General Registration Begins

Wednesday, March 31 General Registration Begins

Monday, August 31– Friday, September 4 Faculty Institute New Student Orientation

Monday, January 11– Friday, January 15 Faculty Institute

Monday, May 24 Early Start Summer Classes**

Tuesday, September 1– Thursday, September 3 General Registration

Tuesday, January 12– Thursday, January 14 General Registration

Monday, September 7 Labor Day–College Closed

Monday, January 18 Martin Luther King Day– College Closed

Tuesday, September 8 Classes Begin (Last Day for 100% Refund)

Tuesday, January 19 Classes Begin (Last Day for 100% Refund)

Tuesday, September 8– Monday, September 14 Late Registration/Add

Tuesday, January 19– Monday, January 25 Late Registration/Add

Tuesday, September 15 Last Day for 75% Refund

Tuesday, January 26 Last Day for 75% Refund

Tuesday, September 22 Last Day for Drop/50% Refund

Tuesday, February 2 Last Day for Drop/50% Refund

Tuesday, September 29 Last Day for 25% Refund

Friday, February 5 Last Day to Apply for Graduation

Monday, November 9– Friday, November 20 Spring Semester Advance Registration

Tuesday, February 9 Last Day for 25% Refund

Tuesday, November 24 Last Day to Withdraw from Fall Semester Classes Thursday, November 26– Saturday, November 28 Thanksgiving Recess Monday, December 21– Thursday, December 24 Final Week (See Final Week Class Schedule) Tuesday, December 29 Final Grades Due December 25–January 15 Winter Recess (College Closed December 25 and January 1)

Monday, March 15– Saturday, March 20 Spring Recess Wednesday, March 31– Tuesday, April 13 Fall Semester (and Summer) Advance Registration Tuesday, April 13 Last Day to Withdraw from Full Semester Classes Monday, May 10– Thursday, May 13 Final Week (See Final Week Class Schedule) Monday, May 17 Final Grades Due Tuesday, May 18Thursday, May 20 Professional Days Saturday, May 22* Commencement * Subject to change due to availability of Proctors

6

Tuesday, June 1– Thursday, June 3 General Registration Monday, June 7 Classes Begin (Last Day for 100% Refund) Monday, June 7– Tuesday, June 8 Late Registration/Add Wednesday, June 9 Last Day for 75% Refund Monday, June 14 Last Day for 50% Refund Wednesday, June 16 Last Day for 25% Refund Monday, July 5 College Closed Monday, July 19 Last Day to Withdraw from Full Session Classes Friday, July 30 Summer Session Ends Monday, August 2 Final Grades Due

Fall Semester 2010: Tuesday, September 7 Classes Begin

Note: For courses offered in a shortened session or a special time frame, the equivalent registration periods, refund dates, etc. will be determined and announced by the Office of Academic Services. ** Early Start Summer Classes begin before Summer Session 2010


2010-2011

A c a d e mic C a l e nd a r Revised July 23, 2009

Fall Semester 2010

Spring Semester 2011

Summer Session 2011

Tuesday, July 6 General Registration Begins

Thursday, December 2 General Registration Begins

Wednesday, March 30 General Registration Begins

Monday, August 30– Friday, September 3 Faculty Institute New Student Orientation

Monday, January 10– Friday, January 14 Faculty Institute

Monday, May 23 Early Start Summer Classes**

Tuesday, January 11– Thursday, January 13 General Registration

Tuesday, August 31– Thursday, September 2 General Registration Monday, September 6 Labor Day–College Closed

Monday, January 17 Martin Luther King Day– College Closed

Tuesday, September 7 Classes Begin (Last Day for 100% Refund)

Tuesday, January 18 Classes Begin (Last Day for 100% Refund)

Tuesday, September 7– Monday, September 13 Late Registration/Add

Tuesday, January 18– Monday, January 24 Late Registration/Add

Tuesday, September 14 Last Day for 75% Refund

Tuesday, January 25 Last Day for 75% Refund

Tuesday, September 21 Last Day for Drop/50% Refund

Tuesday, February 1 Last Day for Drop/50% Refund

Tuesday, September 28 Last Day for 25% Refund

Friday, February 4 Last Day to Apply for Graduation

Monday, November 8– Friday, November 19 Spring Semester Advance Registration

Tuesday, February 8 Last Day for 25% Refund

Tuesday, November 23 Last Day to Withdraw from Fall Semester Classes

Monday, March 14– Saturday, March 19 Spring Recess Wednesday, March 30– Tuesday, April 12 Fall Semester (and Summer) Advance Registration

Thursday, November 25– Saturday, November 27 Thanksgiving Recess Monday, December 20– Thursday, December 23 Final Week (See Final Week Class Schedule) Monday, December 27 Final Grades Due December 24–January 14 Winter Recess (College Closed December 24 and December 31

Tuesday, April 12 Last Day to Withdraw from Full Semester Classes Monday, May 9– Thursday, May 12 Final Week (See Final Week Class Schedule) Monday, May 16 Final Grades Due Tuesday, May 17Thursday, May 19 Professional Days

Tuesday, May 31– Thursday, June 2 General Registration Monday, June 6 Classes Begin (Last Day for 100% Refund) Monday, June 6– Tuesday, June 7 Late Registration/Add Wednesday, June 8 Last Day for 75% Refund Monday, June 13 Last Day for 50% Refund Wednesday, June 15 Last Day for 25% Refund Monday, July 4 College Closed Monday, July 18 Last Day to Withdraw from Full Session Classes Friday, July 29 Summer Session Ends Monday, August 1 Final Grades Due

Fall Semester 2011: Tuesday, September 6 Classes Begin

Note: For courses offered in a shortened session or a special time frame, the equivalent registration periods, refund dates, etc. will be determined and announced by the Office of Academic Services. ** Early Start Summer Classes begin before Summer Session 2011

Saturday, May 21* Commencement * Subject to change due to availability of Proctors

7


OVERVIEW of schenectady county community college

The campus was further enhanced in 1987 when the Center for Science and Technology (CST) opened. This unique facility contains the College’s physics and chemistry laboratories as well as specialized laboratory facilities for circuits, electronics, vacuum science, and computer networking. A campus development project was completed in 1992. This added a new student center in Elston Hall which includes a cafeteria, the College Store, student lounge, recreational space, biology and geology laboratories and 15 classrooms. The South Wing addition to Elston Hall added four new culinary arts laboratories and an expanded restaurant facility, the Casola Dining Room. An enclosed pedestrian bridge connecting Elston Hall with the Center for Science and Technology was also added, providing improved access to the CST. In the Spring of 2000, SCCC’s new Gateway Building officially opened. The colorful one-story building houses general classrooms, a child care center, the Gateway Montessori Preschool and offices. Construction was completed in the Fall of 2001 on the Stockade Building, a three-story academic building which houses computer classrooms, traditional classrooms, lecture halls, conference rooms, the Continuing Education Division, offices and specialty programs. The Stockade Building is connected to Elston Hall and the Begley Library through an enclosed walkway in the heart of campus. An impressive Culinary Arts Expansion in Elston Hall houses the new Casola Dining Room, two culinary arts laboratories, a dedicated

• FROM THE NORTH AND EAST via State Street, Route 5, turn left at Washington Avenue in front of the College. Turn right into main parking lot. • FROM THE WEST (SCOTIA/ GLENVILLE), via Route 5, turn right at the “Schenectady County Community College” exit ramp off the Western Gateway Bridge. Turn .. . left at stop sign into main parking lot. .... • FROM THE WEST, via New York State Thruway Exit 26, take I-890 East to Exit 4B “Erie Boulevard.” Stay to the left and follow ramp “To Route 5 Scotia.” At the traffic light, turn left on to State Street, (Route 5 West Western Gateway Bridge) for 1/4 mile. Take the “Schenectady County Community College” exit ramp on the right. At stop sign (Columbus Drive), turn right; at the next stop sign, turn left into main parking lot. • FROM THE SOUTH AND EAST, via New York State Thruway, I-90, Exit 25, take I-890 West to Exit 4C “To Route 5, Scotia.” At the traffic light, turn left on to State Street, (Route 5 West Western Gateway Bridge) for 1/4 mile. Take the “Schenectady County Community College” exit ramp on the right. At stop sign (Columbus Drive), turn right; at the next stop sign, turn left into main parking lot. Visitors may park in “Faculty/Staff” rows and register with the security guard in Elston Hall. ..

........ .. . ..

In 1978, a multi-purpose building was constructed on campus which houses the Begley Library, including Multi Media Services. This building also houses the SCCC Music Department, designed to meet the needs of students in the nationally accredited music programs, and the Carl B. Taylor Community Auditorium, home to musical and theatrical performances and special events.

Directions to Campus

........

The Campus

Campus enhancements in the Campus Master Plan include expansion into the surrounding downtown Schenectady area, student housing, expansion to the Music/Drama wing of the Begley Building, a walkway across Washington Avenue and improvements to the east parking lot.

.... .

Located on the western edge of the City of Schenectady, the extensively renovated Van Curler Hotel was transformed into a college, and classes began in September 1969. The building was subsequently renamed Elston Hall in honor of Charles W. Elston. Mr. Elston was a member of the original Board of Trustees and served as chairperson of that board for eight years. Elston Hall houses traditional and electronic classrooms, computer, learning and language labs, science and culinary arts laboratories, the Casola Dining Room, the Van Curler Room, the Lally Mohawk Room, meeting rooms, the College Store, a cafeteria and offices.

The College has continued to increase the number of electronic classrooms with Internet access, multimedia teaching stations and student access to computers. On-campus athletic facilities include an all-weather track, a soccer field, a baseball field and a softball field. A portion of Schenectady County’s bike-hike trail is located on the campus along the edge of the Mohawk River for use by students and the general public.

. ..

Schenectady County Community College was officially established by the Schenectady County Board of Representatives on January 26, 1967, based in part on a study made by a citizens’ committee which showed a need for a community college in Schenectady County. Following approvals by the State University of New York and the appointment of Trustees for SCCC, the Van Curler Hotel was purchased by the County and designated as the site for the College.

kitchen for the Casola Dining Room, a bakery outlet, and a seminar room. The Center for Science and Technology features new labs for Nanoscale Materials Technology.

... .

History and Facilities


Campus Location Schenectady County Community College is centrally located in downtown Schenectady at the corner of State Street (Route 5) and Washington Avenue. SCCC is easily accessible from all points in the Northeast. Bus and Amtrak train terminals are within easy walking distance, and Albany International Airport is 25 minutes by car or taxi. The College is also served by CDTA local bus service. Parking is available on campus. The Schenectady area has much to offer including cultural activities, from museums and art exhibits to theatres and music halls. Nationally-known performers in music, dance and theatre make regular appearances in the area at the historic Proctors, the famed Saratoga Performing Arts Center and numerous other sites. Recreational opportunities are equally numerous. Several golf courses, downhill and cross-country ski centers, health clubs, camping facilities and resorts are in within easy traveling distance from Schenectady.

The College Schenectady County Community College operates as a comprehensive community college under the programs and standards of the State University of New York. Sponsored by the County of Schenectady, the College’s programs are approved by, and registered with, the New York State Education Department, and the College is authorized by the Regents of the University of the State of New York to award certificates and Associate’s degrees.

Mission Statement The mission of Schenectady County Community College is to provide quality, comprehensive higher education to meet the career, transfer, training, cultural and lifelong learning needs of the individual, the community and the workforce. The College is committed to making education accessible and affordable to a population with diverse backgrounds, needs and aspirations.

Goal Areas SCCC has established nine goal areas to address the College’s Mission and Directions Statements: Access and Recruitment; Teaching/Learning Environment; Student Services; Student Progress; Faculty and Staff; Community Partnerships/Workforce Development; Technology Utilization; Facilities; and Resource Development. 1. Access and Recruitment: Create sources of SCCC information for prospective students and the community regarding admissions, academic programs, support services, financial aid and career path development; develop effective programs to market the College to prospective students; and identify strategies to retain current students as they seek to achieve their academic goals. 2. Teaching/Learning Environment: Strive for continuous improvement of the SCCC academic setting including best practices in teaching and learning pedagogies, innovative new programming directions and new program offerings to respond to community-identified needs. 3. Student Services: Develop, improve and maintain programs and funding sources to enhance student engagement as well as academic, social, transfer and career success.

4. Student Progress: Identify, assess and analyze key indicators of student progress to monitor the College’s responsiveness to student needs. 5. Faculty and Staff: Maintain and further improve initiatives pertaining to College faculty and staff including diversity, evaluation, communication and professional development. 6. Community Partnerships/Workforce Development: Maintain and expand community partnerships to meet the cultural, training and educational needs of business, organizations and individuals in the College’s service area. 7. Technology Utilization: Support teaching, learning and productivity throughout the College through ongoing investigation, acquisition, development and implementation of technology advancements and provision of training for faculty and staff. 8. Facilities: Prioritize and fund maintenance/upgrade projects and growth of the College campus and associated services, including support and implementation of the College’s five-year Campus Master Plan. 9. Resource Development: Optimize New York State and Schenectady County support for and partnership with the College and develop additional internal and external funding sources through new and innovative methods.

Comprehensive Opportunities Schenectady County Community College provides: • College parallel programs that prepare students to transfer to four-year colleges and universities; • Career/technology programs that prepare students for immediate employment; • Continuing education and community service programs for students striving for professional growth or personal enrichment; • Public service activities provided in support of community development; • Developmental education for students with special academic needs; • Workforce development programs in response to local employer/ employee needs; • Student development activities, including cultural programs, guest lecturers, financial assistance, counseling services and intercollegiate athletics; • An effective and efficient management and delivery system to ensure maximum accessibility to these comprehensive programs and services to all people throughout the Capital District at the lowest possible cost. In addition, the College provides the quality instruction, resources and encouragement necessary for students:

• to identify realistic educational and career objectives;

• to cultivate attitudes, habits and interests that encourage lifelong learning;

• to develop awareness of and responsibility to the individual’s community; and

• to acquire a comprehensive general education.


General Education Statement of Principles The purpose of general education is to help students develop a broad cultural and intellectual context for the substantive knowledge and career skills they acquire. To accomplish this purpose, Schenectady County Community College is committed to ensuring that graduates of A.A., A.S. and A.A.S. degree programs will demonstrate the abilities to: • Apply logical and critical reasoning in evaluation and problem solving; • Interpret and apply quantitative data; • Understand and apply the methods of scientific inquiry; • Develop effective oral and written communication skills; • Locate, evaluate, and synthesize information from a variety of sources; • Analyze and evaluate arguments as they occur in their own work or another’s work; • Produce well-reasoned arguments; • Utilize appropriate computer and technology skills; • Understand the significance and implications of technological developments; • Identify different historical and cultural perspectives; • Understand domestic and global interactions which shape the contemporary world; • Explore the significance of ethics and value systems in relationship to personal development and social responsibility; • Explore the creative and aesthetic dimensions of human achievement through literature, fine arts, and performing arts.

SUNY General Education Requirement Schenectady County Community College complies with the SUNY Board of Trustees’ Resolution #98-241 on General Education applicable to students first matriculated in an A.A. or A.S. program in Fall 2000 or later who intend to transfer to a SUNY college or university. The approved SUNY-General Education Requirement courses offered at SCCC are listed on the right. ■ The SUNY resolution states that baccalaureate degree candidates, as a condition of graduation, must complete a General Education program of no fewer than 30 credit hours specifically designed to achieve the student learning outcomes in ten knowledge and skill areas. ■ SCCC graduates in A.A. or A.S. degree programs planning to transfer to a SUNY four-year institution are required to meet a minimum of seven (7) of the knowledge and skill areas (a minimum of 21 credits). ■ Completing courses in all 10 areas will assure optimal SUNY transfer. ■ Students transferring courses from another college or who have received “credit by examination” may find that one or more of them fulfill their SUNY General Education requirements (consult with an advisor).

■ The SUNY General Education Course Plan is not a requirement to graduate from SCCC. ■ Students intending to transfer to non-SUNY institutions with different general education requirements should consult with their advisors. Students who do not intend to complete a minimum of seven (7) knowledge and skill area courses are required to sign a SUNY General Education Waiver Form, available from the Academic Services Office (Elston Hall, Room 212) or from the Advisement Center (Elston Hall, Room 223).

SUNY General Education Requirement Knowledge and Skill Areas A minimum of one course from seven of ten different knowledge and skill areas needs to be completed. Mathematics - MAT 145; MAT 147; MAT 149; MAT 160; MAT 167; MAT 180 Natural Sciences - AST 123; AST 125; AST 127; BIO 111; BIO 112; BIO 115; BIO 141; BIO 151; CHM 113; CHM 115; CHM 121; ENV 100; GEO 143; GEO 145; GHY 121; NMT 150; PHY 106; PHY 120; PHY 121; PHY 153; PHY 221 Social Sciences - ANT 121; ANT 135; ECO 211; ECO 221; ECO 223; POL 123; POL 125; PSY 121; SOC 121; SOC 122 American History - HIS 227; HIS 229 Western Civilization - HIS 125; HIS 127 Other World Civilizations - HIS 150; HIS 232; HIS 234; HIS 235; HIS 237 Humanities - ENG 124; HON 124 Arts - ART 127; ART 128; ART 133; ART 135; DRA 123; DRA 133; DRA 143; DRA 181; MUS 115; MUS 121; MUS 127; MUS 131; MUS 147; MUS 257 Foreign Languages - ASL 121*; ASL 122*; FRE 121; FRE 122; ITA 121; ITA 122; SPA 121; SPA 122 Basic Communication - ENG 123 * Applies to Human Services and Teacher Education Transfer programs.

Accreditation Schenectady County Community College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. The College is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The Paralegal program is approved by the American Bar Association. Business programs are accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs. The Culinary Arts A.O.S. degree program is approved by the American Culinary Federation. The Early Childhood A.A.S. and Certificate programs are accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children.


Student Body Profile The student body of SCCC is diverse in gender, ethnicity, age and area of residence. Students come to SCCC with backgrounds ranging from those who have not completed high school to advanced degree holders. Their goals are diverse as well. Students may be working on a degree with plans to transfer to a four-year institution after graduation, or they may be taking courses to upgrade their job skills. Many students are employed while they attend classes and many are parents. Enrollment is split between full-time (57%) and part-time (43%) students. Within these two areas there is a greatly diverse population of students. Based on enrollment statistics from the Fall 2008 semester, 53% of full-time and 59% of part-time students are female. The average age of full-time students is 23 years old and the average age of part-time students is 33 years old. In the Fall 2008 semester, students from ethnic minorities comprised 19% of the full-time student population and 18% of the part-time student population. The SCCC African American population represented 12% of the full-time and 9% of the part-time student body. Hispanic students represented 4% of the full-time and 4% of the part-time student body. The majority of students (58%) are residents of Schenectady County. The remainder are from the Capital District (34%) and other areas of New York and other states (8%). In addition to these students who take courses on campus and through distance learning network, over 1,100 area high school students earned college credit for courses offered by SCCC in their high schools. The diversity of educational and life experiences that students bring to SCCC results in a richness of viewpoints that provides opportunity for dynamic exchange. SCCC strives to provide programs and services to facilitate that experience for all.

An Integral Part of the Community As stated in the College mission, SCCC strives to meet the educational needs of its local community. The College seeks input from a variety of advisory committees, provides programming through the Division of Academic Affairs and the Division of Continuing Education, and endeavors to reach all segments of the community through a variety of avenues, including the SUNY College and Career Counseling Center, administered by SCCC and located in Schenectady.

SUNY College and Career Counseling Center The SUNY College and Career Counseling Center at Schenectady, located at 120 Emmons St., Schenectady, N.Y., 12304, is designed to provide counseling and referral services to those persons in the community interested in making decisions about their educational and career goals. The Center provides an awareness of the various educational and employment training resources that exist in the Capital Region and elsewhere in New York State and offers assistance to those economically disadvantaged persons interested in applying for college admission, securing financial aid and/or pursuing employment training opportunities.

The Center is funded through annual grants from the State University of New York, Office of Special Programs. There is no charge for its services. The telephone number is: (518) 370-2654. Office hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Division of Continuing Education Through the Division of Continuing Education, the College demonstrates its commitment to learning as a lifelong process by providing educational opportunities that enable individuals to adjust to changing family and/or career needs. The Division manages the College’s schedule of evening, weekend and summer credit courses, non-credit professional and personal development courses, workforce development programs, community service programs, online distance learning courses, extension site courses, and contractual courses. Flexible scheduling of a broad range of credit and non-credit courses allows students to pursue their educational goals during daytime, evening, or weekend hours at on-campus and off-campus sites. The instructors who serve as Continuing Education faculty are recruited from the College’s full-time faculty and the professional community, providing an excellent range of experience and expertise. The Division of Continuing Education also assists the College in meeting its comprehensive mission by developing partnerships with other educational institutions and not-for-profit agencies. Through collaborative delivery of programs, the College and its partners play a major role in serving the diverse education and training needs of Schenectady County and the greater Capital Region. The Division works with local school districts to offer the University-in-the-High School and Tech-Prep programs, through which high school students may earn college credits. The Division of Continuing Education assists local businesses to remain competitive and meet their training needs by customizing cost-effective programs that are designed to increase productivity and upgrade employee skills. The Division also provides employers with the opportunity to participate in workforce development training through special SUNY grants. As a partner in the Capital Region Workforce Investment System and the Schenectady County One Stop, Continuing Education assists individuals to achieve skills necessary to enter employment or enhance skills necessary to remain competitive in the workplace. Through its uniquely responsive Workforce Development Office, Continuing Education develops courses, seminars, workshops, conferences, and training programs on a credit, non-credit, or contractual basis. Of special interest are the Division’s high-tech computer training facilities, where state-of-the-art computers are utilized to provide a variety of training programs on popular system and software applications. The Division offers a variety of online distance learning courses to students locally and around the globe. Members of the Armed Forces find it valuable to take courses via the Internet from duty stations around the world, an opportunity SCCC extends as part of its commitment to the Service Members Opportunity College program. The main office of the Division of Continuing Education, located on the first floor of the Stockade Building, is open Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to noon, when classes are in session. At all other times, the office is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


Online Courses

SCCC Foundation

The College offers asynchronous online courses over the Internet in both fully online and hybrid modes, utilizing the ANGEL course management system. The term asynchronous indicates that a student is able to enter the course at any time of day or night, seven days per week, and work toward completion of assignments. The term hybrid means that the course will meet in the traditional classroom part of the time and up to 50 percent of the time online. Online and hybrid courses adhere to the same academic calendar and academic policies as courses utilizing traditional modes. Online course offerings vary by semester and are indicated in each semester’s Programs and Courses Directory. Further information about the College’s online offerings and special informational tutorials about online instruction may be found on the SCCC Web site at www.sunysccc.edu.

The Schenectady County Community College Foundation, Inc. is a separate 501(c)3 charitable organization founded in 1973. It is made up of business and community volunteers who raise, invest and administer private funds in support of the College mission.

Service Members Opportunity College Schenectady County Community College is an approved Service Members Opportunity College (SOC). Under the SOC program, active members of the United States armed forces who matriculate into SCCC programs receive special consideration toward meeting graduation requirements, including greater flexibility in acceptance of transfer credits and acceptance of specific military training programs for academic credit. For further information about the SOC program, contact your SOC representative or the SCCC Office of Academic Services.

College Advisory Committees Advisory Committees of community experts have been established by the College. These Advisory Committees meet with faculty and administrators to discuss matters related to programs and services. SCCC benefits greatly by drawing upon the collective experience and judgment of the Advisory Committees. The committees submit a report to the Board of Trustees through the President of the College each year. ADA Transition Services Admissions Business Career and Employment Services Criminal Justice Developmental Studies Early Childhood Educational Opportunity Program Fire Protection Technology Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism Human Services Library Mathematics, Science and Technology Music Paralegal SUNY College and Career Counseling Center Workforce Development Special Committee: Affirmative Action and Multicultural Affairs Committee A complete list of members of each committee begins on Page 121.

12

The Foundation’s vision is to provide financial support for students to obtain a quality education and assist the College in providing programs and facilities to enrich the community with a well-prepared citizenry and workforce.


ADMISSIONS

Full Opportunity/Open Admissions

Schenectady County Community College participates in the Full Opportunity Program of the State University of New York. Under this plan, Schenectady County Community College guarantees open admission to all applicants who reside in Schenectady County who graduated from high school within the prior year and to applicants who were released from active duty with the Armed Forces of the United States within the prior year. Additionally, the College admits previous high school graduates and residents of other counties who can profit from its programs and services, to the limits of the College’s capacity, and subject to compliance with any deadlines or requirements established by the College in its admissions procedures. All students must follow the admissions guidelines outlined later in this section. Applicants who do not hold a high school or equivalency diploma and who are 18 years of age or older may also enroll if, in the judgment of this College, they have a reasonable chance of succeeding in the college curriculum they have chosen. Applicants who are enrolled in high school as juniors should refer to the Early Admission Program information in this section of the Catalog. The College admits students with a wide variety of academic backgrounds. The College seeks to evaluate each student as an individual and to provide appropriate courses and services through testing; advisement; developmental courses in reading, writing and mathematics; tutoring services; and the Learning Center, Mathematics Lab, and the TRIO and EOP programs. It does not claim to guarantee academic success. It can only provide the full opportunity for academic success. Furthermore, admission under the Full Opportunity Program does not guarantee students that they will be able to complete the curriculum to which they applied in two years of full-time study. Applicants entering in the spring or summer semesters and those needing to complete prerequisite courses may require five or more semesters to complete degree requirements.

Admission Requirements Schenectady County Community College emphasizes flexibility and opportunity in its Full Opportunity admissions policy. Because the College accepts not only students of demonstrated ability, but also those of less developed talent, individuals who feel that they can profit from college level instruction are invited to apply for admission. Applicants for a degree or certificate program must possess either a local or Regent’s high school diploma or a General Equivalency Diploma (GED or its equivalent) or be accepted under the College’s 24 Credit Hour Program as explained below. An I.E.P. diploma is not a recognized diploma. An official high school transcript is required for all applicants who graduated from secondary school within the United States or its territories. Similarly, a student holding a GED will be required to submit the transcript of scores and/or the GED diploma. Colleges within the SUNY system currently do not recognize the completion of any out of state correspondence school program by state residents as a valid credential for admission. Students who attended high school outside of the United States or its territories are normally required to submit their academic credentials to

World Educational Services (WES) for evaluation. Official transcripts may be required for the purposes of evaluation and internal review. In accordance with the policy set forth by the State University of New York (SUNY), students who are home-schooled must satisfy one of the following to be eligible for consideration for admission into SCCC: 1. The student must have a passing score on the state high school equivalency diploma (GED) test. (Only students who have reached the maximum compulsory age of school attendance are eligible to take this test.) 2. The student must provide a letter from the superintendent of the school district in which the student resides, attesting to the student’s completion of home instruction meeting the requirements of Section 100.10 of the regulations of the Commissioner of Education (or equivalent for students who reside outside of New York state.) 3. If a student is 18 years of age or older, he or she may be eligible to be matriculated under the College’s 24 Credit Hour Program as explained below. 4. The student must have previously earned, and been granted, a degree from a regionally-accredited degree granting institution. 5. The student must have passed and completed all requirements for the following five Regents examinations or approved alternative assessments for these examinations: English, Mathematics, US History and Government, a Regents exam in Science, and Global History and Geography. Questions regarding the necessary documentation required of homeschooled students should be addressed to the Director of Admissions. Applicants who have studied at other colleges prior to matriculating at Schenectady County Community College will need to submit an official transcript from each of the educational institutions previously attended in order for transfer credit to be evaluated. Applicants for a degree or certificate who are at least 18 years of age, but who have not graduated from high school, or who do not have a General Equivalency Diploma, may be admitted as matriculated students pursuing a degree under the College’s 24 Credit Hour Program. Admission to this program will be based on the results of a standardized examination and an assessment of the student’s “ability to benefit” by the Office of Admissions. Upon completion of a specific distribution of 24 credit hours as specified by the New York State Department of Education, the student must apply for the General Equivalency Diploma through the Office of Academic Services. This procedure must be completed if students are to be eligible to receive an Associate’s degree or a Certificate from Schenectady County Community College. 24 Credit Hour admission is only available in the fall and spring semesters.

Admission Procedures Students are encouraged to apply to SCCC by using the College’s Free Application for Admission. The application can be obtained from the Admissions Office (518-381-1366) or the College Web site (www.sunysccc.edu). The Web site also provides the opportunity to complete the process online.

13


Students may also use the SUNY Application for Admission. Instructions for its completion are provided in the SUNY Application Viewbook, which is available from any New York state high school guidance office or on campus in the Office of Admissions, Elston Hall, Room 221. All applicants are encouraged to apply as early as possible, beginning in the fall preceding the year they wish to attend SCCC. Applicants without a high school diploma or a General Equivalency Diploma (GED) should contact the Office of Admission to discuss special directions on the processing of their applications. Applications are evaluated upon the receipt of all required documents and transcripts. If additional information is required before a decision can be reached, the applicant will be notified.

Transfer Admission The College’s philosophy of Full Opportunity also applies to transfer applicants. Transfer applicants should submit the College’s Free Application for Admission, and request that an official high school transcript be forwarded to the Office of Admissions. Additionally, applicants who wish to have previous college work evaluated for transfer credit must request that official transcripts from previously attended colleges be sent directly to the Office of Admissions. Transfer applicants will be considered for admission in any term for which they are eligible. However, the College cannot guarantee the availability of required courses in sequence or that the curriculum can be completed in less than two years. Generally, courses to be considered for transfer credit must carry a grade of “C” or better from an accredited college. Credit for courses taken in the armed services will be evaluated on an individual basis. Students desiring credit for courses on the basis of military service experience only should refer to the section of the Catalog pertaining to Credit by Examination. Courses which are applicable to the student’s chosen curriculum will be determined by the Academic Services Office. This evaluation will be sent to the student.

Immunization Requirement New York State Public Law requires that all matriculated students whose birth dates are on or after January 1, 1957, show the following proof of immunity against measles, mumps and rubella: Measles. Two doses of live measles vaccine administered after 12 months of age, or physician’s documentation of measles disease, or a blood test showing immunity. Mumps. One dose of live mumps vaccine administered after 12 months of age, or a physician’s documentation of mumps disease, or a blood test showing immunity.

Immunization Information Requests. A request for a copy of one’s immunization records (specifically measles, mumps and rubella) may be made to the Office of Student Services. All requests must be in writing and bear the student’s signature authorizing release of this personal health information.

Admission of Ex-Offenders/ Disciplinary Dismissals The College admissions application requires applicants to answer the following questions, “Have you ever been convicted of a felony?” and “Have you ever been expelled and/or dismissed from another college or university for disciplinary reasons?” An applicant who answers “yes” to either question will need to submit additional information. The College reserves the ultimate decision on acceptance or rejection of any application. Applicants should also be aware that an individual with a felony conviction may not be able to obtain licensure in certain professions. Applicants who are convicted felons must submit a completed admissions application prior to August 1 for the fall semester, prior to December 1 for the spring semester and prior to May 1 for the summer semester.

Early Admission Program The College has established an Early Admission Program in accordance with State Education Department guidelines to provide selected high school seniors a meaningful educational experience with opportunities most suited to individual needs and capabilities. Two options are available following the junior year in high school: 1. The student enrolls full time at SCCC before completing formal coursework for the diploma at the high school level. An admissions application should be filed along with appropriate recommendations from selected high school personnel. 2. The student retains high school status and has the option of starting at SCCC either during the summer session following the junior year in high school or in September of the senior year. The student will take high school courses concurrently while enrolled as a part-time student at SCCC. All Early Admission applicants must satisfy the following requirements: 1. Successful completion of 11th grade; 2. Evidence of a level of academic achievement that promises successful completion of college work. A student being considered for admission to an Associate in Applied Science curriculum must satisfy at least one of the following two criteria. A student being considered for admission to an Associate in Arts or an Associate in Science program must satisfy both criteria. Early admission into certificate programs is not available.

Rubella. One dose of live rubella vaccine administered after 12 months of age or a blood test showing immunity.

Proof of immunization is to be submitted to the Office of Student Services prior to the first day of classes. For the complete Procedures and Implementation of New York State Public Health Laws on Immunizations and Meningococcal Meningitis and for any other immunization information, please visit the SCCC Web site at www.sunysccc.edu or call the Office of Student Services at (518) 381-1344, Elston Hall, Room 222.

• A cumulative academic average of approximately 85 or a rank which is in the top 25% of the class;

• A combined score of at least 1,500 on the critical thinking, writing, and math sections of the PSAT, SAT, or a composite score of 18 on the ACT. 3. Recommendation from a high school guidance counselor or principal; 4. Completion of an interview involving a parent (or legal guardian), student and admissions officer, the purpose of


which is to explain the responsibilities and implications of the Early Admission Program; and 5. All Early Admission Students must take a placement exam. The following statements pertain to full-time Early Admission students:

• Students will be classified as matriculated freshmen.

• Students must arrange for their SCCC transcripts to be sent to the high school last attended so that these grades can be made a part of their permanent record. Successful completion of the freshman year should entitle students to a high school diploma. If they desire that the diploma be granted by their own high school, they must obtain approval prior to their high school graduation, since this decision lies with the local boards of education.

• Students may take up to five courses at a time, counting those taken concurrently in college and high school.

• The College reserves the right to restrict students to fewer than five courses concurrently, if it is deemed to be in their best interest.

Financial Aid Since Early Admission students are considered to be in college and high school at the same time, federal regulations state that they are NOT eligible for any form of Federal financial aid (grants or loans).

High School Course Preparation For a student enrolled full time to complete the requirements of a degree program in four semesters as specified in the “Curricula and Programs” section of the Catalog, it is essential that the student be adequately prepared in the stated course prerequisites. The College provides opportunities for students who may need to obtain necessary prerequisites. The need of such course prerequisites may, however, require a student to complete additional credit hours and/or semesters to complete the specified degree program requirements.

International Student Admissions Schenectady County Community College accepts applications for admission from international students for the fall and spring semesters. Students attending the College on a student visa (F-1) as authorized by a SEVIS I-20 Certificate of Eligibility are considered to be international students. Applicants who are permanent residents of the United States should follow the normal admissions procedures and are not considered to be international students. Acceptance of international students is based on the following factors: 1. The test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required prior to admission. The minimum acceptable score on the computer-based TOEFL is 213; the minimum score on the Internet-based TOEFL is 79. These are equivalent to a paper-based TOEFL score of 550. The TOEFL requirement may be waived for students from countries where English is the primary language or when a student has successfully completed an English Composition course with a grade of “C” or better at a regionally accredited U.S. college. 2. Students must have academic credentials at a level appropriate for entrance to college level study. The Full Opportunity Program regarding admission to the College does not apply to international students.

3. Application Deadline for International Students: Due to the amount of time required to process international student applications and evaluate academic credentials, the State University of New York International Student Application for Admission (available from the Admissions Office) should be processed as early as possible to ensure adequate time for acceptance to the College. For international students, the application process should be totally completed with all documentation prior to August 1 for the fall semester and December 1 for the spring semester. 4. Normally, all written credentials from outside the U.S. need to be evaluated by World Educational Services (WES) at the expense of the applicant (e.g., secondary and post-secondary transcripts). 5. Students must be able to certify the availability of $16,000 (U.S. currency) for each 12-month period to support their cost of tuition, fees, books, room, board and other living costs while in attendance at the College. 6. Health insurance coverage is required. Students must provide documentation of health insurance coverage while attending Schenectady County Community College prior to acceptance. This is in addition to the accident insurance that is required for all students. 7. International students are not eligible for any form of financial aid for attendance at Schenectady County Community College. Students attending the College on a student visa must pay non-resident tuition (double the resident tuition) regardless of the length of time that they have resided in New York State. (See section on Tuition and Fees in the Catalog). 8. If an international student is accepted at SCCC, the student will be mailed a SEVIS I-20 Certificate of Eligibility. Students residing outside of the United States must pay all applicable Federal SEVIS fees and have a printed receipt that proves payment prior to the visa interview at the U.S. Consulate. Updated information is available on the SCCC Web site at www.sunysccc.edu. 9. International students who entered the country with an F-1 Visa or who changed their immigration status to F-1 while in the United States are strongly recommended to report to the Office of Student Development (E223) every semester to assure maintenance of status. All F-1 students who transfer to SCCC must also apply for an SCCC SEVIS I-20 (certificate of eligibility) within 15 days of registering for classes.

Special Admissions Information Music Applicants. Admission to the Performing Arts–Music and the Music/Business degree programs is on a selective basis. Applicants are required to audition successfully in music reading and applied music before acceptance into either program. Applicants should schedule an audition appointment and request audition information by contacting the Department of Music at (518) 381-1231. As a result of course scheduling, students initiating either music degree program in a term other than the fall semester may require more than four semesters for completion.


The Honors Program The Honors program enables students in the College’s Associate’s degree programs to enhance their educational experience at SCCC. Honors courses exist in a variety of subjects so that students from all of SCCC’s degree programs can benefit from them. Students who have completed 12 credit hours (usually four, three-credit courses) in designated Honors courses with a minimum 3.25 G.P.A. will receive a diploma with an Honors Program designation. Note: This is different from Graduation Honors, which is based upon a G.P.A. of 3.7 or higher, or High Honors, which is based upon a G.P.A. of 3.2 to 3.7.

Students enrolled in an SCCC program who have completed 12 credit hours of college level coursework at SCCC or another college and who have a minimum G.P.A. of 3.25 may fill out an application, which requires an essay and two letters of reference. Students who do not yet have 12 credit hours may enroll for individual Honors courses before admission to the Honors Program.  Many Honors Courses are described under the HON designation, but others are designated by section H within disciplines.  For more information or to obtain an application, please contact Dr. Dean Bennett, Assistant Professor/Honors Coordinator, at (518) 381-1469 or bennetdw@sunysccc.edu.


Transfer Relationships Under the transfer policies of the SUNY Board of Trustees, New York state residents who are graduates of A.A. and A.S. degree programs at Schenectady County Community College are guaranteed an opportunity to continue their education on a full-time basis at a SUNY baccalaureate campus. In order to be eligible for transfer under this guarantee, you must file an application and complete supplemental material by specified deadline dates. Please see the SCCC Transfer Counselor or the SUNY Application and Viewbook for details. SCCC has developed a number of formal transfer agreements with many four-year public and private colleges and universities. These agreements identify those institutions and indicate the patterns of study at SCCC which will maximize the transfer of credit to the desired four-year institution. Among those schools having transfer articulation agreements with specific departments at SCCC are: Albany College of Pharmacy; Cazenovia College; Charter Oak College; City University of New York; John Jay College; College of St. Joseph (Vermont); College of Saint Rose; Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Daniel Webster College; Dowling College; Eastern Kentucky University; Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Excelsior College; Hartwick College; Massachusetts College of the Liberal Arts; New England Culinary Institute; Niagara University; Russell Sage College; Sage College of Albany; Siena College; Skidmore College; Paul Smith’s College; Southern Vermont College; Sullivan University; SUNY at Cobleskill; SUNY at Delhi; SUNY Empire State College; SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry; SUNY at Farmingdale; SUNY at Fredonia; SUNY Institute of Technology at Utica/Rome; SUNY Maritime; SUNY Oswego; SUNY Plattsburgh; SUNY Postdam; SUNY Upstate Medical University, Union College; University at Albany; University of New Haven. These colleges and universities have specific requirements for admission in conjunction with completion of the SCCC programs involved in the various transfer agreements. Students wishing to investigate the possibility of transferring should consult the Student Development Center or the Department Chairperson responsible for their program early in their studies at SCCC.

Delhi B.B.A. Programs at SCCC Through a jointly registered, inter-institutional program, SUNY Delhi offer courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) in Hospitality Management and in Business and Technology Management on the SCCC campus. All upper division courses necessary to satisfactorily complete the degrees are offered on the SCCC campus, enabling the student to attain the degrees by taking all Delhi courses at SCCC. The Hotel and Resort Management core offers instruction in lodging management, recreation and club management, strategic marketing processes, research methods and applications, and human resources management. The Travel and Tourism core includes convention management, travel agency operations management, computerized ticketing for both domestic and international travel sales and distribution, and packaging and promotions development. The Business and Technology Management degree focuses on building skills sets in management, communication, leadership and technology, allowing students to enter a variety of fields after graduation.

For more information about SUNY Delhi’s degree programs at SCCC or for an application for admission, please call (518) 381-1416.

High School Articulation A variety of articulation arrangements have been established with regional high schools and BOCES Career and Technical Centers to facilitate the seamless transition from secondary to postsecondary studies. For further information contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs at (518) 381-1381.

Ellis Hospital School of Nursing/ SCCC Joint Program Applicants The College cooperates with the Ellis Hospital School of Nursing in offering an Associate in Science degree in Nursing which is jointly registered by the New York State Education Department. Under this 21-month program, students prepare for professional registered nurse licensure by enrolling in biology, humanities and social science courses (the SCCC Health Studies Certificate Program) at the College and in nursing courses at the School of Nursing. Graduates of this program have historically ranked very high on the New York state licensing examination. Prospective students should apply through the Admissions Office of the Ellis Hospital School of Nursing (518-243-4471). Prerequisites for the Ellis Nursing program must be completed prior to enrollment.


TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and Fees

Certificate of Residence

The tuition and fees for full-time and part-time students are given on Page 18. Students carrying 12 or more credits in any given semester are considered full time, although an average of at least 15 credit hours per semester is required to complete any Associate’s degree program on a normal two-year schedule.

The county of legal residence for a New York state resident attending a community college contributes to the College a portion of the College’s cost for providing services to the student. The basis for assessing counties for this funding is the Certificate of Residence.

The tuition, fees and charges published in the Tuition and Fee Schedule are in effect at the time of the printing of this Catalog. The College reserves the right, however, to make changes in tuition, fees and charges at the discretion of the Board of Trustees. Full-time tuition covers all credit courses, day or evening, offered by SCCC, including cross-registration agreements. It does not cover tuition for non-credit courses or courses on other campuses for which no prior cross-registration approval has been obtained.

Student Insurance Plans A 12-month accident plan is compulsory for full-time students and the fee is non-refundable. Supplemental health insurance is recommended for physician outpatient visits and hospitalization. The College offers optional sickness insurance at a moderate price for full-time students. Students are urged to give this careful consideration. There is an optional accident medical insurance plan available for part-time students on campus. Further information regarding the insurance may be obtained from the Student Services Office or the Business Office.

Student Activity Fee In accordance with SUNY policy adopted by the College and approved by the Board of Trustees, a mandatory Student Activity Fee for students is charged by the College at each registration. Fee varies based on status (part-time vs. full-time). The Student Government Association budget is funded by the Student Activity Fee and supports the total activities program, all clubs and organizations and sponsors all intercollegiate athletic programs of the College. It is the responsibility of the College, through the appropriate College officials, to ensure that all fees are expended for purposes determined to be cultural, educational, recreational and social. The Student Activity Fee currently includes a membership to the YWCA and YMCA of Schenectady. For more information, visit Student Services, Elston Hall, Room 222. An external audit review is conducted annually of the Student Government Association budget. This report is available to the public. Contact the Student Services Office, Elston Hall, Room 222.

To qualify for in-state tuition, a student must submit a Certificate of Residence annually. Failure to submit a Certificate of Residence will result in the student being billed out-of-state tuition charges. The application for Certificate of Residence (Form B-80) is available in the Office of Academic Services, Student Accounts, on the SCCC Web site (www.sunysccc.edu) and in the Programs and Courses Directories for Fall, Spring and Summer. Schenectady County residents will be required to provide a proof of residency with their affidavit or certificate. To qualify as a New York state resident, a student must currently live in New York state and have lived within the state continuously for a period of at least one year prior to the date that the Form B-80 is completed. To qualify as a New York state resident, a student must also be a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident or have a valid immigrant status. Non-immigrants who currently are in the U.S. on any type of visa are not eligible for resident tuition. New York state residents who have lived in more than one county during the past six months MUST complete the Form B-80 for each county in which they have resided.

Refund Policy Refunds to students are made by mail only to the address shown on the student’s registration form. Credit card refunds will be credited to the card used for the initial payment. Full refunds will be made for each course canceled by the College. However, if a course is canceled, it is the student’s responsibility to add other courses, if necessary, to maintain full-time status. No refunds are made of the following fees: • Late Registration Fee • Accident Insurance Fee • Sickness Insurance Fee • Parking Fine Fees For Credit Courses: Students who withdraw from all of their courses or reduce their credit load, either from full-time to part-time or within part-time status, will receive a refund, provided they submit forms containing all the required signatures to the Academic Services Office as follows:

18

• Prior to 8 p.m. of the first day of the semester: 100% Refund • Through the end of the first week of the semester: 75% Refund • Through the end of the second week of the semester: 50% Refund • Through the end of the third week of the semester: 25% Refund • After the end of the third week of the semester: No Refund


For Courses Offered on Other Than a 15-Week Basis. Refunds will be scheduled on a proportioned basis, similar to the preceding list. Refunds to either full-time or part-time students are made by mail only to the address shown on the student’s registration form. Full refunds will be made for each course canceled by the College. However, if a course is canceled, it is the student’s responsibility to add other courses, if necessary, to maintain full-time status. No refunds are made of the following fees: • Late Registration Fee • Accident Insurance Fee • Sickness Insurance Fee • Parking Fine Fees

Outstanding Financial Obligations Students with outstanding obligations to the College through the Library, Business Office, College Store, Financial Aid Office and Student Services Office will not be permitted to register for subsequent terms, receive diplomas, have official or unofficial transcripts sent or receive grade reports. The College uses a collection agency and/or attorney as a means of debt collection. The student will be liable for any and all costs and disbursements associated with collecting outstanding obligations and interest including reasonable attorneys’ fees.

For Non-Credit Courses: Refunds will be provided according to the following schedule unless the class is specified as non-refundable. • Up to 48 hours prior to the first class meeting: 100% Refund • 48 hours up to the first class meeting: 100% less $10 • After first class meeting: No Refund Federal Financial Aid recipients should review the Financial Aid section of the Catalog for information on the required Federal Financial Aid Refund Policy on Page 19-20.

19


Tuition and Fee Schedule** Tuition Full Time

Part Time

New York State Resident

$3,150 per year

$131 per credit hour

Out-of-State Resident

$6,300 per year

$262 per credit hour

University in the High School Tuition

$43 per credit hour

Insurance Accident

$4 Fall semester (required)

$2 per semester (optional)

Accident

$5 Spring semester (required)

$2 per semester (optional)

Accident

$3 Summer term (required)

$2 per Summer term (optional)

Sickness

$3 Fall semester (optional)

Sickness

$5 Spring semester (optional)

Sickness

$3 Summer term (optional)

Fees Student Activity Fee

$52 per semester

$3 per credit hour per semester

(matriculated students only)

Late Registration Fee

$25 per semester

$10 per course

(not to exceed $25)

Transcript Fee (each transcript)

$3

$3

Each faxed transcript

$6

$6

Placement Credentials (each set)

$3

$3

Credit by Examination (challenge) per exam

$25

$25

Return Check Fee (each time)

$20

$20

Credit for Previous Experience Processing Fee

$15 per credit hour

$15 per credit hour

*Graduation Fee

$30

$30

Second degree or certificate awarded at same time

$10

$10

Music Laboratory Fee

$419 per semester

$419 per semester

EMS Course Fee (EMS 210)

$100

$100

EMS Course Fee (EMS 220)

$50

$50

Online Course Fee

$12 per credit hour

$12 per credit hour

Parking Fine–First Offense

$10

$10

Parking Fine–Additional Offense

$20

$20

Parking Fine–Unauthorized Disabled Area Parking

$50

$50

Technology Fee

$70

$7 per credit hour

Aviation Laboratory Fee for new students (2009-2010)

AER 101 Introduction to Flight Laboratory: $8,400 AER 141 Elements of Instrument Flight Laboratory: $8,200 AER 228 Commercial Operations Lab I: $6,700 AER 229 Commercial Operations Lab II: $7,200

* Paid when the student submits the degree application. ** Subject to change by the Board of Trustees.

20


FINANCIAL AID

Determining Financial Need and Eligibility for Financial Aid

If you answered “yes” to any question, you are independent of your parents for federal financial aid purposes.

The financial aid program at SCCC provides monetary assistance to matriculated students who can benefit from further education, but who cannot do so without such assistance. Amounts of awards vary and depend upon the student’s demonstrated and verified financial need, as well as the amount of government funds available for distribution. The primary responsibility for meeting the expenses of a college education rests with the student and family.

Campus-Based Aid

An estimated family contribution toward college is determined through a process called “need analysis,” which measures family financial circumstances. Financial need is then defined as the difference between family contribution and the cost to attend Schenectady County Community College. To apply for most types of financial aid, a student must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Using this information, the SCCC Financial Aid staff will determine eligibility for federal financial assistance. A New York State Express TAP Grant application will be available to all New York state residents who complete a FAFSA. More information about TAP is available at the Web site www.hesc.com.

Federal Financial Aid Criteria to be an Independent Student For the 2009-2010 academic year, the questions below are the federal criteria for independence. You are independent, and do not require parent information on the FAFSA, if you answer “yes” to any of the following questions:

• Were you born before January 1, 1986?

• As of today are you married or separated?

• Are you currently on active duty with the U.S. Armed Forces?

• Are you a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces?

• Do you have children who receive more than half of their support from you?

• Do you have dependents, other than children or spouse, who live with you and that you provide more than half of their support?

• Since the age of 13, were both parents deceased, were you in foster care, or were you a ward of the court?

• Are you or were you an emancipated minor as determined by a court?

• Are you or were you in legal guardianship as determined by a court?

• At any time on or after July 1, 2008, were you considered to be an unaccompanied youth or homeless?

If you answered “no” to every question, you are dependent on your parents for federal financial aid purposes.

The four programs listed are the major sources of aid available based on the financial need analysis as documented through the FAFSA:

1. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) 2. Federal Academic Competitiveness Giant (ACG) 3. Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) 4. Federal Work Study (FWS)

To be considered for one or all of these programs, a student must:

• complete an SCCC Financial Aid Student Information Sheet;

• be currently matriculated in a degree or certificate program.

Preference will be given to aid applicants whose completed financial aid materials have been received by the College’s Financial Aid Office prior to May 1. Students may be required to document taxable and non-taxable income, household size and other information reported on the FAFSA. Applications received after May 1 will be considered as long as funds are available. For the FAFSA to be received by the College by May 1, it should be mailed before April 1. The FAFSA may be completed online at fafsa.ed.gov.

Federal Financial Aid Refund Policy The U.S. Department of Education has implemented a new refund policy for federal financial aid programs (Pell, ACG, SEOG and Student Loans). When a student withdraws from or stops attending all classes in the first 60 percent of a term, federal regulations require that the college calculate the percentage and amount of federal financial aid the student did not “earn” by his/her attendance and return those funds to the federal programs. For example, if a student withdraws after attending only 30 percent of the term, then that student is only entitled to 30 percent of his/her federal financial aid (grants and loans). Students who attend classes after the 60 percent point in the term are considered to have earned all federal funds. If a student received more federal financial aid than the amount earned, the College is required to return the unearned funds to the U.S. Department of Education. Students need to be aware that if this unearned federal assistance was used to pay College charges for tuition, fees and books, they may now owe the College for the portion of tuition, fees, and books that was previously covered by the unearned portion of their federal financial aid. If students received a cash disbursement of a Federal Pell Grant, ACG Grant, and/or Federal SEOG grant funds, they may also be required to repay a portion of these unearned federal grants to the U.S. Department of Education. Students who owe an outstanding balance to the United States Department of Education will be notified of any outstanding balances owed within 30 days of the date that they withdrew from all of their classes or 30 days from the date the College learned that they were

21


not attending all of their classes. The students will then have 45 days to repay the overpayments or to reach satisfactory repayment arrangements with the College or the U.S. Department of Education. If a student does not repay the overpayment or make satisfactory arrangements within the 45 days, he/she will be considered to have a federal financial aid overaward, and the student’s account will be referred to the U.S. Department of Education for collection. Students will not be eligible for federal financial aid at any college until the overaward has been cleared.

Benefits are applied for and awarded by academic term, and the amount of the award is based on the student’s credit load.

Students who owe the College a balance for tuition, fees and/or bookstore charges due to the reduction in their federal financial aid eligibility, must make payment with the College Student Accounts Office within four weeks of notification. Additional information, and examples of the new refund policy, is available from the Student Accounts office.

There are two very helpful Web sites which provide up-to-date information about veterans’ education benefits. They are: http://www.hesc.com/content.nsf/SFC/Veterans Tuition Awards and www.gibill.va.gov.

When an overpayment for institutional costs has occurred, a return of funds to the federal financial aid programs will be made in the following order:

1. Unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loans. 2. Subsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loans. 3. Federal Direct PLUS Loans. 4. Federal Pell Grants for which a return of funds is required. 5. Federal Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG) for which a return of funds is required. 6. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) for which a return of funds is required.

Federal Government Grants Federal Pell Grant Program. Undergraduates enrolled in a degree or certificate program may apply. Eligibility for a Federal Pell Grant is determined by family income and assets, size of family, number of family members in college and other factors. The amount of the award for 2009-2010 is expected to range from $305 to $5,350, depending on level of eligibility and total college costs. Students should apply directly to the federal government for this grant using the FAFSA on the Web at fafsa.ed.gov. Students enrolled less than half time may be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant. Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant. (ACG) These grants are available to eligible full-time students who have completed a “rigorous high school program” on or after 2005 and who are Pell Grant recipients. Second-year students must have at least 24 credits with a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program. (SEOG) These grants are available to eligible students in the amounts of $100 to $4,000 per academic year. Priority is given to Federal Pell Grant recipients with the lowest estimated family contributions. Priority for the highest funding level is given to students in high cost programs. Veteran’s Benefits. Service veterans, disabled service veterans, certain dependants of deceased or disabled veterans and members of the Selected Reserves, who are matriculated students, may be eligible to receive education assistance from the Veterans Administration.

Students are advised to contact the Office of Academic Services, Elston Hall, Room 212, regarding possible eligibility and are urged to file the necessary application forms through that office at least two months before the beginning of the academic term. Applicants for VA education benefits are encouraged to file for federal and New York State financial aid as well.

Federal Aid to Native Americans. The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) provides annual scholarship grants to Native American students to aid them in attending institutions of higher learning. Students interested in a scholarship grant must contact the BIA or agency office that keeps the records of enrollment for their particular tribe.

Federal Tax Credits HOPE SCHOLARSHIP TUITION TAX CREDIT** • Students who paid tuition by cash, check, credit card or student loan may be eligible to receive a tax credit in that year. The tax credit is for tuition less any financial aid grants (TAP, Pell, APTS and SEOG), scholarships or tuition reimbursement received. • The Hope Scholarship Tuition Tax Credit of up to $1,800 per year, would cover 100 percent of the first $1,200 in tuition and “qualified fees” and 50 percent of the second $1,200 in tuition and “qualified fees” during the first two years of college. • Students must be enrolled for at least six credits per semester. LIFETIME LEARNING TUITION TAX CREDIT** • Students who paid tuition by cash, check, credit card or student loan may be eligible to receive a tax credit in that year. The tax credit is for tuition less any financial aid grants (TAP, Pell, ACG, APTS and SEOG), scholarships or tuition reimbursement received. • The Lifetime Learning Tuition Tax Credit is equal to 20 percent of the first $10,000 in tuition for a maximum annual tax credit of $2,000. There is no limit on the number of years that you can claim the credit. • Students could be eligible for the tax credit when taking one or more undergraduate or graduate courses. ** Either tax credit is available to independent students and their spouses, or in the case of a dependent student, to the taxpayer entitled to claim that student as an income tax exemption. Both tax credits can only be used as a credit to reduce the tax liability on the Federal tax return. This means that if you do not have any federal tax liability for that year you are not eligible for the tax credit. It is not necessary to itemize deductions to take these tax credits. A taxpayer may not claim a Hope Scholarship tax credit and a Life Time Learning tax credit in the same tax year for the same student. For 2008 single taxpayers with adjusted gross income under $48,000 and married taxpayers with adjusted gross income under $96,000 are eligible for the maximum credit. Eligibility decreases with income of $48,000 to $58,000 ($96,000 to $116,000 for married couples filing a joint return).

Questions should be directed to your tax advisor or the Internal Revenue Service.


Financial Aid Recipients’ Rights and Responsibilities

eligible for payment except in the case of students who were previously selected for verification.

Federal regulations require that to maintain any form of federal aid, such as a Federal Pell Grant, ACG Grant, a Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant, a Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Work Study, the student must be in good academic standing as determined by the College.

Publicizing Verification Requirements and Procedures. The verification procedures and requirements published here will also be given to the students in the Financial Aid Policies handout. This handout is provided to every student who receives a Pell grant, student loan and/ or campus based funds with the Financial Aid award letter. It is also available on the College Web site, www.sunysccc.edu.

Students will be notified of these conditions of award via their financial aid award letters. In accepting these awards, students are indicating they understand, accept and agree to abide by these stated conditions.

Satisfactory Academic Progress for Federal Financial Aid Eligibility

Upon satisfactory payment of tuition, fees and all other financial obligations due the College, all semester awards and grants, or balance of same, will be disbursed to aid recipients according to the disbursement schedule for that term. The Federal Tax Reform Act of 1986 requires that all financial aid grant assistance (Pell, TAP, ACG, EOP, FSEOG, scholarships, etc.) minus the cost of tuition, fees, books and supplies must be considered taxable income for the recipient. It is the student’s responsibility to keep appropriate records and receipts. Questions should be addressed to the Internal Revenue Service or other tax professionals.

Verification Procedures The College will comply with all verification requirements as required in the current year U.S. Department of Education Verification Guide. If an application has been selected for verification, no disbursement for any Title IV program will be given until verification has been completed. Deadline Dates for Verification. All applicants for whom the College has received a valid Student Aid Report (SAR or ISIR) while the student was enrolled must submit all required documentation by the deadline date. The deadline date for completing the verification process is Aug. 31, at the end of each academic year, or no later than 120 days after the student’s last day of enrollment, whichever is earlier. Any applicant who does not complete the verification process by the deadline date will forfeit all right to payment. Notification to Student of Required Documentation of Verification. When a student’s financial aid application indicates a need for verification, the student will be informed by mail, or through the Web site, in a timely manner what documentation is needed to satisfy the verification requirements. Any student who does not respond to requests for documentation will be contacted and informed about the appropriate deadlines for verification and the consequences of failing to complete the verification process. Notification to Student of Results of Verification. If as a result of verification, there are no errors discovered or the errors are within the approved tolerances, the student will be sent a financial aid award letter indicating his/her eligibility. After verification has been completed, any loan applications on file will be processed. If as a result of verification significant errors are discovered, the College will notify the student of the nature of the errors and corrections will be submitted through either the electronic financial aid processing system or through the mail. The College must receive a valid student aid report (SAR or ISIR) by the student’s last day of enrollment of the award year. Any student aid report received after that time will not be

The standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress for federal financial aid eligibility are the same as the requirements for a student to be in good academic standing outlined below. Academic Standing. The academic status of matriculated students is determined by the total credit hours attempted, semester and cumulative grade point averages (G.P.A.), and number of credit hours completed as prescribed by the Academic Standing Tables. Such determination will be made at the end of each semester of study. The action described will be assigned to the student’s transcript and the information regarding this status will be transmitted to the student. Good Academic Standing. A matriculated student is considered to be in Good Academic Standing at the end of a term and for the subsequent term if the student meets the criteria for Satisfactory Progress and Pursuit of Program. Satisfactory Progress. A student is considered to be making Satisfactory Progress if he/she maintains a cumulative G.P.A. above the level of dismissal defined in the following table. Total Credit Hours Attempted 0-11 12-23 24-35 36-47 48-59 60 and above

Dismissal Cumulative G.P.A. 0.00 Below 1.00 Below 1.50 Below 1.70 Below 1.90 Below 2.00

Total credit hours above include all credit hours attempted in residence at Schenectady County Community College. In addition, applicable transfer credits are included in the Total Credit Hours attempted, but they are not included in the calculation of the G.P.A. Pursuit of Program. Students are considered to be in Pursuit of Program if they maintain a level above the point of dismissal by completing the specified number of hours indicated in the following table. Successful completion is defined as receiving a grade of “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” “I” or “P” for any course taken in residence (including plus/ minus grades). Total Credit Hours Registered (Dismissal) 0-22 23-35 36-47 48-59 60-71 72-83 84 and above

Minimum Number of Credit Hours Required to Be Successfully Completed 0 12 21 30 42 54 66


Minimum Eligibility Standards for New York State Awards This table illustrates SUNY’s minimum standards for pursuit of program and satisfactory progress for purposes of determining eligibility for New York state financial aid. To be eligible for state awards, both standards must be satisfied. In addition, the student must be matriculated and in good academic standing as defined by the College, and the student must be taking a minimum of 12 credits per semester in courses that satisfy requirements in the student’s academic program. If a student is repeating a course that was previously completed with a passing grade, that course cannot be counted for purposes of New York state awards. Before Being Certified for This Semester Payment 1. For Pursuit of a Program of Study A student must have completed this number of credit hours in the preceding semester*

1st

2nd

3rd 4th 5th

6th

0

6

6

9

9

12

2. For Satisfactory Progress A student must have earned at least this many credit hours 0

3

9

18

30

45

0.5 0.75 1.3 2.0

2.0

With at least this grade point average (G.P.A.)

0

* A grade of W or FX does not constitute credit completed. The requirements above are for full-time students and would be pro-rated for part-time students eligible for New York state financial aid. Waiver Provisions have been made for students who do not meet the requirement for program pursuit and/or academic progress to apply for a one-time only waiver. According to SED waiver guidelines, a student may ask for and receive a one-time waiver if the student can document that extraordinary or unusual circumstances prevented him/her from achieving the above described minimum standards. Waiver requests are available in the Office of Academic Services.

When a student has not met the requirements of Good Academic Standing he/she will be dismissed from curriculum and will lose all eligibility for federal, state, and institutional financial aid (grants, scholarships and loans). Required “C” Average After Second Year. Federal regulations require that students have a “C” average after their second year. Any student who has total credit hours attempted of 60 or more (not including remedial classes) must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or he/she will lose eligibility for all federal financial aid programs. If a student with less than a 2.00 cumulative G.P.A. has been readmitted to his/her curriculum and financial aid eligibility due to mitigating circumstances, he/she will be considered to have a “C” average as long as he/she continues to have at least a 2.00 semester G.P.A. This is to recognize the fact that it may take a student more than one semester to raise his/her cumulative G.P.A. to 2.00. Appeal Process. If a student has not met the requirements of Good Academic Standing and he/she believes that there are mitigating circumstances that should be considered, the student may appeal the dismissed status by completing a readmission application with the Office of Academic Services. The deadline to apply for readmission is the day before the last day of General Registration the week before classes begin. A record of the appeal and the final determination will be maintained in the student files. The Readmission Committee will review the student’s readmission application and mitigating circumstances. If a student is considered to be making academic progress and is reinstated to curriculum he/ she will also be reinstated for Federal Financial Aid. New York state awards may have other criteria for reinstatement. For Title IV purposes only, the maximum number of times that a student may be reinstated due to mitigating circumstances will be three times. This will not include automatic readmission when a student has continued to successfully complete the minimum requirements established by the Readmission Committee (2.00 semester G.P.A., no “Fs” no “Ws”). This is to recognize the fact that it may take a student more than one semester to raise his/her cumulative G.P.A. to the minimum level required. Maximum Time Frame for Completion. Federal regulations require a maximum time frame for completion of a degree or certificate not to exceed 150 percent of the normal requirements of that program. For Title IV financial aid purposes only, the College has defined a maximum number of attempted hours for completion of a two-year degree to be 90 credits or 150 percent of the required credits for that particular degree. The maximum number of attempted hours for a one-year certificate is 45 credits or 150 percent of the required credits for that particular certificate. The College will review each student’s eligibility at the end of each semester. If the student has attempted less than 150 percent of the coursework at that time, he/she will be considered to be making progress and will be eligible for Title IV aid for the following semester. If due to withdrawals, failed courses, etc. the student has exceeded the maximum number of attempted credits for his/her program, he/she will no longer be eligible for federal financial aid programs (grants or loans) for any future semester.

24


For the purpose of determining a student’s current status for the maximum time frame for completion only, the following criteria will be used in the evaluation of the student transcript. Remedial coursework. If after individual testing and evaluation a student is recommended to take non-credit remedial coursework (CSS courses), those courses may not be counted in the 150 percent maximum number of attempted credits based upon the individual circumstances of the student. Repeated Courses. If a student repeats a course, the course will count in the maximum number of attempted credits each time the course is taken. Courses Dropped in Refund Period. If a student drops courses in the 100 percent, 75 percent or 50 percent refund periods, those courses will not be included in the count of credits attempted.

Student Appeals of Maximum Time Frame. A student who has lost his/her financial aid eligibility due to exceeding the maximum time frame may wish to appeal that status if he/she believes that there are mitigating circumstances. Examples of mitigating circumstances would be: medical problems, death in the family, curriculum changes, etc. A student may submit an application for appeal through the Financial Aid Office. If a student changes curriculum or graduates and requests a second degree, his/her transcript will be evaluated to determine what portion of the requirements for that curriculum has been satisfied. After a degree audit has been completed, a new count of credits attempted will be determined based upon the credits completed that satisfy requirements in the new curriculum. For example, if a student has attempted 60 credits but only 30 credits (including transfer credits) will satisfy requirements in the new curriculum, then the count of the attempted credits will be reset from 60 to 30. The student will have a new maximum of 60 additional credits to complete the new curriculum. A student who receives an adjusted count of credits attempted due to a curriculum change will have a maximum cap of 120 credits attempted (or four years full-time equivalent) to complete all programs at this college. This will count all credits attempted in any curriculum at this college other than non-credit remedial courses.


New York State Awards

Educational Loans

Educational Opportunity Program (EOP). This program is available to New York state residents who are both academically and economically disadvantaged and who demonstrate financial need. This is a limited enrollment program. Students must be admitted to EOP their first semester. Transfer to a four-year school and EOP is contingent on being accepted into EOP at SCCC.

William D. Ford Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program. Schenectady County Community College participates in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Stafford Loan Program. Under this program, students borrow money from the federal government to pay for their college costs. The U.S. Department of Education makes the loans, through the College, directly to students. The College will use the student’s Direct Loan to pay College charges and will give the student any remaining money for living expenses.

If eligible, full-time students may receive an EOP award for up to six semesters. The average EOP award has been $275 per academic year. Tuition Assistance Program (TAP). New York state residents who are full-time matriculated students may qualify for the Tuition Assistance Program. Questions should be addressed to the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation, Office of Grants and Awards, 99 Washington Ave., Albany, N.Y., 12255 or 1-888-697-4372. Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid in order to apply for TAP. Students must reapply each year. Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS). Applicants must be undergraduate New York state residents enrolled for three to 11 semester credits. Students must be in good academic standing, which includes at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average. In addition, students are not eligible for APTS if they have utilized all semesters of eligibility in the TAP program. If a student was claimed or was eligible to be claimed as a tax dependent, the New York state net taxable income for the family (parents, student and spouse) can be up to $50,500. If a student was not eligible to be claimed as a tax dependent, the New York state net taxable income of the student and spouse together can be as much as $34,250. Annual awards at Schenectady County Community College can range up to $2,000, the maximum cost of part-time study. Students seeking assistance for part-time study must complete the FAFSA and the APTS application available in the SCCC Financial Aid Office. New York National Guard Tuition Incentive Program. The New York National Guard Tuition Incentive program will pay up to the full cost of tuition at the College to eligible Army or Air National Guard members who meet the following conditions: • New York state resident;

• Matriculated student in a degree program;

• Enrolled for at least 6 credits per semester;

• Maintain a minimum G.P.A. of 2.0;

• Apply for all available tuition assistance grants;

• Approved by their National Guard units.

Assistance for Native Americans. Students who are members of one of the several Native American tribes located within New York state, and who are residents of a reservation, may be eligible to apply for one of these grants. Information and/or applications may be obtained from the Native American Education Unit, New York State Education Department, Education Building Unit, Albany, N.Y., 12234. Important: Effective Sept. 1, 1981, all students who receive state awards must be pursuing a program of study and making satisfactory progress toward the completion of the program’s academic requirements.

There are three types of Federal Direct Loans: • Federal Direct Stafford Loans. Students can obtain Federal Direct Stafford Loans based on financial need. The government will pay the interest on the loan while the student is in school.

• Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans. Students can obtain Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans regardless of need, but will have to pay all interest charges.

• Federal Direct PLUS Loans. Parents of dependent students can borrow a Federal Direct PLUS Loan to help pay for their child’s education.

Application Procedures. Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students must submit a Request for a Federal Direct Student Loan form to the Financial Aid Office. Students will be required to sign a master promissory note. Eligibility Criteria. To be eligible for a Federal Direct Stafford Loan a student must: 1. be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien; 2. be taking at least six credit hours and be matriculated in a degree program; 3. not owe any refunds on a Federal Pell Grant or other awards received and not be in default of repayment on any type of student loan. Each new student loan recipient will be required to attend an entrance interview before receiving a loan check and an exit interview when graduating or terminating from school.

Maximum Loan Amounts Dependent Student. A first year dependent student (parent information is required on the FAFSA), with less than 30 earned or transfer credits, may borrow up to $5,500 per year with a maximum of $3,500 of that amount being in a subsidized loan. Second year dependent students, with at least 30 earned or transfer credits, may borrow up to a maximum of $6,500 per year with a maximum of $4,500 of that amount in a subsidized loan. A dependent undergraduate student may only borrow up to an aggregate limit of $31,000. Independent Student. Independent students (parent information is not required on the FAFSA), may have up to an additional $4,000 in unsubsidized loans per year. A first year independent student, with less than 30 earned or transfer credits, may be eligible to borrow up to $9,500 per year with a maximum of $3,500 of that amount being in a subsidized loan. Second year independent students, with at least 30 earned or transfer credits, may be eligible to borrow up to $10,500 per year with a maximum of $4,500 in a subsidized loan. An independent undergraduate student may only borrow up to an aggregate limit of $57,500.


The maximum amount that a student can borrow is the Cost of Attendance minus other financial aid. (See Page 27 for amount.) Repayment Terms. Interest rates for Federal Direct Loan programs and comparable FFELP loans for new borrowers are the same. The fixed interest rate for a Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan is 5.6% in 2009-2010. The fixed interest rate for a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is 6.8 percent. For a Federal Direct PLUS Loan, the maximum interest rate is 7.9 percent. In addition, all Federal Direct Loan borrowers are charged an origination fee of 1.0 percent. There are several ways to repay a Federal Direct Loan: A standard repayment plan has a fixed monthly repayment amount for a fixed period of time, usually 10 years. An extended repayment plan has a lower fixed monthly payment amount, and loan repayment can be extended beyond the usual 10 years. A graduated repayment plan usually begins with lower monthly payments, and payment amounts increase at specified times. Payments may be for the usual 10 year period, or they may be extended beyond 10 years. An income-contingent repayment plan sets annual repayment amounts based on the borrower’s income after leaving school. The loan is repaid over an extended period of time, not to exceed 25 years. The Federal Direct Loan Service Center will be responsible for maintaining the loan account and repayments. It is the student’s responsibility to maintain contact with that center. Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP). Under the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP), private lenders provide the money for loans and lenders deliver the loan money to schools. Federal Direct Loans simplify the loan process and eliminate the need for an outside lender, such as a bank. Federal Direct Loans make loan repayment much easier—payments go directly to the federal government. Schenectady County Community College does not participate in the FFELP program. Loan Consolidation. Students who have previously borrowed FFELP student loans through a lending institution and who are now borrowing a Federal Direct Loan are encouraged to consolidate all of their student loans into one Consolidation Loan. This will help the borrower avoid the situation of a student owing two separate loans to two different lenders.

Institutional Scholarships SCCC administers a number of scholarships provided by the SCCC Foundation as well as by community members and service organizations. They vary in amount and are based on a variety of factors, including grade point average, financial need, academic program and number of earned credits. Applications are made available during March through the Financial Aid Office. Additional information is available in the Financial Aid Office, Elston Hall, Room 221, telephone (518) 381-1352.

Scholarships of $300 or more: Albany Rod and Kustoms Club Scholarship........................................................ one at $500 Allen Scholarship........................................................ three at $500 Aviation Science Scholarship......................................... one at $500 Thomas and Patricia Baker Human Services Award........ one at $400 Nicholas M. Barbaro Music Scholarship......................... one at $750 Melvin E. Bartlett Sr. Memorial Scholarship................................................................ one at $400 Hector Boiardi Scholarship............................................four at $500 Clinton A. Braidwood Scholarship................................. one at $550 Broughton Fellowship................................................ one at $4,403 Brown-O’Connell Scholarship....................................... one at $500 Grace Susan Burian Award............................................. one at $350 Peter F. Burnham Award................................................ one at $500 Robert F. Case Memorial Scholarship............................. one at $375 Dr. Erma Ruth Chestnut Scholarship............................. one at $600 Peter J. DiGiacomo Memorial Music Scholarship........... two at $500 Maude H. Dunlap Scholarship....................................... one at $500 Faculty Student Association Scholarships..........24 at $500 - $1,000 Faculty Student Association Scholar Award..................................................6 at $500 - $1,000 First Cardinal Scholarships..................................7 at $500 - $1,000 Randall Flint Scholarship............................................... one at $300 Foundation Scholar Awards.......................................... 40 at $3,150 (over four semesters) Friendship Baptist Church Award.................................. one at $400 Give Back Scholarship................................................... one at $500 Russell Gloor Community Service Scholarship.................................................... one at $500 Gold Key Award............................................................ two at $500 Karen Brown Johnson Scholarship................................. one at $900 Junior League of Schenectady........................................ one at $750 John S. Krempa Scholarship.......................................... one at $500 Rosemary Lanahan Business and Law Club Scholarship......................................... two at $900 Lockheed Martin Scholarship..................................... two at $1,250 Donald Masick Memorial Scholarship............................ one at $500 Fred and Alice McChesney Memorial Scholarship................................................ one at $300 Charles Mills Memorial Scholarship............................ two at $1,000 N.Y.S. Sheriff’s Association............................................. one at $500 Gail Nolan Memorial Scholarship.................................. one at $500 Richmor Aviation Scholarship..................................... two at $1,000 Lewis and Gretchen Rubenstein Scholarship............... two at $1,000 SCCC Alumni Scholar Award........................................ one at $350 Schenectady County Academic Law Enforcement Scholarship................................. one at $1,000 Schenectady County Bar Association Scholarship Award.................................................. one at $1,000 Schenectady County Legal Aid Society Max and Betty Herskowitz Awards................................. two at $425 Second Chance Scholarships......................... 5 at up to $2,000/year Allen and Anna Slaterpryce Family Scholarship..................................................... one at $500 Soroptimist International of Schenectady........................................................ one at $1,000 Student Government Association Scholarships...............................................................four at $500


SUNY Empire State Diversity Honors Scholarship........ approximately 20, (average award $400) Trustco Scholarship.................................................... one at $1,000 Women’s Club of Schenectady....................................... two at $600 Zonta Club of Schenectady Florence Kudernatch Memorial Scholarship................................................ one at $350 Scholarships of less than $300: The College also administers approximately 50 scholarships each year which vary in amount from $100 to $250. In addition, the SCCC Foundation awards or administers approximately 12 Directors’ Scholarships with average awards of $250 or more each year.

Employment Federal Work-Study Program. This program makes part-time jobs available to students who demonstrate financial need. Work assignments are, for the most part, located on campus. The number of hours a student may work is determined by the amount of financial need and the level of funding. Students are paid at least the minimum wage. A percentage of federal work study funds will be allocated to off-campus community service jobs. Anyone who is interested in a community service job should contact the Financial Aid Office. General Part-Time Employment. The Career and Employment Services Office (Elston Hall, Room 223) maintains an online career management system, Electronic Access for Students and Employers, EASE, that students can access to view various job opportunities, search for local employers, and find on-campus offices that hire students who do not receive Federal Work Study. Students need an E-mail address to access the system. Visit the office Web Site for additional information at www.sunysccc.edu/ces.

Other Assistance Tuition Deferrals. Students who will be receiving financial assistance from scholarships, grants or loans may be eligible for a tuition deferral or a postponement of payment until the funds have arrived. Contact the Financial Aid Office for more information. Book Deferrals. Students who will be receiving financial assistance from scholarships, grants or loans may be eligible for credit at the College Store for books and supplies after classes begin. Contact the Financial Aid Office for more information. Emergency Loans. The SCCC Foundation sponsors an Emergency Loan Fund through the Financial Aid Office for short-term loans (usually up to $25 for up to 30 days) to assist in an emergency situation. Contact the Financial Aid Office for more information.


2009/2010 Estimated Cost of Attendance These are estimated charges for a full time student for the Fall and spring semesters. The charges for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses are estimates, and they are not actual charges to the student. The Financial Aid Office uses these estimated costs of an average student as a basis for determining financial aid eligibility. Students Living With Parents/Relatives Tuition/Fees $3,403 Books and Supplies 1,100 Room and Board 2,500 Transportation 1,500 Personal Expenses 1,000 Average Student Loan Origination Fee 22 $9,525

Students Not Living With Parents/Relatives $3,403 1,100 7,200 1,500 1,000 22 $14,225

n

An additional $419 Music Laboratory fee is charged to students taking courses which include private music lessons. Students in the Hotel and Restaurant Management, Culinary Arts and Assistant Chef programs should anticipate higher costs for uniforms and supplies in their first year. n An additional Aviation fee is charged to students taking courses which include private instruction ranging from $6,700 to $8,400 per semester. n

The Financial Aid Office may use professional judgment to adjust these budgets based on the individual circumstances of the student.

2008-2009 Summary of Financial Aid Awards During 2008-2009, SCCC students received approximately $12,594,389 in financial assistance. The number of recipients is not unduplicated, since students may receive aid from more than one source: Estimated Amounts Federal Pell Grants

Number of Recipients

$4,346,912

1,655

Student Loans

5,621,699

1,700

Tuition Assistance Program

2,032,652

1,250

Federal Academic Competitiveness Grants

71,666

114

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants

81,324

176

Educational Opportunity Program

51,466

147

TRIO Program

21,194

41

Federal Work-Study Program

75,000

56

Aid for Part-Time Study

59,352

52

233,124

240

Scholarships Total

$12,594,389

29


SUPPORT SERVICES Division of Student Affairs The Division of Student Affairs works to broaden, enrich and support the education and development of each student. It offers services responsive to the needs of a diverse student body and provides them in an individually oriented and effective manner. The Division is comprised of three major offices: Student Development Elston Hall, Room 223 (Includes the Academic Advisement Center, Career and Employment Services and Counseling Services) Student Services Elston Hall, Room 222 (Includes Athletics, ADA Transition Services, Educational Opportunity Program, Immunizations, Liberty Partnerships Program, Multicultural Services, Student Government, New Student Orientation and Student Activities) Student Access Elston Hall, Room 221 (Includes Admissions and Financial Aid) (See Pages 11-27.) Division offices are open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Monday through Thursday evening until 8 p.m. with specialized coverage.

Student Development Academic Advisement Center The Academic Advisement Center serves as an information center for all students attending SCCC, as well as all prospective students needing academic advisement assistance. In addition, staff in the Advisement Center serve as the academic advisors for part-time matriculated students, all non-matriculated students and all students admitted under the 24-Credit Hour Program. Advisement assistance includes academic/program planning, course scheduling and registration, readmission, program changes and withdrawals. The Academic Advisement Center has day and evening hours.

Career and Employment Services Education by itself, does not guarantee employment. Employers want to hire people who have invested time and energy in honing their skills, accomplishing goals, and working successfully with others in environments that reflect similar working conditions. That’s why our staff has dedicated themselves to helping students navigate the world of work by establishing community partnerships that offer students a chance to master their unique talents, behaviors, and knowledge while at the same time practicing these attributes in settings related to their ultimate goal. Many of our students are hired after successfully participating in internships, volunteer and seasonal work and professional associations. The exploration of work environ-

ments is very important when making decisions on future employment or educational attainment. Let us help you become an expert in your field of study by starting early and creating a strategy for success. Career and Employment Services focuses on the following activities: • Coaching students to identify, appreciate, and improve upon their natural strengths; • Teaching students how to establish a vision, think “out-of-the-box,” set daily habits, and develop a strategy to achieve their goals; • Teaching students how to use research skills and resources that link them to opportunities; • Teaching students how to communicate their value to others and • Coordinating networking events, experiential learning, and online resources that bring together students, alumni, employers and faculty for the purpose of answering important questions and identifying opportunities related to their field of study. Areas of Office Expertise: Strength Building Career Exploration Career Resources Researching Employers Job Search Strategies Interviewing Skills Community Partnerships

Alumni/Employer Connections Internships and Jobs Professional Networking Industry and Employment Data Résumés and Cover Letters Career Event Coordination

Online Services for Students: • Office Web site: www.sunysccc.edu/ces • Register to use the Career Service Management System called EASE. • Gain access to employers, jobs, internships and career information. • Review Career Events and Recruiting Opportunities on-campus and in the Capital Region.

Counseling The counseling program provides opportunities for students to learn the life and career planning skills necessary for the development and achievement of their goals. Counseling services are offered to full-time and part-time students on an appointment or walk-in basis, including select evenings. Career Development. The Counseling program provides career counseling with the belief that career planning and development is an ongoing experience. The professional staff assists in the development of career exploration approaches and decision making skills which may have lifelong usefulness. Individuals may explore interests, skills, life goals and past experiences as a means of seeking career direction. Educational Counseling. Counselors assist individuals with decision making regarding selection of a major or program of study.


Counseling is also provided to assist with other questions and concerns related to one’s academic program at SCCC. Personal Counseling. Personal concerns and problems sometimes interfere with achieving success in college. Counselors are available to assist with these situations. Problems in the areas of loneliness, finances, job schedules, family conflict, emotional stress and substance abuse are matters with which counselors assist students. Referral counseling is provided when other community programs and resources can better meet the needs of students. Students seeking more effective social interaction and personal skills, such as goal setting, decision-making or interpersonal relations may develop such skills through counseling services. Transfer Counseling. Counselors are available to assist students with the college transfer process. This may include making decisions regarding choice of major and school, providing information about the application process and related topics. Throughout the year, four-year college representatives visit the campus to meet directly with students. In addition, a variety of catalogs and transfer reference books are available in the Student Development Center, as is DISCOVER, the computer-based career guidance system.

Student Services Athletics The intercollegiate athletic program for men consists of baseball and basketball in the fall and bowling and baseball in the spring. The intercollegiate athletic program for women consists of basketball in the fall, bowling in the spring, and women’s crew in the fall and spring. Competition is conducted with nearby community and four-year colleges. As a member of Region III of the National Junior College Athletic Association, the College competes in a variety of intercollegiate activities with teams from New York, Massachusetts and Vermont. Schenectady County Community College is also a member of the Mountain Valley Collegiate Conference which provides the opportunity for athletic competition among the community colleges in upstate New York. All students who wish to participate in intercollegiate athletics should contact the Director of Athletics at (518) 381-1356 as early as possible.

ADA Transition Services Schenectady County Community College, in accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, ensures that admission, services, activities, facilities and programs are accessible to qualified students with disabilities. Students in need of reasonable accommodations should register with the ADA Transition Services Office as soon as possible to ensure that accommodations are in place prior to the start of classes. Accommodations are determined by the disability documentation submitted to the Coordinator of ADA Transition Services. This documentation must be from an appropriate licensed professional who identifies the student’s disability and describes the impact the disability has on the student’s academic performance. While self-identification of a disability is voluntary, registration with the ADA Transition Services Office is encouraged so that students can get the accommodations that they need.

The ADA Transition Services Coordinator provides information and referral to programs and services that may be beneficial to those students registered with the ADA Transition Services Office. In addition, the Coordinator serves as liaison with community agencies that sponsor students with disabilities. ADA Transition Services provides voter registration forms and support services to anyone requesting assistance with completing the voter registration form. In order to register with the ADA Transition Services and obtain more information about its services, please call (518) 381-1345 or visit Elston Hall, Room 222.

Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) The Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) is a program of academic support and financial assistance for students who demonstrate the potential for success in college, but whose academic and financial circumstances would normally not provide that educational opportunity. Eligible applicants are provided with academic support through tutorial services, remedial assistance and developmental coursework. Financial assistance, based upon demonstrated need and availability of funds, is also provided to lessen the cost of pursuing a college education.

EOP Application Requirements 1. If eligible, a student will be reviewed by the Admissions staff for consideration for the Educational Opportunity Program. 2. The following forms should be completed and sent to the College’s Financial Aid Office to determine eligibility for financial aid assistance:

• The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

• The SCCC Financial Aid Student Information Sheet 3. All parent and/or student documentation of taxable and non-taxable income must be sent to the Financial Aid Office. 4. Since EOP is a limited enrollment program, interested students should apply as early as possible. For a student to be considered for all possible types of available financial assistance, these two financial aid applications should be completed and mailed before April 1 prior to the academic year for which the student wishes to enroll. All financial aid applications are available in the College’s Financial Aid Office.

Liberty Partnerships Program The SCCC Liberty Partnerships Program (SCCC LPP) identifies and supports Schenectady County residents who, for a variety of societal and educational perplexities, endure obstacles that may prevent them from completing their current grade level and/or their high school education. SCCC LPP provides an array of services to support these students and actively provides support to the students’ families. SCCC LPP can assist parents to find better jobs, gain education and take a more prominent role in the education of their children. SCCC LPP is a collaboration with the schools, the families, and community agencies that provide support services to students in grades five-12 each year in cooperation with the Schenectady School District and Help Yourself Foundation. Services and programs are


provided during school and after school hours via strong programming and activities which include some Saturday sessions and summer camp.

to the administration of the College through the Director of Student Activities. Through elected government representatives, students have a voice in matters pertaining to their organization and activities, and share responsibility for decisions that affect the student body.

Multicultural Affairs

SGA is represented by four officers: President, Vice President, Treasurer and Student Trustee, elected annually by direct vote of the SGA membership. In addition, 16 senators (eight freshmen and eight seniors) are elected and represent the students in conducting the affairs of SGA. Elections are held every April and September.

Multicultural Affairs supports the belief that the strength of any organization lies in its diversity. It is important to create and maintain a welcoming, supportive environment and to promote acceptance and appreciation for differences. Multicultural Affairs is committed to further enhancing the SCCC environment to promote a culture of respect and inclusion where all feel valued, respected and supported to perform to their full potential. The Office has: educational and cultural programming, support services, multicultural resources, workshops and presentations, community liaison on multicultural issues, referral and assistance, student outreach and retention and recruitment programs

New Student Orientation New Student Orientation is held prior to the start of classes each semester. This program, which is open to all new full- and part-time students, includes small group meetings which focus on information related to one’s program of study, academic advisement, college success, multiculturalism, voter registration, classroom expectations, relationships, volunteerism, student clubs and organizations, athletics and other specific areas of interest. Students have the opportunity to meet and speak with faculty, staff and other students. Social activities are planned. Information regarding New Student Orientation can be obtained from the Office of Student Services, Elston Hall, Room 222, by calling (518) 381-1335, or can be viewed on the College’s Web site at www.sunysccc.edu in August and January.

Student Activities Recognized student clubs and organizations initiate and conduct programs and activities under the provisions of the College-approved Student Government Association constitution. In accordance with SUNY policy adopted by the College and approved by the Board of Trustees, a mandatory Student Activity Fee for full-time and part-time matriculated students is charged by the College at each registration. Non-matriculated students may elect to pay the activity fee if they are interested in participating in the activities program. The Student Government Association budget is funded by the Student Activity Fee and supports the total activities program and sponsors all intercollegiate athletic programs of the College. It is the responsibility of the College, through the appropriate College officials, to ensure that all fees are expended for purposes determined to be cultural, educational, recreational and social. Further information regarding the Student Activity fee is available through the Student Services Office, Elston Hall, Room 222, or via the College’s Web site, www.sunysccc.edu. Student Government Association (SGA). The Student Government Association is the governing body of student life. Students who pay the Student Activity Fee are members of the Association. SGA is the established organization representing a responsible student viewpoint

The Student Government Association is designed to promote the interests of the entire student body and to integrate these interests to further improve the College. SGA sponsors and supports intercollegiate sports, special interest clubs and organizations and a variety of other College events. Further information can be obtained by contacting the SGA Office at (518) 381-1338, stopping by the Student Services Office, Elston Hall, Room 222, or accessing the Web site at www.sunysccc.edu.

The Student and College Governance The Faculty of Schenectady County Community College, in its bylaws, has made provisions for student membership on every standing committee of the Faculty. Through this formal representation, the goal is that the student body will play an active role in the conduct of the affairs of the College. A student member is elected annually to the Board of Trustees by the total student body of the College. The Student Trustee attends all meetings of the Board of Trustees as a representative of the students, participates as a full voting member of the Board of Trustees and serves in a liaison capacity with the Student Government Association. Elections are conducted each year during the spring semester. Candidates for that office may be enrolled either as a full-time or part-time student, have a minimum 2.0 Grade Point Average and have paid the Activity Fee. Students also are represented with full voting rights on the following College committees:

• Academic Policies (two students) • Campus Safety Council (two students) • College Planning Council (two students) • Community and Cultural Events (two students) • Curriculum (two students) • Faculty Student Association Board of Directors (seven students) • Professional Policies, Nominations and Awards (two students) • Student Affairs (two students)

Other committees include

• Ad hoc award committees (at least two students per committee) • Commencement (two students) • Enrollment Services Council (two students) • Information Systems Council (two students)

• Web site Committee (one student)

Interested students should see the Director of Student Activities, located in Elston Hall, Room 222, for details on the guidelines for serving on a College committee.


Student Resources

are encouraged to submit story ideas to the Editor in the Office of Planning and Development, Elston Hall, Room 124.

Alumni

The student literary magazine, Rhythms, is published once a year through Rhythms Literary Club, sponsored by the Student Government Association.

SCCC Alumni are encouraged to stay in touch with the College community and visit the campus. SCCC Alumni may access SCCC resources including the Academic Computing Laboratory, Begley Library, Career and Employment Services, and also receive a 10% discount at the College Bookstore by applying for a SCCC Alumni ID Card. The ID Application Form can be downloaded from a link on the alumni section of the College’s Web site, www.sunysccc.edu. For the latest news, check out the Web site which contains information on Alumni Services, an Alumni E-mail Directory, Class Notes, etc. The College has an Alumni Advisory Board and graduates are encouraged to participate. For more information, please contact the Office of Planning and Development, located in Elston Hall, Room 120, to provide input for alumni activities and to participate in various campus events at (518) 381-1324.

Child Care An on-campus Child Care Center operated by the YWCA is available for children of students, faculty and staff. The center is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Open to children between 6 weeks and five years of age, the Center is licensed by the NYS Office of Children and Family Services. A summer program for children ages 6 through 12 is also available. Space is limited. College liaison for the Child Care Center is the Associate Dean for Student Services, Elston Hall, Room 222; telephone (518) 381-1336 or 381-1375.

The College Store The College Store, located in Elston Hall, provides a complete selection of course books (both new and used), school and culinary supplies, imprinted sportswear, gifts, and other items. The friendly and knowledgeable College Store staff is happy to help students find the correct textbooks for classes, assist with returned textbooks and answer student questions. A “Used Book Buyback” is conducted both at the beginning and end of each semester. Throughout the academic year, various contests and drawings make The College Store an exciting place to shop.

The College Store “Online” The College Store “Online” offers all available textbooks and course material information. Information is also provided on ordering computers, laptops and software/hardware at educational discount pricing. Visit www.fsacollegestore.edu.

College-Wide Publications The Binnekill, named for the body of water which once ran behind the SCCC campus, is a biweekly newsletter containing stories about upcoming campus events, student profiles, faculty and staff news and other important campus information. The Binnekill can be found on the SCCC Web site (www.sunysccc.edu). Copies are available near the Security Desk in Elston Hall. All members of the College community

Emergency Closing In the event that it is necessary to cancel or delay classes because of snow or other conditions, announcements will be made over the following area radio stations: AM FM WROW-AM 590 WFLY-FM 92.3 WGY-AM 810 WYJB-FM 95.5 WGNA-AM 1460 WAJZ-FM 96.3 WTRY-FM 98.3 WRVE-FM 99.5 WCPT-FM 100.9 WABT-FM 104.5 WZMR-FM 104.9 WPYX-FM 106.5 WGNA-FM 107.7 Television: Announcements will also be made on WRGB-Channel 6, Capital News 9, WTEN-Channel 10, WNYT-Channel 13 and WXXA TV-23. The decision to cancel daytime classes is made by 6 a.m. The decision to cancel evening classes is made by 2 p.m. However if the weather worsens between 2 and 4 p.m. the College will reassess conditions and cancel evening classes by 4 p.m. Although the College disseminates the information to the media as early as possible, the College has no control over the way in which stations announce emergency closings. The stations are asked to read the following announcement: “Classes at Schenectady County Community College are cancelled/delayed.” An announcement regarding class cancellation/delay is also provided on the College phone system, (518) 381-1200, and on the College Web site, www.sunysccc.edu. Unless the County of Schenectady announces the closing of all other operations due to weather conditions, the College is open for the conduct of other business. SCCC utilizes NY Alert for notification of emergency situations to include class cancellation due to inclement weather.

Food Service The College Commons is operated by Chartwells, a division of Compass and the Faculty-Student Association of Schenectady County Community College, Inc., serving breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a variety of short-order and snack items. The food service is available from morning through evening when classes are in session, and on a selected basis at other times. Look for daily specials. Vending machines are located in the College Commons, Elston Hall and the Center for Science and Technology Building lobby. A microwave is available in the College Commons for use.

Gateway Montessori Preschool at SCCC The Gateway Montessori Preschool program is a laboratory preschool located in the Gateway Building on the SCCC campus. The cur-


riculum demonstrates best practices in Early Childhood Education. A kindergarten curriculum is also offered. The school operates two and a half hours per day for five days per week and follows the SCCC academic calendar. The Montessori classroom is a multi-age environment; the school invites children ages 21/2 to 6 years to join. Active parent communication and involvement is maintained through parent meetings, newsletters, E-mails and conferences. For more information, please contact Deb Ahola, Educational Coordinator, at aholdada@sunysccc.edu (381-1401) or Tammy Calhoun, Program Administrator, at calhoutb@sunysccc.edu (381-1295).

Housing Referral Service for Students Schenectady County Community College provides a housing referral service to assist students in obtaining housing within the community. The College maintains a housing list of apartments, flats and studios available for student rental, many of which are located within walking distance of the campus, or near bus routes which serve the campus. Information is available in the Office of Student Services, Elston Hall, Room 222; telephone (518) 381-1279.

Parking

Parking Sticker

All motor vehicles parked on campus by students, faculty or staff (full- and part-time) must be registered with Campus Security (Security Desk located at the main entrance of Elston Hall) and the appropriate decal mounted on the rear window. Motorcycles should be registered - no decals will be issued. Failure to register your vehicle and properly affix your College decal will result in the ticketing and/or towing of your vehicle. Cars parked in unauthorized areas will be ticketed. Cars parked in fire lanes, disabled parking areas without appropriate decal, driveways or loading zones will be towed away at the owner’s expense. The College maintains a general security staff for surveillance of the parking areas, but it is not responsible for preventing theft or damage to cars. Complete parking regulations are provided upon vehicle registration and are printed in the SCCC Handbook Planner and Campus Resource Guide.

Student Housing SCCC is continuing to explore a student housing building with developers. The current site for the proposed building is on Washington Avenue, across from Elston Hall, with housing availability for students projected for Fall 2010. Further announcements on student housing will be posted on the SCCC Web site, www.sunysccc.edu.

Student ID Cards All students are required to obtain an SCCC Student ID/Library Card at the onset of their first semester. The Student ID/Library Card is a permanent identification card for SCCC students. This card is also used for library purposes, access to the Computer Lab and for admission to athletic events, lectures, student activities and to use the

YMCA and/or YWCA facilities. The Student ID Card must be validated each academic year. A current validation sticker will be affixed to the card. Student ID Cards can be obtained and validated at the Student Activities Office (Elston Hall, Room 222) and/or at the Security Desk. This card is also used as the student’s library card. The Library staff will place an activated bar code on the card that can be deactivated immediately should the card be lost. If a card is lost, a new card will be issued. Lost cards must be reported immediately to the Begley Library. The use of another student’s ID Card is a violation of the Student Code of Conduct. Properly validated ID Cards are to be carried at all times and must be produced, upon request, to any authorized College authority (administrators, faculty member or security personnel). Students may also be requested to show photo identification such as a driver’s license. Optional photo IDs are available for students, faculty and staff at a nominal cost through the College Store.

Academic Support A variety of courses, laboratories, workshops and support services are offered by the College to help students achieve academic success. Students are encouraged to explore these services upon enrollment at the College and to make use of all appropriate programs.

Academic Computing and Networking Services Facilities Schenectady County Community College is committed to providing student access to computers. College academic facilities continue to expand and provide students with diversified computing environments and applications. Over 700 microcomputers of various kinds are available throughout the campus and a variety of software has been incorporated into College coursework. SCCC maintains several different computer labs which utilize state-of-the-art PCs. All computer labs are equipped with networked laser printers. In addition to computer workstations, the College has a fully integrated campus Local Area Network (LAN). Microsoft Windows 2007 and TCP/IP network architectures are supported. Internet access is available campus wide. Academic Computing provides ANGEL helpdesk support to students seven days a week. Students can call the ANGEL help phone number, send a helpdesk E-mail or visit Academic Computing during normal College operating hours. SCCC uses an array of commercially successful Windows applications, programming language compilers and curriculum-specific computing tools in order to expose students to contemporary computer technology. Network or workstation applications on campus include Visual Studio, Microsoft Visual C++, Maple, Java Development, HTML Authoring Tools, Graphics editing software, Microsoft Office, Minitab Statistics, online reservation system software used in the travel and hospitality training and tax application software. Special computer labs are available for students preparing for careers in the travel industry and various scientific fields such as chemistry and electrical engineering. The labs consist of PCs with network facilities to parallel current computerized business practices.


The Elston Hall main Computer Laboratory, located in Rooms 529 and 530, is open weekdays, evenings and Saturdays when classes are in session. Lab assistants are on duty during all available lab hours to help students with hardware and software problems. In addition, workshops are provided to orient new students to the operations of the computer facilities and equipment. Access to additional computer facilities is available in the library, departmental labs, Learning Center and TRIO. PCs are used in the Learning Center to assist students in reading, writing, mathematics and study skills. Personalized instruction in the use of these systems is highly emphasized. The Center for Science and Technology (CST), Begley Building, Elston Hall and the Stockade Building contain electronic classrooms with CD/DVD Writers and Internet access. Scanners are available in Begley Library, Elston Hall, Rooms 529 and 530, in the Learning Center. These facilities allow the College to provide increasing amounts of instruction using up-to-date technology. Wireless Internet access is provided in the Commons in Elston Hall, the Begley Library, the Begley lobby, the Center for Science and Technology and in the main Computer Lab, Elston Hall, Room 529.

Begley Library Begley Library meets the learning, library research, and teaching needs of SCCC students, faculty and staff through its combination of print collections, media, extensive Web-based collections, and quick access to materials from libraries elsewhere Library staff are committed to supporting College and other library users in pursuit of their information needs and for lifelong learning. Quick Collection Stats

88,066 Volumes held in paper 3,636 E-books 32,636 Online magazine and journal titles 220 Print magazine and journal subscriptions 20,187 Media materials

Online Access. Begley Library’s online collections and services are available to the College community around the clock—even when the library is not open. Through the library’s Web site, library users can: • search for books in the online library catalog and connect directly to e-books; • access course-related e-reserves; • use thousands of online magazines, newspapers and scholarly journals licensed by the library for use by the College community; • view brief online tutorials on frequently asked questions, such as how to search for DVD’s in the online catalog; • use the My Research Subject Is...guides designed for SCCC courses and program; • set up an e-interlibrary loan account and request articles, books and media from other libraries with a single click and; • get live assistance online from a reference librarian at SCCC or a librarian from a partner college, available 24 hours a day, 365 days a week. In-person assistance. In addition to individual reference assistance online around the clock, the library reference desk is staffed by a librarian available for walk up assistance during almost all of the hours that the library is open. Students may also make appointments for Individual Research Consultations for more extensive work with a librarian. In addition, faculty may request that a librarian meet with

his or her class. Librarians offer both general orientation sessions and classes tailored to address specific subjects and research competencies. The library also plays a role in the development and delivery of course-based information literacy content for the College, utilizing appropriate formats such as Web-based tutorials customized for specific courses. A world of libraries. Because of Begley Library’s membership in numerous library consortiums, it is possible for library users to have timely access to materials from other libraries within SUNY, elsewhere in the region, state, nation, and the world. The library also participates in the SUNY Open Access Program and the region’s Direct Access Program, for SCCC students, faculty, or staff who want to go directly themselves to any other SUNY library or to other participating local area libraries to borrow materials. Timely delivery. Online delivery of articles and short documents from other libraries can occur in as little as several hours and typically not more than 48 hours. Physical delivery of books and other media among SUNY libraries is supported by a 24 hour upstate to 48 hour from downstate courier service. Library as place. The library’s learning environment features wireless access on both floors and in the lobby seating area outside of the library entrance. Media listening and viewing rooms, a multi-purpose studio with media production and satellite receiving capability, a quiet study room and general classrooms are also part of the Library’s space. Equipment available to library users includes computers, both PC’s and laptops for in-library use, printers, scanners, photocopiers, DVD and CD players, VCR’s, and microform scanner/reader/printers.

College Success: First Year Success Seminar Students interested in getting acquainted with SCCC before the semester begins should register for a one-credit orientation course titled FSS 120 First Year Success Seminar. FSS 120 is an orientation course designed to enhance the success of first-year college students by introducing such topics as time management, learning styles, classroom expectations, support services and resources, major/ career planning, stress management, and personal wellness. For more information, refer to the course description for FSS 120 or contact the Chairperson of the Department of Developmental Studies.

Computer Use Policy Registered students may apply for an E-mail account by contacting the Academic Computing Office, Elston Hall, Room 530. Users of the College’s E-mail accounts are required to abide by the SCCC Computer Policies and Procedures, copies of which are available in the Academic Computing Lab, Begley Library and on the SCCC Web site. This policy outlines both appropriate and unacceptable uses of the College’s E-mail system, responsibilities of users and privacy policies relating to SCCC’s Web site. E-mail accounts remain valid during the period of enrollment at SCCC.


Department of Developmental Studies Mission Statement. The primary mission of the Department of Developmental Studies is to provide students with quality developmental education in reading, writing, mathematics and study skills to acquire the requisite skills needed to attain academic success in college level work. In addition, the department administers placement testing and promotes student retention through accessible academic support services such as the Learning Center/Writing Lab, the Mathematics Lab and Tutoring Services. The Learning Center and the Mathematics Lab provide academic support that includes individualized professional tutoring, computer-assisted-instruction and workshops to students from all levels of academic preparedness, particularly students with special academic needs. The purpose of Tutoring Services is to enhance classroom instruction by providing quality tutoring that fosters active and independent learning. Visit the Department Web site at www.sunysccc.edu/academic/devstudy/. Courses in College Study Skills (CSS). Courses in reading, writing, mathematics and study skills are offered for students who need to strengthen prerequisite skills for academic success. Students are expected to enroll in prerequisite reading, writing and mathematics courses as recommended. Even though developmental course credits do not satisfy degree requirements, these credits contribute to full-time status and eligibility for financial aid. These courses are listed under the CSS prefix. The Learning Center/Writing Lab. Elston Hall, Room 523. The Learning Center provides academic assistance to students in reading, writing, study skills, and information literacy. Assistance is available through individual instruction by professional and peer tutors, computer assisted instruction, study groups in content areas, and workshops. The Learning Center also serves as a writing lab to students who need assistance with written assignments including research papers. Computers are available for word processing and educational software. Adaptive computer technology is available for students with disabilities. Free workshops focusing on learning strategies are scheduled throughout the semester for students. Contact the Learning Center for times and dates or connect to the Learning Center link on the Department’s home page. Math Lab. Elston Hall, Room 518. The Math Lab offers individualized tutoring on a drop-in basis in most mathematics courses. Professional tutors help students who need assistance with homework or need to refresh their mathematics skills. In addition to tutors, computer-software tutorials and Maple software are available. The Math Lab is open more than 50 hours per week during the academic year. For additional information including hours, connect to the Math Lab link on the Department’s home page. Tutor Services. Elston Hall, Room 328. Tutor Services provides up to three hours a week of free peer tutoring as well as professional tutoring to part- and full-time students enrolled at SCCC. Applications to receive peer tutoring are available online at www.sunysccc.edu/academic/devstudy/tutorsys/, in the Tutor Services Office, Elston Hall, Room 328, or in the Department of Developmental Studies, Elston Hall, Room 403. For additional information including hours, follow the Tutor Services link on the Department’s home page.

36

Accounting and Computer Lab. Elston Hall, Room 427. Professional and peer tutors provide individualized tutoring on a drop-in basis in most accounting and computer courses in the ACC/CIS Labs. More information including hours can be found by connecting to the Accounting and Computer Labs link on the Department’s home page.

Language Laboratory The Language Laboratory provides academic support in the learning of languages other than English. Audio, video and computer equipment assist students in the learning and mastering of three languages: Spanish, French and Italian. Use of the Language Laboratory is required for all students taking these languages. The Language Laboratory aide supervises and maintains the equipment and assists students and faculty in the use of the laboratory. Course instructors use the laboratory facilities to enhance their lectures. The Language Laboratory is located in Elston Hall, Room 520; telephone (518) 381-1373.

TRIO Student Support Services The TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) program at SCCC provides participants with opportunities for academic development, assistance with basic college requirements and serves to motivate students towards the successful completion of their post-secondary education. The goal of TRIO SSS is to increase the college retention and graduation rates of its participants and facilitate the process of transition from one level of higher education to the next. Services provided include: • Tutorial services;

• Academic, financial, or personal counseling;

• Resources for students with Learning Disabilities;

• Assistance in securing admission and financial aid for enrollment in four-year institutions;

• Information about career options;

• Mentoring;

• Direct financial assistance (grant aid) to a limited number of current TRIO SSS participants who are receiving Federal Pell Grants.

The TRIO SSS Office is located in Elston Hall, Room 328; telephone (518) 381-1465.


ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGISTRATION

Academic Standards and Regulations

Academic standards and regulations are based on The Academic Code of Schenectady County Community College, as adopted by the Faculty. The portions of the Code included in this Catalog are those particularly relevant to students. All students are subject to the policies of the Code and to other procedural or financial policies that may be enacted by appropriate College officials or agencies. The Code, in its entirety, is available in the Academic Advisement Center, Elston Hall, Room 223, and in the Begley Library.

Student Classifications All students have either matriculated or non-matriculated status: Matriculated. Individuals have matriculated status in a program if they have been formally admitted to a degree or certificate program of the College under standard College and State University of New York admissions procedures, who have completed placement tests in basic skills administered by the College (if required), and who continue to pursue their program successfully. Non-matriculated. Individuals are non-matriculated if they are enrolled in a course or courses and have not been formally accepted in a degree or certificate program, or have had their matriculation terminated for any reason. Only matriculated students are eligible for a degree or certificate from the College. Non-matriculated students should be aware of the need to matriculate if they plan to earn a degree or certificate. Full-Time. Full-time study requires a minimum of 12 semester credit hours in day and/or evening courses, including any taken through cross-registration agreements. Students are classified as having full-time or part-time status on the basis of their current load. One semester credit hour is awarded for the equivalent of 15, 50-minute class periods, with a normal expectation of 30 hours of supplementary assignments.

Registration Registration is conducted prior to each semester as indicated in the official College calendar on Pages 4 and 5. Students who wish to earn a degree or certificate, or who wish to be eligible for state or federal financial aid, and are matriculating for the first time, register for courses through a New Student Registration Program. Each session accommodates a limited number of students so that individual

concerns and questions regarding the selection of courses can be properly addressed. The sessions give new students a comprehensive introduction to the registration process, academic assessment and to academic advisement. Continuing students have the opportunity to advance register for classes. Notification of advance registration dates is sent to all students currently enrolled in classes at the College. A Programs and Courses Directory, which includes a schedule of day and evening courses, is published prior to the start of each semester. The course schedule is mailed to Schenectady County residences and is available on the SCCC Web site at www.sunysccc.edu. Residents of other counties may request copies by calling the Continuing Education Division Office. The schedule provides students with a convenient “mail-in” registration form. Students who wish to take courses, but who have not yet decided to enroll in a program, may register for courses during general registration. In addition to in-person registration, students have the option to register online through the SCCC Web site (www.sunysccc.edu).

New Student Registration Program New Student Registration Programs are held prior to the start of each semester to assist entering students with the registration process. These programs include:

• Testing to determine proficiency in reading, writing and mathematics skills for proper course placement, and in order to provide academic assistance as needed;

• An introduction to the Advising and Registration process

• An opportunity to talk with an advisor regarding program and course selection;

• Registration for courses.

Students will receive information about New Student Registration Programs following their acceptance to the College.

Academic Advisement The goal of academic advisement is to assist students in planning academic programs consistent with their degree and/or career objectives. Academic advisors provide specific information and guidance to students; however, the individual student is responsible for decisions related to courses/program selection and for satisfying institutional requirements. During General and New Student Registration Programs, academic advisement is provided by faculty and professional staff serving as

37


members of academic department/special services teams. See Page 28. Full-Time Students. Following initial matriculation (admission, assessment, advisement and registration), each full-time student is assigned an academic advisor who is a member of the Faculty. Advisor assignments are made according to the student’s program of study and are intended to be continuous throughout the student’s college career, unless a program change requires modification. It is expected that each student will arrange to meet with the Academic Advisor at least once each semester for individual consultation and program planning. A student can find out the name of his/her advisor in the Academic Services Office, Elston Hall, Room 212. Part-Time and Non-Matriculated Students. General advisement services are provided on a continuous basis throughout the academic year as a service to part-time and non-matriculated students, and as a supplement to individual advisor assignments. These services are provided by professional staff members in the Student Development Center in conjunction with the academic departments and the Office of Academic Services. Course Selection Approval. All students must have their planned schedules reviewed and signed by an Academic Advisor prior to registration. Students planning to register online will need to obtain a pin number from an Academic Advisor prior to their Web registration. Exceptions to this review are granted to non-matriculated students who may choose to self-advise.

Cross-Registration Schenectady County Community College participates in the cross-registration program established by the former HudsonMohawk Association of Colleges and Universities. Under this agreement, the option of cross-registration is extended to full-time matriculated students at participating colleges to enroll in credit courses. Students must take at least half of the course load at their home campuses. These courses and grades are considered as resident credit and are entered accordingly on their permanent records. Students may not cross-register during the summer session. SCCC maintains cross-registration agreements with the following institutions: Adirondack Community College, Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany Law School, Albany Medical College, College of Saint Rose, Empire State College, Excelsior College, Green Mountain College, Hudson Valley Community College, Maria College, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, The Sage Colleges, Siena College, Skidmore College, Union College and the University at Albany. Approval for all cross-registration courses must be given in writing by the Director of Academic Services and the student’s advisor prior to the end of Late Registration. Additional information and the required form may be obtained from the Office of Academic Services.

Registration Policies Course Load Restrictions. A student may register for no more than a total of 19 semester credit hours during any regular semester, including those taken through cross-registration agreements. During sessions of eight weeks or less in duration, a student shall be limited to enrollment in courses generating credits at the rate of 1.3 semester credit hours per week, unless an overload has been authorized in advance. Auditing. A student may register as a paid auditor during any scheduled registration period, as indicated in the College calendar. State and county residents 60 years of age may register for a “senior citizen audit,” without a fee or tuition, only during the late registration period, on a space available basis. Online courses and private music lesson courses are not open to senior citizen audit. An auditor need not participate in class activities, take tests nor submit homework assignments. The degree to which the auditor may do these things is determined by the instructor. All audited courses will be recorded on the student’s transcript as audits. However, if an auditor ceases to attend class without withdrawing from the class, the instructor may indicate that a grade of “NR” be recorded. Waiver of Requirement. A specific course may be waived for appropriate reasons, but the total credit requirements for any degree cannot be altered. A waived course does not decrease the number of credit hours required for graduation. A waiver must maintain the goals of the program as well as the policies/requirements of the College, SUNY and New York State Education Department (SED) and be approved by the appropriate Department Chairperson. Repeating Courses. A student may repeat a course twice, with no additional credit earned. Only the higher grade will be used in all future cumulative grade point average computations; however, all grades will be retained on the transcript. Once the highest possible grade has been achieved, a student may not repeat the course. Withdrawal. A student may officially withdraw from a class without a grade penalty anytime up to the end of the 11th week of full semester classes by completing the appropriate course withdrawal form in the Office of Academic Services. For summer and time shortened courses, refer to the appropriate schedule for withdrawal dates. For such withdrawal, a grade of “W” is assigned. Students who stop attending without officially withdrawing receive the academic grade earned at the completion of the term. Academic Leave. Matriculated students in good academic standing who find it necessary to interrupt their program of study at the College are automatically granted an academic leave for a period not to exceed two semesters. Such students maintain their matriculated status and, upon return, may choose to pursue program requirements in effect at the time of their matriculation provided that the College continues to offer those courses and/or that program. Coursework completed while on academic leave is subject to the policies and procedures governing non-residence credit. Students who fail to register for the first semester after the academic leave has expired will have their matriculation suspended. Such students will, on return, be required to apply for readmission to the College.


Residence Credit. Residence credit is obtained by registering for and successfully completing credit bearing courses offered by the College. Residence credit may also be obtained through participation in the College’s cross-registration program, as outlined on Page 36. Residence Requirements – Associate’s Degree. At least 30 semester credit hours in residence applied to the degree program must be successfully completed in order to be eligible for an Associate’s degree. Residence Requirements – Certificate. At least 15 semester credit hours in residence applied to the certificate program must be successfully completed in order to be eligible for a certificate. Non-Residence Credit. Non-residence credit is defined as credit earned at other academic institutions or certain non-collegiate organizations or credit earned by examination or for previous experience. Non-resident credit does not generate grade points for the purpose of calculating grade-point averages. External Transfer Credit. Accredited post-secondary transfer credit may be accepted for coursework taken at academic institutions if approved by the Department Chairperson. Courses of equivalent quality and content taken at other academic institutions will be accepted if passed with a grade of “C” or better, if such courses are applicable to the student’s program. Transfer credit may be awarded by the Dean of Academic Affairs upon recommendation of the Department Chairperson for coursework taken in certain non-collegiate organizations when published guides are available to evaluate such coursework and the Faculty has approved the use of those guides. The Faculty has approved the use of A Guide to Educational Programs in Non-Collegiate Organizations for making such evaluations. Guidelines have been established for granting non-residence credit for certain courses taken through the American Institute of Banking. Credit by Examination/Credit for Previous Experience. Matriculated students may earn credit by examination for individual courses required in their program of study. Credit by examination may be awarded for a passing grade on an externally published proficiency examination or an internally developed challenge examination. The availability of internally developed challenge examinations for selected courses is determined by individual academic departments. The challenge examination request, including a justification statement, must be submitted prior to the end of the seventh week of the student’s final semester preceding graduation. The request must be approved by the Faculty member, the Department Chairperson and the Academic Dean (application available from the Office of Academic Services) and the test administration fee paid prior to the administration of the challenge examination. Matriculated students may earn credit based on previous experience for individual courses required in their program of study. To initiate the process, the student should petition the department responsible for the specific course(s), listing each course and a brief statement justifying its consideration. Credit earned by examination or through previous experience is not considered as earned in residence. Credit earned by examination or through previous experience will be recorded as “credit” (CR) on transcripts, and will not affect a student’s grade point average (G.P.A.). Students must accumulate 12 or more semester hours of residence credits before credit by examination or credit for previous experience is noted on transcripts.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Under the College Level Examination Program, Schenectady County Community College awards credit by examination for certain specific courses. In order to ensure selection of the appropriate examination(s) and to learn of potential additional requirements, students are advised to consult the appropriate department chairperson prior to registering for CLEP examinations. Information and registration materials for CLEP examinations are available in the Student Development Center. Academic Placement Testing. The placement tests in basic skills must be completed prior to the first day of classes of the term in which the student is matriculated. The results will determine appropriate placement into developmental reading, writing, mathematics and/or study skills courses which serve as prerequisites to the corresponding program requirements. Exceptions to the placement testing requirement are granted to a student who (1) has passed the English 11 NY State Regents exam with a grade of 75 or better and has also passed any of the following mathematics NY State Regents exams: Course I, Course II, Course A, Algebra, Geometry, or Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry with a grade of 75 or better, or (2) has presented evidence of transferable credit for both College Composition and for Algebra I or higher, or (3) has presented evidence of transfer credit for both College Composition and also passed the math Regents courses listed in item (1), or (4) who has scored 450 on all three sections of the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) Reasoning Test: Critical Thinking, Writing and Math, or (5) who has comparable scores of 18 verbal and 18 mathematics on the ACT (American College Testing). An individual may submit a written request for a re-test on the placement test (for the current semester) within 14 days of the original testing based on any one of the following criteria: 1. Illness or injury made known to the test administrator during the test. 2. Previously undisclosed documented disability (re-test in the Student Development Center). 3. Irregularity in test situation (e.g., no clock, interruption, missing pages in test booklet) made known to the test administrator at the time of the test. The request will be reviewed by the Chairperson of the Developmental Studies Department. The individual will be notified in writing of the decision within seven days. Placement test scores of high school graduates and GED recipients are valid for three years from the date of testing. However, placement test scores of students who apply for admission under the 24-Credit Hour Program are valid for only one year. Transcript Requests. Requests for transcripts are made to the Office of Academic Services. All requests must bear the student’s signature authorizing release of the academic information. Requests may be made by completing a transcript request form in the Office of Academic Services or the College Web site or through a signed letter. Transcript requests cannot be accepted over the phone.


A fee of $3 must accompany each request for an official or unofficial transcript. Unofficial transcripts can be faxed for a fee of $6. Official transcripts bear the College seal and the Director of Academic Services’ signature. Official transcripts will be sent directly to receiving institutions and may be issued to students in a signed, sealed envelope. Students who wish to transfer to other colleges are normally required to submit official copies of transcripts.

Classroom Expectations Course Requirements. Students will be provided a written statement of all course requirements by their instructor during the first class session. This statement will include a grading policy stating the relative weighting of the course requirements in determining the student’s final grade. Students are responsible for meeting course prerequisites and for promptly obtaining such texts or materials as may be required for the course. Attendance Policy. Students are responsible for maintaining prompt and continuous attendance in all classes and are responsible for any assignments or material presented in their absence. The degree to which absences and lateness affect a student’s final grade will be determined by the individual instructor and stated in his/her course syllabus. A grade of “FX,” attendance-related failure, may be issued to a student who has missed more than 20 percent of the total number of class hours a course meets in one semester.

5. In effectuating the provisions of this section, it shall be the duty of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to exercise the fullest measure of good faith. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of availing himself/herself of the provisions of this section. 6. Any student who is aggrieved by the alleged failure of any faculty or administrative officials to comply in good faith with the provisions of this section shall be entitled to maintain an action or proceeding in the Supreme Court of the county in which such institution of higher education is located for the enforcement of his/her rights under this section. 6a. A copy of this section shall be published by each institution of higher education in the Catalog of such institution containing the listing of available courses. 7. As used in this section, the term “institution of higher education” shall mean schools under the control of the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York, or the Board of Trustees of Higher Education of the City of New York or any community college.

Academic Integrity Academic integrity is the foundation of institutions of higher learning, and students will act in accordance with the academic integrity guidelines of the College. The following guidelines apply to all courses offered by the College.

• Each student’s work will be her/his own work.

• Each student will appropriately identify the work of others when it is incorporated into the writing of her/his papers, examinations, or oral presentations. This includes both direct quotations and paraphrased opinions and ideas.

• Each student will follow the directions of the instructor with regard to permissible materials in a room at the times of tests and examinations.

• Each student will proceed during examinations without any assistance whatsoever and without communicating in any way with another student while an examination is being conducted.

• Each student will refrain from obtaining or disseminating the content of any examination prior to distribution by the instructor.

• Except as directed by the instructor, students enrolled in laboratory sections will complete all observations and reports based solely on their own processing of the experiment or demonstration.

• Each student will submit her/his work to only one instructor, unless s/he has the prior approval of all instructors involved.

• Students will represent data and sources appropriately and honestly.

A class meeting is an uninterrupted instructional session involving one or more class or practicum periods during which a single attendance record is made. Education Law State of New York 244-a. Students Unable Because of Religious Beliefs to Attend Classes on Certain Days 1. No person shall be expelled from or be refused admission as a student to an institution of higher education for the reason that he/she is unable, because of his/her religious beliefs to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study or work requirements on a particular day or days. 2. Any student in an institution of higher education who is unable, because of his/her religious beliefs to attend classes on a particular day or days shall, because of such absence on the particular day or days, be excused from any examination or any study or work requirements. 3. It shall be the responsibility of the faculty and of the administrative office of each institution of higher education to make available to each student who is absent from school, because of his/her religious beliefs, an equivalent opportunity to make up any examination, study or work requirements which he/she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such equivalent opportunity. 4. If classes, examinations, study or work requirements are held on Friday after 4 p.m. or on Saturday, similar makeup classes, examinations, study or work requirements shall be made available on other days where it is possible and practicable to do so. No special fees shall be charged to the student for these classes, examinations, study or work requirements held on other days.

Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to:

• Plagiarism: The intentional or unintentional representation of another person’s work as one’s own. Examples include, but are not limited to:

• Quoting, paraphrasing, or summarizing another’s work without appropriately acknowledging the source; • Using another’s research without acknowledging the source;


• Submitting another’s paper, purchased or otherwise obtained, as one’s own. • Cheating on Examinations: Looking at another’s work, using or bringing materials not permitted by the instructor during the exam, communicating with another student, receiving any kind of assistance, including but not limited to assistance from electronic devices, during an examination, and obtaining or disseminating the content of an examination prior to its distribution by the instructor.

• Multiple Submission: Submitting any work, even one’s own, to more than one instructor, without the permission of those instructors

• Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: Knowingly allowing another student to use one’s work or cheat from one’s exam

• Fabrication: Falsifying or inventing information in any situation, including but not limited to data for a lab or researched project

Consequences of Violating Academic Integrity: The following are the College’s guidelines for consequences for violating academic integrity, but the student must consult the course syllabus, since the instructor will determine the consequences for each course. Consequences may include, but are not limited to, one or a combination of the following penalties:

• Oral or written warning

• Deduction of points, grade of “F” or 0 for the assignment, project, or exam

• Failure of the course

• Disciplinary action by the Student Affairs Office. Results of disciplinary actions are outlined in the Student Code of Conduct (included in the Student Handbook).

Independent Study An independent study project is an organized experience independently pursued by a student under the direction of a faculty member. Matriculated students with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.50 are eligible to request an independent study course through a faculty member willing and able to supervise the project. An independent study proposal must be recommended by the appropriate Department Chairperson and subsequently approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs prior to the student registering for the course.

Final Examinations A final examination, if required, will be specified in the course requirement as determined by the academic department. All final examinations will be held during the final exam week. Students will not be held liable for more than two final examinations during a single day. Students performing at the “A” level may be exempted from the final examination if their instructor has so provided in the grading policy for the course.

Academic Status Grading System. The following grades are assigned by course instructors and carry the grade points indicated. Grade Grade Grade Points/ Meaning Credit Hour A Excellent 4.00 A- 3.67 B+ 3.33 B Good 3.00 B- 2.67 C+ 2.33 C Average 2.00 C- 1.67 D+ 1.33 D Poor 1.00 D- 0.67 F Failure 0.00 FX Failure 0.00 (attendance-related) The following grades are not counted in determining the grade point average: I Incomplete W Withdrawal AU Audit NC No Credit NR Not Reported P Pass CR Credit for previous experience or by examination T Transfer Grade Point Average (G.P.A.). A student’s cumulative grade point average is determined by dividing the total grade points earned by the total credit hours attempted. All grades from repeated courses are indicated on the student transcript, although only the highest grade achieved is calculated in the G.P.A. Credit hours attempted by students normally include all those taken in residence credit-bearing courses. Pass/fail grades are not calculated in the G.P.A. Incomplete Courses. Course requirements are expected to be met within the time limits established for the term. An instructor may grant a student an extension, normally not to exceed 60 calendar days from the last day of final examinations, by submitting a grade of “I” for that student. Extensions may be given only when necessitated by circumstances beyond the student’s control. Grades of “I” automatically become “Fs” after 60 calendar days from the end of the final exam period if not otherwise changed by the instructor. Term Honors. Only matriculated students are eligible for term honors. Students who receive a grade of “I” will not be considered for term honors in that semester, with the following exception: students who complete the course within three weeks of the end of the final exam period may apply for term honors. A full-time student’s name is placed on the President’s List for each term in which the student has earned a G.P.A. of 3.70 or higher while earning at least 12 credit hours for that term. Part-time students earning six credit hours in a term and having accumulated 12 credit hours are also eligible. A full-time student’s name is placed on the


Dean’s List each term in which the student has earned a G.P.A. from 3.20 to up to 3.70 while earning at least 12 credit hours that term. Part-time students earning six credit hours in a term and having accumulated 12 credit hours are also eligible. Graduation Honors. Degree recipients with a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.70 or higher graduate with High Honors. Degree recipients with a cumulative grade point average from 3.20 to up to 3.70 graduate with Honors. Mid-Term Warnings. At the end of the seventh week of classes in the fall and spring semesters, faculty submit warning grades to the Director of Academic Services. Students performing below the “C” level are notified of their status by mail. Academic Standing. The academic status of matriculated students is determined by the total credit hours attempted, semester and cumulative grade point averages and number of credit hours completed as prescribed by the Academic Standing Tables below. Such determination will be made at the end of each semester of study. The action described will be assigned to the student’s transcript, and the information regarding this status will be transmitted to the student. Good Academic Standing. A matriculated student is considered to be in good academic standing at the end of a term and for the subsequent term if the student meets the criteria for Satisfactory Progress and Pursuit of Program. Satisfactory Progress. A student is considered to be making satisfactory progress if he/she maintains a cumulative G.P.A. above the level of dismissal defined in the table below. Total Credit Dismissal Hours Attempted Cumulative G.P.A. 0-11 0.00 12-23 Below 1.00 24-35 Below 1.50 36-47 Below 1.70 48-59 Below 1.90 60 and Above Below 2.00 Total Credit Hours above include all credit hours attempted in residence at Schenectady County Community College. In addition, applicable transfer credits are included in the Total Credit Hours Attempted, but they are not included in the calculation of the G.P.A. Pursuit of Program. Students are considered to be in pursuit of program if they maintain a level above the point of dismissal by completing the specified number of hours indicated in the table below. Successful completion is defined as receiving a grade of “A,” “A-,” “B+,” “B,” “B-,” “C+,” “C,” “C-,” “D+,” “D,” “D-,” “I” or “P” for any course taken in residence. Total Credit Hours Registered (Dismissal) 0-22 23-35 36-47 48-59 60-71 72-83 84 and above

Minimum Number of Credit Hours Required to Be Successfully Completed 0 12 21 30 42 54 66

When a student has not met the requirements of Good Academic Standing, he/she will be notified by the Director of Academic Services. Registration does not become official until the College determines whether the student meets the requirements for Good Academic Standing. Academic Probation. Since a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 is one of the requirements for graduation from a degree or certificate program, matriculated students who fall below this level at the end of any academic term are placed on academic probation. Such students remain eligible to register for coursework but lose eligibility to hold student office, participate in intercollegiate functions or serve as a public representative of the College. Probationary status remains in effect until the student has achieved a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher. During the probationary period, these students may be limited to enrollment of no more than 14 credit hours. A semester or term probation is a warning given to students who earn a G.P.A. below 2.00 for that academic period. Dismissal and Readmission. Students who have lost their matriculation, whether through academic dismissal or through interruption of their program of study, may apply for readmission to the College. Students initiate the process by completing the application form provided by the Office of Academic Services and meeting with an advisor in the Advisement Center to re-examine their goals. These initial steps in the application process must be completed prior to the last day of general registration for the term in which readmission is to take place. Academic dismissal remains in effect until the student has been readmitted by the Readmission Committee. Readmitted students will be subject to the program requirements in effect at the time they are reinstated as matriculated students. Any change in program requirements resulting from the readmission process is subject to evaluation by the appropriate Department Chairperson. Fresh Start Policy. The Fresh Start Policy applies to students who return to SCCC after an absence of five or more years and successfully complete 12 credits with a GPA of at least 2.00. Students may petition the Director of Academic Services to have their former academic record before the five-year absence accepted in the same manner as if the credits were transfer credits. That is, earned credits are carried forward for up to 30 hours of credit in which a grade of “C” or higher was earned. The cumulative GPA is based only on credits earned subsequent to the student’s re-entry. The student’s complete record, before and after academic forgiveness, remains on the transcript. This Fresh Start Policy can be made only once during a student’s career at SCCC.

Graduation Requirements Application for Graduation. In order to establish eligibility for graduation from either a certificate or degree program, each student must complete an application for graduation. Students must meet each of the following academic requirements to be eligible for an Associate’s degree or certificate: 1. Candidates must meet the program requirements in effect at the time of their matriculation and earn a cumulative G.P.A. of at least 2.00.


2. Candidates must be matriculated in the program from which they wish to graduate at least one semester prior to graduation and meet the residence requirements for degree and/or certificate programs. 3. Candidates must be recommended for graduation by vote of the Faculty or be approved by the President of the College when the Faculty vote is based on incorrect information. 4. Candidates for a degree must hold a high school diploma or its equivalent.

• dates of attendance

Additional Degree or Certificate. Students may earn an additional degree or certificate provided that the secondary program is essentially different from the primary program (e.g., the secondary program includes at least 15 credit hours of requirements not in common with the primary program) and that all degree or certificate requirements for both programs have been met.

• receipt of degree

• any office of the State University of New York or its agent on a “need to know” basis;

Discounting Grade Policy. For the purpose of meeting the minimum graduation grade point average (G.P.A.) requirement, a student may petition the Dean of Academic Affairs to discount grades of “C” or lower from the cumulative grade point average. For the petition to be considered, the courses must not be required in the program in which the student is matriculated for graduation. Any courses which may serve as specific electives in the program of matriculation cannot be discounted.

• personnel within the institution determined by the institution to have legitimate educational interest;

• officials of other institutions in which students seek to enroll, on condition that the issuing institution makes a reasonable attempt to inform students of the disclosure or makes such transfer of information a stated institutional policy;

• persons or organizations providing financial aid to the students, or determining financial aid decisions concerning eligibility, amount, condition and enforcement or terms of said aid;

• Veterans Administration;

• accrediting organizations carrying out their accrediting functions;

• parents of a student who have established a student’s status as a dependent according to Internal Revenue Code of 1954, Section 152;

• persons in compliance with a judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena, provided that the institution first makes a reasonable attempt to notify the student;

Petition for discount must be made in writing during the semester of graduation and requires the recommendation of the appropriate Department Chairperson. Petitions will be considered at the time of final graduation audit and may be granted at the discretion of the Dean of Academic Affairs whose decision shall be final. The student’s cumulative G.P.A. on the transcript will remain unchanged. The Director of Academic Services will report to the Faculty each year the number of proposed graduates who have been affected by the implementation of this policy. Attendance at Graduation Ceremony. Candidates for degrees and certificates can participate in SCCC’s Commencement ceremony if they have applied to graduate and are expected to complete their degree and/or certificate program requirements in August, December or May of the current academic year. Final clearance for degrees and certificates will be completed after Commencement when final grades are submitted. Identification of Honors candidates at the Commencement ceremony will be based on the students’ cumulative grade point averages excluding the final Spring semester grades. Official honors and Academic Recognition will be determined after submission of final grades. Participation in the Commencement ceremony does not ensure the degree or certificate will actually be awarded.

Release of Student Information The following policy governs the disclosure of education record information by the Office of Academic Services. 1. In accord with the Family Educational Rights Privacy Act of 1974 (The Buckley Amendment), enrolled students have the right to inspect and review all official records, files and data directly related to them which are maintained by the College. Under the law providing access to institutional records, students have the right to:

• obtain copies of those records at the expense of the eligible student;

• receive a response from the institution to reasonable requests for explanation and interpretations of those records;

• have an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content of those records. 2. The following information about a student may be released to any outside source not officially connected to SUNY or one of its agents:

• degree earned 3. The College may disclose education records or components thereof without written consent of students to:

• persons in an emergency, if the knowledge of information, in fact, is necessary to protect the health or safety of students or other persons. 4. If you do not wish your name to be released to military recruiters, you must provide a written request to the Office of Academic Services. 5. No further information will be released without the written consent of the student.

Student Complaint Procedures for Academic and Administrative Matters Academic Matters. A student wishing to file a complaint regarding an academic matter should begin the following process within six months after the end of the semester in which the grade for the course was issued: 1. Consult with the instructor of the course in question. If an understanding or resolution is not achieved, or if this step is not feasible, the student may then: 2. Consult with the appropriate Department Chairperson. The Chairperson will consult with the involved faculty member and with the student and attempt to reach a mutually agreeable resolution. If an understanding or resolution is not achieved, the student may then:


3. Appeal in writing to the Dean of Academic Affairs. The written appeal, detailing both the complaint and the results of their consultations with the instructor and with the Department Chairperson, should be delivered to the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs. An appointment for consultation with the Dean or Dean’s designee may be scheduled at that time. The faculty member involved will be notified that the student has appealed to the Dean of Academic Affairs, and be given a copy of the student’s written appeal. Within 15 days of notification via memo from the Dean, the faculty member may choose to provide a written reply which shall be considered in the disposition of the complaint. The faculty member may also schedule an appointment to consult with the Academic Dean. Determinations and dispositions of complaints will be made by the Dean of Academic Affairs of Schenectady County Community College within 30 days of receipt of the written complaint. The Dean will consult with and notify the President of determinations and dispositions. The student will be notified in writing of the decision.

Administrative Matters. A student wishing to file a complaint regarding an administrative matter should complete the following steps:

• Consult with the staff member who has responsibility for the matter in question. If an understanding or resolution is not achieved, the student may then:

• consult with the supervisor of the office or unit for a resolution of the complaint. If a resolution is to be appealed, the student may then:

• appeal in writing to the Dean of the division which has administrative responsibility for that office or unit. The written appeal, detailing both the complaint and the results of the consultations with the staff member and supervisor should be delivered to the Office of the Dean. An appointment for consultation with the Dean may be scheduled at that time.

Determination and Disposition of a Complaint. The Dean will respond to a written complaint within 30 days of receipt. The Dean will consult with and notify the President of determinations and dispositions. The student will be notified in writing of the decision. All Other Matters. A student who wishes to file a complaint regarding a College matter but is uncertain where to begin the process should begin with the Division of Student Affairs for referral to the appropriate office.

44


Curricula Curricula Offered Offered at at Schenectady Schenectady County County Community Community College College Program

Degree

HEGIS Code Page #

Aviation Science............................................................................A.S..................................... 5302.............................45 Business Accounting*.............................................................................A.A.S................................... 5002.............................58 Business Administration*.................................................... A.S./A.A.S................................ 5004..........................46, 59 General Business*.................................................................Certificate............................... 5001.............................81 Music/Business........................................................................ A.A.S................................... 5004.............................72 Chemical Dependency Counseling............................................ A.A.S................................... 5506.............................60 Computer Desktop Support Specialist...................................Certificate............................... 5103.............................78 Computer Information Systems................................................. A.A.S................................... 5103.............................61 Computer Networking and Systems.......................................... A.A.S................................... 5104.............................63 Computer Science*.......................................................................A.S..................................... 5101.............................47 Computer Repair and Networking..........................................Certificate............................... 5104.............................79 Criminal Justice*................................................................A.A.S./Certificate.......................... 5505..........................63, 80 Early Childhood.................................................................A.A.S./Certificate.......................... 5503..........................66, 80 Emergency Management*........................................................... A.A.S................................... 5508.............................67 Fire Protection Technology*...................................................... A.A.S................................... 5507.............................68 Fire Science*............................................................................Certificate............................... 5507.............................81 Health Studies..........................................................................Certificate............................... 5299.............................82 Hotel Technology Assistant Chef*.....................................................................Certificate............................... 5404.............................77 Culinary Arts*.........................................................................A.O.S................................... 5010.............................64 Hotel and Restaurant Management*........................................ A.A.S................................... 5010.............................69 Human Services*.................................................................... A.S./A.A.S................................ 5501..........................48, 71 Liberal Arts and Sciences Humanities and Social Sciences*.............................................. A.A..................................... 5649.............................51 Individual Studies.................................................................A.A./A.S................................. 5699.............................49 Mathematics and Science*.........................................................A.S..................................... 5649.............................52 Science......................................................................................A.S..................................... 5649.............................56 Teaching Assistant................................................................Certificate............................... 5503.............................83 Teacher Education Transfer*......................................................A.S..................................... 5608.............................57 Nanoscale Materials Technology .............................................. A.A.S................................... 5311.............................73 Nursing** (through Ellis Hospital School of Nursing)...................A.S..................................... 5208.............................15 Paralegal*.................................................................................... A.A.S................................... 5099.............................74 Performing Arts Drama.......................................................................................A.S..................................... 5610.............................53 Music............................................................................... A.S./Certificate............................ 5610..........................54, 82 Tourism and Hospitality Management*..................................... A.A.S.............................. 5011.10.............................75 Tourism, Sales and Convention Management* ....................Certificate............................... 5010.............................84 Jointly registered, inter-institutional programs with SUNY Delhi Bachelor of Business Administration in Hospitality Management (B.B.A.)......................... 0508.............................70 Hotel and Resort Management Core.........................................................................................................................70 Travel and Tourism Core..........................................................................................................................................76 Business and Technology Management (B.B.A.)................................................................... 0599............................ *** Enrollment in other than registered or otherwise approved programs may jeopardize the student’s eligibility for certain financial aid awards. All degree and certificate programs offered at Schenectady County Community College have been registered with the State Education Department and approved by the State University of New York.

* Program may also be completed by attending evening classes on a part-time basis. ** The Nursing A.S. degree is granted by the Ellis Hospital School of Nursing in conjunction with SCCC. See Page 16 for further information about this program.

*** Contact the Delhi liaison at (518) 381-1416.

45


46

14 29 5 10 35 N/A N/A 5 6 12 2 20 32 170

86% 76% 60% 80% 83% N/A N/A 80% 100% 75% 100% 80% 78% 80%

64% 41% 40% 80% 57% N/A N/A 60% 100% 67% 0% 55% 63% 58%

78%

100% 71% 67% 60% 100% 77% 70% 75% 67% N/A 100% 74% 88% 100% N/A 70% 75% 76% 58%

43% 46% 33% 60% 50% 55% 61% 65% 67% N/A 86% 74% 63% 50% N/A 40% 50% 58% 20%

14% 14% 0% 10% 0% 17% 30% 15% 0% N/A 36% 30% 13% 50% N/A 30% 0% 21% 19%

14% 11% 17% 20% 75% 21% 11% 10% 33% N/A 21% 17% 0% 50% N/A 0% 50% 16%

21% 31% 20% 0% 17% N/A N/A 60% 0% 42% 0% 10% 28% 22%

14%

29% 7% 0% 20% 0% 9% 13% 20% 0% N/A 14% 13% 13% 0% N/A 0% 25% 12%

0% 7% 20% 50% 20% N/A N/A 0% 50% 0% 0% 35% 16% 18%

% Still at SCCC after May 2008

* “First-Time Full-Time� includes students enrolled full-time in the fall semester who were first time students. 1. Continuing Education means students are enrolled at a post-secondary institution in the Fall of 2008, according to the National Student Clearinghouse. 2. Students may be continuing their education and working full or part time. 3. Employment status is based on the November 2008 survey of May 2008 graduates. This survey had a 20% response rate. 4. Excludes Certificate programs.

423

TOTAL (4):

7 28 6 10 4 53 61 20 3 N/A 14 23 8 2 N/A 10 4 253

Accounting Business Administration Chemical Dependency Counseling Computer Information Systems Computer Networking & Systems Criminal Justice Culinary Arts Early Childhood Electrical Technology Emergency Management Fire Protection Technology Hotel and Restaurant Management Human Services Music/Business Nanoscale Materials Technology Paralegal Tourism and Hospitality Management Subtotal - Career Degree Programs

Career Degree Programs

Aviation Science Business Administration Computer Science Human Services` Humanities and Social Sciences Individual Studies (A.A.) Individual Studies (A.S.) Mathematics and Science Performing Arts: Drama Performing Arts: Music Safety and Security Management Science Teacher Education Subtotal - Transfer Degree Programs

21% 10% 0% 20% 29% N/A N/A 0% 33% 25% 0% 20% 19% 19%

% Enrolled % Enrolled % Graduated % Transferred Spring 2006 Fall 2006 by May 2008 without Graduating

Transfer Degree Programs

Entered Fall 2005

Retention/Graduation Rates First-Time, Full-Time* Students Entering Fall 2005

452

6 33 7 7 7 46 66 14 3 5 9 34 7 2 0 27 9 283

2 32 5 25 43 0 0 6 4 16 0 7 29 169

Number of Graduates

41%

17% 30% 43% 43% 29% 39% 27% 36% 67% 20% 11% 41% 29% 50% N/A 30% 44% 33%

0% 66% 40% 28% 72% N/A N/A 33% 0% 69% N/A 57% 55% 56%

Continuing Education (1)

51%

0% 75% N/A 67% 100% 100% 69% 50% N/A N/A 100% 50% 100% N/A N/A 60% 0% 68%

N/A 0% N/A 100% 11% N/A N/A N/A 100% 33% N/A 50% 11% 22%

Employed Full-Time

Transfer/Placement Rates 2008 Graduates

SCHENECTADY COMMUNITY COLLEGE Retention/Graduation/Transfer and Placement Statistics

DEGREE PROGRAMS

28%

0% 17% N/A 33% 0% 0% 31% 50% N/A N/A 0% 20% 0% N/A N/A 20% 100% 21%

N/A 17% N/A 0% 44% N/A N/A N/A 0% 67% N/A 50% 56% 41%

Employed Part-Time


CURRICULA AND PROGRAMS

transfer curricula

The Associate in Arts degree (A.A.) is awarded in Humanities and Social Sciences and is designed to transfer primarily to a Bachelor of Arts degree curriculum at a four-year institution. The Associate in Science degree (A.S.) is awarded in Science and professionally-related programs and is designed to transfer primarily to a Bachelor of Science degree curriculum or, in the case of Performing Arts–Music, to a Bachelor of Music degree curriculum. Transfer Degree Programs • Aviation Science • Business Administration • Computer Science • Human Services • Individual Studies • Liberal Arts: Humanities and Social Sciences • Mathematics and Science • Performing Arts– Drama Music • Science • Teacher Education Transfer

The Honors Program The Honors Program enables students in the College’s Associate’s degree programs to enhance their educational experience at SCCC. Honors courses exist in a variety of subjects so that students from all of SCCC’s degree programs can benefit from them. For detailed information, please see Page 14 of the Catalog.

Aviation Science Associate in Science (A.S.) The Aviation Science A.S. program provides students with a pilot or non-pilot option which will enable successful transfer into a baccalaureate program in the field of aviation. The pilot option provides students with substantial experience in actual flight training toward a Private Pilot Certificate and Instrument Rating, a Commercial Pilot Certificate and a Flight Instructor Certificate in conjunction with their A.S. degree. Flight laboratories are provided by Richmor School of Aviation at the Schenectady County Airport. Laboratory fees can be found with tuition and fees on Page 18.

Mission

rigorous academic program strong in mathematics and science. The Non-Pilot Option allows students to explore other possible aviation careers including Air Traffic Control, Aviation Management, Accident Investigation and Aviation Administration. The Aviation Science program is designed to provide graduates with: • The tools necessary to act as a pilot in command and as safe professional pilots; • Realistic experiences that develop professional attitudes, behaviors and skills useful in the aviation industry; • Critical thinking and problem solving skills through the application of the Aeronautical Decision Making (ADM) model and; • An opportunity to transfer to public or private four-year colleges or universities.

First Year

Pilot Option

Fall Semester CR AER 103 Introduction to Flight....................................... 4 AER 101 Introduction to Flight Lab................................ 1 AER 102 Aviation History............................................... 3 ENG 123 English Composition........................................ 3 Mathematics Elective (a)................................ 3-4 14-15 Spring Semester CR AER 140 Elements of Instrument Flight.......................... 4 AER 141 Elements of Instrument Flight Lab................... 1 PHY 106 Meteorology..................................................... 3 ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 Mathematics Elective (b)............................... 3-4 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 17-18

Second Year Fall Semester CR AER 200 Commercial Operations................................... 3 AER 228 Commercial Operations Lab I........................... 1 AER 210 Aviation Law.................................................... 3 Physics Elective (c)........................................... 4 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 17 Spring Semester CR AER 236 Flight Safety..................................................... 3 AER 229 Commercial Operations Lab II......................... 1 AER Aviation Elective(s) (e).................................. 3-4 Physics Elective (c)........................................... 4 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 CIS Elective (d)............................................. 3-4 17-19

The Aviation Science degree A.S. program allows students to investigate various career options in the aviation industry before transferring to a more centrally focused baccalaureate program. The Pilot Option program combines flight and ground training with a

47


Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 65 Notes: (a) Mathematics Elective MAT 145 or higher (b) Mathematics Elective MAT 167 or higher (c) Physics Elective: PHY 153/154 or PHY 221/222 (d) CIS Elective: CIS 121 or higher (e) Aviation Elective(s): Any additional aviation course notated with an AER prefix.

First Year

Non-Pilot Option

Fall Semester CR AER 103 Introduction to Flight....................................... 4 AER 102 Aviation History............................................... 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 CIS Elective (c).............................................. 3-4 Mathematics Elective (a)................................ 3-4 16-18 Spring Semester CR PHY 106 Meteorology..................................................... 3 Aviation Elective (d) OR................................ 3-4 Restrictive Elective (e) ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 Mathematics Elective (a)................................ 3-4 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 15-17

Second Year Fall Semester CR AER 210 Aviation Law.................................................... 3 AER 150 Airport Management and Security.................... 3 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 Physics Elective (b).......................................... 4 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 16 Spring Semester CR AER 236 Flight Safety..................................................... 3 Aviation Elective (d)...................................... 3-4 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 Restrictive Elective (e)................................... 3-4 Physics (b) OR Mathematics Elective (a)....... 3-4 15-18

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 62 Notes: (a) Mathematics Elective MAT 145 or higher. (b) Physics Elective: PHY 153/154 or PHY 221/222 (c) CIS Elective: CIS 121 or higher (d) Aviation Elective: Any additional AER course, with the exception of 1-credit AER laboratories. (e) Restricted Elective: This may be any course with the exception of courses designated in the SCCC Catalog as not satisfying A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements. Students may fulfill this requirement with MGT 250 Internship. MGT 250 requires Math, Science and Technology and Business/Law Departmental approval.

Business Administration Associate in Science (A.S.) Mission The mission of the Business Administration A.S. program is to facilitate the transfer of students seeking to major in business administration or accounting at a baccalaureate degree-granting institution. Diverse course offerings, cutting-edge technology, and individualized advisement will prepare students to achieve their academic goals. The Business Administration A.S. program enables graduating students to:

• Think strategically, creatively and critically; • Develop strong analytical skills; • Learn and apply a broad range of ethical business practices; • Understand the relevance of contemporary events in the business world and; • Complete a solid core of general education courses, which will ease transfer to a four-year college or university. The Business Administration A.S. program is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

First Year Fall Semester CR ACC 121 Financial Accounting....................................... 4 BUS 121 Business Law I.................................................. 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications.................... 3 MGT 123 Business Organization and Management.......... 3 16 Spring Semester CR ACC 122 Managerial Accounting..................................... 4 BUS 123 Business Law II................................................ 3 BUS 223 Business Statistic OR MAT 147 Statistics........................................... 3 ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 16

Second Year Fall Semester CR ECO 221 Principles of Macroeconomics.......................... 3 MAT 167 Precalculus with Analytic Geometry OR Higher........................................................ 4 SOC 121 Sociology......................................................... 3 Science Elective (b)....................................... 3-5 Restricted Elective (a).................................... 3-4 16-19 Spring Semester CR ECO 223 Principles of Microeconomics........................... 3 MAT 180 Calculus I OR Higher Mathematics OR Science Elective (b)....................................... 3-5 Humanities Elective ........................................ 3 Humanities Elective ........................................ 3 Restricted Elective (a).................................... 3-4 15-18

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 63 48


Notes: (a) A Restricted Elective is to be chosen from among non-required courses ACC (ACC 222 or higher), CIS 129 or higher, MGT, MKT and TEL. Students may select as an option either the Accounting or Management Internship (ACC 250 or MGT 250) as one of the restricted electives. In their selection of Restricted Electives, students should become familiar with the specific requirements of the colleges to which they plan to apply for transfer. (b) Students should become familiar with the particular requirements of the colleges to which they plan to apply for transfer. Coursework in calculus is becoming an increasingly frequent requirement. Should science be chosen, students should be aware that some four-year colleges require a two-term sequence of the same science or laboratory science courses.

Computer Science Associate in Science (A.S.) Mission The Computer Science A.S. program provides students with a rigorous and comprehensive Computer Science education. The program offers the most recent theory and application in the context of the ever changing developments in Computer Science. The student’s educational experience is enhanced by the computing facilities available at the College. The curriculum is primarily designed for the student who anticipates transfer to a four-year institution to complete work for the baccalaureate degree. The Computer Science program provides graduates with: • A strong learning experience based on a foundation in computer science; • A core liberal arts curriculum; • An exposure to current practices that are used in the university level and in professional environments; • Enriching experiences that develop professional attitudes, behaviors, and skills and; • Working articulation agreements with four-year institutions.

First Year Fall Semester CR CIS 134 C++/UNIX........................................................ 4 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 MAT 160 Discrete Structures........................................... 3 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 13 Spring Semester CR CIS 246 Data Structures................................................. 3 ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 MAT 180 Calculus I......................................................... 4 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 16

Second Year Fall Semester CR CIS 133 JAVA................................................................. 3 MAT/CIS Elective (d)..................................... 3-4 Lab Science Elective (a).................................... 4 MAT 181 Calculus II........................................................ 4 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 17-18 Spring Semester CR General Elective (e).......................................... 3 CIS Elective (c)................................................. 3 Lab Science Elective (a).................................... 4 Liberal Arts Elective...................................... 3-4 Mathematics Elective (b)............................... 3-4 16-18

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 62

49


Notes: (a) Laboratory Science Electives: BIO 141-142, BIO 241, CHM 121-122, GEO 143-145, PHY 221-222 (b) Mathematics Elective: MAT 167 (if taken as a prerequisite for MAT 180), MAT 240, MAT 242, MAT 244 (c) Computer Science Electives: CIS 129 (if taken as a prerequisite for CIS 134), CIS 135, CIS 136, CIS 220, CIS 223, CIS 225, CIS 229, CIS 236, CIS 237, CIS 238, CIS 259 (d) Students should carefully review the MAT/CIS requirements of the college to which they plan to transfer before selecting either a MAT or CIS course from those in (b) or (c) above. (e) This may be any course with the exception of courses designated in the SCCC Catalog as not satisfying A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements. However, students need to consider the transferability of the course to particular colleges. Depending upon math background, students may take MAT 167 Precalculus with Analytic Geometry in the first semester as a prerequisite to the Calculus sequence with no loss in course sequence or credits. Humanities and Social Science electives should be taken to supplement General Education Principles. Electives should be chosen based upon concentration, transfer school prerequisite and interest. Advisor should be consulted.

Human Services Associate in Science (A.S.) The Human Services A.S. enables students to acquire a liberal arts knowledge blended with an understanding of the social and psychological basis of human behavior. Through the completion of one field internship, the students are provided with an opportunity to apply the social work theory and skills acquired in the Human Services curriculum and to practice the development of a professional identity. Students learn about diverse individuals as well as the effects of social welfare policies on the individual person.

Mission The mission of the Human Services A.S. program is to prepare students for academic success in baccalaureate transfer programs in social work, human services and related professional areas of study. This program is based on best practices associated with the National Association of Social Workers. The Human Services program emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge from social science disciplines, development of core social work theory and skills, ethical conduct and preparation for future professional careers. The Human Services A.S. program enables its graduating students to: • Transfer to four-year colleges or universities to successfully complete a professional baccalaureate degree; • Acquire a professional identity, core social work theory and skills, commitment to ethical practice and respect for diversity and; • Develop critical thinking skills through work with individuals and groups, as well as written and oral assignments.

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 SOC 121 Sociology......................................................... 3 SOC 125 Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare............................................ 3 SOC 127 Interpersonal and Group Dynamics.................. 3 15 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 Restricted Elective (h)................................... 3-4 Psychology Elective (g) OR Mathematics Elective (a)................................ 3-4 General Elective............................................ 3-4 Biology Elective (b)....................................... 3-4 15-19

Second Year Fall Semester CR HUS 221 Theory and Field Experience I (f)..................... 3 HIS 125 Western Civilization to 1715 OR HIS 127 Western Civilization Since 1715 (c).... 3 PSY 224 Abnormal Psychology....................................... 3 Psychology Elective (g) ................................ 3-4 Biology Elective (b)....................................... 3-4 15-17

50


Spring Semester CR HIS 232 World Civilizations to 1700 OR HIS 234 World Civilization Since 1700 OR Other World Civilizations course (d)................ 3 POL 123 US Government and Politics............................ 3 Humanities Elective (e).................................... 3 Restricted Elective (h)................................... 3-4 Liberal Arts Elective...................................... 3-4 15-17

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 60 Notes: When choosing electives, students should become familiar with the particular requirements of the college to which they plan to transfer. (a) Only transfer-degree level courses are applicable as Mathematics electives. Students will select from among MAT 145 or higher. Mathematics requirements of the college to which students plan to transfer should be carefully reviewed before selecting mathematics coursework. (b) Students are required to take two semesters of biology. Choices include any two of the following: BIO 111, BIO 112, BIO 141, BIO 142 or BIO 161. Science requirements of the college to which students plan to transfer should be carefully reviewed before selecting science coursework. (c) Students may use this option to complete specific requirements of the transfer institution they plan to attend. (d) HIS 232, HIS 234 or any course in the SUNY General Education Other World Civilizations category will fulfill this requirement. (e) The study of a language other than English is suggested; Spanish or American Sign Language is highly recommended. SPA 115, SPA 116, and FRE 111 do not satisfy the SUNY General Education requirement for foreign language. (f) Admission to HUS 221 requires SOC 125 and consent of the department as a pre-requisite. (g) Any course with a PSY prefix. (h) Restricted Elective can be selected from the following: Any course with a CRJ, PSY or SOC prefix; ECO 211 Introduction to Economics, ECO 221 Principles of Macroeconomics: ECO 223 Principles of Microeconomics; HUS 150 Introduction to Chemical Abuse and Dependence; HUS 155 Substance Abuse Counseling; HUS 252 Addictive Drugs: Issues and Selected Topics; HUS 133 Child Maltreatment; Prevention, Investigation and Treatment or HON 281 Sociology of Power and Class. A basic knowledge of computer operation can be of value to students in this field. Those who lack this background should consult their advisors concerning available options for acquiring this skill. Human Services students may be subject to a fingerprint check or be asked about criminal convictions before working in the field. Individuals who have a criminal history may have difficulty obtaining a field placement and/or employment in the field of Human Services and may want to consult an advisor or college counselor before pursuing the program.

Individual Studies Associate in Arts (A.A.) Associate in Science (A.S.) The Individual Studies programs provide a means of expanding the flexibility in program options to students who are interested in combining career, professional, or technical courses with a solid liberal arts foundation to facilitate transfer to four-year programs. These programs consist of three programmatic components: core general education courses, academic focus area courses, and elective courses. Students wishing to apply to this degree program must develop a proposal which outlines career and transfer goals along with courses to be taken to meet those goals and must consult with the appropriate Chairperson for approval. If accepted, the Chair will forward the proposal to the Dean of Academic Affairs for approval. The application process must be completed by the 10th week of the semester preceding the term in which the program is to begin and students must apply for admission to the program prior to earning the last 30 credits of the degree. Admission to this degree program requires: • Completion of 12 credit hours of instruction at SCCC with a minimum grade point average of 2.0; • Development of a detailed program of study in consultation with an appropriate chairperson; • A program of study with at least 15 credit hours of requirements not in common with an existing SCCC program and; • A program of study with specific transfer and career goals identified.

Associate in Arts (A.A.) First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 Mathematics General Education (a)............... 3-4 Science General Education (a)....................... 3-4 Focus Area: Liberal Arts (b)........................... 3-4 Elective (d).................................................... 3-4 15-19 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 Social Science General Education (a)................ 3 American History General Education (a).......... 3 Focus Area: Liberal Arts (b)........................... 3-4 Science Elective (c)........................................ 3-4 15-17

Second Year Fall Semester CR Western Civilization General Education (a)...... 3 Foreign Language General Education (a).......... 3 Focus Area: Liberal Arts (b)........................... 3-4 Focus Area: Liberal Arts (b)........................... 3-4 Elective (d).................................................... 3-4 15-18 Spring Semester CR Other World Civilizations General Ed. (a)........ 3 Arts General Education (a)............................... 3 Focus Area: Liberal Arts (b)........................... 3-4 Elective (d).................................................... 3-4 Elective (d).................................................... 3-4 15-18

51


Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 60 Notes: (a) Courses should be chosen from approved SUNY General Education courses in each category. If planning to transfer to a non-SUNY institution up to three courses may be substituted for General Education courses. A SUNY General Education Requirement Waiver form, available in the Office of Academic Services (Room 212), must be completed. (b) Courses in the Academic Focus Area must be selected from approved Liberal Arts courses with Advisor, Department Chair and Dean approval. (c) The science elective should be selected based upon the Academic Focus Area and the transfer school prerequisites. (d) Electives should be chosen based upon the Academic Focus Area with consideration of transfer school requirements and must be approved by the Advisor, Department Chair and Dean of Academic Affairs.

Associate in Science (A.S.) First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 Mathematics General Education (a)............... 3-4 Science General Education (a)....................... 3-4 Academic Focus Area (b)............................... 3-4 Elective (d).................................................... 3-4 15-19 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 Social Science General Education (a)................ 3 American History General Education (a).......... 3 Academic Focus Area (b)............................... 3-4 Science Elective (c)........................................ 3-4 15-17

Second Year Fall Semester CR Western Civilization General Education (a)...... 3 Foreign Language General Education (a).......... 3 Academic Focus Area (b)............................... 3-4 Academic Focus Area (b)............................... 3-4 Elective (d).................................................... 3-4 15-18 Spring Semester CR Other World Civilizations General Ed. (a)........ 3 Arts General Education (a)............................... 3 Academic Focus Area (b)............................... 3-4 Elective (d).................................................... 3-4 Elective (d).................................................... 3-4 15-18

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 60 Notes: (a) Courses should be chosen from approved SUNY General Education courses in each category. If planning to transfer to a non-SUNY institution up to three courses may be substituted for General Education courses. A SUNY General Education Requirement Waiver form, available in the Office of Academic Services (Elston Hall, Room 212), must be completed.

52

(b) Courses in the Academic Focus Area must be selected with Advisor, Department Chair and Dean of Academic Affairs approval. (c) The science elective should be selected based upon the Academic Focus Area and the transfer school prerequisites. (d) Electives should be chosen based upon the Academic Focus Area with consideration of transfer school requirements and must be approved by the Advisor, Department Chair and Dean of Academic Affairs.


Liberal Arts: Humanities and Social Sciences Associate in Arts (A.A.) The Liberal Arts: Humanities and Social Sciences A.A. curriculum is primarily for the student who anticipates transfer to a four-year institution to complete work for a baccalaureate degree. The curriculum serves the needs of those planning to major in disciplines within the humanities or social sciences and provides a vital foundation as a preparation for a wide variety of academic majors such as: art, economics, English, communication, foreign languages, history, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and women’s studies, among many others. 

Mission The Liberal Arts: Humanities and Social Science A.A. program prepares students for academic success in baccalaureate transfer programs in liberal arts disciplines. The curriculum encourages students to question and explore the ways in which nature, society and culture express and reflect human endeavors. The Humanities and Social Sciences A.A. program enables graduating students to:

• Demonstrate proficiency in communication; • Examine ideas and issues from multiple perspectives; • Synthesize knowledge from various disciplines; • Demonstrate analytical and creative approaches to problem-solving and; • Transfer to public or private four-year colleges or universities.

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 Civilization (a)................................................. 3 Language Other Than English (c)..................... 3 Behavioral Social Science Elective (e)............... 3 MAT 145 Mathematical Topics OR Higher.................... 3-4 15-16 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature/HON 124................ 3 Civilization (a)................................................. 3 Language Other Than English (c) OR................. Humanities Elective......................................... 3 Behavioral Social Science Elective (e)............... 3 General Elective (h)....................................... 3-4 15-16

Spring Semester CR Literature (b).................................................... 3 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 Restricted Social Science Elective (f)................. 3 Humanities OR Soc. Science Elective............... 3 Science Elective (g)....................................... 3-4 15-16

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 60 Notes: (a) To fulfill the Civilization requirement, students must take one of the following sets of courses: (1) HIS 125 Western Civilization to 1715 and HIS 234 World Civilizations Since 1700; (2) HIS 232 World Civilizations to 1700 and HIS 127 Western Civilization Since 1715/HON 144 The Shaping of the Modern World; (3) HIS 125 Western Civilization to 1715 and HIS 127 Western Civilization Since 1715/HON 144 The Shaping of the Modern World; or (4) HIS 232 World Civilizations to 1700 and HIS 234 World Civilizations Since 1700. Students who are intending to transfer to a SUNY school are advised to take either set (1) or (2). (b) Students are required to take two courses with the LIT prefix; HON 244 also satisfies this requirement. (c) One semester of a language other than English is required, though a second semester is strongly recommended. ASL 121, ASL 122, SPA 115, SPA 116, and FRE 111 do not satisfy this requirement, but can be taken as a Humanities elective. (d) The Restricted Arts elective can be satisfied by any course with the ART, DRA, or MUS prefix, except for MUS 231. (e) Courses with the ANT, PSY, and SOC prefix satisfy this requirement, as does HON 281. (f) HON 144, HON 271 and all courses with the ECO, HIS, PHI, and POL prefix satisfy this requirement. Students intending to transfer to a SUNY school are advised to take a semester of American History. (g) Students should carefully review the science requirements of the college to which they plan to transfer before selecting science courses. (h) This may be any course with the exception of courses designated in the SCCC Catalog as not satisfying A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements. However, students need to consider the transferability of the course to particular colleges.

Second Year Fall Semester CR Literature (b).................................................... 3 Restricted Arts Elective (d)............................... 3 Restricted Social Science Elective (f)................. 3 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 Science Elective (g)....................................... 3-4 15-16

53


Mathematics and Science Associate in Science (A.S.) Mission The mission of the Mathematics and Science A.S. program is to prepare students for academic success in baccalaureate transfer programs, such as mathematics, chemistry, physics, environmental studies, forensics, engineering, and actuarial science. The program provides graduates with a strong foundation in the central areas of science and mathematics, utilizing modern technology and equipment, as well as a solid liberal arts curriculum. The Mathematics and Science program enables graduating students to: • Obtain a foundation in mathematics, chemistry, and physics with additional scientific areas of study. This foundation is necessary to transfer to public or private four-year colleges or universities; • Complete a core liberal arts curriculum; • Engage in current practices that are used at the university level and in professional environments; • Develop professional conduct and skills; • Apply critical thinking skills to problem solving and; • Transfer to public and private four-year colleges or universities.

First Year Fall Semester CR CHM 121 General Chemistry I......................................... 4 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 Mathematics Elective (b)............................... 3-4 CIS Elective (a).............................................. 3-4 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 16-18 Spring Semester CR CHM 122 General Chemistry II........................................ 4 ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 MAT 180 Calculus I......................................................... 4 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 17

Second Year Fall Semester CR PHY 221 College Physics I.............................................. 4 MAT 181 Calculus II........................................................ 4 Mathematics OR Lab Science Elective (c)...... 3-5 Restricted Elective (d)................................... 3-5 14-18 Spring Semester CR Humanities Elective......................................... 3 PHY 222 College Physics II............................................. 4 Mathematics Elective (b)............................... 3-4 Mathematics OR Lab Science Elective (c)...... 3-5 Liberal Arts Elective......................................... 3 16-19

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 63

54

Notes: Humanities and Social Science electives should be chosen to supplement General Education Principles. Electives should be chosen based upon concentration, transfer school prerequisite, and interest. Advisor should be consulted. (a) CIS Electives: CIS 121 or higher (b) Mathematics electives: Mathematics electives: MAT 147, MAT 149, MAT 160, MAT 167 (if taken as a prerequisite to MAT 180), MAT 240, MAT 242, MAT 244 (c) Math or Lab Science Electives: Any of (b) above, BIO 141-142, BIO 241, CHM 228-229, GEO 143, GEO 145 (d) Restricted Electives: Any of (a), (b), (c) above, BIO 154, BIO 161, ENV electives, GHY 121, PHY 106

(1) An advanced course taken via cross-registration may be approved in any of the four elective categories.

(2) Depending upon math background, students may take MAT 167 Precalculus with Analytic Geometry in the first semester as a prerequisite to the Calculus sequence with no loss in course sequence of credits.

(3) Students electing Health Sciences or Biology concentrations should take BIO 141-142 during the first year and postpone Social Science electives to the second year.

(4) Electives should be chosen in conjunction with the student’s academic advisor, based upon concentration, transfer/articulation, and interest. Though students may develop an individualized sequence following program guidelines, attached concentrations offer RECOMMENDED sequences to facilitate ease of transfer: Health Sciences Concentration BIO 141-142 (1st year) CHM 228-229 (2nd year) BIO 161 BIO 241 Chemistry Concentration CHM 228-229 MAT 240 or 244 Mathematical Sciences Concentration MAT 149, MAT 160, MAT 240, MAT 242, MAT 244 Biology Concentration BIO 141-142 (1st year) CHM 228-229 (2nd year) BIO 241 Engineering Concentration MAT 240 or 244 CIS Electives Physics Concentration MAT 240-244 CIS Electives


Performing Arts–Drama Associate in Science (A.S.) The Performing Arts: Drama A.S. curriculum is designed to prepare students to transfer successfully to baccalaureate-degree programs in theatre and theatre-related studies. In addition to the theatre courses, the program includes a core of liberal arts courses, supplemented by electives drawn from the College’s offerings in fine arts, speech, and music. Students strengthen performance, technical, and managerial skills through participation in fully-staged and workshop productions.

Mission Through curriculum and production, the mission of the Performing Arts-Drama A.S. program is to introduce students to the arts, crafts, criticism, history, traditions, and aesthetics of the live theatre so that they can pursue further education in theatre or related fields. Students will develop and refine performance skills, technical crafts, critical analysis, and aesthetic appreciation. The program also seeks to increase awareness of diverse theatrical arts and to provide such experiences for the campus and the greater community. The Performing Arts-Drama program enables graduating students to: • Obtain knowledge of the theatre arts based in a strong liberal arts foundation; • Transfer to a baccalaureate-degree-granting institution or to a professional training institution; • Demonstrate a unique theatrical voice; • Understand classic and contemporary theatre history, dramatic literature, and aesthetic theory; • Continue to explore and polish theatrical skills and crafts and; • Engage in active, critical theatre-going as a lifelong cultural activity.

First Year

Spring Semester CR LIT 233 Drama Classics-Modern and Contemporary..... 3 Liberal Arts Elective...................................... 3-4 Literature Requirement (b)............................... 3 Science Requirement (c)................................ 3-4 Restricted Elective (d)...................................... 3 15-17

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 61 Notes: (a) To fulfill the Civilization requirement, students must take one of the following sets of courses:

(1) HIS 125 Western Civilization to 1715 and HIS 234 World Civilizations Since 1700; or

(2) HIS 232 World Civilizations to 1700 and HIS 127 Western Civilization Since 1715/HON 144 The Shaping of the Modern World;

(3) HIS 125 Western Civilization to 1715 and HIS 127 Western Civilization Since 1715/HON 144 The Shaping of the Modern World;

(4) HIS 232 World Civilizations to 1700 and HIS 234 World Civilizations Since 1700;

Students who are intending to transfer to a SUNY school are advised to take either set (1) or (2). (b) Students are required to take two courses with the LIT prefix; HON 244 also satisfies this requirement. (c) Students should carefully review the science requirements of the college to which they plan to transfer before selecting science courses. (d) Restricted electives can be selected from courses with the prefixes ART, DRA, MUS, SPE, or creative writing courses. Many of the courses in the Restricted Elective category are not three-hour courses. Students must select combinations of courses so that the nine-hour minimum requirement is fulfilled.

Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 Civilization (a)................................................. 3 DRA 133 Theatre Workshop I......................................... 3 DRA 123 Introduction to Theatre.................................... 3 MAT 145 Mathematical Topics OR Higher................... 3-4 15-16 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 Civilization (a)................................................. 3 DRA 237 Rehearsal and Production................................. 4 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 Restricted Elective (d)...................................... 3 16

Second Year Fall Semester CR LIT 231 Drama Classics to 1870.................................... 3 Liberal Arts OR CIS Elective.......................... 3-4 Literature Requirement (b)............................... 3 Science Requirement (c)................................ 3-4 Restricted Elective (d)...................................... 3 15-17

55


Performing Arts–Music Associate in Science (A.S.) The Performing Arts-Music A.S. curriculum is primarily for students who wish to transfer to a four-year institution to complete a baccalaureate degree in music education, performance, jazz studies or music therapy. Students in the program may select electives to support transfer into music education, performance, or jazz studies programs. The Department of Music is housed in a discrete wing of the Begley Building with complete, convenient and modern facilities including music classroom, studios, a piano lab and practice rooms. Rehearsal areas are specially designed for instrumental ensembles, choral work, chamber music and individual practice. The Carl B. Taylor Community Auditorium is the main performance venue for the Music Department. An entrance audition is required for admission to this program. Contact the Department of Music at (518) 381-1231 for further information.

Mission The mission of the Performing Arts-Music A.S. program is to provide a quality education in accordance with the principles of Schenectady County Community College’s mission statement. Specifically the program provides rigorous training in music performance, skills, theory, and history comparable to the first two years of a baccalaureate degree. The Performing Arts-Music program enables graduates to acquire: • Musicianship through individual and ensemble performance training and experiences; • Theoretical and analytical musical skills; • Technical competence and aesthetic awareness for a broad range of musical literature and musical cultures representing style periods from antiquity to the present and; • Competency in the General Education knowledge and skill areas as specified by the College and the State University of New York. Schenectady County Community College is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 MUS 161 Performance Organization I (a)........................ 1 MUS 163 Performance Concentration I............................ 2 MAT 145 or Higher OR Science Elective (b).. 3-4 Basic Musicianship I: MUS 151 Theory I........................................... 2 MUS 155 Aural Skills I..................................... 1 MUS 257 Literature and Style I........................ 3 MUS 287 Keyboard Techniques I..................................... 1 16-17

56

Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 MUS 162 Performance Organization II (a)....................... 1 MUS 164 Performance Concentration II.......................... 2 MAT 145 or Higher OR Science Elective (b).. 3-4 Basic Musicianship II: MUS 152 Theory II.......................................... 2 MUS 156 Aural Skills II.................................... 1 MUS 258 Literature and Style II....................... 3 MUS 288 Keyboard Techniques II.................................... 1 Restricted Music Elective.................................. 1 17-18

Second Year Fall Semester CR HIS 125 Western Civilization to 1715 OR HIS 127 Western Civilization Since 1715......... 3 MUS 261 Performance Organization III (a)...................... 1 MUS 263 Performance Concentration III......................... 2 MUS 289 Keyboard Techniques III.................................. 1 Basic Musicianship III: MUS 157 Conducting I.................................... 1 MUS 251 Theory III......................................... 2 MUS 255 Aural Skills III.................................. 1 Restricted Music Electives ............................... 5 16 Spring Semester CR MUS 262 Performance Organization IV (a)...................... 1 MUS 264 Performance Concentration IV......................... 2 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 Basic Musicianship IV: MUS 158 Conducting II................................... 1 MUS 252 Theory IV......................................... 2 MUS 256 Aural Skills IV.................................. 1 Restricted Music Electives ............................... 5 15

Minimum credit hours required for degree: 64 Notes: (a) Performance Organization I-IV (MUS 161, 162, 261, 262) are required as follows: • All Brass and Woodwind Concentrations will complete four semesters of Wind Ensemble. • All Percussion Concentrations will complete a minimum of two semesters of Percussion Ensemble and two semesters of Wind Ensemble. • All Organ, Piano, and Vocal Concentrations will complete four semesters of Chorus. • All Guitar Concentrations will complete four semesters of Guitar Ensemble. • All String Concentrations will complete four semesters of SCCC or off-campus ensembles with appropriate registration, as advised by the Department. • All students enrolled in Performance Concentration (MUS 163, 164, 263, 264) are required to also be enrolled in the appropriate major ensemble. (b) Strongly advised: one semester of mathematics and one of science coursework.


Restricted Electives: First Year*: (Select one credit from Restricted Electives.) MUS 167 Percussion Techniques

CR 1

Spring (Select five credits from Restricted Electives.) MUS 115 Rock Music: Style and Development

CR 3

MUS 168 Vocal Techniques

1

MUS 135/136 Applied Music I or II 2 (Secondary instrument or voice, two semesters maximum towards graduation requirements.)

MUS 169 Guitar Techniques

1

MUS 284 Music in Contemporary Education II

3

MUS 110 Lab Ensemble I

1

MUS 286 Woodwind Techniques

2

MUS 112 Music Notation Software Basics

1

MUS 231 Music Business

3

MUS 108 Jazz Harmony and Accompaniment I

1

MUS 233 Basic Arranging

2

MUS 180 Introduction to Music Therapy

1

MUS 234 Jazz Improvisation II

2

MUS 162 additional Performance Organization

1

MUS 272 Recital

1

(A maximum of two additional Performance Organization courses may be used as credit toward fulfilling degree requirements.) First year restricted elective may be taken either fall or spring semester.

MUS 180 Introduction to Music Therapy

1

MUS 162 additional Performance Organization

1

Foreign Language (one semester required for voice concentration only*)

3

Second Year: Fall (Select five credits from Restricted Electives.)

First year electives

1

CR

MUS 115 Rock Music: Style and Development

3

MUS 131 African American Music Survey

3

MUS 135/136 Applied Music I or II

2

(Secondary instrument or voice, two semesters maximum towards graduation requirements.) MUS 283 Music in Contemporary Education I 3

MUS 285 Brass Techniques

2

MUS 127 Jazz Styles and Development

3

MUS 232 Jazz Improvisation I

2

MUS 270 Studio Literature

1

MUS 180 Introduction to Music Therapy

1

MUS 162 additional Performance Organization

1

Foreign Language (one semester required for voice concentration only*)

3

First year electives

1

* A maximum of three credits of a foreign language can be applied toward degree.

Additional Notes: 1. Students planning on transferring to Music Education Baccalaureate programs are strongly advised to take the following sequence of restricted electives: One Special Techniques (MUS 167, 168, or 169), MUS 283, MUS 284, MUS 285, MUS 286.) 2. Students interested in jazz and commercial music study should consider the following restricted electives: MUS 110/111, MUS 127, MUS 231, MUS 232, MUS 233, MUS 234.

57


Science Associate in Science (A.S.) Mission The mission of the Science program is to provide a foundation in the central areas of science while utilizing the most recent technological equipment. The Science curriculum is designed primarily for the student who anticipates transfer to a four-year institution to complete work for a baccalaureate degree. The curriculum provides a vital foundation as a preparation for a wide variety of academic majors such as: biology, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, chiropractic medicine, environmental studies, geology, and earth science. The Science program enables graduating students to: • Obtain a foundation in mathematics, chemistry, and physics with additional scientific areas of study. This foundation is necessary to transfer to public or private four-year colleges or universities; • Complete a core liberal arts curriculum; • Engage in current practices that are used at the university level and in professional environments; • Develop professional conduct and skills; • Apply critical thinking skills to problem solving and; • Transfer to public and private four-year colleges or universities.

First Year Fall Semester CR CHM 121 General Chemistry I......................................... 4 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 CIS Elective (c).............................................. 3-4 Mathematics Elective (a)................................ 3-4 Science Elective (b)....................................... 3-5 16-20 Spring Semester CR CHM 122 General Chemistry II........................................ 4 ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 Science Elective (b)....................................... 3-5 Mathematics Elective (a)................................ 3-4 Social Science Elective (g)................................ 3 16-19

Second Year Fall Semester CR Humanities Elective (g).................................... 3 PHY Sequence (e)............................................. 4 Liberal Arts Elective (f).................................. 3-4 Restricted Elective (d)................................... 3-5 Social Science Elective (g)................................ 3 16-19 Spring Semester CR PHY Sequence (e)............................................. 4 Liberal Arts Elective (f).................................. 3-4 Restricted Elective (d)................................... 3-5 Humanities Elective (g).................................... 3 13-16

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 61

58

Notes: (a) Mathematics Electives: MAT 147, MAT 149, MAT 160, MAT 167, MAT 180, MAT 181, MAT 240, MAT 242, MAT 244 (b) Science Electives: AST 123, AST 125, AST 127, BIO 141-142, BIO 151-152, BIO 241, CHM 115, CHM 228-229, GEO 143, GEO 145, BIO 115, BIO 154, BIO 161, ENV Electives, GHY 121, or PHY 106. Health Studies students and Biology students are advised to take BIO 141-142 (1st year), CHM 228-229 (2nd year) and BIO 241. (c) CIS Electives: CIS 121 or higher (d) Restricted Electives: Any of (a), (b), (c) above, ACC 121-122, MGT 123, MGT 127. Health Sciences students and Biology students should take CHM 228-229. (e) Sequence Selection: Select PHY 153-154 or PHY 221-222 (f) Liberal Arts Elective: Health Sciences students should take BIO 161 and BIO 241 and Biology students should take BIO 241. (g) Humanities and Social Science electives should be taken to fulfill General Education Requirements. Electives should be chosen in conjunction with the student’s academic advisor based upon career goals, transfer/articulation, and interest. An advanced course taken via cross-registration is encouraged especially if a local college is the student’s transfer choice.


Teacher Education Transfer Associate in Science (A.S.) The Teacher Education Transfer A.S. curriculum is designed for students who want to transfer to a teacher education program at a four-year college or university. The program serves those interested in teaching in a public pre-school through high school setting. The curriculum is compliant with all SUNY and New York State Education Department (SED) requirements for transfer to a baccalaureate program leading to teacher certification.

Mission The mission of the Teacher Education Transfer A.S. program is to assist in the preparation of highly qualified, trained professionals for public service in the field of education. The program will prepare students for transfer and eventual licensure by providing a solid liberal arts foundation and pre-professional courses. The Teacher Education Transfer program enables graduating students to: • Understand the opportunities and challenges facing the teaching profession today; • Transfer to a four-year institution either public or private; • Explore career options and assess their readiness to assume a professional status; • Experience direct observations in educational settings and to incorporate this experience with academic learning to create a realistic career plan and; • Participate in a professional community dedicated to ethical practice and cultural diversity. Since programs in four-year institutions leading to teacher certification vary substantially in their requirements, students should carefully review specific program requirements that could be met by completing the required and elective courses in their two-year program with any requirements of the colleges to which they might transfer. Before working in a public educational setting, prospective employees will be required to undergo a fingerprint check. Individuals with a criminal history should be aware that they may have difficulty obtaining clearance for student teaching and/or New York State Teacher Licensing. Student with questions in this area may want to consult an advisor or counselor before pursuing the TET program.

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 Western Civilization Requirement OR Other World Civilizations Requirement (a)...... 3 Concentration Course (h) OR CIS Elective................................................... 3-4 Foreign Language (c)........................................ 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 15-16

Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature OR HON 124 Honors English................................ 3 Western Civilization Requirement OR Other World Civilizations Requirement (a)...... 3 Restricted PSY Elective (f)............................. 3-4 Foreign Language (c)........................................ 3 MAT 145 Mathematical Topics OR Higher.................... 3-4 15-17

Second Year Fall Semester CR Restricted Arts Elective (d)............................... 3 Restricted Education Elective (g)................... 3-4 Science Requirement (b)............................... 3-4 Concentration Course (h).............................. 3-5 TET 221 Foundations of Education OR Concentration Course (h).............................. 3-4 15-20 Spring Semester CR Liberal Arts OR American History (e)............ 3-4 Science Requirement (b)............................... 3-4 Concentration Course (h).............................. 3-4 Concentration Course (h).............................. 3-5 TET 221 Foundations of Education OR Concentration Course (h).............................. 3-4 TET 252 Pre-professional Seminar (i)............................. 1 16-22

*Minimum Credits Hours for degree – 61 Notes: When choosing courses, students should become familiar with the particular requirements of the college to which they plan to transfer and those interested in obtaining New York State Teacher Certification should be aware of New York State Teacher Certification requirements. (a) Students must select one of the following sequences, which will ensure coverage of both an early and later historical period as well as fulfill two SUNY General Education requirements: HIS 125 and HIS 234 or HIS 232 and HIS 127/HON 144. (b) Students are required to complete two semesters of science. Science requirements of the college to which students plan to transfer should be carefully reviewed before selecting science coursework. (c) Completion of one year of study in a single language other than English is the minimum requirement. ASL may fulfill the language requirement for this program, or it may be used as a Humanities requirement. Students may also wish to investigate the available CLEP foreign language examinations for college credit. Students may not select SPA 115 Basic Conversational Spanish I, SPA 116 Basic Conversational Spanish II, or FRE 111 Basic Conversational French to satisfy language requirements. Computer languages do not satisfy this requirement. (d) Restricted Arts Elective: three credits of coursework in ART, DRA, MUS (except MUS 231). (e) Students planning to attend a SUNY school should take an American History course. (f) Students intending to teaching Early Childhood, Birth through Grade 2 and/or Childhood Grades 1-6 should take PSY 230 Child Development. Those intending to teach Middle/ Adolescent Grades 5-8 and/or 7-12 should take PSY 223 Adolescent Psychology.

59


(g) Restricted Education Elective: Students may choose from ECH 225, HUS 133, LIT 210, PSY 230, PSY 223, PSY 221 or PSY 225, based on the particular requirements of their concentration area and the college to which they plan to transfer. (h) Students should choose a concentration based on their teaching goals. Concentrations consist of a minimum of 12 credits; 15 credits are possible if a student does not need a CIS course. Students are encouraged to consult with their academic advisor or a transfer counselor when planning their concentration. Mathematics/Science students should consult the chairperson of the Mathematics, Science and Technology Department for additional assistance. A personalized Liberal Studies concentration is also available, but students should be aware that such an individualized course of study may not optimize transfer. Students may find the following resources helpful: The SUNY transfer template: http://www.suny.edu/tett New York State Teacher Certification Exams Web site: (including LAST information): http://www.nystce.nesicn.com Information about New York State Teacher Certification: http://ohe32nysed.gov/tcert/ SCCC Transfer Counselor: Bernice Dunn, Counselor IV, (518) 381-1342, dunnbv@sunysccc.edu (i) TET 252 Pre-professional Seminar is a capstone course intended for the final semester of study. TET 221 is a co-requisite for TET 252 and may be taken the semester before or concurrently.

career curricula The Associate in Applied Science degree (A.A.S.) is primarily occupationally oriented. In addition to preparing the student for entry into the field, some programs may also be appropriate as transfer degrees into certain specialized baccalaureate programs. The Associate in Occupational Studies degree (A.O.S.) is awarded for programs that are occupationally oriented, preparing the student for immediate entry into the field. Career Degree Programs • Accounting • Business Administration • Chemical Dependency Counseling • Computer Information Systems • Computer Networking and Systems • Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts • Early Childhood • Emergency Management • Fire Protection Technology • Hotel and Restaurant Management • Human Services • Music/Business • Nanoscale Materials Technology • Paralegal • Tourism and Hospitality Management

Accounting Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Mission The mission of the Accounting A.A.S. program is to provide students with knowledge of accounting practices and management information systems for immediate use in the workplace. The coursework is complemented by support courses in business management and liberal arts. A primary objective of the program is to link the curriculum and students to community and business needs. The Accounting program enables graduating students to: • Demonstrate proficiency in basic and intermediate accounting principles; • Demonstrate critical thinking and effective communication skills and; • Demonstrate a sound understanding of ethical business principles. The Accounting program is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

60


First Year Fall Semester CR ACC 121 Financial Accounting....................................... 4 BUS 113 Business Mathematics OR................................... BUS 223 Business Statistics.............................. 3 BUS 115 Basic Keyboarding (a).....................................(1) BUS 121 Business Law I.................................................. 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 CIS Elective (b)............................................. 1-3 14-17 Spring Semester CR ACC 122 Managerial Accounting..................................... 4 ACC 225 Income Tax Accounting.................................... 3 ACC 201 Computer Applications in Accounting............. 1 BUS 123 Business Law II................................................ 3 ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 MAT 126 Descriptive Statistics OR Higher.................... 3-4 17-18

Second Year Fall Semester CR ACC 222 Intermediate Accounting I................................ 3 MGT 123 Business Organization and Management.......... 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 Humanities Elective (c).................................... 3 Science Elective . .......................................... 3-4 15-16 Spring Semester CR ACC 226 Intermediate Accounting II............................... 4 ACC 242 Cost Management OR MGT 221 Managerial Finance.......................... 3 BUS 212 Business Communications................................ 3 ECO 211 Introduction to Economics OR Higher............. 3 Accounting Elective (d).................................... 3 16

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 62 Notes: (a) Students may demonstrate proficiency in this course by showing equivalent high school coursework or a waiver. In the case of a high school equivalent or waiver, it will not be necessary to replace this one credit. (b) Students must complete CIS 102 Computing Basics or higher CIS course to fulfill this requirement. (c) It is urged that a course with the prefix HIS be taken as the Humanities elective. The Humanities elective is to be chosen from non-required courses, applicable to the appropriate degree program, in the following areas: Art Appreciation, Drama, ENG 211, ENG 220, Foreign Language, History, Humanities/ Social Sciences (HSS prefix), Literature, Music (appreciation and literature), Philosophy, Speech and appropriate Honors courses. (d) Accounting Electives are limited to: ACC 246 Auditing, ACC 248 Government Accounting, ACC 250 Accounting Internship or MGT 250 Business Internship.

Business Administration Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Mission The Business Administration A.A.S. program prepares students for employment in an entry–level management position. Liberal Arts courses complement an emphasis on fostering practical workforce skills. The program strives to establish, maintain and expand partnerships in the business community. The Business Administration A.A.S program enables graduating students to: • Demonstrate a sound understanding of ethical business principles and practices; • Demonstrate effective verbal, written and interpersonal communication skills and; • Compete successfully in a diverse and technically challenging world. The Business Administration A.A.S. program is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

First Year Fall Semester CR BUS 118 Keyboarding I.................................................. 3 BUS 121 Business Law I.................................................. 3 CIS 121 Introduction to Computers OR Higher............. 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 MGT 123 Business Organization and Management.......... 3 15 Spring Semester CR ACC 121 Financial Accounting....................................... 4 BUS 113 Business Mathematics OR BUS 223 Business Statistics.............................. 3 BUS 123 Business Law II................................................ 3 ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 Restricted Elective (a).................................... 3-4 16-17

Second Year Fall Semester CR ACC 122 Managerial Accounting..................................... 4 BUS 212 Business Communications................................ 3 MAT 126 Descriptive Statistics OR Higher.................... 3-4 MGT 127 Human Resource Management......................... 3 Departmental Elective (b).............................. 3-4 16-18 Spring Semester CR ECO 211 Introduction to Economics or Higher............. 3 ETH 221 Professional and Applied Ethics....................... 1 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 Science Elective............................................. 3-5 Departmental Elective (b).............................. 3-4 16-19

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 63

61


Notes: (a) Restricted Elective is to be chosen from any non-required course with the following prefixes: ACC (ACC 222 or higher), BUS, CIS (higher than CIS 121), MGT, MKT, PAL, or TEL. (b) Departmental Electives are selected from any ACC (ACC 222 or higher), BUS, MGT, MKT, TEL in consultation with an advisor.

Chemical Dependency Counseling Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) The Chemical Dependency Counseling A.A.S. degree program prepares students for immediate employment in residential, in-patient and other rehabilitation centers. The 63-credit curriculum highlights the areas of prevention, group and family counseling, assessment, treatment, case management, psychopharmacology and working with diverse populations. Two, four-credit hour field placement courses give students 300 clock hours of experience working in area agencies under the supervision of qualified health professionals with Credential in Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling (CASAC) certification. Graduates of the program will have fulfilled the academic requirements for the CASAC application and will immediately be eligible for CASAC Trainee Certification through the New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS).

Mission The Chemical Dependency Counseling, A.A.S. degree program’s mission is to prepare its graduates for immediate employment in residential, in-patient and other rehabilitation centers. The specialized addiction curriculum is enhanced by social science courses and coordinated with field experiences to provide students with models of ethical conduct, helping skills and the foundation for a professional career. The Chemical Dependency Counseling program enables graduates to: • Demonstrate supportive and facilitative communication skills; • Demonstrate a professional identity, commitment to ethical practice, and a respect for diversity; • Complete a sequence of two, four credit hour field placement courses to meet the New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services 300-hour field requirements and; • Qualify as a Credential in Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling (CASAC) trainee through the New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services. Schenectady County Community College has been approved as a New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) Education and Training Provider. According to NYS OASAS, students who have a criminal history are not automatically prevented from receiving their CASAC, but will be required to provide information relative to their conviction to be considered as part of the review of the CASAC Application. Secondary Program Exclusion Section 8.6 of the Academic Code provides that students may earn an additional degree or certificate provided that the secondary program includes at least 15 credit hours of requirements not in common with the primary program. Students who are enrolled in both the Human Services A.A.S. and the Chemical Dependency Counseling A.A.S. programs will need to work carefully with their advisors when choosing electives to meet this secondary program exclusion.

62


First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 HUS 150 Introduction to Chemical Abuse and Dependency.............................................. 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 SOC 121 Sociology......................................................... 3 Mathematics Elective (a)................................ 3-4 15-16 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature OR............................. SPE 121 Introduction to Speech....................... 3 HUS 155 Substance Abuse Counseling............................ 3 HUS 252 Addictive Drugs: Issues and Topics.................. 4 SOC 125 Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare............................................ 3 BIO Elective (b)............................................. 3-4 16-17

Second Year Fall Semester CR HUS 225 Integration of Theory and Field Experience I (c)....................................... 4 PSY 224 Abnormal Psychology....................................... 3 SOC 127 Interpersonal and Group Dynamics.................. 3 PSY 228 Behavioral Change........................................... 3 HUS 250 Planning, Assessment and Treatment................ 3 16 Spring Semester CR HUS 226 Integration of Theory and Field Experience II (c)...................................... 4 PSY 222 Developmental Psychology............................... 3 HUS 255 Alcohol and Substance Abuse: Prevention and Education................................ 3 General Elective............................................... 3 Liberal Arts Elective (d)................................. 3-4 16-17

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 63 Notes: (a) MAT 126 Descriptive Statistics is the minimal requirement. Students with the requisite background should consult their advisors concerning selection of an appropriate higher level course. (b) BIO 111, BIO 112, BIO 121, BIO 141 or BIO 161 is recommended. (c) Admission to HUS 225 and HUS 226 requires HUS 150 and consent of department as prerequisites. (d) The study of a language other than English is suggested; Spanish is highly recommended.

Computer Information Systems Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Mission The Computer Information Systems A.A.S. program is designed to provide students with skills to meet the changing employment needs of the information technology (IT) industry. With the flexibility of three focus areas (Programming, Web Development and Management Information Systems) and elective course offerings in this degree, students are able to custom design a program that prepares them for depth of understanding in distinct IT areas. Graduates of this program will be able to apply computing skills to solve problems and adapt to emerging technologies within the context of business systems. Students will have gained experience in communicating effectively, working productively in teams, demonstrating professionalism and ethical behavior. The student’s educational experience is enhanced by the computing facilities available at the College and the opportunity for an internship outside of the College setting. Students are provided with practical hands-on experience in computer applications use and program development in innovative, state-of-the-art computerized classrooms. This rigorous program combined with education in the liberal arts and sciences prepares the student for transfer to four-year colleges or for employment as an entry-level IT specialist. Students are encouraged to work closely with their academic advisor to plan their programs of study. The Computer Information Systems program enables graduates to: • Prepare for rewarding and productive employment in a computer information systems environment; • Apply critical thinking skills and approaches to problem solving; • Recognize the value of collaborative work in the contemporary business environment; • Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical and social issues involved in computing and; • Apply interpersonal and communication skills necessary in a diverse society.

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications.................... 3 CIS 136 Introduction to Web Development................... 3 TEL 121 Introduction to Information Systems................ 3 Liberal Arts Elective (a).................................... 3 CIS 102 Computing Basics (b)....................................... 1 15-16 Spring Semester CR BUS 212 Business Communications................................ 3 ENG 211 Technical and Professional Writing OR............... ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................. 3 Mathematics Elective (c)................................ 3-4 Humanities Elective (d).................................... 3 CIS 129 Programming Fundamentals............................ 3 15-16

63


Second Year Fall Semester CR CIS 223 Database Management...................................... 3 ETH 221 Professional and Applied Ethics....................... 1 Science Elective (e)........................................ 3-4 Focus Area Course (g)................................... 3-4 Focus Area Course (g)................................... 3-4 Focus Area Course (g)................................... 3-4 16-20 Spring Semester CR CIS 229 Systems Analysis and Design............................ 3 Restricted Elective (f).................................... 3-4 Focus Area Course (g)................................... 3-4 Focus Area Course (g)................................... 3-4 Focus Area Course (g)................................... 3-4 15-19

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 61 Notes: (a) Any Liberal Arts Elective applicable to the appropriate degree level. (b) This course can be waived based on proficiency documented on a high school transcript. It will not be necessary to replace the one credit. (c) MAT 129 Algebra II w/Trig or higher (MAT 160 Discrete Structures is recommended). (d) SPE 121 Introduction to Speech is recommended. (e) Science Elective is to be chosen from non-required courses applicable to the appropriate degree level. (f) CIS 259 CIS Internship recommended; may choose CIS 110 and higher except CIS 121. (g) Students should choose a focus area based on their professional goals. Focus areas consist of a minimum of 18 credits. Students are encouraged to consult their academic advisor when planning their focus area. Please note that second semester Focus Area courses must include a Liberal Arts elective, an appropriate mathematics elective or an Economics course depending on the selected Focus Area. Focus Area Second Year, Fall Sequence Programming CIS 133 Programming In Java CIS 134 C++/UNIX CIS 237 Advanced Web Programming Web Development CIS 240 Internetworking Fundamentals CIS 236 Advanced Web Design CIS 237 Advanced Web Programming Management ACC 123 Acct for Decision Making OR Information ACC 121 Financial Accounting Systems MGT 123 Business Organization MAT 147 Statistics OR BUS 223 Business Statistics

64

Focus Area Second Year, Spring Sequence Programming Any Liberal Arts Elective applicable to the appropriate degree level CIS 246 Data Structures CIS 110 and higher (except CIS 121) OR MAT 147 (recommended) OR MAT 167 and higher Web Development CIS 238 XML MKT 223 Marketing Any Liberal Arts Elective applicable to the appropriate degree level OR MAT 147 (recommended) OR MAT 167 and higher Management MKT 223 Marketing Information ECO 211 Intro to Economics OR higher Systems BUS restricted elective can be chosen from: ACC 122 Managerial Acct, BUS 121 Business Law, FPT 112 NIMS


Computer Networking and Systems Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) The Computer Networking and Systems A.A.S. program was created to respond to a need identified by area businesses and organizations. Well-trained and knowledgeable network administrators are required to design and support the computer data networks that have become a critical component of the core business infrastructure. This degree is designed to prepare students for employment as network and systems administrators and provides students with both a theoretical and hands-on foundation using industry-standard hardware and software. The Computer Networking and Systems program enables graduates to: • Qualify for employment in entry level computer and network support roles; • Design, implement and troubleshoot computer networks; • Understand and administer standard networking operating system software; • Install, maintain and configure network hardware including servers, routers and switches; • Install and maintain services such as Web, E-mail and file and print services and; • Understand and deploy network security measures.

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 CIS 240 Internetworking Fundamentals........................ 3 CIS 121 Introduction to Computers OR CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications...... 3 CIS 110 Workstation Arch/Support I (A+)..................... 3 MAT 129 Algebra II OR Higher.................................... 3-4 15-16 Spring Semester CR ENG 211 Technical and Professional Writing................... 3 CIS 129 Programming Fundamentals............................ 3 MAT 160 Discrete Structures........................................... 3 CIS 111 Workstation Arch/Support II (A+).................... 3 CIS 241 Routing Fundamentals..................................... 3 15

Second Year Fall Semester CR CIS 247 Switching and Advanced Routing..................... 3 CIS 256 Introduction to Systems Management.............. 4 CIS 134 C++/UNIX........................................................ 4 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 Science Elective............................................. 3-5 17-19 Spring Semester CR CIS 262 Introduction to Network Security..................... 3 CIS 257 Advanced Networking and Systems Management.................................................... 4 CIS 225 Operating Systems........................................... 3 Humanities Elective......................................... 3 13

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 60

Criminal Justice Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Mission The mission of the Criminal Justice A.A.S. program is to provide students with the academic, ethical and legal foundation for career opportunities in the criminal justice and private security fields. Graduates are prepared for employment in various components of the criminal justice system or transfer to a baccalaureate program. The Criminal Justice program enables graduates to: • Understand human behavior as it relates to the components of the criminal justice system; • Understand the relevance of current events in the administration of justice; • Demonstrate effective written, oral, and interpersonal communication skills and; • Understand the importance of ethical practices. Graduates of this program are qualified for positions with state and local police and corrections agencies, and in private security operations. Typical positions include police officer, state trooper, security office, insurance investigator, conservation officer, border patrol agent, customs patrol officer or corrections officer.

First Year Fall Semester CR CRJ 113 Introduction to Criminal Justice....................... 3 CRJ 131 Criminal Law................................................... 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 SOC 121 Sociology......................................................... 3 CIS 121 Introduction to Computers OR.......................... CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications...... 3 15 Spring Semester CR CRJ 133 Criminology..................................................... 3 CRJ 135 Introduction to Security................................... 3 CRJ 143 Criminal Evidence/Procedure........................... 3 ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 15

Second Year Fall Semester CR CRJ 215 Juvenile Delinquency....................................... 3 CRJ 219 Corrections...................................................... 3 MAT 126 Descriptive Statistics OR Higher.................... 3-4 ETH 221 Professional and Applied Ethics....................... 1 Liberal Arts Elective ........................................ 3 Criminal Justice Elective (a)............................. 3 16-17 Spring Semester CR CRJ 117 Police Organization and Supervision................ 3 SPE 121 Introduction to Speech..................................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective (b)........................ 4 General Elective (c).......................................... 3 Criminal Justice Elective (a)............................. 3 16

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 62 65


Notes: (a) Criminal Justice Electives are to be chosen from: CRJ 147 Terrorism and Public Security, AER/CRJ 150 Airport Management and Security, CRJ 152 Policing Theory and Practice I and CRJ 153 Policing Theory and Practice II, CRJ 217 Principles of Investigation, CRJ 229 Community Based Corrections, CRJ 233 Current Issues in Criminal Justice, or CRJ 237 Criminal Justice Internship. (b) Select a Laboratory Science Elective from a four-credit hour laboratory course in either Biology, Chemistry, Geology or Physics. (c) The General Elective may be selected from any academic discipline other than Criminal Justice.

Culinary Arts Associate in Occupational Studies (A.O.S.) Mission The mission of the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism is to provide superior education and technical training for students entering the Hospitality Industry. This enables graduates to achieve success in hotels, restaurants, culinary arts, event planning and tourism, either in an entry level or management position. Individuals may earn a Certificate or an Associate’s degree in their chosen field and/or have the opportunity to take specific courses of interest that will add to their specialized skills and personal knowledge, as well as assist them in managing a hospitality business. The teaching staff is well qualified, with practical experience in hotels, commercial and institutional food service operations. The Department’s modern food labs include convection and hearth ovens, broilers, griddles and steam tables. State-of-the-art food labs simulate hotel and restaurant kitchen and dining room conditions. The Casola Dining Room, adjacent to the Hotel and Restaurant Management laboratory, is open to the public for à la carte service and banquets. It provides students an opportunity to gain experience in a wide range of dining room and banquet service activities, including tableside preparation and meal service. Typical positions for which graduates may qualify are: assistant chef (or with experience, executive chef or sous chef), managing chef, steward, working chef, assistant pastry chef, assistant garde manger, banquet chef, vegetable cook, broiler cook, soup and sauce cook, fry cook, second cook (commercial cook) and roundsman. Opportunities are available for students with imagination, creativity and a willingness to work. In addition to textbook expenses, students in the Culinary Arts program are expected to purchase uniforms ($100+) and a knife set ($200+). Hats and/or hair nets are required by the New York State Health Code. Students will be required to comply with the dress and sanitation requirements of the American Culinary Federation. Note: The only jewelry permitted in cooking laboratories are wedding rings and watches. No nail polish is allowed. Full uniform attire is required for any food preparation activity in all labs at all times. Specific details regarding the Policies for Food Laboratories are available from the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism. Each Culinary Arts A.O.S. major must satisfy a work experience requirement of 600 hours or its equivalent in the hospitality industry. Details may be obtained from the Chairperson of the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism. The Culinary Arts A.O.S. program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation. The Culinary Arts A.O.S. program enables graduates to: • Demonstrate competency skills in basic food preparation, baking and dessert making, food and beverage management, human resource management, dining room and banquet service, sanitation and nutrition;

66


• Demonstrate basic skills in advanced techniques of haute cuisine, garde manger, and pastry and desserts; • Refine and strengthen culinary capabilities through the practical application of skills and knowledge gained in foundation and hospitality courses; • Experience an appropriate 600 hours of work to complement the classroom and laboratory requirements of the program and; • Prepare for entry-level or management positions in the culinary field.

First Year Fall Semester CR HOT 111 Food Preparation I........................................... 3 HOT 119 Elements of Baking........................................... 3 HOT 131 Mathematics for Food Service Records............. 3 HOT 132 Sanitation Techniques...................................... 2 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper. (a) OR HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper. (a) .......... 3 TAT 121 Introduction to Hospitality Industry................. 3 17 Spring Semester CR HOT 112 Food Preparation II.......................................... 3 HOT 117 Food and Beverage Control.............................. 3 HOT 120 Introduction to Beverage Management............. 1 HOT 218 Human Resources Mgmt/HFI........................... 3 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper. (a) OR HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper. (a)........... 3 HOT 251 Quantitative Foods (a)...................................... 3 16

Second Year Fall Semester CR HOT 114 Food Administration and Menu Planning......... 3 HOT 255 Garde Manger I................................................ 3 HOT 257 Classical Cuisine I (a)....................................... 4 HOT 259 Regional American Baking and Pastry.............. 3 HOT 275 Marketing, Advertising and Sales of Hospitality Industry......................................... 3 16 Spring Semester CR HOT 220 Wines of the World*........................................ 3 HOT 233 Basic Nutrition................................................. 3 HOT 256 Garde Manger II............................................... 3 HOT 258 Classical Cuisine II (a)...................................... 4 HOT 260 International Baking and Pastry........................ 3 16

Spring Semester CR HOT 112 Food Preparation II.......................................... 3 HOT 120 Introduction to Beverage Management............. 1 HOT 125 Cakes and Cake Decorating.............................. 3 HOT 218 Human Resources Mgmt/HFI........................... 3 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper.(a) OR HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper. (a)........... 3 HOT 251 Quantitative Foods (a)...................................... 3 16

Second Year Fall Semester CR HOT 225 Commercial Baking I........................................ 3 HOT 255 Garde Manger I................................................ 3 HOT 257 Classical Cuisine I (a)....................................... 4 HOT 259 Regional American Baking and Pastry.............. 3 HOT 275 Marketing, Advertising and Sales of Hospitality Industry......................................... 3 16 Spring Semester CR HOT 117 Food and Beverage Control.............................. 3 HOT 233 Basic Nutrition................................................. 3 HOT 226 Commercial Baking II....................................... 3 HOT 258 Classical Cuisine II (a)...................................... 4 HOT 260 International Baking and Pastry........................ 3 16

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 65 Notes: (a) The time element for these courses will vary according to functions and assignments required to cover the projects involving actual conditions of preparation, cooking, and service of a complete menu. The course outline will be flexible to meet the successful fulfillment of projects. NOTE: Cleaning, preventative maintenance, and sanitation are practiced under the supervision of the Instructor and Technical Assistant during and after all laboratory exercises.

* Students who cannot take this class because of medical conditions or religious beliefs should substitute a three-credit HOT or TAT course not required in the curriculum.

BAKING CONCENTRATION First Year Fall Semester CR HOT 111 Food Preparation I........................................... 3 HOT 119 Element of Baking............................................ 3 HOT 131 Mathematics for Food Service Records............. 3 HOT 132 Sanitation Techniques...................................... 2 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper. (a) OR HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper. (a)........... 3 TAT 121 Introduction to Hospitality Industry................. 3 17

67


Early Childhood Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) The Early Childhood A.A.S. program combines academic rigor with a hands-on approach to the profession. The curriculum balances strong content knowledge with specific method skills, both of which are reinforced with a minimum of 300 hours of supervised internships, practicums and observations in area schools and agencies. In addition, students interact regularly with the children in the Gateway Montessori Preschool at SCCC. Graduates of the program are qualified to work with children ages birth to 8 years old in a number of environments including preschools, nursery schools, daycare, public schools, early intervention agencies or Head Start. They may also continue their education transferring to baccalaureate programs at four-year institutions. The program has articulation agreements with several four-year institutions.

Mission The Early Childhood A.A.S. program’s role is to guide individuals in acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to foster the development and constructive education of young children. The program strives to model and promote high quality early childhood education in the community. It is the goal of the Early Childhood program to: • Graduate students who will demonstrate the proficiency, knowledge and skills necessary to promote the healthy development of young children and provide an appropriate education for young children ages birth to 8; • Be responsive and supportive to those community agencies serving young children and their families and; • Be instrumental in improving the level of professionalism in the area of early childhood education. The Early Childhood Program at SCCC operates the Gateway Montessori Preschool. The Preschool serves as a lab school for students in the program by providing a model of best practices and by giving students opportunities to work with children one-on-one or in group settings. Students take part in guided observations via the state-of-the-art video technology and work with children in the areas of art, music, movement, math, science and social studies. As of January 1, 2003, all students enrolled in ECH 131 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar I and ECH 231 Field Instruction and Seminar II will need to supply the following before entering the field: • Clearance through NYS Criminal Conviction Unit by fingerprinting; • Clearance through NYS Central Clearance Registry for Child Abuse and Maltreatment; • A notarized Criminal Conviction Statement; • A signed “I Will” statement to uphold the NAEYC Code of Ethics and SCCC Early Childhood Professional Behaviors and; • Medical evidence of their ability to work with children and a negative TB result.

68

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 PSY 230 Child Development.......................................... 4 ECH 121 Introduction to Early Childhood...................... 3 ECH 123 Curricular Methods I and Assessment.............. 3 HUS 133 Child Maltreatment.......................................... 3 16 Spring Semester CR ECH 131 Early Child. Field Instruction and Seminar I.... 4 ECH 223 Curricular Methods II and Develop.................. 3 LIT 210 Children’s Literature......................................... 3 PSY 225 Introduction to Special Education.................... 4 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 17

Second Year Fall Semester CR ECH 225 Fostering Emergent Literacy............................. 4 ECH 220 Engendering Creativity: Arts in the Classroom . .................................... 3 ECH 231 Early Child. Field Instruction and Seminar II... 4 ECH 252 Care of Infants and Toddlers............................ 3 ECH 255 Administration of Early Childhood Program (c) OR Restricted Humanities Elective (d).................... 3 17 Spring Semester CR ECH 227 Guidance of Young Children............................ 3 Mathematics Elective (a)................................ 3-4 Science Elective (b)....................................... 3-4 PSY 221 Educational Psychology (c) OR Restricted Humanities Elective (d).................... 3 ECH 260 Portfolio Seminar............................................. 1 13-15

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 63 Notes: (a) Mathematics 126 or higher-Students who are planning to transfer should consult receiving institution. (b) Any science elective-Students who are planning to transfer should consult receiving institution. Some programs may require a lab science. (c) Students may choose between ECH 255 Administration of Early Childhood Programs or PSY 221 Educational Psychology. ECH 255 is only offered in the fall semester; the Restricted Humanities Elective should be taken during the spring semester. PSY 221 is only offered in the spring semester; the Restricted Humanities Elective should be taken during the fall semester. PSY 221 is recommended for those students who are considering transfer. (d) Students may choose from the following: SPA, FRE, ITA, ASL, SPE, or ENG 124. Students interested in Teacher Education are advised to take SPA 121 or ASL 121.


Emergency Management Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Mission The mission of the Emergency Management A.A.S. program is to prepare students for careers related to homeland security, public safety, and continuity planning for all-hazard threats. This degree provides introductory level instruction in the organizational and institutional aspects for Emergency Management stakeholders and the issues they confront. Upon completion of the program students will be able to: • Identify critical infrastructure and key asset categories; • Determine the organizational and institutional aspects of emergency management stakeholders; • Define all-hazard threats from malicious, naturally occurring, and accidental sources; • Identify best practices in emergency management; • Apply the standards of best practices in the critical analysis of emergency management policies and; • Analyze emerging trends in emergency management.

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 61 Notes: (a) Select one (1) of the following courses as the Restricted Elective: POL 125 State and Local Government, AER 150/ CRJ 150 Airport Management and Security, PAL 111 Survey of American Law, MGT 135 International Business, CRJ 131 Criminal Law, or CRJ 143 Criminal Evidence and Procedure. (b) Students should consult with an advisor on the general elective courses. Students who expect to transfer to a State University of New York (SUNY) four-year college or university should consult with an advisor about the SUNY General Education requirements. Students not expecting to transfer to a four-year college or university are encouraged to consider either PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology or SOC 121 Sociology.

Graduates of the program are qualified for positions in local, state and federal public safety agencies, private interests related to critical infrastructure protection, business continuity planning, insurance, and producers and vendors of homeland security goods and services, and not-for-profit associations that represent the interests of First Responders (firefighters, emergency medical personnel, law enforcement), businesses, and public safety. Graduates may seek transfer to a four-year program in a related area.

First Year Fall Semester CR CIS 121 Introduction to Computers OR Higher............. 3 CRJ 147 Terrorism and Public Security.......................... 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 FPT 112 Principles of Emergency Services...................... 3 MGT 123 Business Organization and Management.......... 3 15 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 CRJ 117 Police Organization and Supervision................ 3 FPT 135 Fire Administration.......................................... 3 HIS 127 Western Civilization Since 1715....................... 3 Lab Science Elective......................................... 4 16

Second Year Fall Semester CR FPT 115 Hazardous Materials I....................................... 3 TEL 121 Introduction to Information Systems................ 3 MAT 128 Algebra I OR Higher...................................... 3-4 POL 123 United States Govt and Politics........................ 3 General Elective (b).......................................... 3 15-16 Spring Semester CR FPT 116 Hazardous Materials II..................................... 3 HIS 229 American History Since 1877........................... 3 Restrictive Elective (a)...................................... 3 General Elective (b).......................................... 3 General Elective (b).......................................... 3 15

69


Fire Protection Technology Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Mission The Fire Science Technology A.A.S. program provides professional training for students wishing to obtain technical skills in fire protection. The curriculum contains theoretical and scientific knowledge to complement the hands-on fireground training of volunteer and career firefighters. The Fire Protection Technology program enables graduating students to: • Demonstrate practical skills in fire protection, prevention and suppression; • Understand the importance of ethical professional practices; • Understand the relevance of contemporary events for those in first-responder positions; • Demonstrate effective communication skills and; • Qualify for positions in fire protection or related fields in insurance or government agencies.

*FPT Sequence Courses are offered each semester as identified below. Students are encouraged to discuss course schedule with an Academic Advisor from the Department of Business and Law. Sequence A (Fall ’10, ’12, ’14) FPT 115 Hazardous Materials I..........................(3 credits) FPT 219 Fire Behavior and Combustion............(3 credits) Restricted Elective (a)...................... (3-4 credits) 9-10 credits Sequence B (Spring ’11, ’13, ’15) FPT 116 Hazardous Materials II........................(3 credits) FPT 131 Fire Prevention....................................(3 credits) FPT 215 Fire Investigation................................(3 credits) 9 credits Sequence C (Fall ’09, ’11, ’13) FPT 112 Principles of Emergency Services.........(3 credits) FPT 120 Building Construction for Fire Protection....................................(3 credits) FPT 216 Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply................................(3 credits) 9 credits

All of the specialized courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening only.

Sequence D (Spring ’10, ’12, ’14) FPT 135 Fire Administration.............................(3 credits) FPT 137 Fire Protection Systems.......................(3 credits) Restricted Elective (a)...................... (3-4 credits) 9-10 credits

First Year

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 62

Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 MAT 128 Algebra I OR Higher...................................... 3-4 FPT Sequence A or C*........................................ 9-10 15-17 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature OR SPE 121 Introduction to Speech....................... 3 CHM 113 Introduction to Chemistry OR BIO 112 Human Biology.................................. 4 FPT Sequence B or D*........................................ 9-10 16-17

Second Year Fall Semester CR CIS 121 Introduction to Computers OR Higher............. 3 Social Science OR Humanities Elective . .......... 3 FPT Sequence A or C*........................................ 9-10 15-16 Spring Semester CR PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 ETH 221 Professional and Applied Ethics ...................... 1 FPT Sequence B or D*........................................ 9-10 Liberal Arts Elective...................................... 3-4 16-18

70

Notes: (a) Restricted electives (minimum of six credits) must be selected from FPT 237 Industrial Fire Protection, MGT 127 Human Resource Management, MGT 129 Labor Relations, AER/CRJ 150 Airport Management and Security, CRJ 147 Terrorism and Public Security, EMS 210 Basic EMT or FPT 250 Fire Protection Internship.


Hotel and Restaurant Management Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.)

• Prepare for front or back of the house entry-level or management positions in the hospitality field and; • Transfer to four-year institutions into appropriate baccalaureate degree programs.

Mission

Students interested in obtaining a baccalaureate degree in Hospitality Management should seek information about SUNY Delhi’s Hospitality Management (B.B.A.): Hotel and Resort Management Concentration offered at SCCC. Please refer to Page 70 for specific program details.

The mission of the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism is to provide superior education and technical training for students entering the Hospitality Industry. This enables graduates to achieve success in hotels, restaurants, culinary arts, event planning and tourism, either in an entry level or management position. The curriculum includes practical courses in baking and food preparation; management courses in purchasing, food and beverage controls and legal problems; as well as liberal arts courses to give students a well-rounded educational background. The program prepares graduates to enter various phases of the hospitality industry, one of the most dynamic and fastest growing fields open to college graduates today. Typical positions for which graduates may qualify are: assistant managers at hotels, motels and restaurants; food service administrators in institutional cafeterias; assistant food and beverage comptrollers; assistant banquet managers; assistant comptroller and night auditors; assistant purchasing agents; assistant stewards; and assistant chefs. The teaching staff is well qualified, with practical experience in hotels, commercial and institutional food service operations. The Department’s modern food labs include convection and hearth ovens, broilers, griddles and steam tables. State-of-the-art food labs simulate hotel and restaurant kitchen and dining room conditions. The Casola Dining Room, adjacent to the Hotel and Restaurant Management laboratory, provides students an opportunity to gain experience in a wide range of dining room and banquet service activities, including tableside preparation and meal service. It is open to the public for à la carte service and banquets. In addition to textbook expenses, students in Hotel and Restaurant Management are expected to purchase uniforms ($100+) and a knife set ($200+). Hats and/or hairnets are required by the New York State Health Code. Students will be required to comply with the dress and sanitation requirements of the American Culinary Federation. Note: The only jewelry permitted in cooking laboratories are wedding rings and watches. No nail polish is allowed. Full uniform attire is required for any food preparation activity in all labs at all times. Specific details regarding the Policies for Food Laboratories are available from the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism. Each Hotel and Restaurant Management major must satisfy a work experience requirement of 600 hours, or its equivalent, in the hospitality industry. Details may be obtained from the Chairperson of the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism. The Hotel and Restaurant Management program enables graduates to: • Demonstrate competency skills in basic food preparation, baking and desert making, food and beverage management, human resource management, dining room and banquet service, sanitation, and nutrition; • Experience an appropriate 600 hours of work to complement the classroom and laboratory requirements of the program;

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 HOT 111 Food Preparation I........................................... 3 HOT 119 Elements of Baking........................................... 3 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper. (a) OR HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper. (a)........... 3 TAT 121 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry........... 3 Social Science Elective (b)................................ 3 18 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 HOT 112 Food Preparation II.......................................... 3 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper. (a) OR HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper. (a)........... 3 HOT 276 Meetings and Convention Mgmt...................... 3 Mathematics Elective (b)............................... 3-4 15-16

Second Year Fall Semester CR HOT 114 Food Admin. and Menu Planning.................... 3 HOT 217 Front Office Management................................. 3 HOT 251 Quantitative Foods (a)...................................... 3 HOT 275 Marketing, Advertising and Sales for Hospitality Industry.................................... 3 HOT 291 Computers for Hospitality Industry OR ACC 121 Financial Accounting..................... 3-4 Liberal Arts Elective (b)................................. 3-4 18-20 Spring Semester CR HOT 117 Food and Beverage Control.............................. 3 HOT 220 Wines of the World*........................................ 3 HOT 218 Human Resources Mgmt/HFI........................... 3 Science Elective (b)....................................... 3-4 Humanities Elective (b).................................... 3 15-16

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 66 Notes: (a) The time element for these courses will vary according to functions and assignments required to cover the projects involving actual conditions of preparation, cooking, and service of a complete menu. The course outline will be flexible to meet the successful fulfillment of projects. (b) Students planning to transfer should consult with an advisor before choosing electives. NOTE: Cleaning, preventive maintenance, and sanitation are practiced under the supervision of the Instructor and the Technical Assistant during and after all laboratory exercises. * Students who cannot take this class because of medical or religious beliefs should substitute either a three credit HOT or TAT course not required in the curriculum.

71


Hotel and Restaurant Management Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) and Hospitality Management Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) The jointly registered, inter-institutional program with SUNY Delhi, approved by the State University of New York and the New York State Education Department, is designed for students who plan to pursue the SUNY Delhi Hospitality Management B.B.A. program offered at SCCC. Upon successful completion of the A.A.S. program at SCCC, students are accepted into SUNY Delhi with full junior standing in order to complete the B.B.A. degree. Admission to SUNY Delhi’s program is guaranteed for those with a minimum grade point average of 2.3 under this joint program.

Hotel and Resort Management Core First Year Suggested Sequence of Courses Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition (Silo 10)......................... 3 HOT 111 Food Preparation I........................................... 3 HOT 119 Elements of Baking........................................... 3 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper. (a) OR............... HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper.(a)............ 3 TAT 121 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry........... 3 Humanities Elective (Silo 4, 5, 8 or 9) (b)........ 3 18 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 HOT 112 Food Preparation II.......................................... 3 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper. (a) OR HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper. (a)........... 3 HOT 276 Meetings and Convention Mgmt...................... 3 MAT 128 Algebra I OR Higher...................................... 3-4 15-16

Second Year Suggested Sequence of Courses Fall Semester CR HOT 114 Food Admin. and Menu Planning.................... 3 HOT 217 Front Office Management................................. 3 HOT 251 Quantitative Foods (a)...................................... 3 HOT 275 Marketing, Advertising and Sales for Hospitality Industry.................................... 3 Science Elective (Silo 2)................................ 3-4 Liberal Arts Elective (Western Civ, Am His, Language or Arts Elective) (Silo 4, 5, 8 or 9) (b)(c).................................... 3 18-19 Spring Semester CR HOT 117 Food and Beverage Control.............................. 3 HOT 220 Wines of the World (d)..................................... 3 HOT 218 Human Resources Mgmt/HFI........................... 3 ECO 221 Principles of Macroeconomics OR ECO 223 Principles of Microeconomics (Silo 3)............................................................. 3 ACC 121 Financial Accounting....................................... 4 16

Minimum Credit Hours required for A.A.S. degree: 67 Note: The term “Silo” refers to SUNY Delhi’s designation for the SUNY General Education requirements in the 10 Knowledge and Skills areas. Please see your advisor for a more detailed explanation and a list of courses.

(a) The time element for these courses will vary according to functions and assignments required to cover the projects involving actual conditions of preparation, cooking, and service of a complete menu. The course outline will be flexible to meet the successful fulfillment of projects.

(b) Electives must be chosen from approved SUNY General Education courses in these academic areas.

(c) Students may substitute MAT 129 if needed as prerequisite for MAT 147, however, the Liberal Arts Elective will then be required in the Junior or Senior year.

(d) Students who cannot take this class because of medical conditions or religious beliefs should substitute a three credit HOT or TAT course not required in the curriculum.

Cleaning, preventive maintenance, and sanitation are practiced under the supervision of the Instructor and the Technical Assistant during and after all laboratory exercises.

Third Year/SUNY Delhi Suggested Sequence of Courses Fall Semester CR HOSP 310 Hospitality Human Resources II............... 3 HOSP 335 Purchasing for the Hospitality Industry.... 3 HTEL 165 Lodging Accommodations Mgmt . ........... 3 ACC 122 Managerial Accounting............................. 4 General Education Course (Silo 4, 5, 8 or 9)...................................... 3 16 Spring Semester HOSP 320 HOSP 350 HTEL 310 ANTH 300 MAT 147 HOT 291

CR Hospitality Financial Management............ 3 Hospitality Law........................................ 3 Hotel Maintenance and Engineering......... 3 Survey of World Cultures (Silo 6)............. 3 Statistics (Silo 1)....................................... 3 Computers for the Hospitality Industry.... 3 18

Fourth Year/SUNY Delhi Suggested Sequence of Courses Fall Semester CR BUSI 360 International Business Management.......... 3 HOSP 330 Strategic Marketing................................... 3 HTEL 420 Hotel and Resort Operations.................... 3 General Education Elective (Silo 4, 5, 8, or 9)..................................... 3 Upper Division Elective............................ 3 15 Spring Semester HOSP 470 BUSI 343 GOVT 300 COMM 310

CR Hospitality Management Seminar............. 3 Individual Behavior in Organization OR BUS 344 Organizational Theory......... 3 Public Policy............................................. 3 Argumentation and Debate....................... 3 Business Elective (Lower Division)........... 3 15

Minimum hours required for B.B.A. degree: 131 72


Human Services Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) The Human Service A.A.S. program enables students to gain a solid theoretical foundation, develop core social work theory and skills, and a professional identity.  Through the completion of two field internships, students are provided with the opportunity to apply the social work theory and skills learned in the Human Services curriculum and to practice the development of a professional identity. Graduates of this program are qualified to work with a variety of individuals in case management, outreach, and advocacy positions. Students will explore careers with a variety of populations including children, adolescents, the developmentally challenged, the elderly and the homeless. Students begin to learn about diverse individuals as well as the affects of social welfare policies on the individual person.

Mission The mission of the Human Services A.A.S. program is to prepare students for employment in the public and private sector. This program is based on the best practices associated with the National Association of Social Workers. Students learn the core skills and values of the social work profession and the social welfare system in the United States including the philosophical, historical and ethical dimensions. The Human Services A.A.S. Program enables graduating students to:  • Obtain employment in a variety of public and private settings that work with children, adolescents, the developmentally challenged and the elderly; • Function as a professional within a public and private setting and; • Develop critical thinking skills through work with individuals and groups as well as written and oral assignments. Human Services students may be subject to a fingerprint check or be asked about criminal convictions before working in the field and/or at an internship site. Individuals who have a criminal history may have difficulty obtaining a field placement and/or employment in the field of Human Services. Students may want to consult with an advisor or college counselor before pursuing the program.

Secondary Program Exclusion Section 8.6 of the Academic Code provides that students may earn an additional degree or certificate provided that the secondary program includes at least 15 credit hours of requirements not in common with the primary program. Students who are enrolled in the Human Services A.A.S. and the Chemical Dependency Counseling A.A.S. will need to work carefully with their advisors when choosing electives to meet this secondary program exclusion. 

Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature OR SPE 121 Introduction to Speech....................... 3 HUS 221 Theory and Field Experience I (c).................... 3 SOC 127 Interpersonal and Group Dynamics.................. 3 PSY Elective OR SOC Elective (d)................. 3-4 Restricted Elective (e).................................... 3-4 15-17

Second Year Fall Semester CR HUS 222 Theory and Field Experience II (c)................... 3 PSY 224 Abnormal Psychology....................................... 3 Biology Elective (b) OR...................................... Mathematics Elective (a)................................ 3-4 Restricted Elective (e).................................... 3-4 General Elective............................................ 3-4 15-18 Spring Semester CR ENG 211 Technical Writing............................................. 3 PSY 222 Developmental Psychology............................... 3 SOC 122 Social Problems................................................ 3 Humanities Elective (f)..................................... 3 POL Elective (g)............................................... 3 15

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 60 Notes: (a) MAT 126 or higher (b) BIO 112 Human Biology or BIO 161 Nutrition in Health and Disease (c) Admission to HUS 221 and HUS 222 requires SOC 125 and consent of the department as a pre-requisite. (d) Any course with a PSY or SOC prefix (e) Restricted elective can be selected from among the following: Any course with a CRJ, POL, PSY or SOC prefix; ECO 211 Introduction to Economics; HUS 150 Introduction to Chemical Abuse and Dependence; HUS 155 Substance Abuse Counseling; HUS 252 Addictive Drugs: Issues and Selected Topics; HUS 133 Child Maltreatment; Prevention, Investigation and Treatment; or HON 281 Sociology of Power and Class (f) The study of a language other than English is suggested. Spanish or American Sign Language is highly recommended. (g) Any course with a POL prefix.

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 SOC 121 Sociology......................................................... 3 SOC 125 Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare............................................ 3 Mathematics Elective (a) OR Biology Elective (b)....................................... 3-4 15-16

73


Music/Business Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) The music business industry offers careers in music merchandising, music publishing, and arts management. The Music Business A.A.S. program prepares students for employment in the music industry or transfer to a four-year institution in music merchandising or other music industry career fields. An entrance audition is required for admission to this program. Contact the Department of Music at (518) 381-1231 for further information.

Mission The mission of the Music Business A.A.S. degree program is to provide a quality education in accordance with the principles of Schenectady County Community College’s mission statement. Specifically the program provides rigorous training in music performance, skills, theory and history. The program also provides training in the fundamentals of the music business, including management, accounting practices and economics. The Music Business program enables graduates to demonstrate: • Musicianship through individual and ensemble performance training and experiences; • Theoretical and analytical musical skills; • Technical competence and aesthetic awareness for a broad range of musical literature and musical cultures representing style periods from antiquity to the present and; • Knowledge of business practices and their applications in the music industry. Schenectady County Community College is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 MGT 123 Business Organization and Management.......... 3 MUS 161 Performance Organization I (a)........................ 1 MUS 163 Performance Concentration I............................ 2 Basic Musicianship I: MUS 151 Theory I........................................... 2 MUS 155 Aural Skills I..................................... 1 MUS 257 Literature and Style I........................ 3 MUS 287 Keyboard Techniques I..................................... 1 16 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 MUS 162 Performance Organization II (a)....................... 1 MUS 164 Performance Concentration II.......................... 2 Basic Musicianship II: MUS 152 Theory II.......................................... 2 MUS 156 Aural Skills II.................................... 1 MUS 258 Literature and Style II....................... 3 Restricted Music Elective (b)............................ 3 15

74

Second Year Fall Semester CR ECO 211 Introduction to Economics (d)......................... 3 MUS 261 Performance Organization III (a)...................... 1 MUS 263 Performance Concentration III......................... 2 Basic Musicianship III: MUS 251 Theory III......................................... 2 MUS 255 Aural Skills III.................................. 1 Restricted Music Elective (b)............................ 3 Mathematics OR Science Elective (e)............. 3-4 15-16 Spring Semester CR MKT 223 Marketing......................................................... 3 MUS 231 The Music Business.......................................... 3 MUS 262 Performance Organization IV (a)...................... 1 Restricted Elective (c).................................... 3-4 Mathematics OR Science Elective (e)............. 3-4 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 16-18

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 62 Notes: a) Performance Organization I-IV (MUS 161, 162, 261, 262) are required as follows: • All Brass and Woodwind Concentrations will complete four semesters of Wind Ensemble. • All Percussion Concentrations will complete a minimum of two semesters of Percussion Ensemble and two semesters of Wind Ensemble. • All Organ, Piano, and Vocal Concentrations will complete four semesters of Chorus. • All Guitar Concentrations will complete four semesters of Guitar Ensemble. • All String Concentrations will complete four semesters of SCCC or off-campus ensembles with appropriate registration, as advised by the Department. • All students enrolled in Performance Concentrations (MUS 163, 164, 263, 264) are required to also be enrolled in the appropriate major ensemble. b) Restricted Music Electives must be chosen from MUS 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 115, 127, 131, 135*, 136*, 157, 158, 161-162**, 167, 169, 171, 180, 195, 232, 233, 234, 252, 255, 261-262**, 270, 272, 283, 284, 285, 286, 288, 289. * Lessons in performance area other than Performance Concentration, two semesters maximum. ** A maximum of two additional Performance Organization courses may be used to fulfill graduation requirements. c) Restricted Elective must be chosen from ACC 121, ACC 123, BUS 121, CIS 121, ECO 221, ECO 223 or MGT 127. d) Students planning to transfer to a baccalaureate program should substitute ECO 221 or ECO 223. e) Students planning to transfer to a baccalaureate program should select MAT 145 or higher.


Nanoscale Materials Technology Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Mission The mission of the Nanoscale Materials Technology A.A.S. program is to provide a foundation in materials science, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and electronics. With strong supporting courses in computer aided drafting, vacuum science and technology, and thin film deposition techniques, students will be prepared for employment as highly qualified technicians in the emerging and highly technical semiconductor and superconductor manufacturing and research and development companies. The Nanoscale Materials Technology program enables graduates to: • Qualify for employment as technicians in highly technical semiconductor and superconductor manufacturing and research and development companies; • Identify the major and potential applications of nanodevices made from materials; • Design circuits used in control systems and measurement; • Apply computers and digital systems to the solution and implementation of process control algorithms; • Be familiar with the processes and the importance of quality controls in manufacturing and; • Understand the basics of computer programming.

Spring Semester CR PHY 154 Physics II (a).................................................... 4 MAT 147 Statistics........................................................... 3 NMT 152 Introduction to Nanoscale Materials................. 3 ELT 121 Circuits for Digital Systems II........................... 4 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 17

Second Year Fall Semester CR CIS 129 Programming Fundamentals OR CIS 134 C++/UNIX....................................... 3-4 ELT 230 Electronics....................................................... 5 NMT 225 Introduction to Vacuum Science and Technology................................................ 4 ENG 211 Technical Writing............................................. 3 15-16 Spring Semester CR ELT 256 Process Control and Instrumentation............... 4 CIS 140 Introduction to CAD........................................ 3 NMT 280 Introduction to Thin Film Deposition and Quality Control................................................ 4 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 14

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 63 Notes: (a) PHY 153 Physics I is not a pre-requisite for PHY 154 Physics II.

First Year Fall Semester CR CHM 121 General Chemistry I......................................... 4 MAT 129 Algebra II w/ Trig OR......................................... MAT 160 Discrete Structures OR higher........ 3-4 CIS 121 Introduction to Computers OR CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications...... 3 NMT 150 Introduction to Materials Science..................... 3 ELT 110 Circuits for Digital Systems I............................ 4 17-18

75


Paralegal Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Mission The mission of the Paralegal A.A.S. program is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to function effectively in law-related positions in the legal, business, corporate or government workforce community. The Paralegal program enables graduates to: • Demonstrate a diverse education in substantive and procedural law; • Demonstrate and apply a broad range of ethical legal practices and; • Understand the relevance of contemporary events in the legal field. Graduates of the program qualify for such positions as legal assistant, title research, legal researcher, administrative assistant and legislative assistant. To ensure the integrity and continuity of the SCCC Paralegal program and to comply with external accreditation policies, no more than three (3) legal specialty (PAL) courses may be granted credit by transfer or by alternative credit sources. No transfer credit may be granted for Courts and Litigation (PAL 114) except from an appropriate New York State Institution. Although legal assistants or paralegals are qualified by education, training or work experience to assist a lawyer in the performance of specifically delegated legal work, they are cautioned not to engage in the unlicensed practice of law. The Paralegal A.A.S. program is approved by the American Bar Association.

First Year Fall Semester CR ACC 123 Accounting for Decision Making OR.................. ACC 121 Financial Accounting .................... 3-4 BUS 121 Business Law I.................................................. 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 MAT 126 Descriptive Statistics OR Higher.................... 3-4 PAL 111 Survey of American Law................................... 3 15-17 Spring Semester CR BUS 123 Business Law II................................................ 3 BUS 135 Word Processing (a)......................................... 3 ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 PAL 112 Legal Research.................................................. 3 PAL 114 Courts and Litigation....................................... 3 15

Second Year Fall Semester CR CIS 121 Introduction to Computers.............................. 3 PAL 217 Estates and Trusts............................................. 3 PAL 219 Real Property.................................................... 3 Science Elective................................................ 3 Social Science Elective...................................... 3 15

76

Spring Semester CR ETH 221 Professional and Applied Ethics....................... 1 PAL 231 Family Law...................................................... 3 PAL 233 Administrative Law.......................................... 3 Restricted Humanities Elective (b).................... 3 Restricted Elective (c)....................................... 3 Liberal Arts Elective......................................... 3 16

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 61 Notes: (a) BUS 118 Keyboarding I is a prerequisite for BUS 135 (for paralegals, BUS 118 is preferred). Please note that BUS 118 Keyboarding I may be taken as a restricted elective see (c) below. (b) The Restricted Humanities Elective is to be chosen from nonrequired courses, applicable to the appropriate degree program, in the following areas: Foreign Language, History, Literature, Philosophy, Speech and appropriate Honors courses. (c) Restricted Elective may be chosen from: ACC 225 Income Tax Accounting, PAL 250 Paralegal Internship, CRJ 131 Criminal Law, CRJ 143 Criminal Evidence and Procedure, BUS 118 Keyboarding I, OR any ECO course.


Tourism and Hospitality Management Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Mission The mission of the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism is to provide superior education and technical training for students entering the Hospitality Industry. This enables graduates to achieve success in hotels, restaurants, culinary arts, event planning and tourism, either in an entry level or management position. Individuals may earn a certificate or an Associate’s degree in their chosen field and/or have the opportunity to take specific courses of interest that will add to their specialized skills and personal knowledge, as well as assist them in managing a hospitality business. This program provides students with the theory and hands-on experience related to the inbound and outbound tourism and hospitality industries. The degree is ideal for the student interested in the hospitality industry who does not want to participate in food laboratory courses. With strong internship programs, students will be able to participate in front of the house positions with such places as Walt Disney World, Site Solutions, General Electric Power Division Meeting and Convention Department, New York State Hospitality and Tourism Association, New York State Bar Association and the Albany County Convention and Visitors Bureau. Graduates are well-qualified to assume a variety of responsible roles in the tourism, hospitality and community planning industries including destination travel promotion, event planning, lodging, convention sales and banquet management, and resort and attractions management. The Tourism and Hospitality Management program enables graduates to: • Prepare for a variety of positions in the tourism, hospitality and community planning fields and; • Enter the workforce with practical experience acquired through professional internships.

Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 HOT 276 Meetings and Convention Management............ 3 HOT 291 Computers for Hospitality Industry.................. 3 HOT 218 Human Resource Management in the Hospitality and Food Industry......................... 3 Restricted Social Science Elective (a)................ 3 15

Second Year Fall Semester CR HOT 275 Marketing, Advertising and Sales for Hospitality Industry.................................... 3 TAT 133 Airline Reservation and Ticketing..................... 3 TAT 221 Passenger Management.................................... 3 Mathematics Elective (b)............................... 3-4 Science Elective............................................. 3-4 15-17 Spring Semester CR BUS 121 Business Law I.................................................. 3 GHY 123 Population Geography...................................... 3 TAT 140 Event Management........................................... 3 TAT 231 Directed Study in Travel, Tourism and Convention Management........................... 3 Humanities Elective (c).................................... 3 15

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 60 Notes: (a) Restricted Social Science Elective should be chosen from the following courses: ANT 121, ECO 211 (OR higher), SOC 121 or PSY 121. (b) MAT 147 or higher is recommended if student is planning to transfer to obtain a Bachelor’s degree. (c) For students who plan to interview for inbound tourism positions, employers strongly recommend taking a foreign language course.

Graduates often decide to transfer to four-year institutions to earn their baccalaureate degree in the hospitality field. Students may obtain their baccalaureate degree at Schenectady by taking the Bachelor of Business Administration program offered jointly with the State University of New York at Delhi. Students interested in obtaining a baccalaureate degree in Travel and Tourism Management should seek information about SUNY Delhi’s Hospitality Management (B.B.A.): Travel and Tourism Management Concentration offered at SCCC. Please refer to Page 76 for specific program details.

First Year Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 HOT 217 Front Office Management................................. 3 HOT 277 Planning and Development of Tourism............. 3 TAT 121 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry........... 3 Accounting Elective....................................... 3-4 15-16

77


Tourism and Hospitality Management Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) and Hospitality Management Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) The jointly registered, inter-institutional program with SUNY Delhi, approved by the State University of New York and the New York State Education Department, is designed for students who plan to pursue the SUNY Delhi Hospitality Management B.B.A. program offered at SCCC. Upon successful completion of the A.A.S. program at SCCC, students are accepted into SUNY Delhi with full junior standing in order to complete the B.B.A. degree. Admission to SUNY Delhi’s program is guaranteed for those with a minimum grade point average of 2.3 under this joint program.

Travel and Tourism Management Core First Year Suggested Sequence of Courses Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition (Silo 10)......................... 3 HOT 111 Food Preparation I........................................... 3 HOT 119 Elements of Baking........................................... 3 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper. (a) OR HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper.(a)............ 3 TAT 121 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry........... 3 Humanities Elective (Silo 4, 5, 8 or 9) (b)........ 3 18 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 HOT 112 Food Preparation II.......................................... 3 HOT 238 Dining Room Mgmt. and Oper. (a)..................... OR HOT 253 Banquet Mgmt. and Oper. (a)........... 3 HOT 276 Meetings and Convention Mgmt...................... 3 MAT 128 Or Higher..................................................... 3-4 15-16

Second Year Suggested Sequence of Courses Fall Semester CR HOT 114 Food Admin. and Menu Planning.................... 3 HOT 217 Front Office Management................................. 3 HOT 251 Quantitative Foods (a)...................................... 3 HOT 275 Marketing, Advertising and Sales for the Hospitality Industry.............................. 3 Science Elective (Silo 2)................................ 3-4 Liberal Arts Elective (Western Civ, Am His, Language or Arts Elective (Silo 4,5, 8 or 9) (b)(c).................................. 3-4 18-19 Spring Semester CR HOT 117 Food and Beverage Control.............................. 3 HOT 220 Wines of the World (d)..................................... 3 HOT 218 Human Resources Mgmt/HFI........................... 3 ECO 221 Principles of Macroeconomics OR ECO 223 Princ. of Microeconomics (Silo 3)..... 3 ACC 121 Financial Accounting....................................... 4 16

78

Minimum Credit Hours required for A.A.S. degree: 67 Notes: The term “Silo” refers to SUNY Delhi’s designation of SUNY General Education requirements in the 10 Knowledge and Skills areas. Please see your advisor for a more detailed explanation and a listing of approved courses. (a) The time element for these courses will vary according to functions and assignments required to cover the projects involving actual conditions of preparation, cooking, and service of a complete menu. Instructional outline will be flexible to meet the successful fulfillment of a project. (b) Electives must be chosen from approved SUNY General Education courses in these academic areas. Please see your advisor for a more detailed explanation and a list of approved courses. (c) Students may substitute MAT 129 if needed as prerequisite for MAT 147, however, the Liberal Arts Elective will then be required in the Junior or Senior year. (d) Students who cannot take this class because of medical conditions or religious beliefs should substitute a three credit HOT or TAT course not required in the curriculum. Cleaning, preventive maintenance, and sanitation are practiced under the supervision of the Instructor and the Technical Assistant during and after all laboratory exercises.

Third Year/SUNY Delhi Suggested Sequence of Courses Fall Semester CR HOSP 310 Hospitality Human Resources II............... 3 TRVL 275 Tourism Packaging and Tour Design......... 3 TRVL 310 Geog. of World Travel Destinations ......... 3 ACC 122 Managerial Accounting............................. 4 General Education Course (Silo 4, 5, 8 or 9)...................................... 3 16 Spring Semester HOSP 320 HOSP 350 TRVL 390 ANTH 300 MAT 147

CR Hospitality Financial Management............ 3 Hospitality Law........................................ 3 Travel Agency Operations and Mgmt........ 3 Upper Division Gen Ed (Silo 6) General Education Course........................ 3 (Silo 4, 5, 8 or 9)...................................... 3 Statistics (Silo 1)....................................... 3 18

Fourth Year/SUNY Delhi Suggested Sequence of Courses Fall Semester CR BUSI 360 International Business Management.......... 3 HOSP 330 Strategic Marketing................................... 3 TRVL 475 Destination Development and Mktg......... 3 General Education Elective (Silo 4, 5, 8, or 9)..................................... 3 COMM 300 Organizational Communication General Education Course........................ 3 (Silo 4, 5, 8 or 9)...................................... 3 18


Spring Semester HOSP 470 BUSI 343 GOVT 300 COMM 310

CR Hospitality Management Seminar............. 3 Individual Behavior in Organization OR BUS 344 Organizational Theory......... 3 Public Policy............................................. 3 Argumentation and Debate...................... 3 Business Elective (Lower Division) (a)...... 3 15

Minimum hours required for B.B.A. degree: 134 Note: (a) It is suggested that the student take BUS 212 Business Communications for this elective.

certificate programs Certificates are awarded for programs designed to prepare the student for immediate entry into an occupation or to upgrade abilities and skills or transfer into an SCCC degree program.

• Assistant Chef • Computer Desktop Support Specialist • Computer Repair and Networking • Criminal Justice • Early Childhood • Fire Science • General Business • Health Studies • Music • Teaching Assistant • Tourism, Sales and Convention Management

Assistant Chef Certificate Mission The mission of the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism is to provide superior education and technical training for students entering the Hospitality Industry. This enables graduates to achieve success in hotels, restaurants, culinary arts, event planning and tourism, either in an entry level or management position. Individuals may earn a certificate or an Associate’s degree in their chosen field and/or have the opportunity to take specific courses of interest that will add to their specialized skills and personal knowledge, as well as assist them in managing a hospitality business. This one-year program provides practical training in the restaurant and food service fields. Graduates are qualified for a number of positions, including assistant chef, commercial and assistant hospital food service worker and are able to work in colleges, schools, hospitals, nursing homes, industrial settings, restaurants and quick food services. This certificate program is designed for students wishing a shorter course of study than the two-year Hotel and Restaurant Management or Culinary Arts degree curriculum. Graduates of this program may transfer into the Hotel and Restaurant Management or Culinary Arts degree curriculum with a minimum loss of credit. In addition to buying textbooks, students in the Assistant Chef program are expected to purchase uniforms ($100+) and a knife set ($200+). Hats and/or hairnets are required by the New York State Health Code. Students will be required to comply with the dress and sanitation requirements of the American Culinary Federation. Note: The only jewelry permitted in cooking laboratories are wedding rings and watches. No nail polish is allowed. Full uniform attire is required for any food preparation activity in all labs at all times. Specific details regarding the Policies for Food Laboratories are available from the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism.

79


Fall Semester CR HOT 111 Food Preparation I........................................... 3 HOT 119 Elements of Baking........................................... 3 HOT 131 Mathematics for Food Service Records ............ 3 HOT 132 Sanitation Techniques...................................... 2 HOT 238 Dining Room Management and Operations OR HOT 253 Banquet Management and Operations (a)........................................... 3 TAT 121 Introduction to Hospitality............................... 3 17 Spring Semester CR HOT 112 Food Preparation II.......................................... 3 HOT 117 Food and Beverage Control.............................. 3 HOT 218 Human Resources Mgmt/HFI........................... 3 HOT 251 Quantitative Foods (a)...................................... 3 HOT 238 Dining Room Management and Operations OR HOT 253 Banquet Management and Operations (a)........................................... 3 15

Minimum Credit Hours required for certificate: 32 Notes: (a) The time element for this course will vary according to functions and assignments required to cover the projects involving actual conditions of preparation, cooking and serving of a complete menu. The course outline will be flexible to meet the successful fulfillment of projects. Note: Cleaning, preventative maintenance and sanitation are practiced under the supervision of the Instructor and the Technical Assistant during and after all laboratory exercises.

Computer Desktop Support Specialist Certificate Mission The Computer Desktop Support Specialist Certificate program is designed to provide students with skills to meet industry employment needs for computer support personnel. Graduates of this certificate program will be able to apply computing skills to solve problems and adapt to emerging technologies within the context of business systems. The student’s educational experience is enhanced by computing facilities available at the College. Students are provided with practical hands-on experience in computer applications use and program development in innovative, state-of-the-art computerized classrooms. The Computer Desktop Support Specialist Certificate will prepare students for employment as a software application specialist, help desk specialist, or information processing support specialist. Students who wish to pursue an Associate’s degree (A.A.S.) in Computer Information Systems are encouraged to work closely with their academic advisor to learn how coursework may be successfully applied to the A.A.S. degree. The Computer Desktop Support Specialist Certificate program enables graduates to: • Prepare for rewarding and productive employment in a computer desktop support environment; • Apply critical thinking skills and approaches for problem solving; • Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical and social issues involved in computing and; • Apply interpersonal and communication skills necessary in a diverse society. Fall Semester CR CIS 102 Computing Basics (b).....................................(1) CIS 121 Introduction to Computers.............................. 3 CIS 136 Intro to Web Development............................... 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 MAT 129 Algebra II w/Trig or higher............................ 3-4 TEL 121 Intro to Information Systems............................ 3 15-16 Spring Semester CR BUS 212 Business Communications................................ 3 CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications.................... 3 ETH 221 Prof. and Applied Ethics................................... 1 CIS 240 Internetworking Fundamentals........................ 3 CIS 129 Programming Fundamentals............................ 3 Humanities Elective (a).................................... 3 16

Minimum Credit Hours required for the degree: 31 Notes: a) SPE 121 Introduction to Speech recommended. b) This course can be waived based on proficiency documented on a high school transcript. It will not be necessary to replace the one credit.

80


Computer Repair and Networking Certificate

• Students needing developmental courses should take these courses in the summer prior to starting the program. CSS 120 is the listed prerequisite for MAT 128.

Mission The Computer Repair and Networking Certificate is a one-year program that prepares students for employment as support personnel for computer network administrators in an industrial or commercial environment. The certificate also serves as the first year of the Computer Networking and Systems A.A.S. degree program, so that certificate students who desire an A.A.S. degree can obtain it with one additional year of study. The Mathematics and Science program enables graduating students to: • Obtain a foundation in computer repair and networking theory and practice. • Prepare for employment as support personnel in computer and network support roles. • Develop of critical thinking skills and approaches for problem solving. • Understand the ethical and social issues involved in computing. Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 CIS 121 Introduction to Computers (a) OR..................... CIS 221 Advanced Computer Application........ 3 CIS 110 Workstation Arch/Support I (A+).................... 3 CIS 240 Internetworking Fundamentals........................ 3 MAT 129 Algebra II w/Trig OR Higher.......................... 3-4 15-16 Spring Semester CR ENG 211 Tech and Professional Writing.......................... 3 CIS 129 Programming Fundamentals............................ 3 CIS 111 Workstation Arch/Support II (A+)................... 3 CIS 241 Routing Fundamentals..................................... 3 Liberal Arts Elective (b)................................. 3-4 15-16

Minimum Credit Hours required for certificate: 30 Advisement Notes: a) Students demonstrating appropriate high school credits on computer applications may take CIS 221 (Advanced Computer Applications) for this requirement. b) The mathematics requirement for the program is MAT 129 (Algebra II with Trigonometry). Higher level math courses including MAT 160, MAT 167 an MAT 180 (or higher) are acceptable replacements. The Liberal Arts elective may be used for MAT 128 (if needed as a prerequisite for MAT 129). Other Liberal Arts courses are acceptable on the recommendation of your academic advisor. If the student does not plan to pursue a Computer Networking and Systems A.A.S. degree, a CIS course (or any other prefix course) may be substituted for the Liberal Arts elective.

• Students wishing to obtain BOTH a certificate in Computer Repair and Networking and an A.A.S. degree in Computer Networking and Systems should matriculate in the certificate as their primary program with Computer Networking and Systems as secondary.

81


Criminal Justice Certificate

Early Childhood Certificate

The Criminal Justice Certificate provides academic training for students seeking employment or students currently employed in the field of law enforcement or private sector security seeking an academic credential. The program is flexible enough for the student to select as either a terminal or a transitional program into the existing Criminal Justice Associate of Applied Science degree program. The Criminal Justice Certificate program reflects a partnership with the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services and responds to the City of Schenectady Police Department’s requirement that its applicants earn 30 college credits to qualify for the written police examination.

This Early Childhood Certificate is designed to prepare students who wish to work with children from birth through 8 in a variety of early childhood environments. The courses provide an understanding of the developmental needs of children along with specific skills for working with children. In addition, there is a work experience in which students spend eight hours per week working directly with children in a supervised setting. This program can also serve as a “stepping-stone” for those who want to pursue an A.A.S. or A.S. degree in a related field.

Fall Semester CR CRJ 113 Introduction to Criminal Justice....................... 3 CRJ Restricted Elective (a)................................ 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 CRJ Elective (b)................................................ 3 General Elective (c).......................................... 3 15 Spring Semester CR CRJ Restricted Elective (a)................................ 3 CRJ Restricted Elective (a)................................ 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology OR SOC 121 Sociology.......................................... 3 CRJ Elective (b)................................................ 3 General Elective (d).......................................... 3 15

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 30 Notes: (a) Restricted Elective choices are: CRJ 117 Police Organization and Supervision, CRJ 131 Criminal Law, CRJ 133 Criminology, CRJ 143 Criminal Evidence and Procedure, CRJ 152 Policing Theory and Practice I, CRJ 153 Policing Theory and Practice II, CRJ 215 Juvenile Delinquency, CRJ 219 Corrections. (b) Any course with a CRJ prefix. (c) General Electives may be selected from any academic discipline other than Criminal Justice. (d) Students seeking to declare Criminal Justice A.A.S. as a second major field should consult with their advisor. It is recommended that these students select a course for this elective that meets the Criminal Justice A.A.S. degree requirements: (e.g., CIS 121, ENG 124, MAT 126 or higher, Lab Science or SPE 121).

82

Fall Semester CR ECH 121 Introduction to Early Childhood...................... 3 ECH 123 Curricular Methods I and Assessment.............. 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 Biology (a) OR Mathematics Elective (b)....... 3-4 15-16 Spring Semester CR ECH 131 Early Childhood Field Inst. and Seminar I....... 4 LIT 210 Children’s Literature......................................... 3 PSY 230 Child Development.......................................... 4 PSY 225 Introduction to Special Education.................... 4 Restricted Elective (c)....................................... 3 18

Minimum Credit Hours required for certificate: 33 Notes: (a) Science course should be selected from any BIO prefix. (b) MAT 126 or higher is required. Students who plan to pursue a two-year degree are advised to take a higher level mathematics. (c) Restricted Elective: ECH 227 Guidance of Young Children or HUS 133 Child Maltreatment. As of January 1, 2003, all students enrolled in ECH 131 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar I, ECH 231 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar II will need to supply the following before entering the field: • Clearance through NYS Criminal Conviction Unit by fingerprinting; • Clearance through NYS Central Clearance Registry for Child Abuse and Maltreatment; • A notarized Criminal Conviction Statement; • A signed “I Will” statement to uphold the NAEYC Code of Ethics and SCCC Early Childhood Professional Behaviors; • Medical evidence of his/her ability to work with children and a negative TB result.


Fire Science Certificate

General Business Certificate

The Fire Science Certificate emphasizes professional training for students who wish to obtain technical skills in fire protection. Volunteer and career firefighters may find the Fire Science Certificate helpful in job advancement, and it is often accepted as an alternate to firefighting experience in application for advancement examinations. This certificate should be of interest to persons employed in insurance and fields related to fire protection, as well as to volunteer and career firefighters.

The General Business Certificate is designed to prepare students for clerical jobs by providing instruction in essential skills. The courses in this program are applicable to the Business Administration A.A.S. degree program.

Every Fire Science course in the certificate program is applicable to the two-year degree in Fire Protection Technology. The technical courses are offered only in the late afternoon and evening. Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 MAT 128 Algebra I OR Higher...................................... 3-4 FPT Restricted Elective (a)................................ 3 FPT Restricted Elective (a)................................ 3 FPT Restricted Elective (a)............................. 3-4 15-17 Spring Semester CR CHM 113 Fundamentals of Chemistry OR Higher OR BIO 112 Human Biology............................ 4 CIS 121 Introduction to Computers OR Higher............. 3 FPT Restricted Elective (a)................................ 3 FPT Restricted Elective (a)................................ 3 13

Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 28

The program prepares students for jobs in business, industry and government, such as retail sales clerk, accounts receivable and accounts payable clerk, file clerk and other general office jobs. Fall Semester CR BUS 113 Business Mathematics....................................... 3 BUS 121 Business Law I.................................................. 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 BUS 118 Keyboarding I.................................................. 3 12 Spring Semester CR ACC 111 College Accounting OR ACC 121 Financial Accounting..................... 3-4 BUS 212 Business Communications................................ 3 CIS 121 Intro to Computers OR...................................... Business Elective (a)......................................... 3 Business Elective (a)......................................... 3 12-13

Minimum Credit Hours required for certificate: 24 Notes: (a) Choose any three credit courses from those with the prefix ACC, BUS, MGT, MKT, or TEL.

Notes: (a) Student must complete five of the following courses: • FPT 112 Principles of Emergency Services • FPT 120 Building Construction for Fire Protection • FPT 131 Fire Prevention • FPT 135 Fire Administration • FPT 137 Fire Protection Systems • FPT 215 Fire Investigation • FPT 219 Fire Behavior and Combustion • FPT 237 Industrial Fire Protection

83


Health Studies Certificate The goal of the Health Studies Certificate is academic preparation for students seeking admission to two-year health care programs such as Nursing. Coursework except for that of a developmental nature will transfer into two-year programs. Upon completing the program students will: • Confirm that they have made an informed career choice; • Meet health care program entrance requirements in math and science; • Be academically prepared for the clinical aspects of a health care program; and • Understand the health care delivery system and common ethical issues in health care today. Fall Semester HSC 100 Introduction to the Health Professions............. 1 BIO 112 Human Biology (a)........................................... 4 MAT 128 Algebra I (b)..................................................... 3 ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 14 Spring Semester SOC 121 Sociology......................................................... 3 CHM 113 Fundamentals of Chemistry (a)........................ 4 BIO 161 Nutrition in Health and Disease....................... 3 General Elective (c)....................................... 3-4 General Elective (c)....................................... 3-4 16-18

Minimum Credit Hours Required for Certificate: 30 Notes: a) If prerequisites have been met, substitute BIO 151 and BIO 152 Anatomy and Physiology I and II for BIO 112 and CHM 113. b) MAT 128 Algebra I or equivalent is a required math course. If the student has successfully completed MAT 128 or equivalent, an elective may be chosen from specific health program requirements. c) Elective should be chosen from specific health program requirements.

Music Certificate Mission The mission of the Music Certificate is to provide a quality education in accordance with the principles of Schenectady County Community College’s mission statement. Specifically, the program provides basic level musical training in the areas of performance, musicianship skills and theory. The program is intended for those who wish to either develop the necessary skills for further academic music study or to pursue personal growth. The Music Certificate program will enable graduates to develop: • Musicianship through the study of a major instrument or voice; • Basic theoretical and analytical musical skills and; • Basic awareness of the evolution of western music. Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 MUS 121 Enjoyment of Music......................................... 3 MUS 135 Applied Music I................................................ 2 MUS 147 Music Fundamentals........................................ 3 MUS 181 Beginning Piano*............................................. 2 13 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 MUS 106 Ear Training and Sight Singing......................... 3 MUS 136 Applied Music II.............................................. 2 MUS 182 Intermediate Piano*......................................... 2 Controlled Electives (a).................................... 3 13

Minimum Credit Hours required for certificate: 26 Advisement Notes for discussion with a Music advisor: Students planning to enter A.S. or A.A.S. Music degree programs should consider taking mathematics, science, or social science coursework applicable to the A.S. or A.A.S. program while enrolled in the Music Certificate program. See Controlled Electives below. (a) Controlled Electives: any of the following or combination of the following options can apply. (i) Completion of Music Certificate program only: Any combination of one-, two-, or three-credit MUS courses.

(ii) Preparation for audition in A.S. Performing Arts Music: MUS 100, MUS 231, HIS 125, HIS 127, Social Science electives (includes Anthropology, Economics, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Humanities/Social Sciences (HSS), Teacher Education Transfer, and appropriate Honors courses), MAT, and Science.

(iii) Preparation for audition in A.A.S. Music/Business: ACC 121, ACC 123, BUS 121, CIS 121, ECO 221, ECO 223, MGT 127.

(iv) SCCC ensembles taken as Certificate elective credits may not be used to satisfy music degree program requirements. * Students studying piano as their primary instrument in MUS 135 or MUS 136 (Applied Music) may substitute Controlled Electives for MUS 181 and/or MUS 182.

84


Teaching Assistant Certificate The Teaching Assistant Certificate was designed to serve a dual purpose – to assist individuals to meet the New York State Education Department requirements and as a pathway for those interested in continuing their education in pursuit of a teaching degree. Students earning a Teaching Assistant Certificate will have: • Completed a minimum of four SUNY General Education requirements; • Completed a three-credit Foundations of Education course and will understand the major theories, models and metaphors used to represent and discuss educational practices; • Spent a minimum of 10 hours in an educational setting within the community; • Had an opportunity to assess realistically their interests and possible careers in education and; • Met the New York State Education Department’s education requirements for a Pre-professional Teaching Assistant Certificate. Before working in a public educational setting, prospective employees will be required to undergo a fingerprint check. Individuals with a criminal history should be aware that they may have difficulty obtaining clearance for a New York State Teaching Assistant Certificate. Students with questions in this area may want to consult an advisor or college counselor before pursuing the Teaching Assistant Program.

(a) Restricted Humanities Elective: ENG 124 Introduction to Literature, LIT 210 Children’s Literature, or SPE 121 Introduction to Speech. (b) Restricted Psychology Elective: PSY 230 Child Development, PSY 223 Adolescent Psychology, or PSY 225 Introduction to Special Education. (c) Students may use this elective to complete a mathematics, science, history, OR other liberal arts requirement that meets a transfer or career need. (d) MAT 145 or above OR Science Elective. (e) Arts: Three credits of coursework in ART, DRA, MUS (except MUS 231) OR Foreign Language: ASL, FRE, ITA, or SPA. (Students may not select SPA 115 Basic Conversational Spanish I, SPA 116 Basic Conversational Spanish II, or FRE 111 Basic Conversational French to satisfy language requirements. Computer languages do not satisfy this requirement.) Information about the Assessment of Teaching Assistant Skills (ATAS), formerly called the New York State Assessment of Teaching Assistant Skills (NYSATAS), may be accessed at http://www.nystce.nesinc.com. Before working in a public educational setting, prospective employees will be required to undergo a fingerprint check. Individuals with a criminal history should be aware that they may have difficulty obtaining clearance for a New York State Teaching Assistant Certificate. Students with questions in this area may want to consult an advisor or college counselor before pursuing the Teaching Assistant Program.

Part-time Students/First Year/Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 6 Part-time Students/First Year/Spring Semester.............................CR Restricted Humanities Elective (a).................... 3 Restricted Psychology Elective (b)................. 3-4 6-7 Part-time Students/Second Year/Fall Semester CR Arts OR Foreign Language (e).......................... 3 Mathematics or Science Elective (d).............. 3-4 6-7 Part-time Students/Second Year/Spring Semester CR CIS OR Liberal Arts Elective (c)..................... 3-4 TET 221 Foundations of Education................................ 3 6-7 Full-time Students/Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology.............................. 3 Arts OR Foreign Language (e).......................... 3 Mathematics or Science Elective (d).............. 3-4 12-13 Full-time Students/Spring Semester CR Restricted Humanities Elective (a).................... 3 Restricted Psychology Elective (b)................. 3-4 CIS OR Liberal Arts Elective(c)...................... 3-4 TET 221 Foundations of Education................................ 3 12-14

Minimum Credit Hours required for certificate: 24 Notes: Students planning on transferring should become familiar with the particular requirements of the transfer institution as they choose electives.

85


Tourism, Sales and Convention Management Certificate Mission The mission of the Department of Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism is to provide superior education and technical training for students entering the Hospitality Industry. This enables graduates to achieve success in hotels, restaurants, culinary arts, event planning and tourism, either in an entry level or management position. Individuals may earn a certificate or an Associate’s degree in their chosen field and/or have the opportunity to take specific courses of interest that will add to their specialized skills and personal knowledge, as well as assist them in running a hospitality business. The Tourism, Sales and Convention Management Certificate provides training and instruction in tourism and sales, specifically booking conventions, meetings and training seminars, advertising and promotion. The processing of reservations, registering guests, assigning rooms, handling mail and messages, providing financial and credit accommodations and furnishing information about the hotel, community or special events are also covered in this program. Those desiring a better understanding of dining room and banquet operations (front of the house operations) should take HOT 238-Dining Room Management and Operations, and HOT 253-Banquet Management and Operations as additional electives, though not required in the program. This program is designed for students wishing a shorter course of study than the Tourism and Hospitality Management A.A.S. degree program. However, graduates of this program may transfer into the degree program with no loss of credit. Graduates of this program are qualified for entry level positions in tourism, meeting planning, and front desk positions. Students who take the additional electives will be qualified for entry level positions in catering and banquet offices, as well as entry level positions in dining room operations. Fall Semester CR ENG 123 College Composition........................................ 3 HOT 217 Front Office Management................................. 3 HOT 275 Marketing, Advertising and Sales for Hospitality Industry......................................... 3 HOT 277 Planning and Development Of Tourism............ 3 TAT 121 Introduction to Hospitality Industry................. 3 15 Spring Semester CR ENG 124 Introduction to Literature................................. 3 HOT 276 Meetings and Convention Management............ 3 HOT 218 Human Resources Mgmt/HFI........................... 3 HOT 291 Computers for the Hospitality Industry............ 3 TAT 231 Directed Study in Travel, Tourism and Convention Management........................... 3 15

Minimum Credit Hours required for Certificate: 30

86


CREDIT COURSES Course Numbering System

Electives

Courses are identified by an alphanumeric code, made up of three letters and three numbers, preceding the course title and course description. The three letters identify the subject field or program (MUS=Music). The three numbers generally indicate course level:

The majority of degree and certificate programs, as well as some certificate programs, include electives to be selected from designated areas. Elective courses provide students with the opportunity to choose the courses which are the most appropriate or the most interesting to them.

1. Courses numbered 101 through 199 are primarily first-year courses, but all students meeting course prerequisites may enroll. 2. Courses numbered 201 through 299 are generally second-year courses. These courses are open to students who have completed prerequisites. Sample Course Listing: Course Course Prefix Number

PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology

Course Title

(3-0-3)

Hours of Lecture Per Week

Hours Semester of Lab Hours Per Week of Credit

The remainder of the course listing includes course description, prerequisites and conditions for applicability, if any. Prerequisites, when listed, are those courses which must be completed prior to enrolling in a course. Corequisites, when listed, are courses which may be taken either prior to or at the same time as enrolling in a course. While the College provides each accepted student a schedule of courses each semester pertaining to his/her academic objectives and in partial fulfillment of program requirements, it cannot assure a desired time schedule, a preferred instructor or a given course. Courses are generally offered in the semesters indicated by the following codes after each course description: F - Fall S - Spring If no code is indicated, the course is offered based on program need. Summer and evening course offerings vary and are also based on program need. Contact the appropriate Department Chairperson for more information. The College reserves the right to alter its scheduling or cancel a course because of insufficient enrollment.

Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor in planning the electives to be included in their program of study. To aid the student and advisor in determining which electives will be acceptable, worksheets have been developed for each program offered at SCCC. Worksheets are available from advisers, department offices and the Student Development Center. Humanities Electives are to be chosen from non-required courses, applicable to the appropriate degree program, in the following areas: ART, ASL, COM 121, DRA, ENG 200, ENG 211, FRE, HIS, HON 144, HON 244, HSS, ITA, LIT, MUS 115, MUS 121, MUS 127, MUS 131, MUS 147, PHI, REL, SPA and SPE. Mathematics Electives are to be chosen from non-required mathematics courses that are applicable to the appropriate degree program. The specific courses included in this category are: courses with a prefix of MAT. Note: Students may not select MAT 126, 127, 128, or 129 to satisfy A.A. or A.S. degree requirements. Science Electives are to be chosen from non-required courses, applicable to the appropriate degree program, in the following areas: Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Physical Geography, Geology, NMT 150, NMT 152 and Physics. The specific courses included in the category are: courses with a prefix of AST, BIO, CHM, ENV, GEO, NMT and PHY. Note: BIO 111, 112 or CHM 113 will not satisfy requirements for the Science, Mathematics/Science or Computer Science degree. Follow your Curriculum Worksheet to be sure you take a course appropriate for your degree program. Social Science Electives are to be chosen from non-required courses, applicable to the appropriate degree program, in the following areas: ANT, COM 195, ECO, HIS, HON 144, HON 271, HON 281, HON 282, HSS, HUS 133, HUS 150, HUS 155, HUS 252, HUS 255, PHI, POL, PSY, REL and SOC. Liberal Arts Electives are to be chosen from non-required courses, applicable to the appropriate degree program, in the following areas: Humanities, Mathematics, Science and Social Sciences. The specific courses include those indicated in the preceding four categories. Fine and Performing Arts Electives are to be chosen from non-required courses, applicable to the appropriate degree program, in the following areas: Art, Drama and Music. The specific courses included in this category are courses with a prefix of ART, DRA or MUS.

87


Restricted Electives are to be chosen from those courses so designated in the program requirements. The specific courses are designated by course prefix and/or course number in the program’s Curriculum Worksheet. General Electives are to be chosen from among all courses offered by the College so long as they are applicable to the appropriate degree program. Note: The following courses will be offered during the semester in which they are listed in the various curricular displays. Some courses may be offered in the evening or on Saturday mornings during other terms as well. The College reserves the right to limit registration for courses, to discontinue courses for which there is insufficient enrollment and to change times and/or instructors. Some foreign language courses are given in the evenings and on sufficient demand. In particular, completion of one or two courses in an evening sequence does not obligate the College to offer the remainder of the sequence unless there is sufficient demand. Prefix

Subject Field/Program

ACC ASL ANT ART AST AER BIO BUS CHM CSS CIS CRJ DRA ECH ECO ELT EMS ENG ENV ETH FPT FSS FRE GHY GEO HIS HON HOT HUS HSS ITA LIT MGT MKT MAT MUS NMT PAL PHI

Accounting....................................................................... 87 American Sign Language................................................... 87 Anthropology................................................................... 88 Art.................................................................................... 88 Astronomy........................................................................ 88 Aviation............................................................................ 88 Biology............................................................................. 90 Business............................................................................ 90 Chemistry......................................................................... 91 College Study Skills.......................................................... 92 Computer Information Systems........................................ 92 Criminal Justice................................................................ 94 Drama.............................................................................. 95 Early Childhood............................................................... 95 Economics........................................................................ 96 Electrical Technology........................................................ 97 Emergency Medical Services............................................. 97 English............................................................................. 97 Environmental Science..................................................... 98 Ethics............................................................................... 98 Fire Protection Technology............................................... 98 First Year Success Seminar................................................ 99 French.............................................................................. 99 Geography........................................................................ 99 Geology.......................................................................... 100 History........................................................................... 100 Honors........................................................................... 100 Hotel and Restaurant Management................................. 101 Human Services.............................................................. 103 Humanities/Social Sciences............................................. 104 Italian............................................................................. 104 Literature........................................................................ 104 Management................................................................... 105 Marketing....................................................................... 106 Mathematics................................................................... 106 Music............................................................................. 107 Nanoscale Materials Technology..................................... 110 Paralegal......................................................................... 111 Philosophy...................................................................... 111

88

Page

PHY POL PSY REL SOC SPA SPE TET TEL TAT

Physics........................................................................... 111 Political Science.............................................................. 112 Psychology..................................................................... 112 Religion.......................................................................... 113 Sociology........................................................................ 113 Spanish........................................................................... 113 Speech............................................................................ 114 Teacher Education Transfer............................................. 114 Telecommunications....................................................... 114 Tourism and Hospitality Management............................. 114


Accounting

ACC 111 College Accounting

(3-0-3)

This course concentrates on the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) applied to a sole proprietorship. Topics include: analyzing, journalizing and posting transactions, adjusting entries, completion of the work sheet, financial statements, and the closing process for a service business, Accounting for Cash, Payroll Accounting and the Combination Journal are also covered.

ACC 121 Financial Accounting

(4-0-4)

This course introduces the current procedures of financial accounting and generally accepted accounting principles. The course emphasizes the analysis of business transactions and the study of the accounting cycle. Ethics issues are discussed throughout the course. Accrual based accounting concepts, internal controls, and financial statement preparation are addressed as well as the accounting elements of a corporate business entity. Each student will be asked to complete a practice set of entries for a business entity. F, S

ACC 122 Managerial Accounting

(4-0-4)

This course introduces current managerial accounting concepts, theories and practices applicable to a financial entity. Job order, process cost and activitybased cost systems are introduced. Budgeting, profit analysis, product pricing and reporting concerns of decentralized operations are specific topics covered in this course. Also included are special topics focused on financial statement analysis. Ethics issues are discussed throughout the course. PR: ACC 121 F, S

ACC 123 Accounting for Decision Making - Concepts and Theory

(3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to financial accounting. Emphasis is on the analysis and interpretation of financial information. Generally accepted accounting principles will be discussed throughout the course. The standard reports of financial accounting will be studied as well as the process of identifying, measuring, recording and reporting financial information. Internal control procedures, corporate assets, liabilities, and shareholders’ equity will also be studied as well as reporting concerns of international companies. Interpretation and analysis of financial reports and current issues affecting these reports will be stressed. Corporate financial statements will be reviewed in and out of class via the Internet. PR: MAT 127 or equivalent F

ACC 201 Computer Applications in Accounting

(1-0-1)

This course provides the student with basic computer skills specific to a financial accounting environment. Topics include setting up a business entity’s accounting system, recording financial transactions, and working with budget development and evaluation. Students will create invoices, create and analyze accounts receivable and payment aging reports, and develop financial statements and reports with the assistance of a software application. Students will be required to use computers to complete projects. Outside laboratory work is required. PR: ACC 111 or ACC 121 or ACC 123 S

ACC 222 Intermediate Accounting I

(3-0-3)

Intensive consideration is given to financial accounting theory and the current application of generally accepted accounting principles. A significant amount of time is devoted to financial statement preparation and presentation. Emphasis is placed on the balance sheet. Each of the principal asset accounts shown on the face of the balance sheet is studied in detail. The accounting cycle, measurement of income, acquisition and disposal of assets, and the time value of money are some of the specific topics covered. PR: ACC 122 F

ACC 225 Income Tax Accounting

(3-0-3)

This course is an in-depth study of the current income tax law and tax regulations. It provides the student with practical applications in the preparation of income tax returns for individuals with supporting tax schedules. Instruction is also given on partnership and corporate taxation. Special tax situations are stressed and explanations are developed through the use of examples. A computer software application is used to complete several assignments. S

ACC 226 Intermediate Accounting II

(4-0-4)

This course is a continuation of the study of financial accounting theory and practice. The study of liabilities and stockholders’ equity concludes the study of the balance sheet which began in ACC 222. Specific accounts examined include current and contingent liabilities, bonds, notes, corporate income taxes, leases, capital stock and retained earnings. Preparation of the income statement, statement of retained earnings and statement of cash flows in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles is also covered. Financial statement analysis, revenue recognition rules, and accounting changes are other topics addressed. Computer software packages are utilized in and outside of class to complete several assignments. PR: ACC 222 S

ACC 242 Cost Management

(3-0-3)

This course develops an understanding of accounting information for use by management in planning and controlling operations. A framework for measuring managerial performance is developed through an analytical treatment of cost behavior under dynamic conditions by employing tools such as cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting and actual and standard cost systems. The use of costs in decision-making contexts is emphasized. PR: ACC 122

ACC 246 Auditing

(3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to auditing for accounting students who have not had experience in auditing. The primary emphasis is on the auditor’s decision- making process. Included are concepts in auditing related to determining the nature and amount of evidence the auditor should accumulate, the objectives to be accomplished in a given audit area, the circumstances of the engagement, and the decisions to be made to determine the appropriate evidence to gather and how to evaluate the evidence obtained. Ethical conduct and legal liability of auditors are also covered along with auditing within a computerized environment. PR: ACC 122

ACC 248 Governmental Accounting

(3-0-3)

This course surveys the theory and practice involved in budgetary procedures, accounting for general and special funds, for governments, public schools and other nonprofit entities. PR: ACC 122

ACC 250 Accounting Internship

(1-8-3)

This course provides the business/accounting student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study and field work within selected business entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience is enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate accounting or accounting related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester. PR: ACC 222, Business or Accounting major, G.P.A. of 2.5, and permission of the department S

American Sign Language

ASL 121 Elementary American Sign Language I

(3-0-3)

The first half of the one-year sequence in elementary American Sign Language, this course introduces students to the process and basic structure of ASL to provide a basic understanding of and ability to use the language. Students’ expressive (signing) and receptive (comprehension) skills are enhanced by an

89


understanding of Deaf Culture. A minimum of five hours of additional ASL practice in a laboratory and/or hearing impaired setting is required. This course is designed for beginners.

Astronomy

ASL 122 Elementary American Sign Language II

This course introduces students to the space exploration from ancient myths and dreams to present fulfillment in the reality of unmanned and manned missions to the heavens. The instruments of astronomy such as telescopes, rockets, orbiting observatories, and robotic explorers are highlighted in detail during this course. Manned missions from Mercury through Apollo, to current shuttle/ MIR missions are analyzed as to their scientific objectives, technology, practical benefits, and political importance to the human experience in space. PR: Two years of high school mathematics

(3-0-3)

The second half of the one-year sequence in Elementary Sign Language, this course continues the study of the processes and basic structures of ASL to provide an in-depth understanding of and an ability to use the language more fluently. Students’ expressive (signing) and receptive (comprehension) skills are enhanced by a deeper understanding of Deaf Culture. A minimum of five hours of additional ASL practice in a laboratory and/or Deaf setting is required. PR: ASL 121

Anthropology

ANT 121 Cultural Anthropology

(3-0-3)

This course explores kinship, marriage, family, political, religious and economic organization in cross- cultural perspective. The concentration is on historical development, theoretical perspectives, basic concepts and methodology of cultural anthropology with an emphasis on non-Western societies.

ANT 135 Introduction to Archaeology

(3-0-3)

This course explores the methods and theories of anthropological archaeology as they relate to the understanding of human prehistory as revealed in the archeological record. The course concentrates on basic concepts, methodology, theories about the past and explanations for human cultural development. The scope is world wide and emphasizes preliterate non- Western cultures.

Art

ART 127 Introduction to Watercolors

(2-2-3)

This is a studio art course which includes segments of both lecture-demonstration and laboratory. Lectures will include topics on the history of watercolors and its relationship to the history of art. Sessions will include the exploration of concepts through exercise, as well as working from still life and the model. Design fundamentals will be incorporated into the class on a weekly basis. Personal expression will be strongly encouraged.

ART 128 Introduction to Drawing

(2-2-3)

This is a studio art course which includes segments of both lecture-demonstration and drawing. Sessions will include the exploration of concepts through exercises as well as drawing from objects and the model. Drawing is explored as a discipline, as a tool for analysis, description or documentation, as well as a means of composition and expression.

ART 129 Graphic Art

(2-2-3)

This studio course introduces students to the basic theory and practice of graphic art. Emphasis is placed on understanding design concepts, developing relationships between concepts and image, expression, visual problem solving, and studio practice. PR: ART 128, equivalent experience, or consent of instructor

ART 133 Appreciation of Art-Painting

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the history of the visual arts and to help them develop an understanding and appreciation of artistic creativity. Various examples of painting, print-making, and drawing from Western other cultures such as African, South American, and Indo-Chinese will be analyzed in order to promote an awareness of different approaches to these media, forms, and content. No background in art or formal art history is necessary.

ART 135 Appreciation of Art-Sculpture and Architecture

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the spatial arts of sculpture and architecture and to develop in them an appreciation of artistic creativity as it applies to these art forms. An examination will be conducted of cross-cultural influences among architectural styles such as Moorish on early Renaissance, Greek on Roman, etc. Sculpture is analyzed as an independent art form in order to help the student develop an awareness of the variety of media, form, content, and style. No background in art or formal art history is necessary.

90

AST 123 Exploring Space

AST 125 Solar System

(3-0-3)

(3-0-3)

This is a one-semester course designed to acquaint students with the modern exploration of the Solar System. The emphasis is on the evolution and characteristics of the major planets, moons and numerous minor planets of the Solar System. Other topics include solar and lunar eclipses, seasons, lunar phases, and astronomical folklore. PR: Two years of high school mathematics F

AST 127 Cosmic System

(3-0-3)

This is a one-semester course designed to acquaint students with the scientific study of the heavens. The emphasis is on the evolution, life cycle and characteristics of the stars and galaxies. Information from recent discoveries by the Hubble telescope and other 21st century NT telescopes will be presented. Other discussion topics include constellation identification, space travel, life in the universe, and cosmology. PR: Two years of high school mathematics S

Aviation Science

AER 101 Introduction to Flight Laboratory

(0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to acquire a Private Pilot’s license, Aircraft, SEL certificate. The primary flight training includes dual and solo flight time to meet the FAA practical testing standards in such training as basic flight maneuvers, takeoff and landing, night flying and cross-country procedures. Minimum FAA flight training hours apply and students will, in most cases, exceed those minimum hours in order to meet practical test standards. Completion of the FAA knowledge exam is required for this certificate. PR: FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements, adequate proficiency in English, or the successful completion of CSS 123 and CSS 125; and MAT 129 or equivalent. CR: AER 103 Lab fee: $8,400 F

AER 102 Aviation History

(3-0-3)

This course provides a general description of the entire field of aviation starting with the early achievements of flight and progressing through the various milestones to the present age. This course contains an overview of the governmental involvement with the aviation industry from establishing the postal routes, safety regulation, airline subsidies, through deregulation of the airline industry. This course includes the contributions to aviation by women, minorities and other cultures. The introduction and development of power flight, from Zeppelins, Flying Boats, through the Boeing 777, and the X-30 Oriental Express and beyond is also explored. An extended field trip will be made to either the Curtis Air Museum in Hammondsport, N.Y. or the Rhinebeck Aerodrome, Rhinebeck, N.Y., to see aircraft from the early years of flight. F


AER 103 Introduction to Flight

(4-0-4)

AER 214 Physiology of Flight

(3-0-3)

Basic introductory study of the principles of flight. Subjects covered in this course include: theory of flight, basic aerodynamics, airplane operation, systems and performance, navigation, flight computer computations, communications, publications, regulations and basic emergency procedures. PR: Adequate proficiency in English or successful completion of CSS 123 and CSS 125; and MAT 129 or equivalent. F

In this course students will study the physical effects of flight on the human body including a discussion of the following: cockpit resource management, effects of high altitude flight, G-forces, alcohol and drugs, including OTC and illicit, “IMSAFE” requirement of every pilot for the safety of themselves as well as other persons, passengers and property, and FAR Part 37 Medical disqualifications. PR: AER 103 or permission of the department

AER 140 Elements of Instrument

AER 228 Commercial Operations Lab 1

(4-0-4)

This course is a study of the instrument flying techniques and procedures in conjunction with modern, ILS, VOR, ADF, GPS and radar facilities. The course includes the study of basic attitude instrument flying, instrument navigation procedures, holding, precision and non- precision approach and departure procedures and macro- and micro-meteorology analysis. Students are provided with the information necessary to complete the FAA Instrument Rating Knowledge Exam. PR: AER 103 or equivalent

AER 141 Elements of Instrument Lab

(0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single-engine aircraft and an approved flight training device to acquire an Instrument Rating, Aircraft, SEL. The primary instrument flight training includes dual flight time to meet the FAA practical testing standards in such training as attitude instrument flying, departure, en route and approach procedures in the instrument flight environment, instrument night flying, and cross-country procedures. Minimum FAA flight training hours apply and students will, in most cases, exceed those minimum hours in order to meet practical test standards. Completion of the FAA knowledge exam is required for this certificate. PR: AER 101 and 103 or equivalent Private Pilot Certificate, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended); proof of US citizenship or of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 140 Lab Fee: $8,200

AER 150 Airport Management and Security

(3-0-3)

This course familiarizes students with the fundamental components of a typical commercial airport and its multi-level security requirements. In addition to a commercial airport’s various support functions, the organizational structure, governing FAA regulations, inter-agency relationships and management challenges are examined. Security issues are presented in a post 9/11 environment to include scenario-based discussions and problem-solving situations.

AER 200 Commercial Operations

(3-0-3)

This course is a study of the required knowledge for a Commercial Pilot’s license. Subjects covered in this course include: advanced aerodynamics, advanced aircraft systems, physiology, emergency procedures and planning, flight safety, and aeronautical decision making. There is a focus on crew resource management and flight safety operations to include Part 91 and Part 135 regulations and operations. Students will receive an instructor endorsement for the Commercial Pilot Knowledge Exam at the completion of the course requirements for an airplane-SEL. PR: AER 101 and AER 103 or equivalent

AER 210 Aviation Law

(3-0-3)

This course covers the history of aviation law, federal regulation of air transportation with special attention to ecological aspects of aircraft noise and pollutants and the role of state and federal government in aviation law, including functions of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Terminal Security Administration. PR: AER 103 or permission of the department

(0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical fight experience in a single engine aircraft toward the FAA cross-country requirement to obtain a Commercial Pilot Certificate. This course alone will not complete all requirements for the commercial certificate. Students will gain flight experience in day and night cross-country both dual and solo. Students will be introduced to the crew resource management concept, function and practical use of standard operating procedures, minimum equipment lists and commercial flight operations (Part 135 and Part 121) scenarios. PR: AER 140 and AER 141 or equivalent, Private Pilot with an Instrument Rating, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 200 or equivalent Lab Fee : $6,700

AER 229 Commercial Operations Lab 2

(0-3-1)

This course provides a student with continued practical experience in crew resource management as it applies to complex and high performance aircraft. Continued use of effective communication skills are formulated and evaluated throughout this course. Students are introduced to the function and operation of advanced aircraft systems, practical experience in accelerated stalls and advanced maneuvers in order to apply aerodynamic theory. Students are trained on advanced aircraft systems including constant speed propellers and retractable landing gear, the associated emergency procedures for these systems and planning for commercial flight situations. Students completing this course in conjunction with AER 228 will receive the practical flight experience requirements necessary to complete the FAA Commercial Practical Exam and receive a Commercial Pilot Certificate, Airplane, SEL. PR: AER 200 and AER 228, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. Lab Fee: $7,200

AER 232 Basic Instruction

(3-0-3)

This course covers the techniques of basic flight instruction in order to become an FAA Certified Flight Instructor. Subjects covered include the fundamentals of flight instruction to prepare the student for the FAA Knowledge Exam on the Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI). Additionally, this course will analyze basic and advanced flight maneuvers, mechanics and regulations so as to prepare the student for the oral and written FAA Flight Instructor-Airplane exams. PR: AER 200

AER 233 Basic Instruction Lab

(0-1-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to acquire an FAA Flight Instructor Certificate-Airplane, single engine land. Students will acquire instructional knowledge of the elements of all flight maneuvers and procedures necessary for private and commercial pilot certification. Analysis of the required maneuvers includes the recognition and correction of common student errors. PR: AER 200, AER 228, AER 229 or equivalent, Commercial Pilot Certificate-Airplane, single engine land, FAA Second Class Medical Lab Fee: $3,500

91


AER 236 Flight Safety

(3-0-3)

BIO 151 Anatomy and Physiology I

(3-3-4)

This course introduces practical safety material, organizations and equipment necessary to conduct safe daily flight operations. All factors including weather, maintenance, equipment and human factors will be examined, with particular emphasis on critical decision making under stress conditions. Proper decision making will be based on knowledge of formal weather briefing techniques, flight plan filing, search and rescue methods, post-crash survival, aircraft maintenance programs, accident/incident reports and forms, airport rescue and firefighting, the role of the NTSB and flight safety organizations, and modern hardware (Doppler radar, HSOS, LLWSAS, TCAS, GPWS). PR: AER 103 or permission of the department

This is the first course of a lecture/laboratory sequence designed for students of the allied health fields. The lecture topics covered are anatomical medical terminology, cell structure, tissues, the skin, skeletal system, muscular system and nervous system. The laboratory topics include cells, tissues and an examination of the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Both gross and microscopic work are emphasized. PR: Three years of high school mathematics, high school biology and chemistry (taken within the past three years); or BIO 111 or BIO 112 and CHM 113 (taken within the past two years).

Biology

BIO 152 Anatomy and Physiology II

BIO 111 Fundamentals of Biology

(3-2-4)

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of biology with emphasis on humans. It will examine both the internal systems of humans and the relationship of humans as organisms to the physical and biotic environment. This course is designed for students in services related fields. This course does not satisfy any requirement for the Math/Science, Computer Science, or Science degrees PR: Two years of high school science or math F, S

BIO 112 Human Biology

(3-2-4)

Human Biology introduces the structure and function of the human body. Students will study the major systems of the human body, including reproduction, digestion, and nutrition, circulation, respiration, nervous and hormonal control, and the skeletal and muscular systems. Students will also study human diseases from a perspective of either a malfunction of a body system, environment, or heredity. Laboratory topics include microscopy, cell physiology, structures and functions of the human body, and anatomical dissections.

BIO 115 Current Topics in Biology

(3-0-3)

This is a one-semester course which will address some of the major problems and issues in biology. Cell structure and function, the nutritional needs of cells and organisms, the universal nature of the genetic code which allows genetic engineering, the effects of pollutants and the basic concepts of ecology are among the topics which will be covered. An appreciation of the scientific method and the types of questions science can answer will be fostered.

BIO 141 Biology I

(3-3-4)

(3-3-4)

This is the second course of a lecture/laboratory sequence designed for students of the allied health fields. The lecture topics covered are: the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, immune, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive systems, and in addition, metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance. The laboratory work covers the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Both macroscopic and microscopic work are emphasized. PR: BIO 151

BIO 154 Introduction to Pharmacology

(3-0-3)

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of pharmacology and is designed for students in nursing or other health related fields. It will examine the basic understanding of drug actions, drug absorption, bioavailability, distribution, metabolism and excretion; the administration of therapeutic drugs; drugs that affect the nervous, cardiovascular, and renal systems; drugs with actions on smooth muscle; endocrine drugs; chemotherapeutic drugs; antimicrobials; cancer chemotherapy; immunopharmacology; special aspects of pediatric, geriatric, dermatologic and gastrointestinal pharmacology. PR: BIO 151 and 152 and high school chemistry or CHM 113 or equivalent; higher level of chemistry preferred. S

BIO 161 Nutrition in Health and Disease

(3-0-3)

This is a one-semester course primarily for students in nursing and other allied health fields. Topics include definitions of nutrients and how body physiology handles them, nutrition during the life cycle, basics of diet therapy and patient care. PR: One year of high school science F, S

This first semester of a one-year course explores in depth the principles of modern biology. The development of molecular biology and its techniques will be examined, along with its impact on modern concepts of cell structure and physiology, cell reproduction, energy transfer. Genetics, including the structure and role of DNA, is examined. Changes in DNA over time, that is, evolution and adaptation, are discussed. The laboratory portion of the course consists of topics correlating with lecture and designed to lead the student into independent and/or team research and thought. There is a semester-long research project on Mendelian Genetics. PR: Three years of high school math, high school biology and chemistry (taken within the past three years) or BIO 111 or BIO 112 and CHM 113 (taken within the past two years). F

BIO 241 Microbiology

BIO 142 Biology II

Students are introduced to the most popular e-Commerce business models and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. This course is designed to teach students how to create a business plan and form into work teams to operate an Internet-based news company providing information about various academic units such as sports, music, drama, and culinary arts. Students will be required to research, collect, prepare, and enter data into their sites. Students are taught the web’s history, its impact on society, up-to-date techniques for creating revenue-generating web sites and then apply those techniques to their sites. Students are taught the importance of security, privacy, and social responsibility for successful e-Commerce. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete assignments. PR: CSS 123 and CSS 125

(3-3-4)

This second semester of a one-year course explores in depth the principles of molecular, cellular, and organismal biology. Topics include the molecular basis of inheritance, evolution, population genetics, six-kingdom analysis, and the systems of the human body. The laboratory portion is designed in three parts. Part one consists of learning techniques in molecular biology. Part two involves learning characteristics of the six-kingdom system and the dissection of the fetal pig for different body systems. Part three consists of conducting a laboratory research project with a formal presentation of the results. PR: BIO 141 S

92

(3-3-4)

This is a course in the fundamental principles of the biology of microorganisms. The topics include the morphology, physiology, and disease production capacity of microorganisms, protective mechanisms of hosts, control of microorganisms, genetic engineering and biotechnology, industrial microbiology, and microbial ecology. PR: BIO 141 or 151 or permission of the department F, S

Business

BUS 109 e-Commerce

(3-0-3)


BUS 113 Business Mathematics

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to teach students how to calculate and apply trade and cash discounts, percentages and markups, simple interest, discounting notes, payrolls, bank reconciliations, business and consumer loans, depreciation, and inventory evaluation methods. F, S

BUS 115 Basic Keyboarding

(1-0-1)

The student will learn to key the alphabetic keys using the “touch method.” The student will learn the reaches to the numeric and symbol keys as well as basic formatting, proofreading, and editing techniques. The student will develop keyboarding speed and accuracy. A minimum of 20 net wpm is required. This course is offered in a time period shorter than a full semester. Additional laboratory hours are required. F, S

BUS 118 Keyboarding I

(3-0-3)

The student will learn to key the alphabetic and numeric keys using the “touch method,” as well as formatting, proofreading, and editing techniques using Microsoft Word. The student will develop keyboarding speed and accuracy and will format documents including letters, memoranda, reports, and tables. The student will learn to apply basic language arts skills in the production of documents. F, S

Chemistry

CHM 113 Fundamentals of Chemistry

(3-3-4)

The fundamentals of chemistry are covered in one semester. Topics include Modern Atomic Theory, chemical bonding, classification of chemical reactions, stoichemistry, solution chemistry, the gas laws, and the major definitions of acids and bases. The laboratory will cover laboratory techniques and will be used to illustrate the chemical principles taught in the course. This course does not satisfy any requirement for the Math/Science, Computer Science, or Science degrees PR: MAT 128 F, S

CHM 115 Consumer Chemistry

(3-0-3)

This course will cover the fundamentals necessary to understand the atoms and molecules that are the fundamental building blocks of all things. This knowledge will subsequently be applied to discussions of the chemistry involved in our everyday lives, such as the chemistry of food, medicines, soaps and detergents, household cleaners, perfumes and personal care items, polymers, materials, and the environment.

CHM 121 General Chemistry I

(3-3-4)

This course focuses on the nature and sources of law pertaining to contracts, sales, secured transactions, bankruptcy and insurance. F, S

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence. Topics include Modern Atomic Theory, chemical bonding and intermolecular forces, classification of chemical reactions, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, the gas laws, and enthalpy. The laboratory emphasizes techniques, laboratory notebook keeping and experiments to illustrate the concepts studied. PR: High school math equivalencies of course A and course B or course 1, course 2, and course 3, and high school chemistry or CHM 113 F, S

BUS 123 Business Law II

CHM 122 General Chemistry II

BUS 121 Business Law I

(3-0-3)

(3-0-3)

This course continues the study of law begun in Business Law I, and covers the subjects of personal and real property, bailments, agency, employment, partnerships, corporations, limited liability companies, estates and trusts. PR: BUS 121 F, S

BUS 135 Word Processing

(3-0-3)

The student will learn advanced document formatting using the functions of Microsoft Word. Word processing commands are applied on a variety of documents such as letters with mail merge, tables, and reports. The student will also be introduced to legal forms, graphic enhancements and meeting management. Employment application and follow-up letters will be reviewed. Proof-reading, composition and other language arts skills are integrated and reinforced. PR: BUS 118 F, S

BUS 212 Business Communications

(3-0-3)

This course teaches the principles of effective communication in business, both written and oral. It focuses attention on the communication process including effective listening, writing and speaking. Students analyze business letters, reports and memos for organization of ideas, conciseness and clarity. Students are required to write business letters and memos. Students are also required to write a business report and make an oral presentation. Writing résumés and employment letters is also covered in this course. PR: ENG 123 (may be taken concurrently) F, S

BUS 223 Business Statistics

(3-0-3)

This course provides the student with the knowledge to gather, process and present statistical data, construct frequency charts, compute measures of central tendency and standard and quartile deviations. This latter knowledge is then applied to solving business problems in sampling, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and trend analysis. PR: MAT 127 F, S

(3-3-4)

The course is a second of a two-semester sequence. Topics will include kinetics, buffers, solubility and precipitation reactions, equilibrium, acids and bases and their reactions, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Selected topics may include nuclear chemistry, an introduction to organic chemistry, and transitional metal chemistry. The laboratory emphasizes techniques and laboratory notebook keeping. The laboratory experiments illustrate the concepts studied. PR: CHM 121 or equivalent F, S

CHM 200 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry

(3-3-4)

This course provides an introduction to the major classes of organic compounds followed by an introduction to biochemistry including a study of the structure and function of the four major macromolecules in biochemistry: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes, and nucleic acids. Other molecules such as hormones and vitamins, which are important to the cellular and molecular processes, will also be studied. PR: CHM 122 or equivalent

CHM 228 Organic Chemistry I

(4-3-5)

This course is the first of a two-semester course in organic chemistry. The first semester includes the study of structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, preparation, reactions and reaction mechanisms of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cyclic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, ethers, epoxides, and alcohols. The laboratory stresses techniques, organic synthesis and the use of instruments for analysis. PR: CHM 122 or equivalent

CHM 229 Organic Chemistry II

(4-3-5)

The second semester of organic chemistry covers the structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, preparation, reactions and reaction mechanisms of conjugated systems, aromatic systems, carboxylic acids and derivatives, B-dicarbonyl compounds, aldehydes, ketones, amines, phenols, and aryl halides. The laboratory stresses organic synthesis and the identification of organic compounds. PR: CHM 228 or equivalent S

93


College Study Skills CSS 106 Mathematics Skills

(3-0-*)

This course is a review of basic arithmetic operations with an algebraic approach (including whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios). It provides preparation/review for Intro to Algebra, Business Math, Math for Food Service Records, and Concepts in Mathematics. F, S

CSS 116 Skills for College Success

(1-0-*)

This one-credit course is designed to provide a brief but intensive review of study skills for success in college. The following skills are covered: setting goals, time management, remembering and reproducing what you learn, textbook reading, note taking, and stress management. F, S

CSS 119 ESL for Academic Writing

(3-0-*)

This course is targeted for the academically and linguistically diverse population of SCCC students or prospective students whose first language is not English. The multilevel approach will focus on the common areas of difficulty in second language writing and reading. Its main goal is to enable students to engage in academic work with skills commensurate with those of native speakers.

CSS 120 Introduction to Algebra

(3-0-*)

This course focuses on algebraic operations and properties within the real number system, including integers, rational and irrational numbers. Algebra is introduced to evaluate formulas, solve first degree equations in one variable, perform operations on polynomials, graph lines, and calculate basic geometric formulas. This course provides preparation and review for Algebra I. PR: CSS 106 or equivalent F, S

CSS 122 Reading Skills I

(3-0-*)

This course is intended to equip students with the skills and strategies to expand vocabulary and comprehend reading material beyond literal meaning. Students study vocabulary weekly using context clues, association, and visualization techniques. Students develop skills in finding main idea, details, and inference by reading a variety of literature and expository materials. Students develop critical thinking skills by analyzing, comparing, and contrasting texts, often in writing. Study skills taught include textbook study strategies and note-taking. F, S

CSS 123 Reading Skills II

(3-0-*)

This course provides an opportunity to learn and practice reading comprehension skills that go beyond CSS 122. The course includes vocabulary development, higher level comprehension skills, critical reading and thinking, reading textbooks, reading short fiction, and writing as related to reading. Study Skills taught include marking and annotating textbooks, outlining, mapping, and writing summaries. PR: CSS 122 or recommendation based on placement test F, S

CSS 124 Writing Skills I

(3-0-*)

This course provides instruction and practice in the fundamentals of writing including grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and organization. The student moves from paragraph to essay development using the process approach to writing. Unless otherwise indicated in the semester course schedule, this course is taught using computers in an electronic classroom. F, S

94

CSS 125 Writing Skills II

(3-0-*)

This course emphasizes key elements of essay writing: clarifying a purpose, identifying a specific audience, and adjusting the style and tone accordingly. Development of a thesis, introduction and conclusion are taught, as are the use of transitions and organizational patterns for coherence. Practice in grammar, mechanics and MLA format is provided. Unless otherwise indicated in the semester class schedule, this course is taught using computers in an electronic classroom. PR: CSS 124 or recommendation based on placement test F, S * These courses are developmental in nature and the three credit equivalents do not satisfy degree or certificate program requirements.

Communications COM 121 Mass Media

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on how mass media functions and impacts United States culture. From both a historical and contemporary point of view, it explains the structures and processes of the eight areas of mass media: books, magazines, newspapers, radio, movies, television, recordings, and digital media. It also explores the technological, economic, political and cultural aspects of the media. Communications and mass media theories are examined in tandem with an analysis of the key issues in the field. CR: ENG 123

Computer Science CIS 102 Computing Basics

(1-0-1)

This introductory course provides the student with the computer basics necessary for working with software applications in a personal computer object-oriented environment. Topics include the basics of computer input/output devices, finding and using virtual help sources and file management. Students will be required to make use of personal computers to complete projects.

CIS 110 Workstation Architecture and Support I (A+)

(3-0-3)

This is part one of a two-part, hands-on, lab-oriented course in the foundations of PC configuration and support. Students will learn how to build a computer and install different versions of the Windows operating system. This course will help prepare students for exciting career opportunities in computer technology.

CIS 111 Workstation Architecture and Support II (A+)

(3-0-3)

This is part two of a two-part, hands-on, lab-oriented course. Part two introduces local area networks and servers, preventive maintenance techniques, and specific strategies for troubleshooting hardware and software. PR: CIS 110

CIS 121 Introduction to Computers

(3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to fundamental concepts of computers and computing including number systems, hardware, architecture, information processing, operating systems, networks (including the Internet) and web design. Additionally, students will complete significant projects utilizing contemporary word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation graphics software. Fundamentals of programming will be explored using modern programming languages. Other software applications may be examined during the semester. PR: BUS 115 or equivalent

CIS 129 Programming Fundamentals

(3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to computer programming using the Microsoft Visual Basic programming language. It is intended to be a beginning programming course focusing on programming concepts and fundamentals. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming assignments. PR: CIS 102 and BUS 115 F, S


CIS 133 Programming in Java

(3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to programming in the Java language. Java is an object-oriented programming language used in developing World Wide Web applications. Topics include methods, class declarations, GUI interfaces, and writing Web applets. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 129 F, S

CIS 134 C++/UNIX

(4-0-4)

Students are introduced to commonly used algorithms. Object-oriented design and object-oriented programming principles are employed in problem solving using C++ programming language. Students are introduced to the UNIX operating system. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 129 or equivalent F, S

CIS 136 Introduction to Web Development

(3-0-3)

This course provides the student with the essential concepts and process of web page development, starting with Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (XHTML) coding and building to more complex layouts using cascading style sheets (CSS). The course will emphasize a disciplined approach to software design and coding. Attention will be directed toward the impact of a designer’s choices on communication, understanding and accessibility. Upon completion, all students will develop an original, dynamic, multi-paged website suitable for publishing on the WWW. CR: CIS 102 or adequate proficiency in basic computing skills

CIS 140 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting

(2-2-3)

This course teaches the basics of computer aided drafting as applied to engineering drawings using the AutoCAD drafting package. Topics include: fundamentals of computer aided drafting, drafting equipment, orthographic representations, special views, applied geometry and drawing conventions, basic dimensioning, section views, thread representation, detail and assembly drawings, auxiliary views, isometric and other pictorial drawings, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. The student will then learn the fundamentals of 3-D solids and sheet designs using the Autodesk Inventor package.

CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications

(3-0-3)

This course provides students with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of several components of the Microsoft Office suite of software applications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to test as certified Microsoft Office User Specialists. PR: CIS 121 or equivalent

CIS 223 Database Management

(3-0-3)

This course will give the student a basic overview of Relational Database Design. The student will acquire advanced knowledge of Microsoft Access and the ISO standard SQL language. Students will work individually on one large project encompassing all phases of database design and implementation. CR: CIS 129 and adequate proficiency in Microsoft Access S

CIS 225 Operating Systems

(3-0-3)

This course will introduce students to Operating System theory and application. Operating System’s concepts and components will be explored in both the UNIX (Linux) and Windows environments. Topics include: process management, communication and synchronization, memory management, device management, file systems, system administration and security. PR: CIS 129

CIS 229 Systems Analysis and Design

(3-0-3)

This course places emphasis on a disciplined approach to software development using the application of software engineering principles. Students will be provided with a step-by-step introduction to software development. This course will introduce the student to the software development life-cycle, including a general overview of a typical business-oriented software system, the analysis of the system, an approach to the design of the system, and a plan for system testing and future maintenance. Students will work collaboratively on a business computer information systems project encompassing all phases of the software development life cycle. PR: CIS 223 S

CIS 236 Advanced Web Design

(3-0-3)

This course is for the student who wants to learn advanced web page and site design techniques using contemporary development tools and languages. Concepts relating to client-side programming are explored. PR: CIS 129 and CIS 136

CIS 237 Advanced Web Programming

(3-0-3)

This course is for the student who wants to learn advanced web site programming techniques using contemporary development tools and languages. Concepts relating to server-side programming are explored. CR: CIS 136

CIS 238 XML

(3-0-3)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to learn how to create effective XML documents and to display them on the Web. The course will review the latest W3C standards and explore using namespaces and stylesheets with respect to XML. PR: CIS 223 and CIS 236

CIS 240 Internetworking Fundamentals

(3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to networking. Topics include basic concepts and terminology relating to LANs and WANs including: data communications, types of networks, networking models and theory, protocols, and equipment. There is a strong emphasis on TCP/IP. The material covered in this course is applicable to sections of the Network+ certification exam. CR: CIS 121

CIS 241 Routing Fundamentals

(3-0-3)

This course covers the theory and application of routers to internetwork communications. There is an initial review of TCP/IP, Ethernet, the OSI model, network terminology, protocols, and standards. Primary emphasis is given to static routing and TCP/IP. Dynamic routing protocols are also introduced. Students will have the opportunity to work with simulator software to apply the concepts learned in class to a Cisco internetwork. CR: CIS 240 and CIS 110

CIS 246 Data Structures

(3-0-3)

Students are introduced to some commonly used data structures and their applications using C++. Topics include abstract data types, object-oriented programming, stacks, queues, linked lists, sorting, binary search trees, heaps, and hashing. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 134 or equivalent S

CIS 247 Switching and Advanced Routing

(3-0-3)

This course provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switched network. Students learn about the hierarchical network design model and how to select devices for each layer. The course explains how to configure a switch for basic functionality and how to implement virtual LANs, VTP, and Inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. Students will also learn how to implement and configure common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control and addressing services. PR: CIS 241

95


CIS 256 Introduction to Systems Management

(3-3-4)

This course introduces topics in managing server-based network operating systems, configurations, security, and troubleshooting. Students will have the opportunity to practice and implement techniques and strategies in class. Students will configure a server to provide file, print, and web services. PR: CIS 240

CIS 257 Advanced Networking and Systems Management

(3-3-4)

This course moves into more advanced topics in network communications and administration including server administration, monitoring and troubleshooting. Students will learn to implement advanced techniques in file and printer sharing, e-mail and web services. PR: CIS 256

CIS 259 Computer Information Systems Internship

(1-8-3)

This course provides the computer information systems/ computer science student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study and field work within selected business entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience are enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate computer related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled meetings with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester during final exam week. PR: CIS or Computer Science major with minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and permission of the department.

CIS 261 Network Security

(3-3-4)

This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of network and computer security. Topics include server and network hardening, threat assessment, protecting network infrastructure and services, physical security, business continuity and disaster PR: CIS 256

CIS 262 Introduction to Network Security

(3-0-3)

This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of network and computer security. Topics include server and network hardening, threat assessment, protecting network infrastructure and services, physical security, business continuity and disaster recovery. PR: CIS 247

Criminal Justice

CRJ 113 Introduction to Criminal Justice

(3-0-3)

This course provides the philosophical and historical background of the agencies that compose the criminal justice system. It focuses on the development of justice and law, crime and punishment, the administration of laws, the agencies’ functions, career orientation and public relations. F, S

CRJ 117 Police Organization and Supervision

(3-0-3)

This course offers an introduction to the essentials of American policing, including the most significant issues facing officers and police agencies today. Pertinent aspects discussed during the course will include the historical development, policing concepts of today, politics and police administration, organizational theory, leadership, planning and decision making, organizational communication, human resource management, financial management, and legal aspects of police administration. The course will give students a significant insight into the application of law enforcement within the political, social, and legal environments.

CRJ 131 Criminal Law

(3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the study of substantive criminal law. Selected crimes most likely to be dealt with by the criminal justice professional are explored through discussion, where applicable, of the English Common Law precedents, general modern application and specific New York Penal Law. F

96

CRJ 133 Criminology

(3-0-3)

This course provides an etiology of crime and the understanding of criminal behavior. The course delves into biological, psychological and sociological theories that examine the reasons for such large numbers of arrested and convicted individuals. It also views the collection of empirical data and the statistical analysis of such information which supports each theory. The importance of such empirical data garnered from sociological research and how the research is critical to the implementation within the components of the criminal justice system are examined. Students develop an informed analysis of criminal activity through an understanding of the theories discussed. S

CRJ 135 Introduction to Security

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on the various facets of modern security operation in a variety of settings. Security problems, both internal and external, and possible solutions will be explored for plant protection and industrial security, retail security, campus security and commercial institutions. The importance of this course within the framework of the criminal justice system can be observed by the greater increase in the utilization of security personnel. This profession is in the unique position of requiring its personnel to have a greater familiarity with law, legal powers, emergency situations, and public relations.

CRJ 143 Criminal Evidence and Procedure

(3-0-3)

This course presents an in-depth analysis of the rules of criminal evidence and procedure. The process of the American criminal justice system will be examined and special emphasis will be placed on Constitutional limitations in the area of criminal evidence and the law of search and seizure. Students will learn about the concepts of evidence and rules governing its admissibility, theoretical and pragmatic considerations of substantive and procedural laws affecting arrest, search and seizure.

CRJ 147 Terrorism and Public Security

(3-0-3)

This is an introductory course that investigates the criminal, economic, historical, political, psychological, and social roots of the terrorist phenomenon. This background will be used to analyze the attacks of September 11, 2001, and the resulting counter efforts against terrorism including the creation of the Department of Homeland Security and the National Incident Management System (NIMS) program. The second half of the class will explore existing and potential terrorist threats and how the local, national, and global communities may counter these threats.

CRJ 150 Airport Management and Security

(3-0-3)

This course familiarizes students with the fundamental components of a typical commercial airport and its multi-level security requirements. In addition to a commercial airport’s various support functions, the organizational structure, governing FAA regulations, inter-agency relationships and management challenges are examined. Security issues are presented in a post 9/11 environment to include scenario-based discussions and problem-solving situations.

CRJ 152 Policing Theory and Practice I

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to teach students the necessary theoretical background and practical skills to function as county and municipal level law enforcement officers. Topics reviewed in lecture and in applied exercises include administration of justice, basic law and procedures and patrol functions.

CRJ 153 Policing Theory and Practice II

(3-0-3)

This course continues the study of law enforcement begun in Policing Theory and Practice I. It is designed to teach students the necessary theoretical background and practical skills to function as county and municipal level law enforcement officers. Topics reviewed in lecture and in applied exercises include traffic procedures, investigation procedures, community relations, and supervised field training. PR: CRJ 152


CRJ 215 Juvenile Delinquency

(3-0-3)

This course offers an intensive study of the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency. It addresses the nature of youth crime and how to reduce the amount of juvenile delinquency. The course gives students a greater understanding of the present juvenile justice system including the biological, psychological and sociological approaches to reduce juvenile crime. F

CRJ 217 Principles of Investigation

(3-0-3)

This course offers an introduction to the basic principles and a detailed examination of specific offenses. The course focuses on the crime scene, physical evidence interviewing and interrogation, and the use of informers and confessions. The study of specific offenses focuses on the scientific approach and the methodology used in crime detection. F

CRJ 219 Corrections

(3-0-3)

This course is a detailed study of the history, theory and practice of probation, parole and correctional institutions. It will also explore punishment, rehabilitation, community-based corrections and capital punishment as they exist today. F

CRJ 229 Community Based Corrections

(3-0-3)

This course exposes the student to the concept of community corrections as compared to the more familiar institutional correctional settings. The course will deal with such programs as probation, parole, half- way houses, home detention and other alternatives to incarceration. Relevant law and both adult and juvenile systems will be examined in public and private programs at local, state and federal levels. S

CRJ 230 Interpersonal Violence

(3-0-3)

This course will provide a unique perspective on the issue of interpersonal violence concentrating on the public perception and criminal justice approach to sexual assaults and sexual offenders. An emphasis will be placed on characteristics and behavioral patterns of the offender and the crime itself. Particular attention will be given to the critical issues of victimology, rape typologies, stalking, domestic violence and criminal/constitutional law. Students will benefit from this course as it explores the etiology of sexually deviant behavior from both sociological and psychological approaches within the functioning of the criminal justice system. Students will learn to develop an informed analysis of sexual offenses, sexual offenders, the public perception and the handling of such offenders within the criminal justice system. PR: CRJ 113 or SOC 121

CRJ 233 Current Issues in Criminal Justice

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to allow study and discussion of those relevant issues of most current concern affecting components of the criminal justice system. Such issues as hiring practices, community relations, court decisions, and the impact of the mass media may be explored in relationship to the administration of justice in America. F

CRJ 237 Criminal Justice Internship

(3-0-3)

This is a planned practicum of observation, study and work within selected criminal justice agencies designed to broaden the student’s educational experience through exposure to the practical environment of such agencies. The student’s field work will be supplemented by periodic seminars with the course instructor. PR: Criminal Justice major, completion of 30 credit hours with a 2.5 G.P.A., and permission of the department S

Drama

DRA 123 Introduction to the Theatre

(3-0-3)

This course will introduce the student to the union of the fine and performing arts known as theatre. The focus will be on contemporary theatrical practices, aesthetics and issues. F

DRA 133 (3-0-3) Theatre Workshop This course is a practical study of the roles and functions of actors, directors and stage managers, designers and technicians. This is accomplished through participation in the creation, rehearsal and production of short dramatic presentations. F

DRA 143 History of Western Theatre

(3-0-3)

This course will study the evolution of the Western theatre, from its possible precursors in religious and civic practices in the ancient world to the present day. This course will specifically concentrate on the evolutions of playwriting, theatrical architecture, performance style and technique, spectacle (including scenery, costumes, special effects and lighting), dramatic theory and criticism and the relationship between the societies studied and their theatres. S

DRA 150 Basic Acting

(2-2-3)

This course investigates a broad range of modern and contemporary theories, ideologies, techniques, and processes in the field of stage acting. Students will apply those concepts to in-class exercises, to scene study, and to performances. Students will use those concepts to begin to develop the physical, vocal, and imaginative skills of the actor.

DRA 181 Theatre in London

(2-2-3)

This course delivers an overview of theatre in contemporary London. After an on-campus and/or Internet introductory seminar, students will travel to London for approximately two weeks. They will develop understanding of the contemporary London theatrical and dramatic scenes through a series of tours, performances, guest lectures, and/or demonstrations. Historical perspective will be added through lectures and theatrical tours. Cross-cultural perspectives will be added by lectures, tours of gardens, museums, monuments, libraries, and individually selected activities and excursions. Students will present final projects on the SCCC campus or via the Internet after their return from London.

DRA 237 Rehearsal and Production

(2-4-4)

This course is a hands-on study of theatrical production. Faculty and staff will produce, direct and design; students will assistant direct, act, stage manage, construct scenery and costumes, operate lights and sound, house manage, operate the box office, compose programs, write and distribute publicity, etc. Students will learn and apply standard professional techniques of theatrical research and theatre production. The instructor and other involved staff will work closely with individuals as well as with groups. The production activities will culminate in public performances of a full-length theatrical work late in the semester. PR: DRA 133 or consent of instructor S

DRA 265 Theatre Arts Internship

(1-8-3)

This course provides the theatre student with a planned and supervised work experience in a professional theatrical setting. Students will have the opportunity to practice and refine appropriate professional skill sets and explore future career paths. PR: DRA 133 and permission of the department

Early Childhood

ECH 121 Introduction to Early Childhood

(3-0-3)

This course examines the fundamental philosophy of early childhood education from historical and present day perspectives. Emphasis is placed on the identification of quality programs and their significance in today’s society. Through course work, observations and position statements, students are expected to reflect on their role as potential teachers. Students will be required to complete the following documentation by week 3 of the course: 1) Fingerprinting, 2) NYS Central Registry Clearance, 3) Medical consent to work with children and a negative TB test, 4) Notarized criminal conviction statement and 5) a signed agreement to uphold the NAEYC code of ethics and SCCC ECH professional behaviors. Ten hours of observation will be completed during this course. Students will be provided with the Early Childhood Portfolio Requirements Checklist. F

97


ECH 123 Curricular Methods I and Assessment

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on curriculum development and assessment in early childhood education. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the important frameworks for planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum as it impacts development and the various subject-matter disciplines. Emphasis is placed on the methods and strategies that inform the development of meaningful and relevant curriculum. Students engage in in-depth studies of developmentally appropriate curriculum models including the Reggio Emilia, Montessori, Bank Street, Constructivism, High Scope, Anti-Bias, and Multicultural approaches. The ways in which assessment of learning and the environment drive curriculum development will be explored and applied. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 10 hours observing in an early childhood environment and working with young children. CR: ECH 121

ECH 131 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar I

(1-8-4)

This course is designed to provide work and learning experience in the field of early childhood education. Individual field experience is developed with community agencies and institutions. In addition, interns spend one hour per week in a seminar type session where they reflect on their field experiences and integrate the insights they have achieved in their field work. ** Students are expected to spend eight hours per week in an individual field experience within an early childhood setting in a community agency or educational institution. PR: ECH 121 and ECH 123 S

ECH 220 Engendering Creativity: Arts in the Classroom

(3-0-3)

This course is an exploration of creative expression with an emphasis placed on the importance of the arts in every child’s education. As students unlock their own creative potential, they also become skilled at using methods and techniques that encourage creative development in young children. Students reflect on aesthetics while analyzing the movements and techniques of the visual arts and the genres and elements of music. Students then apply their understanding by presenting art, music, and drama activities to young children. Throughout the semester, students develop and art and music portfolio.

ECH 223 Curricular Methods II and Development of Inquiry Skills

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on the early developmental abilities of children ages birth to eight years. The course is an in-depth experience providing students with the opportunity to examine sensory, pre-operational and concrete operational thought processes of conversation, seriation, observation, comparison, classification, and number concepts. Concrete math, science and social studies materials and experiences are utilized to foster development of quantitative and analytical thinking in geometry, measurement, space, graphing, parts and wholes, cause and effect situations, and environmental issues. Students will construct math, science, and social studies activities through the use of hands-on experiences that address the variety of needs in the children population such as children with disabilities, gifted and talented children, as well as minority and culturally diverse groups. CR: ECH 123

ECH 225 Fostering Emergent Literacy

(3-2-4)

The focus of this course is to examine the process of developmental literacy skills in children ages birth to eight years. The course is an in-depth experience providing students with the opportunity to recognize and describe the developmental stages in literacy acquisition. Students will be provided opportunities to identify factors that influence young children’s literacy, as well as design and implement a literacy program. Students will examine different literary genres and themes appropriate to young children with an emphasis on resources for children of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Guidelines for the design implementation of appropriate literature-based activities will be addressed throughout the course. Students will be required to spend a minimum of 15 hours observing literacy programs and providing literacy-enhancing experiences with children.

ECH 227 Guidance of Young Children

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on the early developmental abilities of children ages birth to eight years. The philosophy of the course is a balanced child centered approach to addressing developmental needs and abilities of young children. Strategies that enhance the child’s self-esteem and consequently that increase

98

self-discipline will be taught. The relationship between the classroom environment and student behavior will be exhibited. This course strives to give each student the understandings of the importance of play, active exploration, the construction and representation of knowledge, social interaction with peers and family members, and peers and family members as significant others in children’s overall development. Students with credit for ECH 127 may not receive credit for this course. PR: ECH 123 CR: PSY 220

ECH 231 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar II

(1-8-4)

This course is an examination of the role of the early childhood teacher in the educational setting and in relationships with children, parents, staff, and other program workers. Emphasis is placed on observing and working with individual students, small groups, and large groups in the classroom. Each student will work eight hours each week under the direct supervision of a cooperating teacher. The weekly class seminar provides an opportunity to discuss and evaluate field experiences with fellow students and the course instructor. PR: ECH 131 F

ECH 252 Care of Infants and Toddlers

(3-0-3)

This course is an overview of the methods that foster the development of infants and toddlers and emphasizes the caregiver’s role in planning the environment and interacting with children. Focus is placed on the relationships among the very young, their families, and the caregivers as being the primary curriculum. Students will be expected to conduct approximately six hours of observation outside the classroom. Students will complete ten hours of field work in this course.

ECH 255 Administration of Early Childhood Programs

(3-0-3)

The purpose of this course is to provide administrative management training in the field of Early Childhood Education. The course addresses issues and techniques involved in the organization and administration of early childhood environments. Focus is placed on the initiation and maintenance of an early childhood program including skills necessary to perform effectively and competently as a director. Students will complete ten hours of field work in this course. PR: ECH 121

ECH 260 ECH Portfolio Seminar

(1-0-1)

This capstone seminar is intended for ECH majors who are about to graduate from their two-year ECH program. Students will review the knowledge and skills they have already acquired and begin to demonstrate their proficiency in a pre-professional portfolio. Opportunity is provided for technical assistance on an individual basis. Each student will assemble a portfolio as a summative experience to be presented to a professional review team. PR: ECH 121 and permission of the department

Economics

ECO 211 Introduction to Economics

(3-0-3)

This course provides an overview of microeconomic and macroeconomic issues and an understanding of the economic choices that individuals, firms, and governments face. It also introduces the concept of scarcity and the working process of a market economic system. Further, this course examines the different market structures, the role of the firm and the impact of government intervention on markets. Finally, this course discusses the meaning and computation of national income, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international trade, and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the economy. F, S

ECO 221 Principles of Macroeconomics

(3-0-3)

This course provides an analytical framework for the understanding of the economy at the national level. This course will also analyze the purpose and functions of national income accounting, the components of Gross Domestic Product, the determinants of long run economic growth, the causes and costs of inflation and unemployment. In addition, this course will cover


the economic impacts of fiscal and monetary policies and the differences between short run and long run macroeconomic aspects of the economy. Finally, this course will examine the importance of the U.S. financial system, the macroeconomic effects of international trade and the determination of interest and exchange rates. F, S

ECO 223 Principles of Microeconomics

(3-0-3)

This course develops an analytical framework for the understanding of the theory of markets, including the decision-making process in businesses, the impact of technological advances on markets and the functioning of the four different market structures. This course will also provide a closer look at the interactions of individual households, business firms and governments in the marketplace. Finally, this course will discuss economic issues related to the well-being of market participants, the tradeoffs between equity and efficiency, the economics of taxation and subsidies, the economics of healthcare, the economics of poverty and income inequality, labor market issues and the basis of free trade. F, S

Electrical Technology ELT 110 Circuits for Digital Systems I

(3-3-4)

This course is an introduction to both AC and DC circuits. Covered DC material includes voltage-current resistance in series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits; Ohm’s Law; and capacitance. Basic test equipment including multimeters, power supplies and logic probes will be used in laboratory sessions. PR: CSS 120 or equivalent CR: MAT 128

ELT 118 Digital Logic

(3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of number systems, Boolean algebra, logic gates, codes, binary arithmetic and digital circuits using Integrated Circuit Technology.

ELT 121 Circuits for Digital Systems II

(3-3-4)

This course is a continuation of digital circuits, plus AC circuits as applicable to digital systems and controls. Basic AC circuits are covered, along with single and 3-phase AC power and distribution. Series and parallel RLC circuits are covered, along with the use of an oscilloscope in troubleshooting and measurement. Digital systems will be continued, with the examination of three state busses and the chips needed to interface with them in personal computer applications. PR: ELT 110 CR: MAT 129 or higher

ELT 230 Electronics

(4-3-5)

This course is an introduction to electronics as applied to digital systems and controls. DC power supplies, zener diodes, switching transistors and linear and non-linear operational amplifier circuits are covered. The course stresses design and prototyping of circuits used in control systems and measurement. PR: MAT 129, ELT 110, ELT 121

ELT 256 Process Control and Instrumentation

(3-3-4)

This course is an introduction to process control fundamentals and the application of the PC in a process environment. Analog and digital signal conditioning is covered, along with the interfacing of personal computers and PLCs to analog and digital systems. The basics of automatic process control are also covered with emphasis on the application of computers and digital systems to the solution and implementation of process control algorithms. PR: ELT 230, CIS 129 or higher CR: MAT 147 or higher

Emergency Medical Service EMS 210 Basic EMT

(2-7-4)

This course is designed to meet New York State Health Department (Bureau of Emergency Health Services) requirements for Emergency Medical Technician training. This course is updated yearly to include materials appropriate for EMT training as included in the New York State EMS program CFR/EMT/AEMT student manual. The course will adhere to the SCCC/REMO AMT Sponsor’s agreement and all current New York State regulations for EMT training, including requirements for class time and instructor certification. Students should note that some Saturday sessions are required in addition to regularly scheduled class hours. PR: All students must be at least 18 years old. F, S

EMS 220 Selected Topics in EMT

(2-3-3)

This course is designed to meet New York State Health Department (Bureau of Emergency Health Services) requirements for EMT Refresher. New laws and policies will be discussed, as well as new technology appropriate to the course which has been introduced during the past three years. The course will adhere to the SCCC/ REMO AMT Sponsor’s Agreement and all current New York State regulations for EMT-B training, including requirements for class time and instructor certification. PR: A student may have a current EMT card that will expire in less than 18 months; a student who was certified as a NYS Emergency Medical Technician may have a lapsed certification; a student who has previously failed the Final Practical Skills Exam within one year or has failed the state written certifying exam after a second attempt may enroll in the refresher course. Proof of failure must be provided to the CIC by the student; a student who has received written permission from the Bureau of EMS to enroll in an EMT-B refresher course as a result of filing for reciprocity based on EMT training from another state. The student must submit the letter which was provided from the Bureau of EMS as proof of eligibility for enrolling in the refresher. F, S

English

ENG 123 College Composition

(3-0-3)

Students will acquire a foundation in the writing process by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing, particularly the essay. They will write a minimum of 24 evaluated pages, including a documented piece of writing; they will also deliver an oral presentation. Students will build on this foundation throughout college and career. Unless noted otherwise on the semester course schedule, this course is taught using computers in an electronic classroom. PR: Adequate proficiency in English language skills or successful completion of CSS 123 and CSS 125 F, S Note: Studies have shown that students who are not proficient in reading comprehension and/or writing skills usually experience significant difficulty in coping with academic work. Therefore, students who receive inadequate scores on entrance tests administered by SCCC are expected to take courses offered by the Department of Developmental Studies to bring their reading and/or writing skills to the appropriate level before registering for ENG 123.

ENG 124 Introduction to Literature

(3-0-3)

This course encourages students to question and explore the ways in which literature, as an art form, expresses and reflects human endeavors. It introduces students to the examination of literary genres, devices, and critical theory. Students read and discuss fiction, drama, and poetry. Communication techniques studied in ENG 123 College Composition are strengthened and refined through written assignments. This is a writing-intensive course in which students will write a minimum of 15 evaluated pages. Credit will not be given for both HON 124 and ENG 124. PR: ENG 123 F, S

99


ENG 200 Introduction to Creative Writing

(3-0-3)

Students will learn the essential principles, strategies, and methods of creative writing and will acquire a foundation in the skills necessary to master this art. The emphasis will be on the writing of short fiction, but opportunities will be provided to explore poetry, drama, screenwriting, the novel, and the essay. Students will also learn how to go about getting their work published. PR: ENG 123 CR: ENG 124

ENG 211 Technical and Professional Writing

(3-0-3)

This course applies the principles of effective writing to the specific form of professional and technical writing. Students write reports, proposals, memos, resumes and cover letters, and deliver oral reports on subjects in their specific professional disciplines. Emphasis is placed upon designing texts for specific professional audiences after analyzing the needs and values of these audiences. PR: ENG 123

Environmental Science

ENV 100 Introduction to Environmental Science

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to environmental concepts and issues from an interdisciplinary approach. Environmental issues and controversies will be explored from ecological biological, social, economic, ethical and governmental policy positions. The students will gain an understanding of the basic scientific method, tools and techniques needed to understand and analyze environmental issues such as populations growth, resource depletion, industrial and municipal pollution (air, water & trash), global warming and ozone depletion. Students will be required to make several field trips to environmental sites as part of this course and will complete a project dealing with a current local environmental issue. Fulfills non-lab science elective requirement for except the Mathematics/Science program.

ENV 203 General Ecology

(3-3-4)

Through lecture and laboratory experiences this course focuses on the study of major ecological principles including: population and community biology, competition and predation, physiological ecology and adaptations, ecosystems, nutrient cycles, energy flow, and ecological succession. The ecological basis of contemporary environmental problems is examined and related to human activities. Quantitative perspectives and analysis will be used throughout. PR: BIO 142 and CHM 122, or equivalent

ENV 205 The Environment and Social Issues

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to provide a multidisciplinary introduction to the understanding of social issues that impact humans and their relationship to the environment as well as their participation in decision making roles that lead to environmental problem solving. The course will concentrate on: varying factors that influence individual and cultural differences in identification and perception of environmental issues, the social processes involved in addressing the identified environmental problems, and introductory techniques for the integration of different human values and cultural processes into environmental planning and management strategies. PR: BIO 142 and CHM 122, or equivalent

ENV 260 Subtropical Coastal and Marine Ecology

(2-4-4)

This course focuses on the current environmental and ecological issues of a subtropical ecosystem (Indian River Lagoon). The lectures and field experiences will emphasize the application of basic ecological principles to life in the coastal ecosystem, then focus on characteristics of marine and coastal habitats and the groups of organisms that occur there. The course will include physical, chemical and biological aspects of these salt/fresh-water environments, and will explore several different marine ecosystems: reefs, seagrass beds, salt water marshes, mangrove, and cypress swamps. Students will analyze the role of human impact on these environments, spending a maximum amount of time in the field. Through direct observations, species collection, water analysis, and lecture the students will develop an understanding of how such issues as food production, energy consumption, population growth, greenhouse effect, all impact upon these environments, their usage and quality. The laboratory portion of the course will involve two weeks of intensive field work at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Florida. There is a separate field trip cost, which will include air fare, transportation, room and board, and site costs. Because the field experience occurs after the May Commencement, graduating

100

students may not use this course to meet graduation requirements. Graduating students may take this course if a) they are willing to miss Commencement and b) they meet all graduation requirements without this course. Graduates may also choose to postpone graduation until the following semester. PR: One year of college biology or chemistry or consent of Department

Ethics

ETH 221 Professional and Applied Ethics

(1-0-1)

This course provides exposure to leading ethical theories as well as an opportunity to employ these principles. Aided by viewing videotaped, dramatized scenarios, the reasons advanced for acting ethically and the excuses given for not acting ethically will be studied. The consequences of freedom and personal responsibility will be explored, as will the ability to recognize ethical issues. F, S

Fire Prevention

FPT 112 Principles of Emergency Services

(3-0-3)

This is an introductory course that surveys the historical development of fire protection, organizational structure of fire protection agencies, and the range of issues and topics related to fire protection. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum.

FPT 115 Hazardous Materials I

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on the nature of hazardous materials (HazMat) and the role of First Responders in prevention, mitigation, and remediation of incidents. Hazardous materials risk is presented within the context of First Responder operations. This course fully integrates National Incident Management (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) protocols.

FPT 116 Hazardous Materials II

(3-0-3)

A continuation of Hazardous Materials I, course content stresses recognition of potentially hazardous situations, protocols of organized response, and regulatory guidelines. Hazardous materials response is presented within the context of First Responder operations. Specific attention is placed on the different response protocols needed for remediation of weapons of mass destruction events and other sources of HazMat situations resulting from natural disasters, accidents, negligence and criminal activities. This course fully integrates National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) protocols. PR: FPT 115

FPT 120 Building Construction for Fire Protection

(3-0-3)

This course provides the components of building construction that relate to fire and life safety. The focus of this course is on firefighter safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies. This course fully integrates National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) protocols.

FPT 131 Fire Prevention

(3-0-3)

This course provides fundamental information regarding the history and philosophy of fire prevention, organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau, use of fire codes, identification and correction of fire hazards, and the relationships of fire prevention with built-in fire protection systems, fire investigation, and fire and life-safety education. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements.

FPT 135 Fire Administration

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on organization, personnel management distribution of equipment, records and fire safety as they pertain to the fire service. Techniques for successful and efficient fire service operations are covered in this course. These topics include communications and fire alarm systems, legal aspects of fire prevention, fire investigation and the recording and evaluation of fire data for statistical purposes.


FPT 137 Fire Protection Systems

(3-0-3)

This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements.

FPT 213 Hydraulics and Equipment I

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on incompressible fluids, principles of fluid statics and dynamics, fluid flow, pipe and hose or head losses, and pump systems operations. Sprinkler and standpipe systems and other special systems are covered. PR: MAT 128 or equivalent

FPT 215 Fire Investigation

(3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the following subjects as they individually relate to fire investigations: elements of fire, combustion properties of fuel, pyrolysis, burn patterns, ignition sources and explosions. A review of methods of interviewing, report writing, rules of evidence, forensic lab procedures, model arson law and NYS arson law is included. PR: May require New York State Police identification and/or registration

FPT 216 Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply

(3-0-3)

This course provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements. CR: MAT 218

FPT 219 Fire Behavior and Combustion

(3-0-3)

This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and how they are controlled. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements.

FPT 237 Industrial Fire Protection

(3-0-3)

Provides an introduction to the field of industrial fire protection and focuses on the topics of hazard control, special hazards and protection, fire protection equipment, and systems and handling of emergencies.

FPT 250 Fire Protection Internship

(1-8-3)

This course provides the fire protection technology student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study, and field work within selected areas of the fire protection profession. These areas include but are not limited to: municipal fire departments, state or local fire protection agencies, industrial fire safety organizations, and installers of fire protection systems. Textbook theory and classroom experience are enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate fire protection, prevention, or suppression related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. PR: FPT major with 30 completed credits, minimum overall GPA of 2.5, FPT course in area of internship, and permission of the department.

French

FRE 111 Basic Conversational French

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the idiomatic usage, vocabulary, and syntax of contemporary colloquial French. Each lesson focuses special attention on speaking and understanding spoken French in a situational context. The topics covered include: reading a French menu, making plane reservations, making a telephone call (local or overseas), changing foreign currency, obtaining directions. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language lab is required per term.

FRE 121 Elementary French I

(3-0-3)

The first half of the one-year sequence in elementary French gives students a basic understanding of the French language through listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction. The course also provides an understanding of the civilization, culture and customs of French-speaking people. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory per term. The course is designed for beginners or students with fewer than two years of high school French.

FRE 122 Elementary French II

(3-0-3)

A continuation of Elementary French I, this course concludes the introduction of the elements of French grammar and French culture, and concentrates on the refinement of elementary communication skills. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: FRE 121 or permission of the instructor

FRE 222 Intermediate French I

(3-0-3)

This course provides an extensive review of French grammar, and concentrates on helping students improve their vocabulary, conversational fluency and reading skills through the discussion of selected readings in French. Classroom discussions on the readings and French culture are held primarily in French. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language lab is required per term. PR: FRE 122 or permission of the instructor

FRE 224 Intermediate French II

(3-0-3)

A continuation of Intermediate French I, this course completes the review of French grammar and provides more reading of French literature and non-fictional prose. Classroom discussions in French are held on the readings and on French customs and culture. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language lab is required per term. PR: FRE 222 or permission of the instructor

First Year Success Seminar FSS 120 First Year Success Seminar

(1-0-1)

The First Year Success Seminar is an orientation course designed to enhance the success of first-year college students by introducing such topics as time management, learning styles, classroom expectations, support services and resources, major/career planning, stress management, and personal wellness.

Geography

GHY 121 Physical Geography

(3-0-3)

This is a one-semester, non-lab science course in physical geography. Weather elements and climate characteristics are examined. Detailed consideration is given to each climate region, the location of that region, and the causes for that climate. Geologic factors that shape land forms are examined. Consideration is given to the flora and fauna of each climate region, including the causes for the distribution of these biologic assemblages. A strong emphasis is placed on teaching the locations of various geographic features. F

GHY 123 Population Geography

(3-0-3)

This one-semester course explores the general principles of human and cultural geography. Spatial and ecological relationships are examined to obtain a perspective for contemporary world patterns. Special consideration is given to the nature areas to which Americans frequently travel. The location and description of physical and cultural features of those areas are stressed. S Credit in GHY 123 does not satisfy a science requirement.

101


Geology

GEO 143 Physical Geology

(3-3-4)

This is the first part of a two-course sequence introducing students to the nature, processes and formation of Earth’s material and the majors features of the earth’s crust and topography. This course will consider the mineralogy of the rocks, different rock types and structures. Detailed consideration will be given to the internal processes that shape the earth’s surface, including plate tectonics, igneous activities, weathering, erosion and deposition and earthquakes. PR: Two years of high school science and mathematics. F

GEO 145 Surface Geology

(3-3-4)

This is the second part of a two-semester sequence introducing students to the features of the earth’s crust and topography. This course will consider the various geologic agents and processes that produce, shape and modify the surface environment. Detailed consideration will be given to the rise and decay of mountains, moving water, glaciers, deserts, shorelines and oceans as well as comparative planetary geology with other bodies in the Solar System. PR: Two years of high school science and mathematics. NOTE: Students using Geology as a lab science sequence are advised to take GEO 143 before GEO 145. Either course may be taken alone as a single lab science elective. S

Health Professions

HSC 100 Introduction to the Health Professions

(1-0-1)

This course is designed to enhance the success of first-year students who are interested in a career in a health- related profession. It will assist students in making informed career choices by exposing them to a variety of health professions and the process necessary to become a health care professional. Also, students will be introduced to the tools and skills needed to become a successful college student, such as time management, learning styles, classroom expectations, support services, and orientation to the campus.

History

HIS 125 Western Civilization to 1715

(3-0-3)

This course is a survey of the evolution of Western Civilization from ancient times to 1715.Emphasis is on identifying and analyzing the major cultural practices, ideas, and institutions that form the heritage of Western Civilization. Attention also is given to interactions with non-Western cultures. F, S

HIS 127 Western Civilization Since 1715

(3-0-3)

This course is a survey of Western Civilization since 1715. Emphasis is on the development of the distinctive economic, political, social, and cultural features of Western Civilization during this period. The course also relates the development of Western Civilization to that of other regions of the world during the period. Credit may be earned for both HIS 127 and HON 144. F, S

HIS 130 Introduction to Black History in the United States

(3-0-3)

This course will examine the totality of the past and present life and culture of black Americans. It will survey and summarize the various facets of the history and life of black Americans. The course will enable students to evaluate facts and ideas carefully and judiciously so as to give meaning and perspective, clarity and reflection, balance and proportion to the total black American experience. F

HIS 150 African History

(3-0-3)

This course is a first survey covering the origins and development of African societies and cultures. It will examine related themes and issues. One important aspect of the course is to provide insight and understanding of Africans’ views of their own history, culture, and social political, and economic institutions.

102

HIS 227 American History to 1877

(3-0-3)

This course is a survey of American history from the Colonial period through Reconstruction. Major emphasis is given to the political, economic, social and cultural forces that contributed to the emergence and development of the American civilization during this time. F, S

HIS 229 American History Since 1877

(3-0-3)

This course is a survey of American History from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Major emphasis is given to the political, economic, social and cultural forces that have contributed to the emergence and development of the American civilization during this time. F, S

HIS 231 Introduction to Russian History

(3-0-3)

This course is an introductory survey of the history of Russia. Emphasis is given to the major political, economic, social and cultural forces that have shaped the land and peoples of Russia during the past thousand years.

HIS 232 World Civilizations to 1700

(3-0-3)

This course is a survey of world civilizations from ancient times to about 1700. Emphasis is on political, cultural, economic and social developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and Latin America. The course will explore the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities.

HIS 234 World Civilizations Since 1700

(3-0-3)

This course is a survey of world civilizations from about 1700. Emphasis is on political, cultural, economic, and social developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and Latin America. The course will explore the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities and consider the degree to which present day societies are shaped by common global forces or by older and distinct cultural heritages.

HIS 235 East Asian Culture and Society

(3-0-3)

This course takes a detailed look at the historical and philosophical traditions of East Asian culture and society. Connections between East Asia and the West will be emphasized throughout out the course.

HIS 237 Introduction to Chinese History

(3-0-3)

This course is an introductory survey of the history of China. Emphasis is given to the major political, economic, social, and cultural forces that have shaped China from antiquity to the present day.

Honors

HON 124 Honors English

(3-0-3)

This intensive course concentrates on an incisive study of the short story, the novel, drama and poetry. The focus for instruction, discussion and writing is an analysis of the creative process as it applies to these four genres. Credit will not be given for both HON 124 and ENG 124. PR: ENG 123 and consent of department

HON 144 The Shaping of the Modern World

(3-0-3)

This course is a survey of the major cultural, intellectual, political, economic and social forces that have shaped the modern world since the middle of the 17th century. In addition to the general survey of modern world history, each student will select, with the assistance of the instructor, a theme applicable to the time period encompassed by the course for focused study under the instructor’s guidance. Credit may be earned for both HIS 127 and HON 144. PR: Consent of department

HON 244 Topics in Literary Classics

(3-0-3)

This course examines the creative process by which literature is produced and critically analyzes the texts of a group of key works considered to be significant in and of themselves and to reflect the ideas and literary trends of their time. Students will learn critical terminology and major theories of literary criticism and will apply them to close reading and discussion of complete works and substantial selections. The course, designed for the Honors Concentration in


Humanities and Social Sciences, is open to all qualified students. PR: ENG 124 or HON 124, and permission of the department

HON 271 American Presidency

(3-0-3)

In the course of the 20th century, the American presidency has emerged as the premier national political institution, eclipsing the Congress in both power and prestige. This course will investigate the origin and development of the presidency as the single most powerful office of national government, and explore the extent and limits of contemporary presidential power by studying the practice of various recent presidents, primarily Truman through Clinton. PR: POL 123 and permission of the department

HON 281 Sociology of Power and Class

(3-0-3)

This course explores a number of critical issues in the origin and development of Sociology as a distinct discipline with a specific set of assumptions, methods, and ideologies. Emphasis is placed on historical context, conceptual bias and limitations, research techniques, and policy implications. Elements of social analysis are then applied to a significant topic, social inequality and stratification, which is viewed from a multicultural and global perspective. PR: 3 hours of Sociology and permission of the department

Hotel/Restaurant Management HOT 111 Food Preparation I

(2-2-3)

This course presents the basic principles of food preparation for hotels, restaurants and catering establishments. The topics covered include the theory and history of classical and modern culinary arts as well as the organization of the classic and modern kitchen brigades. The course will cover the preparation of basic stocks, soups, sauces, vegetables, fruits, salads and salad dressings, sandwiches and potatoes. Students will also be taught the eight basic knife cuts as specified by the American Culinary Federation. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the New York State Department of Health are strictly enforced. Students are required to have a department approved chef’s uniform and a knife set to participate in class. F, S

HOT 112 Food Preparation II

(2-2-3)

This course presents the more advanced techniques of food preparation. Topics covered include the preparation of beef, veal, lamb, pork, poultry, turkey, duck and game birds. Breakfast cookery, pasta, farinaceous grains, finfish and shellfish will also be prepared. Techniques of healthy cooking as well as traditional cooking techniques are emphasized. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the New York State Department of Health are strictly enforced. Students are required to have a department approved chef’s uniform and a knife set to participate in class. PR: HOT 111 S

HOT 114 Food Administration and Menu Planning

(3-0-3)

This course presents an overview of the hospitality industry and the role of the menu in any food service operation. The course focuses on techniques used in the hospitality industry that show the relationship of food, beverage, labor and other costs to selling price and profit. Topics covered include menu rating criteria, truth in menu, sales mix, menu item popularity and profitability, menu pricing and sales forecasting. Also covered are the identification of distilled spirits and fermented beverages, and the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law. F

HOT 117 Food and Beverage Control

(3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to food and beverage management in the hospitality industry. The course is designed to acquaint the student with factors relating to the establishment of control systems for the various function areas in a food service facility. Emphasis is placed on government regulations, policies and procedures for ordering, receiving, storage, inventory control and issuing. The study of cost controls will include portion cost, yield percentages, food cost percent, inventory turnover rate and break-even analysis. S

HOT 119 Elements of Baking

(2-2-3)

and proper use of equipment. Students gain actual experience in breads, rolls, pies, quick breads, cakes, icings and hearth breads (e.g. pizza, stromboli). Emphasis is placed on basic techniques and procedures of baking. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a department approved professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. F, S

HOT 120 Beverage Management

(1-1-1)

This course will provide the student with the basic skills to work at and manage a bar which serves alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. It will introduce the student to the basic production processes and varieties of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. The course will explain laws and procedures related to responsible alcohol service. Students will become certified through a national exam administered through the Training Intervention Program for Servers of Alcohol (TIPS) program. S

HOT 125 Cakes and Cake Decorating

(2-2-3)

This course provides students with instruction and hands-on practice in the production and decoration of cakes using commercial baking techniques. Cake mixing methods will include two-stage, creaming, and sponge techniques. Decorating instruction will begin with lettering, borders, and simple flowers and will progress to the decoration and assembly of tiered wedding cakes. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the Dept. of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 119 S

HOT 131 Math for Food Service Records

(3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the importance of math principles used in the food service industry. It also serves as a refresher course for students who have been away from math for several years. Topics covered are weights and measures, recipe conversions, menu costing, and the relationship between food cost and profit. It is the basis for understanding the math principles used in advanced food and management courses. F, S

HOT 132 Sanitation Techniques

(2-0-2)

This course emphasizes the importance of proper sanitation techniques in the food service industry. Special emphasis will be placed upon proper food handling techniques. Topics covered will be HACCP, food-borne illnesses, proper cooking, handling and storage of food, the knowledge of correct temperatures to prevent food contamination, and safe personal hygiene for food handlers. Successful completion of a test will result in a food service sanitation procedures certification awarded by the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association. F, S

HOT 217 Front Office Management

(3-0-3)

This course deals with the study of the front office practices and procedures, including duties of room clerk, reservation clerk, cashier, night auditor and concierge. Topics covered include room assignment controls, reservations, confirmations, security controls and registration. Duties of the night auditor are studied and practiced through completion of an accounting audit. F

HOT 218 (3-0-3) Human Resources Management in the Hospitality and Food Industry This course explores the basic management responsibilities in the hotel and restaurant industry. Special emphasis is placed on human relations, motivation, delegation of authority, and the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively use and coordinate human resources. This course discusses the implementation of strategies, plans and programs required to attract, motivate, develop, reward and retain the best people to meet the organizational goals and operational objectives of the hospitality enterprise. S

This course provides an introduction to basic principles of baking including formula procedures, properties of baking ingredients, and function

103


HOT 220 Wines of the World

(3-0-3)

This course concentrates on the basics of wine appreciation. Wines of Europe and America will be tasted and compared. The student will be introduced to the wines of New York, California, France, Germany and other countries. Students will learn how to purchase and enjoy the wines of the world and how to visually and verbally identify wine labels. Because of medical conditions or religious beliefs students may substitute another HOT or TAT course in place of Wines of the World. S

HOT 225 Commercial Baking I

(2-3-3)

This course introduces students to the management and operation of a commercial retail bakery. Through a combination of lectures and labs, students develop the manual skills and product knowledge necessary to produce a range of products including breads, breakfast items, pies, cookies and holiday specialties. Emphasis is placed on scratch baking, but students also work with mixes, bases, and frozen dough products. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 119

HOT 226 Commercial Baking II

(2-3-3)

This course is a continuation of HOT 225. Students will learn about merchandising and sales, ingredient function, and bakery chemistry through lectures and bakery visitations. Through hands-on labs, students will learn commercial production techniques in puff pastry, eclair paste, breads and rolls, doughnuts, tarts, and petit fours. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 225

HOT 233 Basic Principles of Nutrition

(3-0-3)

This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of nutrition as they pertain to the food service industry. The central focus is on the relationship of food intake to the physical and mental well-being of the guest. Topics covered include: what constitutes a healthy diet, the knowledge of nutrient content, food additives, food fads, nutritional labeling, and nutritional needs for special groups. Food service menus will be analyzed for their nutritional value. F, S

HOT 238 Dining Room Management and Operations

(2-3-3)

Students gain experience in basic restaurant procedures and tableside preparation. Studying under the super- vision of a managing instructor, students participate in the operation of an a la carte restaurant. Students are rotated in the following job positions: manager, assistant manager, reservation manager, service staff, cashier and dishroom operations manager. Emphasis is placed upon proper American a la carte service techniques. Students are required to have a professional wait person’s uniform to participate in class. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. F, S

HOT 251 Quantitative Foods

(2-3-3)

This is a course in the preparation and service of a complete banquet menu. Students prepare meals for nonprofit groups that hold their banquets on campus. Both American and ethnic cuisines are prepared in American Banquet Style cooking. Quality and quantity cooking is emphasized, as well as proper plating techniques. Special attention is given to the correct and efficient service techniques for banquets. Planned menus include appetizers, salads, entrees, desserts and beverages. Students are given station assignments by the student chef. The proper use of kitchen equipment is taught. The time element to complete an individual banquet will vary according to menu items and guest requirements. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 111 F, S

104

HOT 253 Banquet Management and Operations

(2-3-3)

This course emphasizes the application of banquet and catering principles. Serving and managing banquets will be emphasized. American, Russian and Buffet services will be covered. Banquet sanitation is also covered, including proper dishroom operation. Students will be required to demonstrate their proficiency by managing, serving and washing dishes for on-premise banquets. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional wait person’s uniform to participate in class. F, S

HOT 255 Garde Manger I

(2-3-3)

This course includes the decorative aspects of garde manger work, employing a diversity of food products. Students prepare hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, fruit and vegetable carvings, chaud-froids and aspics, forcemeats and pates. Also covered are other decorative methods using a variety of fresh food items. Topics emphasized include the operation and procedures of a garde manger position and culinary show competition. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 111 or consent of department F

HOT 256 Garde Manger II

(2-3-3)

This course is a continuation of Garde Manger I. The course explains the preparation of more elaborate culinary creations. The preparation and organization of buffets is studied. Topics include ice carvings, elaborate fish preparation, galantines and culinary show competition. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 255 or consent of department S

HOT 257 Classical Cuisine I

(2-4-4)

Students are assigned to a fully-equipped, modern, professional kitchen. Full course a la carte menus are produced according to the seasonal availability of fresh foodstuffs in a planned schedule of progressively more difficult menus. Special emphasis is placed on the pressure of “line cooking.” Menus for this course are composed of continental dishes, including variations of basic formulas and the transformation of fundamental food products to new and diversified dishes. Students are assigned cooking stations of the traditional kitchen system and function as chef, sous chef, saucier, rotisseur and tournant. Students in this class will be preparing and cooking food for the College’s restaurant, which is open to the general public. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 112 or consent of department F

HOT 258 Classical Cuisine II

(2-4-4)

This course is a continuation of Classical Cuisine I. Menus prepared are composed of more elaborate continental dishes and international cuisine. Students in this class will be preparing and cooking food for the College’s restaurant, which is open to the general public. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 112 or consent of department S


HOT 259 Regional American Baking and Pastry

(2-3-3)

This course introduces the basic theory, techniques and recipes of classical pastry making. Students will produce regional desserts, pastries, and breads from across the United States. A variety of decorating techniques are taught and utilized to finish cakes and pastries. Proper use of baking tools and equipment is also covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 119 or two years of baking experience F

HOT 260 International Baking and Pastry

(2-3-3)

This course provides students with the opportunity to expand and refine their baking skills and builds upon the methods learned in previous baking classes. Students will produce breads and desserts from around the world, including baked goods from France, Italy, Austria, Greece, and England. Advanced techniques in cake decorating, chocolate work and sugar boiling are also covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. PR: HOT 259 S

HOT 275 Marketing, Advertising, Sales for the Hospitality Industry

(3-0-3)

This course explores the methods by which the individual hospitality businesses may increase their sales through development of a complete marketing plan. Emphasis is placed upon coordination of sales, advertising, public relations and sales promotion in the marketing mix. Students (working in groups) are required to produce a plan as a case study. Also, students are taught how to market themselves through completion of a résumé. F

HOT 276 Meetings and Convention Management

(3-0-3)

This course explores the promotion and advertising of convention and group business meetings to both large and small groups. Topics covered include the wide spectrum of the convention market, needs of guests who are part of the group function, and ways to service groups effectively while on the property. Students will produce a plan for convention booking procedures, showing the proper balance between concepts of convention management and the details of service, which are highly specific to individual hotel and motel properties. S

HOT 277 Planning and Development of Tourism

(3-0-3)

This course examines the travel industry which, broadly defined, represents a $100 billion activity worldwide. The course considers the industry’s dimension, approaching the material from the dynamics of the burgeoning tourist business interdisciplinary perspective. It will become clear that an understanding of tourism depends on relating to pertinent developments in economics, business, ecology, government, law, psychology, sociology and even anthropology. The student is introduced to the broad field of travel integrated by individual companies, travel agencies, airlines, hotels, tour services and rental cars. Resort development is also studied. F

HOT 291 Computers for the Hospitality Industry

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to fundamental computer concepts and application programs that may be utilized in the hospitality industry. Topics include computer components, use of operating systems to manage files, and application programs such as word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, database management, and Internet use. F, S

Human Services

HUS 133 (3-0-3) Child Maltreatment: Prevention, Investigation, and Treatment This course is an overview of child abuse and neglect from a cross-disciplinary perspective. The course focuses on the possible causes, manifestations, and prevention techniques found in cases of child maltreatment. The role of the mandated reporter as well as the laws and legislation regarding child maltreatment are examined. The ways in which professionals work with children and families who have experienced abuse will be emphasized.

HUS 150 Introduction to Chemical Abuse and Dependency

(3-0-3)

This course examines alcoholism and substance abuse from historical, cultural and clinical perspectives. It will present theoretical frameworks that will help students understand the nature and course of chemical abuse and dependency. An introduction to the diagnostic process will be briefly covered. F

HUS 155 Substance Abuse Counseling

(3-0-3)

This course will focus on alcoholism and substance abuse/dependency counseling. Current research, theoretical models, and methods in the treatment process will be examined. The practical development of counseling skills will be emphasized. This course can be used as a Social Science elective. PR: PSY 121 or HUS 150 or permission of instructor

HUS 221 Integration of Theory and Field Experience I

(*-*-3)

This course provides students with an initial direct practice experience. The course is a combination of field work and nine lecture hours, which provides for an integration of theoretical concepts with practical experience. The field work, a minimum of 108 volunteer hours, takes place in a human service agency under the supervision of an experienced worker. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of the specific agency to the larger community, the particular role responsibilities of the student volunteer, and the steps in the human service process. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. PR: SOC 125 and consent of department S * Students will spend nine hours in class and 108 hours in field placements

HUS 222 Integration of Theory and Field Experience II

(*-*-3)

This course provides students with a second practice experience. The agency selected for HUS 222 field work must be different than the agency selected for HUS 221. The course is a combination of field work and nine lecture hours, which provides for an integration of theoretical concepts with practical experience. The field work, a minimum of 108 volunteer hours, takes place in a human service agency under the supervision of an experienced worker. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of the specific agency to the larger community, the particular role responsibilities of the student volunteer, and the steps in the human service process. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. PR: SOC 125 and consent of department F * Students will spend nine hours in class and 108 hours in field placements

HUS 225 Integration of Theory and Field I/Chemical Dependency

(1-10-4)

This course provides students with an initial direct practice experience. It is a combination of field work and 15 lecture hours, which provides for an integration of theoretical concepts with practical experience. The field work, a minimum of 150 volunteer hours, takes place in a chemical dependency agency under the supervision of a certified CASAC worker. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of the specific agency to the larger community, the particular role responsibilities of the student volunteer, and the steps in the human service process. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. PR: HUS 150 and consent of the department

105


HUS 226 Integration of Theory and Field II/Chemical Dependency

(1-10-4)

This course provides students with a second direct practice experience. The agency selected for HUS 226 must be different from the agency selected for HUS 225. The course is a combination of field work and 15 lecture hours, which provides for an integration of theoretical concepts with practical experience. The field work, a minimum of 150 volunteer hours, takes place in a chemical dependency agency under the supervision of a certified CASAC worker. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of the specific agency to the larger community, the particular role responsibilities of the student volunteer, and the steps in the human service process. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. PR: HUS 150 and consent of the department

HUS 250 Planning, Assessment and Treatment

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the major theories and methods currently employed in the assessment and treatment of substance abuse and addiction. The student in the course will examine procedures by which a counselor/program identifies and evaluates an individual’s strengths, weaknesses, problems and needs which will be used in the development of a treatment plan. PR: HUS 150 and HUS 155

HUS 252 Addictive Drugs: Issues and Selected Topics

(4-0-4)

This course will examine how the abuse of alcohol and other drugs affect the body with an emphasis on the central nervous system, organ systems, and general physical health. Psychoactive drug categories will be explored in relation to their history administration, and how the body processes licit and illicit drugs. Drug interactions, specific physical adaptations, and the physiological basis for the disease concept also will be explored. Selected topics related to pharmacology such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, pregnancy implications, co-morbidity with other mental health disorders, and drug use and issues within specific populations may be explored. PR: HUS 150 or permission of department

HUS 255 Alcohol and Substance Abuse: Prevention/Education

(3-0-3)

This course will focus on prevention education as it relates to the individual, family and community in general. It will highlight the major role substance abuse has played in lowering productivity and increasing absenteeism in the workplace, soaring health care costs, and escalating crime and violence in families and communities. It will present the significance and application of substance abuse prevention education at various levels from pre-schooler to adult. PR: HUS 150

ITA 122 Elementary Italian II

(3-0-3)

A continuation of Elementary Italian I, this course completes an introduction to the basic structure of the language, focusing on listening and reading comprehension skills. Readings from Italian newspapers and magazines supplement the textbook and illustrate the cultural aspects of Italian culture. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: ITA 121 or permission of the instructor

ITA 222 Intermediate Italian I

(3-0-3)

This course develops audio-lingual and grammatical skills in Italian, placing an increased emphasis on the student’s reading skills and grammatical usage. Composition writing, reading and speaking exercises are stressed, and Italian civilization is studied in detail. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: ITA 122 or permission of instructor

ITA 224 Intermediate Italian II

(3-0-3)

A continuation of Intermediate Italian I, this course completes a review of grammatical structures. It focuses on the refinement of communication skills through the use of prepared oral reports and discussion of Italian culture to increase the student’s skill and confidence. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: ITA 222 or permission of instructor

Literature

LIT 210 Children’s Literature

(3-0-3)

This course defines the nature and function of children’s literature by locating an examination of its history, genres, trends, and controversies in both an understanding of children’s cognitive and imaginative response to reading and an exploration of culturally constructed images of and for children. The course offers methodologies for critical reading of a variety of children’s texts and for selecting literature appropriate for a number of child-oriented programs. The course offers opportunities for observation and participation in story hours and other literature-based activities in locations such as child care facilities and public libraries. PR: ENG 123

LIT 211 Native American Literature

(3-0-3)

This course explores the relationship between the humanities and the technologies by investigating the differences and the commonalities of the two perspectives. Course content includes discussion of the scientific and humanistic methods of inquiry, the impact of technology on human and social values, the dilemma of life and death issues and artificial intelligence.

This course will introduce students to the large and diverse array of literature produced by Native Americans in North America, from pre-contact oral literature to contemporary writings in English. Genres studied will include any or all of the following: myths; chants, ceremonies, and rituals; songs; speeches; personal narratives; essays; poems; short stories and novels. The course will concentrate on post-contact literature, especially on the issues faced by men and women of native descent in the United States. The history of Native American/Euro-American relations will provide the context for most of the texts studied, and native cultural beliefs and practices (in religion and non-literary arts, for example) will also help to illuminate these texts. PR: ENG 123

HSS 230 Language, Women, and Gender

LIT 212 Literature of the Hudson-Mohawk

Humanities/Social Science HSS 221 Humanities and Technology

(3-0-3)

(3-0-3)

This course provides an introductory exploration of issues relating to the use of language by and about women. These issues are examined in the context of the relationship of language, thought and culture. PR: ENG 123

Italian

ITA 121 Elementary Italian I

(3-0-3)

This first half of the one-year sequence in elementary Italian gives students a basic understanding of the Italian language through listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction. The course also provides an understanding of the civilization, culture and customs of Italian-speaking people. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. This course is designed for beginners or students with fewer than two years of high school Italian.

106

(3-0-3)

This course explores the rich and diverse cultural and literary heritage of the Hudson-Mohawk Region as well as its geography and history. Students will read works that are either set in the Hudson-Mohawk Region or written by authors who lived within the region. They will also undertake research to uncover more of the region’s literature. PR: ENG 123

LIT 214 Black Literature

(3-0-3)

This course explores the literary conventions, themes, and techniques employed by African-American authors in a variety of genres such as the short story, drama, poetry, and the essay. Emphasis is placed on the development of Black expression in literature and criticism. Students refine critical thinking, reading and writing skills through literary analysis of a broad range of representative works. PR: ENG 123


LIT 216 Mythology

(3-0-3)

LIT 233 Drama Classics: Modern and Contemporary

(3-0-3)

This course will introduce students to selected major myths, and to representative or noteworthy minor myths, which various cultures have created in their efforts to come to terms with perceived reality. The course will also explore the belief systems which underlie those myths. The course also will enable students to recognize the continued value and relevance of myth and myth-making. PR: ENG 123

A study of the major schools of dramatic literature of the latter 19th and 20th centuries (e.g. Realism, Naturalism, Expressionism, Symbolism, Epic Theater, Surrealism, Absurdism, Post- Modernism). Primary emphasis is given to the works, theories, and influences of major European and American dramatists. PR: ENG 124

LIT 218 Law in Literature

This course introduces students to literature which embodies significant legal concepts. Students read and discuss works from literature and analyze how writers portray legal issues through plot, theme, and character development. Legal theory and literary analysis are presented in social and historical context. PR: ENG 123

This course offers a historical survey of British literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century. It examines the development of this national literature in the contexts of British cultural and intellectual history and of Western literary tradition. The course also introduces students to literary forms and conventions characteristic of this period. PR: ENG 123 and either ENG 124 or HON 124 F

LIT 220 Women’s Literature

LIT 254 British Literature Since 1800

(3-0-3)

(3-0-3)

LIT 252 British Literature Before 1800

(3-0-3)

(3-0-3)

In this course students explore the contributions of women authors to literature by reading and analyzing works by women from diverse eras and cultures; these works represent the primary traditional literary genres of fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as such genres as autobiography, testimonio, diary, oratory, and essay, as appropriate. Further, in addition to investigating such issues as the literary canon and the roles played by race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and cultural context, students trace the development and characteristics of feminist literary theory and explore feminist literary criticism. PR: ENG 123

This course is continues a historical survey of British literature covering the 19th and 20th centuries. It examines the development of this national literature in the contexts of British cultural and intellectual history and of Western literary tradition. This course also introduces students to literary forms and conventions characteristic of this period. PR: ENG 123 and either ENG 124 or HON 124 S

LIT 221 Hispanic Literature of the Western Hemisphere

This course traces early writing in America from pre-Colonial times through the mid-19th century (1607- 1850), focusing on the historical growth of the country and the emergence of representative literary types. Key literature figures and movements within the diverse range American literary history will be covered. PR: ENG 123 and ENG 124 F

(3-0-3)

This course provides a survey of major authors and literary works originating in Hispanic culture, and examines their global impact. The selection of authors and texts (in translation, when appropriate) introduces students to diverse geographical, political, and cultural climates that exist within the border of the Hispanic community -- a community that includes Central and South America, the Caribbean, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and portions of the U.S. In addition, course texts inform students of the historical background, extensive influence, and continuing impact of Spanish colonization of the Western Hemisphere. PR: ENG 123

LIT 223 The Detective in Fiction and Film

(3-0-3)

In this course students study the history and development of detective fiction. They read and analyze works of detective fiction from a variety of historical periods and view and analyze some of the genre’s pivotal films. Discussions focus upon the elements of fiction as they apply to this genre, the historical, societal, and ethical aspects of detective fiction, and the elements of film noir. PR: ENG 123

LIT 225 Contemporary World Fiction

(3-0-3)

In this course students explore novels and stories written since the mid-twentieth century by authors of various nationalities, ethnicities, and races across the globe. Through oral and written work, students analyze the aesthetic and cultural dimensions of the individual works in the context of relevant literary and cultural cross-currents. PR: ENG 123

LIT 229 Humor in America

(3-0-3)

This course examines the nature of humor in the context of American national character. Through reading historically, thematically, linguistically, and visually, students will explore the question of the American comic sensibility. Students will learn to apply major theories of humor to close reading of texts representing the development of American humor from Native American trickster tales to contemporary film comedy. PR: ENG 123

LIT 231 Drama Classics to 1870

(3-0-3)

A study of landmark works of world dramatic literature from the ancient Greeks to the 19th century. The characteristic values and styles of the Classical, Medieval, Baroque, and Romantic periods are examined in their tragic and comic modes. PR: ENG 124

LIT 256 American Literature to 1850

LIT 258 American Literature Since 1850

(3-0-3)

(3-0-3)

This course examines the American proponents of realism and naturalism including Twain, James, Dickinson and Crane. The students study 20th century writers of fiction, poetry and drama including such writers as Pound, Hemingway, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Baldwin, Bellow, Frost, Eliot, and O’Neill. PR: ENG 123 and ENG 124 or consent of department S

LIT 266 Literary Science Fiction

(3-0-3)

This course provides an introductory exploration of the literary genre of science fiction.It identifies the thematic and formal characteristics of the genre, and traces its development from and relationship to other forms of literature and the history of science. PR: ENG 123 and either ENG 124 or HON 124

Management

MGT 123 Business Organization and Management

(3-0-3)

This course offers students participatory academic sessions in a study of the managerial process and the social and economic forces of the global economy that influence a manager’s role and decisions. Particular consideration is given to management roles which includes planning, staffing, organizing, leading, and controlling. The functional areas of finance, operations, human resources, marketing, and research and development are explored within an international framework. Ethical issues are discussed throughout the course. F, S

MGT 127 Human Resource Management

(3-0-3)

This course focuses upon personnel administration and the human problems in business. It provides the foundation for contemporary theory and practices relating to the management of people. Discussion and case problems are utilized to prepare the student for the responsibility of managing people. F, S

107


MGT 129 Labor Relations

(3-0-3)

This course provides the opportunity to explore, understand and appreciate the fundamental principles and concepts of labor/management relations. It surveys the historical, legal and structural environments that influence contractual issues and labor relations behavior. Negotiation, administration and major contents of the labor agreement are closely examined. A mock negotiation of a labor/management agreement is conducted.

MGT 135 International Business

(3-0-3)

This course will provide a survey of the interrelationships of world business operations; an introduction to current conceptual perspectives; cultural, educational, political and economic constraints; the international financial and trade frameworks; and the problems and challenges facing the transnational corporation. PR: MGT 123

MGT 221 Managerial Finance

(3-0-3)

This course is an in-depth study of the quantitative technique of financial problem solving and decision making. Lectures concentrate on theory and logic in this area. The role of the financial manager is examined. Practical applications of the theory and the mathematics of finance in a format designed for use with the computer spreadsheet program are incorporated. PR: ACC 121 or 123, CIS 102 or higher and MAT 129 or higher S

MGT 242 Small Business Start-up and Management

(3-0-3)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to learn a systems approach to starting a business, taking action for success, and achieving sustainability. Development of a strategic business plan and an implementation plan are required final projects for this course. PR: Any of the following: BUS 113, BUS 223, MAT 127 or higher, or permission of the department

MGT 250 Business Internship

(1-8-3)

This course provides the business student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study and field work within selected business entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience will be enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field assignments will specifically encourage the development of overall business and management skills. Field study assignments will be administered and completed on site and will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester. PR: Business or Accounting major, completion of 30 credit hours, minimum overall G.P.A. of 2.5, and permission of the department S

Marketing MKT 223 Marketing

(3-0-3)

This is an introductory course that includes international business and offers a broad and necessary understanding of marketing problems, giving the student a foundation for investigating more comprehensive business environment situations. S

Mathematics

MAT 126 Descriptive Statistics

(3-0-3)

This practical statistics course focuses on simple statistical presentations common to a variety of career fields. The course will include the following topics: descriptive vs. inferential statistics, organizing data, measures of central tendency, measures of variation, measures of the position, the normal distribution with applications, linear correlation, and regression.

108

MAT 127 Concepts in Math

(3-0-3)

This course includes topics from basic algebra such as linear equations and formulas, number theory, U.S. Customary and Metric systems of measurement, geometry, consumer mathematics, statistics and probability, and applications in various fields. PR: CSS 106 or equivalent F, S Note: Credit for this course does not satisfy the A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements

MAT 128 Algebra 1

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on the real number system, polynomials, solving first degree linear equations, linear inequalities in one variable, the Cartesian Coordinate System, graphing linear equations by point plotting, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions and exponents, and problem solving. PR: CSS 120 or equivalent F, S Note: Credit for this course does not satisfy the A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements

MAT 129 Algebra II with Trigonometry

(4-0-4)

This course focuses on functions, mathematical modeling, problem solving, quantitative reasoning, and data analysis. Algebraic, numerical, and graphical techniques are used. Topics include: the real number system; solving equations and inequalities; polynomials and factoring; linear; quadratic; and rational functions; systems of linear equations; linear inequalities; complex numbers; algebraic fractions; geometry; and right triangle trigonometry. PR: MAT 128 or equivalent F, S Note: Credit for this course does not satisfy the A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements.

MAT 145 Mathematical Topics

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to acquaint students with various areas of mathematics. Topics may include mathematical systems, groups, logic, truth tables, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, probability, modeling with exponential and logarithmic functions, and statistics. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent

MAT 147 Statistics

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on the following topics: an introduction to probability, probability distributions, descriptive statistics, random variables including the binomial and normal, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square distributions, linear correlation, and linear regression. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent F, S

MAT 149 Topics in Finite Math

(3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to mathematical modeling and traditional topics of finite math with applications to business, economics, social sciences, and/or life sciences. Topics may include linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions as well as mathematics of finance, linear programming, matrices, probability, probability distributions, games and decisions. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent

MAT 160 Discrete Structures

(3-0-3)

Topics in this course include sets, relations and functions, equivalence relations, sequences, recursively defined sequences, recurrence relations, logic, truth tables, techniques of mathematical proof, mathematical induction, the Binomial Theorem, counting techniques, and algorithms. Also covered are graph theory and networks. If time permits, the instructor may choose to cover Boolean algebras, partial orders, and Hasse Diagrams, or basic group theory. MAT 160 replaces MAT 146, and credit will not be granted for both courses. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent


MAT 167 Precalculus With Analytic Geometry

(4-0-4)

This course includes the following topics: functions, inverse functions, polynomial functions, rational functions exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, graphs, polar coordinates, analytic geometry, systems of equations, sequences, and applications. Enrichment topics permitted. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent

MAT 180 Calculus I

(4-0-4)

This course, in the calculus of a single variable, includes, but is not limited to, the following topics: limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic functions, formulas for differentiation, implicit differentiation, related rates, the Mean Value Theorem, applications of differentiation such as curve sketching and optimization problems, antiderivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications of integration such as area and average value. Also included are the integration and differentiation of logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions. PR: MAT 167 or four years of high school mathematics including trigonometry and precalculus or equivalent. F, S

MAT 181 Calculus II

(4-0-4)

MUS 110 Lab Ensemble I

(1-0-1)

This course provides development of skills in sight reading on the student’s concentration instrument or in voice. Different styles including classical, jazz, rock, Latin, musical theatre and commercial music will be presented with emphasis on reading a high volume of literature. This course is recommended for students preparing a career in performance. PR: approved entrance audition for degree programs F

MUS 112 Music Notation

(1-0-1)

This course is designed for students to provide instruction in the essential aspects of music writing software programs such as Sibelius and Finale. Students will be instructed in notation for single instruments, large and small ensembles, and basic music arranging concepts. Other components of the course will include various input methods such as mouse, QWERTY keyboard, and MIDI keyboard entry. Emphasis will be placed on music writing rules and traditions. This course assumes basic music reading skills on the part of the student. PR: Basic music reading skills

MUS 115 Rock Music Style and Development

(3-0-3)

This course, in the calculus of a single variable, concerns recognizing, analyzing, and calculating problems in the following topic areas: the calculus of inverse trigonometric functions, integration techniques, application of the integration, L’Hopital’s Rule, improper integrals, infinite sequences and series, plane curves, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and polar curves. PR: MAT 180 or equivalent F, S

This course explores rock music in terms of historical development, musical style and societal influence. The course discusses the pre-existing styles (pop, country and western, rhythm and blues, jazz, folk, gospel and classical music) that have impacted the evolution of rock music. The development of music listening skills is emphasized. Directed listenings reinforce the concept of musical style as a synthesis of musical elements (rhythm, pitch, dynamics, timbre and form). The role of rock music as a social, cultural, economic and political force is examined. This course is acceptable as a humanities elective.

MAT 240 Calculus III

MUS 121 The Enjoyment of Music I

(4-0-4)

Topics covered in this course include three- dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, calculus of functions of several variables, partial differentiation and multiple integration. PR: MAT 181 or equivalent

MAT 242 Linear Algebra

(3-0-3)

This course covers the following topics: vector spaces. structure of Rn, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, determinants, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, and applications. PR: MAT 180 or equivalent

MAT 244 Differential Equations

(4-0-4)

This course is designed to introduce the student to techniques used to solve ordinary differential equations. Topics covered are first-order linear differential equations and applications, higher-order linear differential equations and applications, differential equations with variable coefficients (power series), and linear differential equations with constant coefficients revisited via Laplace transforms. In addition, the instructor may choose the topic of numerical methods or the topics of solutions around singular points, Bessel and Legendre equations. PR: MAT 181 or equivalent

Music

MUS 100 Basic Ensemble

(1-0-1)

This course is designed to provide instruction in the basic aspects of musical performance and practices. The course will also provide development of sight reading and interpretive skill’s on the student’s instrument or voice.

MUS 106 Ear Training and Sight Singing

(3-0-3)

This course provides development of skills in ear training as well as vocal music reading and singing competencies that include matching pitches, maintaining a pitch center, and sight singing. This course is recommended as preparation for a college music degree program audition. F, S

(3-0-3)

This course in the appreciation of art music of the Western world examines major styles, examples of the great musical works and composers, and relationships with the other arts. The vocabulary and materials of music are presented with examples from major style periods of music, followed by a survey of western art music from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century. The development of listening skills is emphasized. This course is acceptable as a humanities elective.

MUS 127 Jazz Styles and Development

(3-0-3)

This course presents an introduction to the styles and literature of jazz, a uniquely American art form, and its relationships to popular and art music. The course includes a survey of jazz styles beginning with pre-jazz styles, ragtime, early jazz, swing, bebop, cool, third stream, the avant-garde, and fusion. Jazz listening skills, such as form recognition, are also emphasized. This course is acceptable as a humanities elective.

MUS 131 African American Music Survey

(3-0-3)

This appreciation and literature course surveys the music of African Americans. Topics of study range from the slave and folk songs of 19th century America to the popular and classical compositions of 20th century African Americans. A course goal is the development of listening skills. This course is acceptable as a Humanities Elective.

MUS 135 Applied Music I

(1-0-2)

Applied Music I is designed to enable the student to achieve basic competencies in performance. Students will study techniques and repertoire (with a private instructor) appropriate to the individual student’s instrument or voice. The course is designed for personal musicianship enrichment. The course is also designed to prepare students for a college degree program entrance audition. F, S

109


MUS 136 Applied Music II

(1-0-2)

Applied Music II is designed to enable the student to achieve basic competencies in performance. Students will study technique and repertoire (with a private studio instructor) appropriate to the individual student’s instrument or voice. The course is designed for personal musicianship enrichment. The course is also designed to prepare students for a college degree program entrance audition. F, S

MUS 147 Music Fundamentals

(3-0-3)

The basic course in fundamentals of tonal music is designed to develop competencies in the reading and writing of notes, scales, key signatures, intervals, chords, and rhythmic elements. The course is designed for the developing musician and for those preparing a college music degree program entrance audition. F, S

MUS 151 Theory I

(2-0-2)

Theory I covers the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, modes, triads, seventh chords and cadences. This course prepares the student for more detailed analysis of rhythm, texture, and form, with an emphasis on basic harmony and eighteenth century voice leading practices. PR: Acceptance into music degree program CR: MUS 155 F

MUS 152 Theory II

(2-0-2)

Theory II builds on the concepts of Theory I and covers the 18th century voice leading practices, root movements and progressions, and figured bass theory usage. Dominant seventh chords and non-dominant seventh chords are introduced. Also included are secondary dominants, modulation, application of cadential formulas, and dance forms including binary and simple ternary forms. PR: MUS 151 CR: MUS 156 S

MUS 155 Aural Skills I

(1-1-1)

MUS 157 Conducting I

(1-1-1)

This course introduces the basic techniques of conducting: posture and hand position, baton usage, aural skills for conductors, foreign and technical terms, a survey of large ensemble repertoire, metric patterns in two, three, and four, tempo, instrumental transpositions, string bowings and harmonics, score preparation and analysis, preparatory gestures, gestures of syncopation, fermata and caesura problems, and basic ensemble setups. Students will prepare and conduct simple scores in class and analyze orchestral and other scores. Other topics may include rehearsal technique and interpretation. PR: MUS 152 and either MUS 257 or MUS 258 F

MUS 158 Conducting II

(1-1-1)

This course continues study of the basic techniques of conducting: simple compound, asymmetric and subdivided metric patterns, and rehearsal techniques and planning. Separate instrumental and choral conducting techniques are introduced. Students will learn a systematic procedure for marking scores and will conduct scores in class. Several basic instrumental arrangements are prepared by students. Other topics will include cuing and left hand independence, basic ensemble setups, changing tempi, concert programming and interpretation. PR: MUS 157 S

MUS 161 Performance Organization I

(0-*-1)

MUS 161, 162, 261, 262 are the performing ensembles of the SCCC Music Department. They include the Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Chorus, Percussion Ensemble, Guitar Ensembles, Woodwind Chamber Ensemble and Vocal Chamber Ensemble. Participation in ensembles is open to all students by audition and/or permission of the Department. PR: Audition or permission of the Department F

MUS 162 Performance Organization II

(0-*-1)

PR: MUS 161 or permission of the Department S

MUS 163 Performance Concentration I

(2-0-2)

Aural Skills I is a skills development course designed to enhance performance through the recognition, mental imaging and vocal performance of a broad range of musical structures. The course begins with the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, rhythmic patterns, intervals, modes, triads, seventh chords, cadences, and chord patterns. Students are trained to aurally recognize, notate and vocally reproduce these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing, harmonic and melodic dictation and the use of solfege as a learning and study tool. PR: Acceptance into music degree program CR: MUS 151 F

Performance Concentration I-IV are designed to develop the student’s performance and teaching skills to the highest possible level through the careful study of techniques appropriate to the individual student’s instrument or voice with a private studio instructor. Practical experience in performance and critical analysis will be emphasized in the weekly performance classes with division instructors. Practical experience in formal performance will be provided in the division recital. A final performance examination is administered by a faculty panel, including the instructor, at the conclusion of MUS 164 and MUS 264. Courses must be taken consecutively. PR: Acceptance into a music degree program CR: Appropriate major ensemble

MUS 156 Aural Skills II

MUS 164 Performance Concentration II

(1-1-1)

Aural Skills II is a skills development course designed to enhance performance through the recognition and mental imaging of a broad range of musical structures. It continues work in the fundamentals of tonal music: scales, rhythmic patterns, modes, triads, seventh chords, and chord patterns and introduces modulations, non-harmonic tones, inversions of seventh chords, and four-voice chord progressions and patterns. Students are trained to aurally recognize, notate and vocally reproduce these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing and the use of solfege as a learning and study tool. PR: MUS 155 CR: MUS 152 S

(2-0-2)

PR: MUS 163 CR: Appropriate major ensemble

MUS 167 Percussion Techniques

(1-0-1)

This course is designed to familiarize music students with the fundamentals of percussion performance pedagogy. Topics and activities will include snare and other drum techniques, timpani, mallet percussion, Latin and other non-Western styles, accessories and percussion ensembles. Not applicable for percussion concentration students. PR: approved entrance audition for music degree program

MUS 169 Guitar Techniques

(1-0-1)

This course is designed to develop basic competencies in guitar accompaniment for classroom singing and in teaching a beginning guitar class unit within a public school general music sequence. Not applicable for guitar concentration students. PR: approved entrance audition for music degree program

110


MUS 171 Beginning Voice Class

(2-0-2)

This course presents the fundamentals of basic vocal production. Instruction in vocal technique is based upon songs and vocalizes with emphasis upon principles of breathing and placement. Beginning Voice Class is recommended for development of a foundation for the singing voice using classical vocal techniques and repertoire. F, S

MUS 180 Introduction to Music Therapy

(1-0-1)

This course is an orientation to the music therapy field. It presents the historical background and philosophical bases of music therapy and functions of the music therapist as a health-field professional. The course is offered in a time period shorter than one semester. It will usually be offered as a four-week summer course. It can serve as a pre-requisite to four-year college music therapy courses.

MUS 181 Beginning Piano

(2-0-2)

This course provides group instruction for beginning level students. Students learn to read music and develop technical facility at the piano through preparation and performance of progressively difficult music. Keyboard ensemble activities provide additional opportunities for musical development. F, S

MUS 182 Intermediate Piano

(2-0-2)

This course provides group instruction for intermediate level students. Students further develop music skills and technical facility at the piano through preparation and performance of progressively difficult music. Keyboard ensemble activities provide additional opportunities for musical development. PR: MUS 181 or consent of department F, S

MUS 231 Music Business

(3-0-3)

This course explores practical, legal and procedural problems encountered in the music industry with emphasis upon music merchandising, music publishing, recording, arts management and copyright law. A variety of other career areas are surveyed, providing orientation for those preparing for employment in the music business as well as those preparing to transfer to four-year programs in music merchandising and other fields. S

MUS 232 Jazz Improvisation I

(2-0-2)

This course provides an introduction to the study of jazz improvisation. Topics to be discussed include chord scales, modes, arpeggios and harmonic formulae. Special emphasis will be placed on common compositional forms such as ABA, AABA, The Blues, and “rhythm� changes. The music to be studied includes compositions by Ellington, Parker, Coltrane, Gershwin and Kern. PR: MUS 152

MUS 233 Basic Arranging

(2-0-2)

This course provides an introduction to the musical craft of arranging, the setting of music for various combinations of instruments. Topics will include transpositions, instrument ranges, voicings, and writing for jazz and commercial rhythm sections. Students will participate in class exercises and prepare and conduct weekly assigned arrangements as well as a final project. PR: MUS 152

MUS 251 Theory III

(2-1-2)

Theory III builds on the concepts of Theory II and covers two-voice eighteenth century counterpoint, extended and chromatic harmony (extensions, borrowed chords, Neapolitan 6th chords, augmented 6th chords, and altered dominants) and sonata form. The course begins with a review of the basic concepts of Theory II. PR: MUS 152 CR: MUS 255 F

MUS 252 Theory IV

(2-1-2)

Theory IV builds on the concepts of Theory III and covers rondo forms, chromaric mediants, variation technique, enharmonic modulation, common tone diminished 7th chords, Impressionism, the contemporary period, set theory and twelve-tone technique. PR: MUS 251 CR: MUS 256 S

MUS 255 Aural Skills III

(1-1-1)

This course continues with the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, rhythmic patterns, modes, triads, seventh chords, and chord patterns and includes modulations, non-harmonic tones, inversion of seventh chords and four-voice chord progressions and patterns. It adds chromatic and secondary harmonies, ninth chords and non-traditional meters. Students are trained to aurally recognize, notate and vocally reproduce these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing and the use of solfeggio as a learning and study tool. PR: MUS 156 CR: MUS 251 F

MUS 256 Aural Skills IV

(1-1-1)

This course continues with the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, rhythmic patterns, modes, triads, seventh chords and chord patterns, and includes modulations, non-harmonic tones, inversion of seventh chords, four-voice chord progressions and patterns, chromatic and secondary harmonies, ninth chords, borrowed chords, altered dominant harmony, chromatic mediant harmonies, foreign modulation, and non-functional harmony. It adds Impressionist devices, 12-tone technique and other 20th century elements. The course also emphasizes sight-singing and the use of solfeggio as a learning a study tool. Preparing for transfer auditions is emphasized. PR: MUS 255 CR: MUS 252 S

MUS 257 Literature and Style I

(3-0-3)

Literature and Style I is a comprehensive survey of Western art music dating from ancient Greece through the end of the Classical period. The course also includes a brief introductory unit surveying each of the major style periods of Western music. PR: Successful music degree program audition CR: MUS 151, 155 F

MUS 258 Literature and Style II

(3-0-3)

Literature and Style II is a comprehensive survey of Western art music dating from 18th century pre-Classicism through 19th century Romaniticism. Specific units include 19th century Romanticism, music of the 20th century and the development of jazz as an American art form. PR: MUS 257 CR: MUS 152, 156 S

MUS 261 Performance Organization III

(0-*-1)

PR: MUS 162 or permission of the Department F

MUS 262 Performance Organization IV

(0-*-1)

PR: MUS 261 or permission of the Department S

MUS 263 Performance Concentration III

(2-0-2)

PR: MUS 164 CR: Appropriate major ensemble

MUS 264 Performance Concentration IV

(2-0-2)

PR: MUS 263 CR: Appropriate major ensemble

111


MUS 270 Studio Literature

(1-0-1)

This course is presented as a series of one-on-one sessions with the student’s performance concentration instructor. The student will be guided through the study of historically, theoretically and technically significant literature for the student’s concentration. Recorded performances will be studied to reinforce the student’s understanding of style and performance practices. F

MUS 272 Recital

(1-0-1)

This course is presented in a series of one-on-one sessions with the student’s performance concentration instructor. The student will be guided through the process of planning, preparing and performing a full length solo recital. In addition to the musical preparation, the student will be required to coordinate each aspect of the recital, from the facilities arrangements to the actual performance. PR: MUS 270 S

MUS 283 Music in Contemporary Education I

(3-2-3)

This comprehensive overview of the professional world of music in education deals with the process of learning; goals and objectives; bases for selection of strategies, materials, and functional techniques; and evaluative considerations within a consistent philosophical rationale related to contemporary educational environment. Selected teaching opportunities and observations in school music classrooms provide resources for developing teaching foundations. Emphasis is upon school grades K-6. Thirty (30) clock hours of supervised observation in local public schools are an integral part of this course. PR: MUS 152 and 158 F

MUS 284 Music in Contemporary Education II

(3-2-3)

This course provides an overview of current methods, materials and practices in secondary school music instruction. It explores all aspects of teaching music, with emphasis upon active learning which engages students and involves them directly in the learning process. Particular attention is given to the developmental needs and interests of secondary school students. Thirty (30) clock hours of supervised observations are an integral part of this course. PR: MUS 283 S

MUS 285 Brass Techniques

(2-0-2)

This course is designed to develop basic performance and pedagogical skills for brass instruments. In addition to performance development, course topics include acoustics, embouchure development, breathing, instrument selection, and basic maintenance and repair. PR: MUS 152, 156 F

MUS 286 Woodwind Techniques

(2-0-2)

This course is designed to develop basic performance and pedagogical skills for woodwind instruments. In addition to performance development, course topics include acoustics, embouchure development, breathing, instrument selection, and basic maintenance and repair. PR: MUS 152, 156 S

MUS 287 Keyboard Techniques I

(1-0-1)

The MUS 287-289 sequence, presented in the twelve-station electronic piano lab, develops keyboard musicianship and pedagogical skills for public school teaching. MUS 287 establishes basic keyboard rudiments in a group piano setting for music degree program students with little or no keyboard background. Competencies include playing and sight reading easy piano solos and song accompaniments, scales, chords and transpositions. PR: approved entrance audition for music degree programs F

112

MUS 288 Keyboard Techniques II

(1-0-1)

This course builds on the foundations of MUS 287 with emphasis on public school teaching applications. Competencies include scales, playing/reading solos, and preparation of diatonic accompaniments to songs and instrumental solos. Students are assigned to one of the following groups: A) basic keyboard background or B) intermediate keyboard background. PR: MUS 287 S

MUS 289 Keyboard Techniques III

(1-0-1)

This course further develops keyboard musicianship and pedagogical resources established in MUS 288. Materials are expanded to include harmonies, greater use of minor mode, leading a school music class and accompanying performances. Students are assigned to one of two skill level groups appropriate to their performance concentration and background. PR: MUS 288 F

Nanoscale Materials Technology NMT 150 Introduction to Materials Science

(3-0-3)

This course is a general introduction to the study of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, and electronic materials. This course investigates the relationship between bonding, structure (crystals and microstructure) and properties of these materials. The course examines some elementary principles of thermodynamics as they apply to materials, mechanical properties of materials, and the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials.

NMT 152 Introduction to Nanoscale Materials

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the field of nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials have chemical and physical properties that are significantly different from those of bulk materials. At the end of the course, students should be able to appreciate the underlying principles of the resulting size-dependent properties and the processing and fabrication of these materials at the molecular level. The course will cover the structure and properties of a variety of nanoscale materials. In addition, it will cover the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale materials based on top-down and bottom-up approaches. The major and potential applications of nanodevices made from nanoscale materials will also be discussed. PR: NMT 150, CHM 121 CR: PHY 154

NMT 225 Introduction to Vacuum Science and Technology

(3-3-4)

Vacuum science and technology have evolved significantly over the past 30 years and are now indispensible to the fields of scientific research and industry. This hands-on laboratory course will provide an introduction to vacuum equipment and instrumentation and will consist of three major parts: 1) the basics of various pumps, including rotary pumps, turbo pumps, and cryo pumps; 2) the physical and chemical principles underlying the design and use of high vacuums; and 3) vacuum measurements, leak detection, calibration and standards, and safety issues related to vacuum equipment. PR: PHY 124 and CHM 121 and NMT 150, or appropriate industrial experience.

NMT 280 Introduction to Thin Film Deposition and Quality Control

(3-3-4)

This hand-on laboratory course will introduce thin film deposition processes, measurements, and controls in a high- tech manufacturing environment. Advanced applications such as superconductor processes will be used to illustrate the fundamentals of thin film deposition processes. Physical vapor deposition and chemical vapor deposition will be compared and contrasted. Key measurements in thin film deposition processes and properties, both during and after deposition, will be illustrated. Process and quality controls in manufacturing will be discussed. PR: PHY 154, and CHM 121 and NMT 150, or appropriate industrial experience.


Paralegal

PAL 111 Survey of American Law

(3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to the law and legal system of the United States and the individual states. It first examines the roles of the participants from lawmakers and judges to attorneys, legal assistants and litigants. Ethical considerations for these parties are also discussed. Sources of law and the part played by each branch of government in producing law is analyzed. Broad areas of substantive law relating to contracts, torts, crimes, property and personal rights are examined, with the focus on constitutional, statutory and common law developments in these areas. F, S

PAL 112 Legal Research

(3-0-3)

PAL 250 Paralegal Internship

(1-8-3)

This course provides the paralegal student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study, and field work within selected professional entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience is enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate paralegal related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester. PR: Matriculation in the Paralegal program, completion of 30 credit hours, completion of PAL 111, PAL 112, PAL 114, minimum overall G.P.A. of 2.5, and permission of the department S

Philosophy

This course is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to accurately and efficiently research virtually any topic in the law. In addition to providing a background for understanding the tools used, students are taught the fundamental techniques of how to find applicable legal principles and authority among primary and secondary sources of law. Methods for updating the law, through the use of Shepard’s Citations and other tools, are presented so that the legal research product will be accurate and timely. PR: PAL 111 F, S

PHI 141 Survey of Major Western Philosophers

PAL 114 Courts and Litigation

This course introduces students to the complexities of several perennial philosophical problems and concerns, with the aim of encouraging critical thinking and analysis. After a brief introduction to the nature of philosophical inquiry, students are exposed to representative arguments and positions concerning such topics as the nature of reality, knowledge, religion, morality, freedom and determinism, the role of the self, and justice and political society.

(3-0-3)

This course surveys New York and federal courts and jurisdiction, and focuses on procedure, concentrating on New York civil practice. Studies in legal research are continued with emphasis placed on the preparation of forms, briefs, affidavits and pleadings. PR: PAL 111 F, S

PAL 217 Estates and Trusts

(3-0-3)

This course is a study of the substantive and procedural laws of estates, trusts, guardianships, fiduciaries, and estate taxation. PR: PAL 111, PAL 112 F

PAL 219 Real Property

(3-0-3)

This course introduces the law of real property and terminology of real estate interests and conveyances. Real property instruments are defined and examined, including the different types and nature of contracts, deeds, mortgages and leases. Acquisition and loss of real property interests by means other than deeds (such as adverse possession, prescription and inheritance) are also examined. Students prepare an abstract of title by examining recorded instruments. PR: PAL 111 F, S

PAL 231 Family Law

(3-0-3)

This course is a study of the law of domestic relations and family law. This includes the substantive laws of marriage, adoption, divorce, annulment, separation, family obligations, children’s rights and procedural laws concerning Family Court proceedings. Also included will be experience in the drafting of documents and instruments related to the aforesaid subjects. PR: PAL 111, PAL 112 F, S

PAL 233 Administrative Law

(3-0-3)

This course is a study of the nature and sources of administrative law, special problems relating thereto and the place of administrative action in our governmental and legal systems. PR: PAL 111, PAL 112 F, S

(3-0-3)

This course surveys the major trends and developments in Western philosophical thought from the ancient Greeks to the present. After a brief introduction to the divisions and persistent concerns of philosophy, development is traced through the contributions of major representative thinkers and philosophical movements.

PHI 143 Introduction to Philosophical Problems

Physics

PHY 106 Meteorology

(3-0-3)

(3-0-3)

This course covers the fundamental concepts of meteorology including meteorological instruments and observation, synoptic chart air masses, fronts, fog formation and dissipation, and severe weather. Also covered are weather reporting and forecasting and the dissemination of meteorological information. Students will be required to access and utilize the World Wide Web to review and formulate Web-based weather strategies. PR: One year of high school science S

PHY 120 Physical Science I

(3-0-3)

This is one of a two-course sequence for the non-science major designed to provide an overview of the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth science and space science. It covers the fundamentals of physics and space science; topics include the concepts of force, motion, energy, electricity, light, formation of the solar system, lifecycle of stars and classification of galaxies. In addition, the course will focus on the development and application of the scientific method, the relationships among the various physical sciences and the role of physical science in interpreting the world around us. Knowledge of basic algebra and mathematical skills is required. Conceptual understanding of physical principles will be stressed rather than their mathematical interpretations. PR: Two years of high school math

PHY 121 Physical Science II

(3-0-3)

This is one of a two-course sequence for the non-science major designed to provide an overview of the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth science and space science. It covers the fundamentals of chemistry and earth science; topics include the atomic nature of matter, states of matter, changes of state, chemical reactions, the rock cycle, how chemical elements are cycled, the atmosphere and hydrosphere. In addition, the course will focus on the development and application of the scientific method, the relationships among the various physical sciences and the role of physical sciences in interpreting the world around us. Knowledge of basic algebra is required. Conceptual understanding of physical principles will be stressed rather than their mathematical interpretations. PR: Two years of high school math

113


PHY 153 Physics I

(3-3-4)

This course uses algebra, trigonometry and geometry to describe forces, kinematics, dynamics, and conservation laws. The following topics are covered: translation motion, torque, friction, projectile motion, momentum, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, sound and thermodynamics. Vector algebra will be used extensively. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent F

PHY 154 Physics II

(3-3-4)

This course uses algebra, trigonometry and geometry to describe fluids, electricity, magnetism and optics. The following topics are covered: electric force and field, potential, capacitance, current, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic force and fields, AC circuits, reflection, refraction, mirror lenses and gratings.

PHY 221 College Physics I

(3-3-4)

The course is the first part of a one-year sequence. The course uses a calculus-based problem solving approach to describe kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws and sound. The following topics are covered: force, friction, translational and rotational motion, torque, momenta, periodic motion and sound. PR: MAT 180 F

PHY 222 College Physics II

(3-3-4)

The course is the second part of a one-year sequence. This course uses a calculus-based problem solving approach to describe electricity, magnetism, induction, and optics. The following topics are covered: electric force and field, Gauss’s Law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current, resistance and EMF, DC circuits, magnetic force and field, electromagnetic induction, AC circuits, geometric optics and wave optics. PR: PHY 221 and MAT 181 S

Political Science

POL 123 United States Government and Politics

(3-0-3)

This introductory course critically reviews the institutions, structures, and processes of the United States federal government. It employs historical, conceptual, and theoretical approaches in its examination of the Constitution, Federalism, the three branches of government, bureaucracy, elections, political parties, public opinion, civil liberties and civil rights, interest groups, and the media’s role in politics.

POL 125 State and Local Government

(3-0-3)

This course examines the structure and functions of state government, an assessment of state constitutions, the nature of police powers, state politics, state and local revenue, types and problems of municipal government, and critical issues facing state and local governments. F, S

Psychology

PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology

(3-0-3)

This introductory course will offer students a range of approaches and concepts in contemporary psychology. The following topics are covered: research methods, biological basis of behavior, learning, motivation and emotion, perception, intelligence, personality, levels of consciousness, memory, and social psychology. F, S

PSY 221 Educational Psychology

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to introduce the student to major concepts and principles in the field of educational psychology that form the foundation for learning and instruction. The course will examine the relationship of human behavior and the educational processes including cultural influences, processes of learning and socialization, classroom management, development, intellectual functioning, and educational achievement. It is designed primarily for teachers-in-training to understand and apply selected aspects of psychological research and practice to enhance teaching and learning in today’s changing classrooms. Students will be expected to spend a minimum of 10 hours in a classroom setting within the community. PR: PSY 121

PSY 222 Developmental Psychology

(3-0-3)

This course offers an overview of the process of development from prenatal development through aging. It provides an understanding of the developmental process by examining the areas of biological changes, personality and social development, cognitive and moral development, and psychosocial influences across the life span. The impact of cultural factors upon development are also explored. PR: PSY 121 F, S

PSY 223 Adolescent Psychology

(3-0-3)

Students will study human development from puberty to young adulthood. They will examine the adolescent in terms of biological, cognitive, social, and emotional domains. Normal development will be emphasized, but special issues will be investigated. The impact of cultural factors will be explored. PR: PSY 121 S

PSY 224 Abnormal Psychology

(3-0-3)

This course explores historical and present day beliefs about mental disorders. Etiology, symptoms, and treatment for a number of mental disorders are covered. These disorders range in severity from the less severe such as anxiety to the more severe such as schizophrenia. The interaction of the mental health system with other institutions (educational, family, political, and judicial) will be discussed. PR: PSY 121 F, S

PSY 225 Introduction to Special Education

(3-2-4)

This course is an introduction to the education of exceptional children. Characteristics of the various exceptionalities as well as laws, policies, and procedures affecting students with special needs are explored. Emphasis is placed on identifying quality learning environments that ensure the inclusion of every child and current practices for teaching children with diverse learning and developmental needs. The methods and strategies for teaching and including children with special needs are discussed and applied. Students will be working 30 hours in an environment serving children with special needs. PR: PSY 121

PSY 226 Social Psychology

(3-0-3)

This course investigates the interactions between the individual and society and culture. Material covered includes perception of self and others, social roles, attitude and attitude change, interpersonal attraction, pro and anti-social behaviors, social influence, group behavior and environmental context. PR: PSY 121 or SOC 121 F, S

PSY 228 Behavioral Change

(3-0-3)

This course focuses on techniques for changing behavior, of self and others, in a variety of social situations. Major approaches to the study of psychology and learning will be explored. An emphasis will be placed upon behavioral change techniques from behavior modification through cognitive behavioral approaches. Theories of motivation, self-determination, and perception of self and others will be examined. Students will be afforded the opportunity to use concepts learned in this course to develop a personalized behavior change project. F, S

114


PSY 230 Child Development

(4-0-4)

This course is a study into the principles of child growth and development from conception to adolescence. The course content will focus on the physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains of development. The student will be required to observe the development of a child outside the classroom in order to complete a comprehensive child study project. In order to complete this major project, 10-20 hours of outside observation are required.

PSY 235 The Psychology of Sport

(3-0-3)

This course will examine the major psychological theories related to sport and exercise behavior. The course is designed to introduce students to the field of sports and exercise psychology by providing a broad overview of the major topics in the area, including the history of sports and exercise psychology, foundations of personality, motivation, coaching and leadership, gender and cultural issues, team dynamics, performance enhancement strategies, and sports as recreation. PR: SPY 121 or SOC 121

PSY 240 Human Sexuality

(3-0-3)

This course is an introductory overview of the field of human sexuality. Human sexuality will be examined from psychological, biological, sociocultural and historical perspectives. Students will be encouraged to become aware of their own sexual attitudes, values, and behaviors and to evaluate the consistency of their behaviors within their own moral frameworks. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate about sexuality with a greater degree of effectiveness and personal comfort. PR: PSY 121 or SOC 121

Religion

REL 121 World Religions

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to major religions of the world including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course explores each religion’s history, beliefs, and practices, and its contemporary context. The course pays particular attention to the differences between the religions, the similarities among them, and the ways in which they interact with each other.

Sociology SOC 121 Sociology

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the basic patterns of social behavior and the structure and functions of social organizations. Emphasis is placed on research, culture and cultural change, socialization and deviance, population and social stratification, and social institutions. F, S

SOC 122 Social Problems

(3-0-3)

This course provides an orientation to the study of social problems and an analysis of several contemporary issues. The number of topics discussed, the emphasis, and order will vary with the instructor. The topics selected may include, but are not limited to, the following: addiction, crime, ecological and energy issues, education, physical and mental health issues, poverty, prejudice and discrimination, social sexual issues, urban issues, research methodology, and violence. F, S

SOC 125 Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the social work profession in the United States and its philosophical, historical, and ethical dimensions. Students will be introduced to core social work theory, skills, and best practices associated with them. Current issues in social work affecting local, state, and national social programs; agencies; and individuals will be introduced and discussed. F, S

SOC 127 Interpersonal and Group Dynamics

(3-0-3)

This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics. Theories of leadership and groups are discussed and analyzed. The interview process will be emphasized and applied to individuals and groups. Stages of group development will be explained and practiced. The course introduces students to conflict resolution and problem solving techniques and skills. There is a particular emphasis on applying communication dynamics within a professional setting with groups and individuals. The course enables students to discuss, analyze, and develop their personal communication skills. F, S

SOC 222 Marriage and The Family

(3-0-3)

This course concentrates on marriage and family patterns stressing current trends in the United States and also including historical and cross-cultural perspectives. Emphasis is placed on the marital relationship and parenting including such topics as mate selection, interpersonal communication, marital adjustment, domestic violence and dissolution. PR: SOC 121

SOC 224 Sociology of Aging

(3-0-3)

This course concentrates on the social environment of the elderly stressing the sociological, psychological, and physiological aspects of aging. Ageism, health, finances, retirement, living environments, and special problems of the vulnerable and minority elderly are discussed. Current social policy and social programs are also discussed as well as death and dying and the hospice movement. PR: SOC 121

SOC 228 Minority Groups

(3-0-3)

This course will examine how groups of persons sharing characteristics (whether physical or cultural, inherited or learned) interact with groups sharing different characteristics. It will present theoretical frameworks and constructs that will help students understand the nature of prejudice and discrimination and discuss alternative strategies to reduce both. PR: SOC 121

Spanish

SPA 115 Conversational Spanish I

(3-0-3)

This is a beginning course in Spanish which emphasizes oral communication in a variety of topics at a basic level. It covers only that grammar and structure absolutely necessary for speaking. The course is intended for students with no previous knowledge of the Spanish language. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. F, S

SPA 116 Basic Conversational Spanish II

(3-0-3)

The purpose of this course is to further the students’ conversational skills in Spanish. In addition to new vocabulary, the past tense and other useful grammatical points will be covered. As in the first course, there will be great emphasis on developing the students’ speaking ability. The students will create their own dialogues on specified topics, and will be responsible for several readings and several short compositions. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: SPA 115 or permission of instructor

SPA 121 Elementary Spanish I

(3-0-3)

The first half of the one-year sequence in Elementary Spanish gives students a basic understanding of the Spanish language through listening, speaking, reading and writing instruction. The course also provides an understanding of the civilization, culture, and customs of Spanish-speaking people. The course is designed for beginners or students with less than two years of high school Spanish. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. SPA 121 is identified by SCCC as the equivalent of the first college semester of a foreign language study. Students are required to take this level of Spanish or higher to fulfill the SUNY general education requirement. Students who studied Spanish in high school and achieved a score of 85 or above on the Regents Exam demonstrate proficiency in SPA 121 and should enroll in SPA 122. F

115


SPA 122 Elementary Spanish II

(3-0-3)

TEL 221 Data Communications

(3-0-3)

This second half of the one-year sequence in Elementary Spanish continues the introduction of the grammatical structure in an attempt to give the student a basic understanding of and ability to use the language. Besides the emphasis on language skills, the course continues to provide an understanding of the civilization, culture, and customs of Spanish-speaking people. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: SPA 121 or permission of the instructor S

This course is an introduction to the concepts and systems of modern communications and provides a solid foundation in the technology of the field. Topics to be covered include system equipment components and their performance capabilities, carriers and their services, data networks, data link controls, and legislation/regulations pertinent to data communications. PR: TEL 121 S

SPA 222 Intermediate Spanish I

TAT 121 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

(3-0-3)

This course furthers the knowledge of students’ language skills through review of the fundamentals of Spanish structure, and by emphasizing oral reading comprehension and self-expression in speaking and writing. The course also expands students’ understanding of the civilization, culture, and customs of Spanish-speaking people. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: SPA 122 or permission of the instructor

SPA 224 Intermediate Spanish II

(3-0-3)

This course, a continuation of Intermediate Spanish I, emphasizes the fundamentals of Spanish structure in written and oral communication. Readings give students a panoramic view of the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: SPA 222 or permission of the instructor

Speech

SPE 121 Introduction to Speech

(3-0-3)

In this introductory course students have an opportunity to gain skill, confidence, and fluency in public speaking. Students develop an understanding of both basic communication principles and public speaking strategies through their application of these principles to a variety of speaking assignments. F, S

Teacher Education TET 221 Foundations of Education

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the major issues and trends associated with public education and teaching in contemporary society. Students investigate the philosophical, historical, and sociological foundations of schooling and explore a variety of theories and practices. Major issues include school law, governance, career options, ethics, and equality. The course may be taken as a social science elective but is intended primarily for seniors in the Teacher Education Transfer program. Students will be expected to spend a minimum of ten hours in an educational setting within the community. F, S

TET 252 Pre-professional Seminar

(1-0-1)

This capstone Seminar is intended for TET majors who are about to graduate from their two-year preparatory program and transfer to senior institutions. Students will review the knowledge and skills they have already acquired and begin to demonstrate their proficiency. Opportunities are provided for students to acquire additional supervised observation hours and technical assistance on an individual basis. Each student will assemble a pre-professional portfolio as a summative experience. CR: TET 221

Telecommunication

TEL 121 Introduction to Information Systems

(3-0-3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the use and management of information systems and technology that support the business activities of an organization. Areas of focus include the foundations of information systems in business, using information technology for strategic advantage, computer hardware and software, and data resource management. The course also will address telecommunications and networks, electronic commerce, decision support systems, security and ethical challenges, and global management of e-business technology. F, S

116

Tourism & Hospitality

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the basic principles of the hospitality and tourism industry. Topics included relate to economic, social and cultural impact upon the global marketplace. The course illustrates to students the interdependency between culinary arts, hotel/restaurant management and tourism. F, S

TAT 133 Airline Reservation and Ticketing

(3-0-3)

This course studies domestic and international airline ticketing. Students learn how to write tickets using the Official Airline Guide (OAG). Making reservations with airlines, seat availability, airline schedules and air fares are studied. Students learn how to confirm reservations and issue tickets. After students have mastered manual ticketing, they are introduced to the same procedure using a computer reservation system. F

TAT 140 Event Management

(3-0-3)

This course explores the logistics involved in event planning. Scope and size of events will be examined in detail. Topics include concept, design, feasibility, marketing, financial management, risk management, staging, staffing, leadership, safety and security, and careers in the hospitality industry.

TAT 221 Passenger Management

(3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the concepts of passenger group management upon surface travel conveyors. Topics to be covered include arranging cruises, sightseeing tours, railroads, car rentals and hotel accommodations; communication with the client/group representative; and selling group travel services. F

TAT 231 (3-0-3) Directed Study in Travel, Tourism, & Convention Management This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity for concentrated study in the area of individual interest in the field of Travel, Tourism and Convention Management. During the course, selected topics of practical value will be covered by the instructor. Students will select and pursue an instructor-approved topic for individual study. An approved internship experience, including specific educational objectives, may satisfy this requirement. Students will present orally the findings of their studies a nd will submit final reports for instructor evaluation. PR: TAT 121 and HOT 276 S


FACULTY AND STAFF College Administration Quintin B. Bullock, President; B.S., M.Ed., Prairie View A & M University; D.S.S., University of Texas Penny A. Haynes, Dean of Academic Affairs; B.S., SUNY Oneonta; M.A., Binghamton University; Ed.D., Columbia University Patricia J. Godlewski, Dean of Administration; B.S., M.B.A., State University of New York at Albany

Arthur Paolelli, Manager of Administrative Computing; B.S., College of Saint Rose Laurie Hempstead, Assistant to the President/ Board of Trustees, B.S., College of Saint Rose; M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Special Appointments

Edward S. Baker, Dean of Continuing Education; B.A., Elon College; M.A., Appalachian State University

Coordinator for ADA Transition Services, Ellen Wertlieb Elston Hall, Room 222 (518) 381-1345 1-800-662-1200 NYS Relay

Stanley H. Strauss, Associate Dean for Planning and Development; B.S., Purdue University; M.B.A., Boston University

Title IX Coordinator, Carolyn Taylor Pinn Elston Hall, Room 128 (518) 381-1331

Martha J. Asselin, Associate Dean for Student Services/Director of Student Activities; B.A., State University of New York College at Oswego; M.S., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 1995

Affirmative Action Officer/ADA Coordinator, Carolyn Taylor Pinn, Elston Hall, Room 128 (518) 381-1331

Margaret C. King, Associate Dean for Student Development; B.A., Ursinus College; M.S., Ed.D., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 1990

Business and Law

Brian F. McGarvey, Associate Dean for Student Access/Director of Financial Aid; A.A., Dutchess Community College; B.A., M.S., State University of New York College at Oneonta; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 2006

Gerald J. Evans, Professor; B.S., Hartwick College; J.D., New York Law School; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1992

Michael P. D’Annibale, Assistant Dean for Administrative Services; B.A., State University of New York Empire State College Angela M. Prestigiacomo, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs; B.A., M.S., Ed.S, State University of New York at Albany William J. Lawrence, Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs/Director of Academic Services; B.A., M.S., State University of New York at Albany Nicolas G. Ltaif, Director of Academic Computing; A.A.S., Fulton-Montgomery Community College; B.S., State University of New York Institute of Technology at Utica/Rome; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 1997

Teaching Faculty

Harry Buffardi, Assistant Professor; B.S., Empire State College; M.S.S.C., Syracuse University

Matthew J. Farron, Associate Professor; B.S., Siena College; M.B.A., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2008 Sheila M. Foglietta, Associate Professor; A.A., Molloy College; B.S., State University of New York College at Old Westbury; J.D., St. John’s University School of Law Richard L. Hegney, Professor; A.A.S., State University of New York College of Technology at Farmingdale; B.A., Pace University; M.S., Hunter College David J. Hennessy, Professor and Chairperson; B.A., University of Vermont; M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Faculty Service, 2007

Vladia C. Boniewski, Director of Development/ Executive Director of the SCCC Foundation; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S., M.S., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 2001

William J. Nealon, Assistant Professor, B.B.A., Siena College; M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Lynne O. King, Director of Library Services; B.A., Kalamazoo College; M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo

Judith D. Spitz, Professor; A.A.S., Becker Junior College; B.S., College of Saint Rose; M.S., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2005

David G. Sampson, Director of Admissions; B.A., Hartwick College; M.S., Sage Graduate School

Gary E. Perkins, Assistant Professor, A.A.S., Hudson Valley Community College; B.S., Sage College; M.P.A., Marist College

Richard J. Van Ness, Professor; A.A.S., Broome Community College; B.A., Sage College; M.A., M.S., College of Saint Rose; Ph.D., Union College Graduate School Barbara J. Warschawski, Professor; A.S., Fulton-Montgomery Community College; B.S., Skidmore College; M.B.A., Russell Sage College

Developmental Studies Robin S. Geery, Learning Resource Specialist III; B.A., State University of New York College at Plattsburgh; M.A., State University of New York at Albany Donna C. Gigliotti, Instructor, B.A., State University of New York College at New Paltz; M.A., University of Memphis Jillmarie Murphy, Professor; A.A.S., ColumbiaGreene Community College; B.A., M.A., College of Saint Rose; Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2001 Siu Ng, Learning Resource Specialist I; B.A. City University of New York; M.A. Long Island University Peter Ochshorn, Assistant Professor; B.A., Princeton University; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Michigan John H. Quaintance, Associate Professor and Chairperson; B.A., M.A., New Mexico State University Cynthia A. Taber, Professor; B.A., State University of New York College at Oneonta; M.S., University of Wisconsin, State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2006 Kathryn L. Tomaino, Professor; B.S., M.S. State University of New York at Albany Pamela T. Walsh, Assistant Professor; B.S., State University of New York College at Oneonta; M.S. State University of New York at Albany

Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism Thomas P. Alicandro, Technical Specialist; B.A., State University of New York at Albany; Certified Hospitality Educator David E. Brough, Professor and Chairperson; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S., University of Nevada at Las Vegas; M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology; Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany; Certified Executive Chef, Certified Culinary Educator Prescott A. Brown, Professor; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; A.S., Stockbridge School of Agriculture; B.S., University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Alan Yauney, Director, Campus Maintenance

117


Susan Hatalsky, Associate Professor; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S. State University of New York College at Oswego; Certified Executive Chef; Certified Culinary Educator Ellen J. Heekin, Senior Technical Specialist; A.A.S., A.O.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport Paul V. Krebs, Professor; B.S., University of Maryland at College Park; M.S., State University of New York College at Oswego; Certified Culinary Educator James Larkin, Technical Specialist; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S., Purdue University Ingrid C. O’Connell, Professor; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S., Niagara University; M.S., State University of New York at Albany Robert L. Payne, Senior Technical Specialist; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College Anthony J. Strianese, Professor; B.S., Bryant College; M.S., College of Saint Rose; Certified Culinary Educator, State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Services, 1998 Christopher A. Tanner, Technical Specialist; A.O.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.B.A., State University of New York at Delhi; Certified Executive Chef; Certified Hospitality Educator; ACF Certified Culinary Judge Rocco G. Verrigni, Professor; B.S., LeMoyne College; M.S., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2004 Kimberly S. Williams, Associate Professor; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S. State University of New York College at Oswego David J. Wixted, Instructor; A.A.S., State University of New York College of Agriculture and Technology at Morrisville; B.S., State University of New York at Oswego

Eric R. Carlson, Assistant Professor; B.S., State University of New York College at Cortland; M.S., State University of New York at Albany

Syeda I. Munaim, Associate Professor; B.S., George Washington University; Ph.D., Indiana University

Carol A. DeFries, Professor and Chairperson; B.A., St. Lawrence University; M.A., College of Saint Rose

Donald L. Riggs, Instructor; A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S., M.S. Union College

Papa I. Gueye, Associate Professor; B.S. University of Dakar; M.A., University of Toledo; M.A., M.B.A., State University of New York at Albany

Raymond D. Ross, Professor; B.A., Ed.M., State University of New York College at Buffalo; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2002

Judy S. Karmiohl, Professor; B.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook; M.S., State University of New York at Albany Richard L. Leveroni, Professor; B.S., Regents College; B.A., M.S., State University of New York at Albany; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1973; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Faculty Service, 2009 Constance J. Ostrowski, Professor; B.A., Syracuse University; M.A., University of Illinois at Urbana; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities, 2006 Judith E. Prinzo, Assistant Professor; M.A., State University of New York at Albany; B.S., Universidad Pedagoglia Libertador; B.S., Universidad Santa Maria

Tamara B. Calhoun, Associate Professor; A.A.S., Hudson Valley Community College; B.S., M.S., College of Saint Rose

118

Karen E. Hosmer, Assistant Professor; B.M., Oberlin College; M.M., Michigan State University; D.M.A., Temple University; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2009

Anthony Sano, Professor; A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.A., State University of New York at Albany; M.M., University of Hartford

C. Geoffrey Welch, Professor; B.A., University of South Florida; M.A., University of North Carolina

Brett L. Wery, Professor; B.M., North Carolina School of the Arts; M.A., University of Denver; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2003

Aryn Zev, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., State University College at New Paltz

Mathematics, Science and Technology Tania Cabrera, Assistant Professor; B.S., Simmons College; M.A., Columbia University

Tammy S. Gummersheimer, Associate Professor; B.S., Saint Louis University; Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Faculty Service, 2008

Sandra M. Boynton, Professor; B.A., St. Lawrence University; M.A., State University of New York at Albany; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities, 2009

Music

Mark L. Seth, Associate Professor, B.A., University of Washington; M.A., University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany

Eileen Abrahams, Assistant Professor; B.A., Lehman College; M.A., State University of New York College at New Paltz

Dean W. Bennett, Associate Professor; B.A., Brigham Young University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington

Renato V. Tameta, Associate Professor; B.S., Far Eastern University; M.S., Long Island University

Kim M. Scheuerman, Associate Professor; B.A., State University of New York College at Oneonta; M.A., State University of New York at Albany

Keion M. Clinton, Instructor; B.A., Talladega College; M.S., Jacksonville State University

Debra A. Ahola, Professor; A.A., Illinois Valley Community College; B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Illinois State University

Margaret T. Spring, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.S., State University of New York at Albany

William A. Meckley, Professor and Chairperson; B.A., Fairmont State College; M.M., Ohio University; Ph.D., Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1996; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities, 2005

Humanities and Social Sciences

Renee Adamany, Assistant Professor; B.S., M.S., College of Saint Rose; M.S.W., State University of New York at Albany

Ralf W. Schauer, Professor; B.S., State University of New York at Albany; M.S.T., Union College; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1998

Lenore G. Horowitz, Professor; B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo; M.S., University of Massachusetts at Lowell Barbara A. Jones, Associate Professor/Aviation Liaison; A.S., Hudson Valley Community College; B.S., Daniel Webster College Laurie L. Lacey, Professor; B.A., M.S, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh; M.S., University of Vermont; M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany Ted Mar, Associate Professor; B.S., University of British Columbia; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois Ruth L. McEvoy, Professor and Chairperson; A.S., Hudson Valley Community College; B.A., St. Lawrence University; M.S., Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Yiping Wu, Associate Professor; B.A., Nanjing Normal University; M.A., Radford University; D.M.A., The University of Iowa

Adjunct Faculty Business and Law Allegro, Diane Apkarian, Brian Barkley, Kevin L. Beaudoin, Susan Casola, Matteo Civale, Joseph Collins, Keith Conley, Daniel Conley, Patricia Conley, Richard Conlon, Benjamin Crossman, Richard Culhane, Edmond Cusano, Carl Della Rocco III, Michael J. DePasquale, Richard Falcone, Deborah Falvo, Jack Farstad, Robert Fattorusso, Thomas Fivel, Norman Frankoski, James R. Gianatasio, Thomas J.


Grinnell, Carol Higgins, Robert Hilts, Earl Hogan, Carla Izdebski, Michael Juste, Peter Kasko, Richard Kelly, Philip Kenneally Dochat, Lisa Lang, Latefa Langer-Smith, Eileen Lawson, Michelle Lenahan, Thomas Lewis, Wayne Lingenfelter, Dale McCary, Kathryn McIntosh, Steven L. Miller, Annmarie Nadeau, Douglas R. Pardi, Louis Patricca, Christine Pidgeon, Nicola Prevost, Leonard Proskin, Arnold W. Rulison, Kenneth Russell, Stephen Saccocio, John Santilli, Joan Siano Enders, Camille Simmons, John J. Swain, Mark Testo, Thomas E. Zayicek, Peter

Developmental Studies Alois, Dianne Aydinian, Michelle Della Vecchio, Andrea DeNardo, Rozanne Doyle, Rae Ellen Erwetowski, Carolyn Farina, Ann Gigliotti, Donna Graef, Igor Herrman, Thomas Higgins, Robert Jacobson, Laurie Kanser, Cynthia Lindemann, Janice Malecki, Maryanne McCrea, Daniel Meaney, Heather L. Ng, Siu Nocito, David Quaintance, Jay Rowell, Jessica

Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism Alicandro, Thomas Baldwin, Jacqueline Bensen, William Brower, David Brucker, Mark Burns, Frank Burns, Mashana Buzanowski, Debi Caponera, Tracey Cerone, Paul H. Cleland, Tara Cooper, David Delos, Mark Desmond, Peter Dolan, Paul

Dordick, Vera Eckler, Brenda Gregory, Katherine .Kane, Kathleen Kelsey, Earle Moser, Gerard O’Connell, John L. Ortiz, Jaime Otis, Kimberly Rochow, Christopher Sagatis, Darlene Shannon, Donna Sokol, Gail Toth, Richard Tralli-Cassole, Debra Vennard, Timothy

Humanities and Social Sciences Alois, Dianne Astmann, Stephen Besozzi, David Bishop, Sara Bloom, David Buzanowski, Debi Cacchione, Dana Cahill, Rachel Calarco, Paul Caparulo, Ralph Chirila, Alexander Crisafulli, Alida DeBono, Amber Decker, Kelly DiPalma, Stephanie Dolan, Scott Downey, Mary Jo Doyle, Rae Ellen Duca, Guiseppe Dufort, Shirlee Ermie, Kathryn Evanoff, Kathleen Evans, Richard Fallarino, Jaime Farina, Maria Ferraioli, Patricia M. Foster, Christopher Fragale, Linda Friedman, Martin Gigliotti, Donna Gonzalez, Sandra Grinnell, Richard Grund, Lorraine Harden, John P. Hohle, Randolph Jones, Michael Jones, Nancy Kennedy, Sharon Knoblauch, Edward Kovacik, Abbe Kozakiewicz, Lauren LeFevre, Amy Linehan, Kelly T. Longo, Patrick J. Lucas Meising, Lilly Lynch, Maureen MacGloin, Andrea M. Martini, Victor McCary, Maggie McGarvey, Brian McManus, James Micare, Kelly Murat, Leszek Nelson, Thomas Newton, Marcie O’Connor, Mary Clare

O’Hea, Robin Parella, Nicholas Pires, Monica Podlaski, Anthony L. Pouliot, Frank Rose, Richard Rowe, Debbie Rugenstein, Ernest Sanders, Colleen Silver-Kuhne, Laura Slade, Leonard Snyder, Carrie E. Staude, Ryan Stevens, Susan Streifert, Lynn Tyson, Stephen van Bladel, John Vandrei, Charles Wade, Diane Westervelt, Jessica Wilson, Ronalyn Yapo, Louis

Mathematics, Science and Technology Ambrosino, Mary Pat Atkinson, Lois Barr, Adam Bankert, Eve Bell, Frank Benson, Anthony Blodgett, Robert Bousman, Kenneth Brisport, Alton Brittain, Kenneth Buckley, Nancy Burke, Jennifer Cavanaugh, Jessica Chouiniere, Daniel Clevenstine, James Collins, Ralph DeBlock, Heidi DelRosso, Lorraine Deyoe, Marie Espina, Noel Evanoff, Kelly Farina, Ann Feinberg, Daniel Fredericks, Kimberly Freeman, Lavelle A. Friedman, April Gino, M. Colleen Gold, Barry Goldberg, Jason Gray, Anthony Gray, Thomas Grossman, Christine Hacker, Michael Hafensteiner, Marc Hallenbeck, Mary Hassib, Lamyaa Hauser, Sonya Hendrick, Joseph Hoey, Thomas Hosbach, Alan Izdebski, Michael Jaconski, Chad Juste, Peter Kahley-Wolf, Mary Jo Keesee, Elena Kelly, Philip Koscielniak, Kim Kravitz, Jay A. Lambert, Lisa Lawrensen, William

119


Lazar, Ira Liska, Kathy Ltaif, Nicolas Moore, Jerry Murphy, Patricia Nicolaescu, Dan Pallotta, Katie Panczer, Gregory Peapus, Diane Posson, Robyn Procopio, Jeffrey Puszkarczuk, Thomas Reynolds, Todd Rivera, Mario P. Rodenhauser, Karl Rogers, Kenneth Rowan, Martin Ruberti, Diane Ryan, Sean Schroeder, John Seymour-Smith, Jane Stuart, Van Tinani-Mendleson, Manisha Varno, Sandra Visconti, Jody Walsh, James Wertz, Harrison Wilson, Eleanor Xie, Yi-Yuan Zanta, Angelo Zimring, Jeffrey

Professional Staff

Michael J. Dzikowski, Senior Technical Assistant (Academic Computing); A.S., Schenectady County Community College

Heather L. Meaney, Public Relations/Publications Specialist II; B.S., Utica College of Syracuse University

Music

Kimberly D. Emerson, Senior Technical Assistant (Academic Computing); A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College

Dale J. Miller, Coordinator of Institutional Research; B.A., University of Kansas

Ahola, Mark Aldi, Barbara Avitabile, Judith Barker-Schwartz, Ann-Marie Beer, Lucille Bellino, Peter Brehmer, Tim Brown, Joel Brucker, Clifford Corigliano, James Esch, Judith Evans, Mark Falburgh, Arthur Fragomeni, Jack Gerbino, Thomas Gregory, Linden Heilman, Annette Hibberd, Gordon Isachsen, Sten Ivanov, Krassimir Janack, Andrew Kassarova, Petia Lambert, David Malthouse, John Meidenbauer, Michael Miller, Harold Patrick, Ronald Phipps, Nathaniel Pickreign, Christina Pray, Kenneth Savoy, Deborah Strichman, Sherri Thibodeau, Norman Vatalaro, Charles Wicks, Michael Wilson, James C.

120

Denise K. Brucker, Coordinator of Workforce Development; B.A., State University of New York College at Potsdam; M.P.A. Marist College Peter H. Cameron, Assistant for Distributive Learning; A.A. Schenectady County Community College; B.A., College of Saint Rose Faith Critti, Director, Liberty Partnership Program; B.A., Hartwick College Bernice Cubero, Case Manager, Bridge Program; B.B.A., Sage Colleges of Albany Christine Curran, Vocational Counselor, RealJOBS NY; B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.A., College of Saint Rose Mary Dornbush, Assistant for Financial Aid; B.A., M.S., State University of New York at Albany Shirlee A. Dufort, Coordinator of Evening/Alternative Instruction; A.A., Schenectady County Community College; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany Bernice V. Dunn, Counselor IV; B.S., State University of New York at Albany; M.Ed., College of Saint Rose, Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 2009

Daniel Feinberg, Coordinator of Instructional Technology; B.A., Haverford College; M.Ed., George Mason University Stephen A. Fragale, Counselor IV; B.S., State University of New York College at Cortland; M.A., University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth Robert G. Frederick, Coordinator, Career and Employment Services II; B.S., State University of New York College at Cortland; M.A., State University of New York at Binghamton; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 1999 Kathleen M. Dowd Freese, Associate Director of Admissions; B.A., State University of New York College at Oswego; M.S., LaSalle University Judy Fruiterman, TRIO Counselor; B.S., Skidmore College; M.S., State University of New York at Albany Daniel E. Glick, Coordinator of Emergency Management Project; A.A.S., Community College of the Air Force; A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.P.S., State University of New York Institute of Technology at Utica/Rome David M. Gonzalez, Athletic Director II; B.A., Lycoming College; State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 2004 Sandra K. Gonzalez, Associate for Continuing Education; B.S., Minnesota State University; M.E., Framingham State College Nancy M. Hall, Technical Assistant (Academic Computing); A.A.S. Schenectady County Community College

Mary C. Hallenbeck, Senior Technical Assistant (Mathematics, Science and Technology); A.A.S., State University of New York College of Technology at Delhi, B.A., State University College at Oneonta Peter J. Houghton, Senior Technical Assistant (Library Services); A.A.S., State University of New York College of Technology at Alfred Maria C. Kotary, Associate for Continuing Education; A.A.S., Hudson Valley Community College; B.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook; M.S., State University of New York at Albany Caroline A. Laier, Librarian; B.A. Dickinson College; M.L.S., State University of New York at Albany, Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Librarianship, 2008 Douglas J. MacDonald, Basic Skills Teacher; B.A., St. Bonaventure University; M.A., University of New Mexico; M.S. College of Saint Rose Michael J. Mastrella, Academic/Admissions Advisor I; B.S., M.S., State University of New York College at Cortland Daniel A. McCrea, Director, TRIO; A.A., Onondaga Community College; B.A., State University of New York at Albany; M.S., College of Saint Rose

David S. Moore, Librarian; B.A., State University of New York College at Cortland; M.L.S., State University of New York at Albany Dennis G. Mott, Senior Technical Assistant (Library Resources); A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.A., Russell Sage College; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 2005 John L. O’Connell, Senior Technical Assistant (Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism); A.O.S., A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S., State University of New York at Albany Mary Clare O’Connor, Transition Counselor for Liberty Partnership Program and YouthBuild Program; A.A., Schenectady County Community College; B.A., State University of New York at Albany Paula Ohlhous, Coordinator of the Annual Fund and Business Gifts; A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S., College of Saint Rose Carolyn Taylor Pinn, Coordinator of Personnel Services/A.A.O.; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College Robyn M. Posson, Counselor II; B.A., University at Albany; M.S., College of Saint Rose Cynthia A. Russell, Associate Director of Financial Aid; B.A., Hartwick College David A. Russell, Technical Assistant (Academic Computing); A.S., Schenectady County Community College Lois M. Tripp, Director, SUNY College and Career Counseling Center; B.S.W., M.S.W., State University of New York at Albany Raphael J. Tucker, Associate Director, SUNY College and Career Counseling Center; B.S.W, State University of New York at Albany


Amiee S. Warfield, Coordinator for Financial Services; A.A.S., Schenectady County Community College; B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport

Harry Trilling Shang-pinn (Chloe) Tseng Debra Volks Qiongfei (Vicki) Yu

Ellen Wertlieb, Coordinator for ADA Transition Services; B.A., Queens College of the City University of New York; M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., New York University

Continuing Education Division

Ronalyn G. Wilson, TRIO Tutor Coordinator; B.A., M.S., State University of New York at Albany

Student Affairs Division

Rebecca Yates, Program Coordinator, RealJOBS NY; A.S., Columbia-Greene Community College; B.S., State University of New York at New Paltz; M.S., Sage Colleges Cynthia D. Zielaskowski, Associate for Academic Services; B.A., College of Saint Rose; State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service, 2007

Part-Time Professional Staff Executive Division Beth Klein

Academic Affairs Division Nathaniel Arnold Stephen Astman Michelle Aydinian Sharyn Becker Sarah Bishop Margaret Brousseau Kevin Brown Judith Buhrmaster Michael Burdikoff Jennifer Chandler Roberta Daley Rozanne DeNardo Linda Dettbarn Hector Dominguez Rodriguez Tracy Donovan Donald Drewecki Clare Field Douglas Gordon Igor Graef Thomas Gray Robert Grossman Lorraine Grund Patricia Haskell Nancy Heller Thomas Herrmann Sabrina Johnson-Taylor Thomas Lansing Mark Lasek Ira Lazar Janice Lindemann Kathy Liska Ronald Lopez James Lynch Kelly Mac Watters Liam Malone Richard Monda Thinn Oo Tara Parks Carlos Perez Ronald Pratt Alice Renna Tracy Salvage Steven Shepard Patricia Somerscales Melyssa Smith Brian Story Van Stuart

Sharon Boomer Ross Meo

Brian Adams Cynthia Astemborski-Decker Joel Bramer Rae Ellen Doyle Mitzi Espinola Susanna Fenlon Deborah Gair Dawn Jones Rebecca Kraft Gary LaValley Jennifer Lawrence Kristine Moore Valerie Palmieri Karen Pandell Liz Puotinen Danielle Rossner Melanie Scheicher Mary Scott Melanie Uebele Margaret Anne Williams

Emeriti

Lois Atkinson Thomas Baker Patricia Barker Philip Bentley Paul Bryant Gerard Buckhout Warren Bundy* Grayce Burian Alan Carter Matteo Casola Carolyn Cary Lawrence Cline Lisa Cohn Peter Cousins* Ervine Crawford Mary Jane Dike Gertrude Frick* Christine Grossman Wendell Hallenbeck* Gerald Hansen Guy Harrison* Paul Hiatt Nancy Heller Suzanne Larkin James Livingston George Lockyer Frances Loeffler Jessica Malheiros* Mary Beth McDuffee* Patricia Mogro Thomas Nelson James Parent Constance Pollock George Potter Shirley Ratajak Thaddeus Raushi Janet Robbins Diane Ruberti John Schroeder Shirley Stanley Barbara Walton Martin Boone Weinstein

Karl Zipf *deceased

Support Staff Account Clerks Laura Cossart Melissa Kamm Kathleen Slezak Kathleen LaFreniere John Morrett Jenny Ramsundar

Administrative Services Clerk Denise DeVito

Bookkeepers Kathleen Hollingsworth Joyce Robertson

Cleaners Zant Samuria

Clerks Mary Louise Farina Jill Relyea

Computer Operator Paul Iovinelli

Computer Systems Analyst/Programmer Edward Tolentino

Executive Secretaries I Linda Markel Boink Elizabeth Napier

Executive Secretary II Patricia Whitley

Financial Aid Specialist Janice DeLuke

Information Processing Specialists I Barbara Beverley Carol DeIuilo Lynn Harkness Eileen Lemley Taisa Johnson

Information Processing Specialists II Debra Aydinian Kathleen Burke Suzann Burke Charlene Cornell Darcy DeGeorgia Ellyn Delos Patricia DiCarlo Omawattie Dwarka Shirley Hubert Jamie Hungerschafer Halina Lastarza Mary Ann Pliskowski Joanne Romanowski Donna Scavullo Mary Ann Sheehy Christine Volans

Mail Clerk

121


Nora Carnevale

George Rank

Maintenance Helper

Utility Worker

Bruce Danz

Richard Wentworth

Maintenance Workers

SCCC Foundation, Inc.

Ivan Brainard Leon Byrd Frank Harris Cory Treadwell

Foundation Directors

Payroll Audit Clerk Amelia Carter

Principal Account Clerk Susie Palluti

Principal Clerks Deborah Gray Linda Watters

SCCC Cleaners Gloria Dixon Terrell Leigh

Senior Bookkeeper Margaret Adamek

Senior Clerk Nagwa Habib

Senior Computer Systems Analyst/ Programmer Daniel Barletta

Senior Duplicating Machine Operator Terry Treis

Senior Financial Aid Specialist Jean Bursi

Senior General Mechanics Anthony Bojarczuk John Martin III

Senior Library Clerks Nicholas Brancasi Marilyn VanSteenburg

Senior Maintenance Workers Kevin Batson Ronald Cusano David DeVito

Senior Payroll Audit Clerk Charleen DeLornezo

Senior Reservation Specialist Sandra Petronis

Senior Typists Susan Bleser Susan Donahue Linda Hearn Corinne McGarvey Patricia Ostrander Frances Wolf

Supervising Grounds Worker

Kimberly Perone, Chair Kelly Shea-Bradley, Chair-Elect Quintin B. Bullock, Secretary and College President Michael Tobin, Treasurer Susan Baker Frank Casler Paul Farina Diane Smith Faubion Dorothy M. Harris Paola Horvath Alexander T. LaRocco Laura LeClair Ann Marie Lizzi Ceil S. Mack J. Richard Phillippe Terry Phillips Ben Round Robert J. Sullivan Barbara Bishop Ward Michael Wollman Gloria Zampini ‘97 Rachel Zimolka Vladia C. Boniewski ’71, Executive Director Margaret D. Huff ’81, Counsel


Trustees • Foundation

AND ADVISORY COMMITTEES SCCC Board of Trustees

Top: Denise Murphy McGraw, Chair; Sharon Daley, Vice Chair; Renee Bradley, Secretary; Dr. Alexander T. LaRocco, Treasurer; Raymond R. Gillen Bottom: Dorothy M. Harris, Gary E. Hughes, Michael W. Karl, J. Richard Phillippe, Emily Miller, Student Trustee

Advisory Committees ADA Transition Services

David G. Sampson, College Representative Jennifer Sloan, Associate Director of Admissions, Siena College

Thomas Baker, SCCC Emeritus

Business

David Cottrell, MSW, Northeast Career Planning

Robert Braathe, Professor, SUNY Delhi

Student Trustee, Board Representative

Michael Cinquanti, CEO, Genium Group, Inc.

Edward Lessard, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, VESID, Albany Dist. Office

Sharon Daley, Board Representative

Michael Miller, Manager of Training, Golub Corporation Elizabeth Ognibene, Personnel Manager, Schenectady ARC Kathleen Sanford, Recruiter, Time Warner Cable Frank Starkey, HR Program Manager, GE Global Research Joanne Walters, Recruiter, Air National Guard 109 AWI

Charlotte Morgan

Robin Granger, V.P. Communications & Member Relations, The Chamber of Schenectady County

Kim Scheuerman, Associate Professor, SCCC

David J. Hennessy, College Representative

Laura Thomson, Coordinator Transitional Services, BOCES

Michael W. Karl, Board Representative

Robert Young, Human Resource Director, Curtis Lumber

Ellen Wertleib, College Representative

Robert Mantello, President, Bricklayers and Allied Crafts Union #2

Criminal Justice

Admissions

Rick Tomisman, Chief Financial Officer, NYS Association of Training Development Professionals

Timothy S. Bradt, Chief, Schenectady County Sheriff’s Office

Career and Employment Services

David J. Hennessy, College Representative

Renee Bradley, Board Representative Maxine Borom John Burrows, Velocity Print Solutions Nancy Bushee, Guidance Counselor, Niskayuna High School Patrick A. Foti

Nick Abdo, SuperPower, Schenectady, NY Mark Cepiel, Trooper/Recruitment Officer, NYS Police

Henry Hughes

Patrick Ciraulo, Executive Director, Duanesburg Area Community Center

Richard Naylor, Director of Articulation Agreements, Sage College of Albany

Nicole Falzo, HR Recruiter, Sunmark Federal Credit Union

Victor Perun, Chair, Office of Curriculum and Instructional Support, NYS Education Dept.

Robert G. Frederick, College Representative

Gary Wager, President, Tech Valley Networking Services , LLC

Michael Geraci, Chief, Schenectady Police Department Louis J. Pardi J. Richard Phillippe, Board Representative

Dorothy Harris, Board Representative

123


William Sickinger, Director, Safety and Security, Union College

Heidi DeBlock, M.D., Critical Care Physician, St. Clare’s Hospital

Patrick Smith, Director, Zone Five Regional Law Enforcement Training Center

Richard DePasquale, Firefighter/Emergency Medical Technician, Amsterdam Fire Department

Developmental Studies

Robert Farstad, Fire Chief, Schenectady City Fire Department

Ellie Fosmire, Learning Center Coordinator, FMCC

Debra McDermott, Director of Food and Beverage, Albany Marriott

David J. Hennessy, College Representative

Jean Karutis, Project Director, TRIO/Bridge Programs, FMCC

Richard Kasko, Fire Chief, Scotia Fire Department

Donald Messare, District Sales Manager, SYSCO Food Services of Albany LLC

Alexander T. LaRocco, Board Representative

Brian Palazzolo, President, Classe Catering

Judith Grice Zamurs, Assistant Professor/Education Specialist/Mathematics, HVCC

Dale Lingenfelter, Fire Chief, Niskayuna Fire District 1

Patricia Pendergast, Manager, A to Z Wine and Spirit Center

Denise Murphy McGraw, Board Representative

Mike McEvoy, EMS Coordinator Saratoga-EMS Director NYS Fire Chiefs

Widjiono Purnomo, Chef/Owner, Yono’s

John H. Quaintance, College Representative Shiela Tebbano, Director of School Climate Initiative, Schenectady City Schools

Len Prevost, Specialist, Environment, Health and Safety, GE Corp Research & Development

Early Childhood

Peter Russo, Representative, Homeland Security & Public Safety

Carol A. DeFries, College Representative

Patricia Vieta

Jennifer Harrison, Coordinator, YWCA Children’s Center at SCCC

Hotel, Culinary Arts and Tourism

Alexander T. LaRocco, Board Representative Carol Rasowsky, Assistant Professor, The College of Saint Rose Patricia Skinner, Director of Operations Capital District Child Care Council Lynn Streifert, Director, Children with Special Needs Program, Schenectady County Public Health Administration

Fred Acunto, Station Manager, Delta Airlines, Albany International Airport

Suites by Hilton - Albany Louis Maggiore, Managing Partner, Old Bryan Inn & Longfellows Edmond G. Massa, Director, Fifth Third Bank

Harold Qualters, Director, New York State Restaurant Association, Educational Foundation Kathy Quandt, Director of Operations, Albany County Convention and Visitors Bureau MaryLou Race, Director of Sales, Mohonk Mountain House Richard Ruzzo, General Manager, Mohawk Golf Club Mary Scanlan, President, Scanlan Communications Group

James V. Bigley, Vice President, HMB Consultants

Lesley Shimer, Independent Team Leader, BNI Assistant Director, Weekenders USA

Gregory Boland, Manager, Conference Services General Electric Company

Rick Stegmann, Information Technology Manager, Vicarious Visions Inc.

David Brough, College Representative

Paul D. Tonko, Congressman

Frank Burns, General Manager, The Parker Inn

Patrick M. Treffiletti, McDonald’s Restaurants Owner/Operator

Valerie Valente, Coordinator Family Home Support, Schenectady Community Action Program - Head Start

Robert Burns, Executive Chef, Glens Falls Country Club Paul Cerone, Saratoga VoTech Instructor

Justina Treventi, Director of Registration, Site Solutions Worldwide

Educational Opportunity Program

Mark Delos, General Manager, Hall of Springs, SPAC, Glen Sanders Mansion

Mark Zimmerman, Director of Marketing, Albany Marriott Hotel

Joseph A. DiCarlo Jr., Corporate Purchasing and Food Service Director, Northwoods at Hilltop Manor

Human Services

Stephanie Albers, President, A & Z Property Management Joseph Allen Trenia Anderson, SCCC Alumna Julius (Skip) Aycox, Retired Guidance Counselor/ Principal, Schenectady City School District DeShawn McGarrity, Interim Assistant Director of Residential Life, SUNY Albany

Francis M. Domoy, Director, School of Hospitality and Service Management, Rochester Institute of Technology Dan Farrell, General Manager, Innis Arden Golf Club

Margaret Anderton, Executive Director, Bethesda House Mary Andolina, Instruction/Reference Librarian, The Evans Library Fulton-Montgomery Community College Renee Bradley, Board Representative Holly Clark, Director of Collage

Denise Murphy McGraw, Board Representative

Michael John Galbraith, Executive Chef, Century House

Angelicia Morris, Communications Coordinator, NYS Lottery

William Finnen, General Manager, Lake George Club

Gregory D. Gross, Professor, College of Saint Rose

John H. Quaintance, Chairperson, Developmental Studies, SCCC

Rick Fitzpatrick, Clubhouse Manager, The Country Club of Troy

Frank E. Pouliot, Professional Development Coordinator, Conifer Park

Walter Simpkins, Employment Specialist, Jobs, Etc.

Ray Fox, District Manager, Canandaigua Wine

Mary E. Rainey, BSW, Social Services Director, The Salvation Army

Fire Protection Technology Warren W. Abriel, Jr., Deputy Chief, Albany Fire Department

Shannon Hill, Event Manager, The Desmond Hotel Eugene A. Hood, District Manager, National Accounts Business Services

Carol A. DeFries, College Representative

Barbara Rio, Director of Undergraduate Field Education, SUNY Albany

Gary Hughes, Board Representative

Mark Sheehan, Director of New Initiatives Schenectady County Chapter NYSARC, Inc.

Kevin Barkley, Emergency Management Specialist, Lockheed Martin

Patrick Hughes, Business Development, Yankee Trails World Travel

Joseph Zoske, Administrative Coordinator, Social Work Department, Siena College

Richard Conley, Police Officer, Adjunct Faculty Member

Anand Jayapal, Executive Chef, Albany Country Club Blanchard Kenney Jr., Club Manager, Normanside Country Club Nancy Langford, General Manager, Homewood

124


Library and Instructional Technology Mary Andolina, Instruction/Reference Librarian, The Evans Library, Fulton-Montgomery Community College Patricia Baia, Instructor, Arts & Science Department, Albany College of Pharmacy

Music David Bourgeois, President, Whitelake Music and Post Clifford Brucker, Freelance Musician Rachel Gayne Annette Heilman, Certified Master Teacher

Stanley E. Skinner Jr., Professional Administrator and Management Consultant Lois M. Tripp, College Representative

Workforce Development Denise K. Brucker, College Representative Raymond E. Gillen, Board Representative

Suzanne Bernadt, Teacher Librarian, Hamilton Hill Elementary School

Edward P. Malia, Recording Engineer

Karen Gardner-Athey, Library Systems Training Specialist, SUNY Office of Library and Information Services

J. Richard Phillippe, Board Representative

Susan Gallagher, Director of Distance and Online Learning, Hudson Valley Community College

Diane B. Warner, Director of Music, Shenendehowa Central School District

Walter Grattidge

Brent Wheat, Music Educator

Francis Ricci, Director, Schenectady Job Training Agency

Brenda L. Hazard, Director, Marvin Library, Hudson Valley Community College

Paralegal

Charles Steiner, President, Chamber of Schenectady County

Dorothy Harris, Board Representative Lynne O. King, College Representative Andrew Kulmatiski, Director, Schenectady County Public Library

William A. Meckley, College Representative Charles Vatalaro, Director, SUNY Recording Studio

Catherine M. Callahan, Law Librarian, NYS Department of Law Library Andrea Gilligan, Paralegal, Attorney General’s Office Lyle Hartog, Legal Assistant, Criminal Justice Policy

Cara Molyneaux, Head of Access Services, Shaffer Library, Union College

David J. Hennessy, College Representative

Jean Sheviak, Executive Director, Capital District Library Council

Gary E. Hughes, Board Representative

Mathematics, Science and Technology Rodney L. Aldrich, Manager, Environmental Services Sterling Environmental Engineering Raymond R. Gillen, Board Representative Joe Hendrick, Regional CISCO Coordinator, Schenectady City School District Stephen Israel, Commissioner, Schenectady County Aviation Department Richard Lemanski, Adjunct Faculty Member, Aviation Science Kenneth Lenseth, Engineering Project Manager, SuperPower Ronald Mason, Director of Sales, Northeast Information Systems

Margaret D. Huff, Attorney at Law Sanford H. Levine, Esq. Christina Watson Meier, Attorney at Law Christine Patricca, Esq. Karen Satterlee, Paralegal, Law Office of Sven R. Paul Eli Taub, Attorney-Arbitrator-Mediator

Gary Hughes, Board Representative Robert Mantello, President, Bricklayers and Allied Crafworkers Suzanne Pollard, Empire State DevelopmentCapital Region

Frank Visco

Special Committee: Affirmative Action and Multicultural Affairs Committee Martha Asselin, Associate Dean/ Director of Student Activities, SCCC Carolyn Taylor Pinn, Coordinator of Personnel Services/Affirmative Action Officer, SCCC Stanley Strauss, Associate Dean for Planning and Development, SCCC Jay Quaintance, Department Chair, Developmental Studies, SCCC Oma Dwarka, Information Processing Specialist II, SCCC

Susan M. Watson, CPA

Judith Prinzo, Instructor, Humanities/ Social Sciences, SCCC

SUNY College and Career Counseling Center

Renato Tameta, Assistant Professor, Math/Science/Technology, SCCC

Richard Bennett III, Director of Continuing Education, Summer Session & Workforce Development, Hudson Valley Community College

Mariam Cajuste, Affirmative Action Officer/City/County

David Coplon, Retired

Isabella Brown, Retired School Teacher

Renee Bradley, Board Representative

Reginald Harris, SCCC Alumnus

Ruth L. McEvoy, College Representative

Taida DeGuzman, Director, Office of Default Recovery Services, NYSHESC

Julian Burnet. Student Representative, SCCC

James McGuinness, President, McGuinness and Associates

LaVonne Freeman, Program Director, Carver Foster Care Prevention Program

Andrei Rar, Senior Materials Scientist, SuperPower, Inc.

Wesley L. Holloway, Director, Associate Relations and Diversity Initiatives, Golub Corporation

Karl Rodenhauser

Richard E. Homenick, Executive Director, Schenectady Municipal Housing Authority

Edward Smith Marilyn Stapleton, Director, Ellis School of Nursing Gary Wager, President, Tech Valley Networking Services, LLC Samuel C. Wait, Jr., Associate Dean, School of Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Yi-Yuan Xie, Senior Materials Scientist, SuperPower, Inc. Robert P. Yunick

J. Richard Phillippe, Board Representative

Alexander T. LaRocco, Board Representative Maritza Martinez, Associate Director, University at Albany Educational Opportunity Program Jo-Anne Rafalik, Program Director, YWCA of Schenectady Mark C. Sheehan, Director, New Initiatives, Schenectady County Chapter NYSARC Walter Simpkins, Coordinator of Community Fathers Program, Hamilton Hill Arts Center

125


State University OF NEW YORK

S

tate University of New York’s 64 geographically dispersed campuses bring educational opportunity within commuting distance of virtually all New Yorkers and comprise the nation’s largest comprehensive system of public higher education. When founded in 1948, the University consolidated 29 state-operated but unaffiliated institutions whose varied histories of service dated as far back as 1816.

State University of New York is governed by a Board of Trustees, appointed by the Governor, which directly determines the policies to be followed by the 34 state-supported campuses. Community colleges have their own local boards of trustees whose relationship to the State University Board is defined by law. The University motto is: “To Learn — To Search — To Serve.”

Today, more than 420,000 students are pursuing traditional study in classrooms and laboratories or are working at home, at their own pace, through such innovative institutions as the SUNY Learning Network and Empire State College.

SUNY Board of Trustees

The distinguished faculty is recruited from the finest graduate schools and universities throughout the United States and many countries around the world. Their efforts are regularly recognized in numerous prestigious awards and honors, including the Nobel Prize.

Robert J. Bellafiore, B.A., Albany

State University’s research contributions are helping to solve some of today’s most urgent problems. State University researchers pioneered nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and the supermarket bar code scanner, introduced time-lapse photography of forestry subjects and isolated the bacteria that causes Lyme disease.

H. Carl McCall, B.A., New York City

The University’s program for the educationally and economically disadvantaged, consisting of Educational Opportunity Programs and Educational Opportunity Centers, has become a model for delivering better learning opportunities to young people and adults traditionally bypassed by higher education. The 30 locally-sponsored two-year community colleges offer local citizens programs that are directly and immediately job-related as well as degree programs that serve as job-entry educational experience or a transfer opportunity to a baccalaureate degree at a senior campus. In 2004, the Governor and the Legislature approved a second multi-year, $1.8 billion capital construction program for the University. The first plan, adopted in 1998 provided $2 billion in capital investments in the University system. This investment in critical maintenance will protect the University’s infrastructure and enable the University to keep pace with modern technology for the benefit of students and faculty. The State University’s involvement in the health science education is extensive. Hundreds of thousands of New York’s citizens are served each year by faculty and students in University hospitals, clinics or affiliated hospitals. The University’s economic development services programs provide research, training and technical assistance to the state’s business and industrial community. State University libraries, which support teaching and research activities, are an important community resource.

126

Carl T. Hayden, Chairman, A.B., J.D., LL.D., Elmira Aminy I. Audi, B.A. , Manlius

Edward F. Cox, B.A., J.D., New York City Stephen J. Hunt, B.A., M.B.A., Katonah

Melody Mercedes, Buffalo Pedro Antonio Noguera, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York City Michael E. Russell, A.A., B.S., East Setauket Linda S. Sanford, M.S., Somers Carl Spielvogel, B.B.A., New York City Kay Stafford, Plattsburgh Harvey F. Wachsman, B.A., M.D., J.D., Upper Brookville Gerri Warren-Merrick, B.A., New York City Carl P. Wiezalis, B.A., M.S., Albany


SUNY Administration Interim Chancellor/Vice Chancellor and Secretary of the University John J. O’Connor, B.A., M.S. Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Risa I. Palm, B.A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D Vice Chancellor for Community Colleges Dennis Golladay, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. Vice Chancellor for Capital Facilities Philip W. Wood, B.A., M.B.A University Counsel and Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs Nicholas Rostow, B.A., Ph.D., J.D. Vice Chancellor for Government Relations Michael C. Trunzo, B.A., M.P.A. Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer James R. Van Voorst, B.A., M.S. University Centers/Doctoral Granting Institutions State University of New York at Albany State University of New York at Binghamton State University of New York at Buffalo State University of New York at Stony Brook New York State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University New York State College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University State University College of Environmental Science and Forestry State University College of Optometry Downstate Medical Center Upstate Medical University

State University of New York College of Technology at Farmingdale State University of New York Maritime College State University of New York College of Agriculture and Technology at Morrisville State University of New York Institute of Technology at Utica/Rome Community Colleges Adirondack Community College Broome Community College Cayuga County Community College Clinton Community College Columbia-Greene Community College Corning Community College Dutchess Community College Erie Community College Fashion Institute of Technology Finger Lakes Community College Fulton-Montgomery Community College Genesee Community College Herkimer County Community College Hudson Valley Community College Jamestown Community College Jefferson Community College Mohawk Valley Community College Monroe Community College Nassau Community College Niagara County Community College North Country Community College Onondaga Community College Orange County Community College Rockland Community College Schenectady County Community College Suffolk County Community College Sullivan County Community College Tompkins Cortland Community College Ulster County Community College Westchester Community College

University Colleges State University College at Brockport State University College at Buffalo State University College at Cortland State University Empire State College State University College at Fredonia State University College at Geneseo State University College at New Paltz State University College at Old Westbury State University College at Oneonta State University College at Oswego State University College at Plattsburgh State University College at Potsdam State University College at Purchase Colleges of Technology State University of New York College of Technology at Alfred State University of New York College of Technology at Canton State University of New York College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill State University of New York College of Technology at Delhi

127


INDEX a

Academic Advisement .........................................35-36 Academic Advisement Center.................................... 28 academic calendar....................................................4-5 academic code........................................................... 35 academic computing facilities...............................32-33 academic integrity................................................38-39 academic placement testing....................................... 37 Academic Policies and Registration...................... 35 academic probation................................................... 40 academic standards................................................... 35 academic standing............................................... 21, 40 academic status....................................................39-40 Academic Support Services....................................... 32 accident insurance, student................................. 16, 18 accommodations for students with disabilities........... 29 Accounting A.A.S.................................................58-59 Accounting courses................................................... 87 Accounting Lab......................................................... 34 accreditation, SCCC.................................................... 8 activity fee, student....................................... 16, 18, 30 ADA Transition Services............................................ 29 ADA Transition Services Coordinator................ 29, 119 additional degree or certificate................................... 41 Adjunct Faculty . .............................................116-118 Administration, Faculty, Staff.............................. 115 Admissions............................................................ 11 24-Credit Hour Program..................................... 11 Application Requirements................................... 11 Delhi B.B.A. Programs at SCCC.......................... 15 Early Admission Program..............................12-13 Educational Opportunity Program...................... 29 Educational Opportunity Program Application Requirements................................... 29 Ellis Hospital School of Nursing, joint program with . ........................................... 15 Ex-Offenders...................................................... 12 Full Opportunity Program.................................. 11 High School articulation..................................... 15 High School course preparation.......................... 13 Honors Program................................................. 14 Immunization Requirement................................ 12 international student........................................... 13 music applicants................................................. 13 open admissions................................................. 11 procedures.....................................................11-12 requirements....................................................... 11 Special Admissions Information.......................... 13 transfer admission............................................... 12 transfer relationships.......................................... 15 Advance registration.......................................... 4, 5, 35 Advisement 24-Credit Hour Program............................... 11, 28 academic..................................................28, 35-36 for full-time students.......................................... 35 for non-matriculated students....................... 35, 36 for part-time students......................................... 36 Advisory Committees, College....................10, 121-123 Affirmative Action Officer (A.A.O)...................... 2, 118 Affirmative Action statement....................................... 3 Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS)........................... 24, 27 Alumni...................................................................... 31 Alumni Advisory Board............................................. 31 American Bar Association............................................ 8 American Culinary Federation Accrediting Commission....................................... 8 American Sign Language courses..........................87-88 Anthropology courses................................................ 88 Application information/Web site.............................. 13 Application for Admission, SUNY............................. 13 application for graduation......................................... 41 Application Viewbook, SUNY....................................... 13 Art courses................................................................ 88 assistance for Native Americans................................. 24 Assistant Chef Certificate......................................77-78

128

Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs........................................................ 8 Astronomy courses.................................................... 88 athletics..................................................................... 29 attendance policy...................................................... 38 auditing courses........................................................ 36 auditions, music........................................................ 13 Aviation Science courses.......................................88-90 Aviation Science A.S.............................................45-46

b Baking Concentration, Culinary Arts A.O.S............... 65 Begley Library....................................................... 6, 33 bias-related incidents................................................... 2 bike-hike trail.............................................................. 6 Binnekill..................................................................... 31 Biology courses......................................................... 90 Board of Trustees, SCCC.................................. 2, 3, 121 book deferrals........................................................... 26 book store................................................................. 31 Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA).................................... 20 Business Administration A.A.S.............................59-60 Business Administration A.S.................................46-47 Business and Industry Training.................................... 9 Business courses...................................................90-91 Business Education Partnership................................. 15 Business Program Accreditation................................... 8

c calendar, academic...................................................4-5 campus location.......................................................... 7 campus map....................................... inside back cover cancellation of classes, weather-related...................... 31 Career and Employment Services.............................. 28 career counseling....................................................... 28 Career Curricula........................................................ 58 Casola Dining Room.............................................. 6, 64 Center for Science and Technology (CST).............. 6, 32 Certificate of Residence............................................. 16 Certificate Programs.................................................. 77 challenge examinations............................................. 37 cheating (Academic Integrity)...............................38-39 Chemical Dependency Counseling, A.A.S.............60-61 Chemistry courses..................................................... 91 Child Care Center................................................. 6, 31 Childhood, Early, A.A.S............................................. 66 classroom expectations.............................................. 38 closing, emergency, weather-related........................... 31 code of conduct, student (Academic Integrity).....38-39 College administration............................................ 115 College committees, student participation in............. 30 College Level Examination Program (CLEP).............. 37 college organization and support................................. 2 College Store, The..................................................... 31 College Study Skills (CSS), courses in................. 33, 92 Commons................................................................. 32 community outreach................................................... 9 complaint procedures...........................................41-42 comprehensive opportunities...................................... 7 Computer Desktop Support Specialist Certificate...... 78 Computer Desktop Support Specialist courses.....92-94 Computer Information Systems courses.................... 92 Computer Information Systems A.A.S..................61-62 computer laboratories..........................................32-33 Computer Networking and Systems A.A.S................. 63 Computer Repair and Networking Certificate............ 79 Computer Science courses....................................92-94 Computer Science A.S..........................................47-48 Computer Use Policy................................................. 33 consumer information, student................................... 2 Continuing Education, Division of.............................. 9 costs, estimated 2009/2010....................................... 27 Counseling Services..............................................28-29 career.................................................................. 28

Career and Employment services........................ 28 educational....................................................28-29 personal.............................................................. 29 transfer............................................................... 29 Course Descriptions...........................................85-114 course load restrictions.............................................. 36 course numbering system.......................................... 85 course requirements.................................................. 38 course selection approval.......................................... 36 credit by examination................................................ 37 Credit Courses................................................. 85-86 credit, external transfer.............................................. 37 credit for previous experience................................... 37 credit, non-residence................................................. 37 credit, residence........................................................ 37 Criminal Justice A.A.S..........................................63-64 Criminal Justice Certificate........................................ 80 Criminal Justice courses.......................................94-95 cross-registration....................................................... 36 Culinary Arts Program accreditation............................ 8 Culinary Arts A.O.S..............................................64-65 Culinary Arts courses.......................................101-103 cultural diversity, commitment to................................ 2 Curricula and Programs........................................ 45 curricula chart........................................................... 43

d day care..................................................................... 31 Dean’s List................................................................. 40 deferrals, tuition and book........................................ 26 Delhi B.B.A. program at SCCC................ 15, 43, 70, 76 dependent student status........................................... 19 Developmental Studies, Department of...................... 34 direct loans................................................................ 24 directions to campus................................................... 6 Disabilities, Services for Students with...................... 29 discounting grade policy........................................... 41 DISCOVER................................................................ 29 discrimination procedures........................................... 2 dishonesty, academic................................................. 39 dismissal................................................................... 40 diversity, student..................................................... 2, 9 Drama, Performing Arts A.S...................................... 53 Drama courses........................................................... 95

e Early Admission Program.....................................12-13 Early Childhood courses......................................95-96 Early Childhood A.A.S.............................................. 66 Early Childhood Certificate....................................... 80 Economics courses...............................................96-97 educational counseling.........................................28-29 educational loans..................................................24-25 Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)........... 24, 29 Education Law, State of New York 244-a................... 38 electives................................................................85-86 Electrical Technology courses.................................... 97 Eligibility, NYS awards............................................... 24 Ellis Hospital School of Nursing, joint program with.............................................. 15 Elston Hall.................................................................. 6 emergency closing................................................. 31 Emergency Management A.A.S.................................. 67 Emergency Medical Services courses......................... 97 Emeriti, College....................................................... 119 employment, student................................................ 26 English courses....................................................97-98 Environmental Science courses.................................. 98 Estimated Costs table................................................ 27 Ethics courses............................................................ 98 external transfer credit............................................... 37


f

h

Faculty and Staff...............................................115-120 faculty, adjunct.................................................116-118 faculty, teaching................................................115-116 Family Education Rights Privacy Act of 1974............ 41 federal aid to Native Americans................................. 20 Federal Aid Academic Eligibility................................ 21 Federal Direct Loan Program, William D. Ford............... 24 Direct Stafford Loans.......................................... 24 Family Educational Loan Program (FFELP)........ 25 Federal Financial Aid Refund Policy.....................19-20 Federal Government grants....................................... 20 Federal Tax Credits.................................................... 20 Fees activity................................................................ 18 aviation lab......................................................... 18 challenge examination........................................ 18 EMS courses....................................................... 18 degree, second.................................................... 18 graduation.......................................................... 18 late registration................................................... 18 music laboratory................................................. 18 on-line courses................................................... 18 parking fine........................................................ 18 placement credential........................................... 18 previous experience credit.................................. 18 return check....................................................... 18 technology.......................................................... 18 transcript............................................................ 18 University in the High School............................. 18 final examinations..................................................... 39 Financial Aid........................................................ 19 Financial Aid Award Summary 2008/2009................ 27 financial aid application............................................ 19 financial aid, early admissions..............................12-13 financial need, determining....................................... 19 financial aid recipients’ rights and responsibilities.................................................... 21 financial obligations, outstanding.............................. 17 Fire Prevention courses........................................98-99 Fire Protection Technology A.A.S.............................. 68 Fire Protection Technology courses......................98-99 Fire Science Certificate.............................................. 81 First Year Success Seminar................................... 33, 99 food service............................................................... 31 Foundation, SCCC.................................................... 10 Foundation, SCCC, Board of Directors.................... 120 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)....................................................... 19 French courses.......................................................... 99 Fresh Start Policy...................................................... 40 Full Opportunity Program......................................... 11 full-time status.......................................................... 35

health insurance, student.................................... 16, 18 Health Studies Certificate.......................................... 82 Health Studies courses............................................ 100 HEGIS Codes............................................................ 43 high school articulation............................................. 15 high school course preparation.................................. 13 history and facilities.................................................... 6 History courses........................................................ 100 Honors courses................................................100-101 honors, graduation.................................................... 40 Honors Program.................................................. 14, 45 honors, term........................................................39-40 Hospitality Management, B.B.A. Delhi Hotel and Resort Management Core.................... 70 Hospitality Management, B.B.A. Delhi Travel and Tourism Management Core................ 76 Hotel and Restaurant Management A.A.S.................. 69 Hotel and Restaurant Management courses......101-103 housing, student........................................................ 32 Hudson-Mohawk Association of Colleges and Universities.................................................. 36 Humanities and Social Sciences A.A., Liberal Arts..... 51 Humanities and Social Sciences courses.................. 104 Human Services A.S.............................................48-49 Human Services A.A.S............................................... 71 Human Services courses.......................................... 103

g Gateway Building........................................................ 6 Gateway Montessori Preschool.............................31-32 General Business Certificate....................................... 81 General Education Principles....................................... 8 General Education Requirement, SUNY....................... 8 General Equivalency Diploma (GED)........................ 12 General Information................................................ 6 Geography courses.................................................... 99 Geology courses...................................................... 100 Goal Areas, College..................................................... 7 governance, the student and College......................... 30 grade point average (G.P.A.)...................................... 39 grading policy........................................................... 39 grading system.......................................................... 39 graduation, attendance at ceremony.......................... 41 graduation requirements......................................40-41 graduation statistics................................................... 44 grants, Federal Government...................................... 20

i I.D. cards................................................................... 32 immunization requirement........................................ 12 incomplete courses.................................................... 39 independent student status........................................ 19 independent study.................................................... 39 Individual Studies, A.A.........................................49-50 Individual Studies, A.S.........................................49-50 institutional scholarships......................................25-26 insurance, student..................................................... 18 intercollegiate athletics.............................................. 29 international student admissions............................... 13 Italian courses......................................................... 104

j Jazz/Commercial Music Emphasis, Performing Arts: Music A.S............................54-55

l Language Lab............................................................ 34 Learning Center/Writing Lab..................................... 34 library cards.............................................................. 33 library services.......................................................... 33 Liberal Arts: Humanities and Social Sciences, A.A..... 51 Liberty Partnerships Program...............................29-30 lifelong learning.......................................................... 9 Literature courses.............................................104-105 loan amounts, maximum......................................24-25 loan consolidation..................................................... 25 loans, educational...................................................... 25 loans, emergency....................................................... 26 loan repayment terms................................................ 25 location, campus......................................................... 7

m Management courses........................................105-106 map of campus................................... inside back cover Marketing courses................................................... 106 Math Lab................................................................... 34 Mathematics and Science A.S.................................... 52 Mathematics courses........................................106-107 matriculated status.................................................... 35 Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Higher Education...... 1, 8 mid-term warnings.................................................... 40 Minimum Eligibility Standards Table for New York State Awards....................................... 22 Mission, College.......................................................... 7

Multicultural Affairs.................................................. 30 multicultural appreciation........................................... 2 music accreditation..................................................... 8 Music/Business A.A.S................................................ 72 Music Certificate....................................................... 82 Music courses...................................................107-110 Music, Performing Arts A.S....................................... 54

n Nanoscale Materials Technology A.A.S...................... 73 Nanoscale Materials Technology courses................. 110 National Association of Schools of Music..................... 8 Native Americans, assistance for................................ 24 Native Americans, federal aid to................................ 20 New Student Orientation.......................................... 30 New Student Registration Program............................ 35 New York State Awards, financial.............................. 24 New York State Awards, Minimum Eligibility Standards Table................................... 22 New York State National Guard Tuition Program.................................................. 24 New York State Education Department........................ 7 New York State Higher Education Services Corporation (NYSHESC).................................... 24 New York state residents........................................... 16 non-credit courses....................................................... 9 non-matriculated status............................................. 35 non-residence credit.................................................. 37 nursing, joint program with Ellis Hospital School of Nursing............................................... 15

o obligations, financial................................................. 17 Online courses.......................................................... 10 Overview..................................................................... 6

p Paralegal A.A.S.......................................................... 74 Paralegal accreditation................................................. 8 Paralegal courses..................................................... 111 parking...................................................................... 32 part-time advisement................................................. 28 part-time employment, student................................. 26 part-time professional staff...................................... 119 part-time student orientation..................................... 30 Peer Tutor Program.................................................... 34 Pell, Federal Grant Program...................................... 20 Performing Arts–Drama A.S...................................... 53 Performing Arts–Music A.S..................................54-55 personal counseling................................................... 29 Philosophy courses.................................................. 111 Physics courses.................................................111-112 placement statistics.................................................... 44 placement testing................................................ 34, 37 plagiarism................................................................. 38 PLUS Loans, Federal Direct....................................... 24 Political Science courses.......................................... 112 preparation for college............................................... 13 Preschool, Gateway Montessori............................31-32 President’s List........................................................... 39 probation, academic.................................................. 40 professional staff, College.................................118-119 Profile, Student Body................................................... 9 Programs and Courses Directory................................. 2 programs offered at SCCC, chart............................... 43 Psychology courses...........................................112-113 publications, college-wide......................................... 31 pursuit of program.............................................. 22, 40

r readmission............................................................... 40 refund policy............................................ 16-17, 19-20 registration................................................................ 35 registration policies..............................................36-37 release of student information................................... 41 Religion courses...................................................... 113 religious beliefs, absence because of.......................... 38 repeating courses....................................................... 36

129


residence certificate, county of.................................. 16 residence credit......................................................... 37 resident credit, cross-registration............................... 36 residence requirement for Associate’s degree and Certificate........................................................... 37 retention statistics...................................................... 44 Rhythms club and magazine....................................... 31 rights and privileges, student....................................... 2 rights and responsibilities for financial aid recipients...................................................... 21

s satisfactory academic progress for financial aid eligibility....................................21-23 satisfactory progress............................................ 21, 40 SCCC Trustees, Foundation, Advisory Committees...............................................121-123 scholarships, institutional.......................................... 25 Science A.S................................................................ 56 second degree or certificate....................................... 41 Section 504............................................................... 29 security, Elston Hall................................................... 32 senior citizen audit.................................................... 36 Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC)............ 10 sickness insurance, student....................................... 18 Sign Language courses, American.........................87-88 Sociology courses.................................................... 113 software available for use on campus......................... 32 Spanish courses................................................113-114 special admissions information.................................. 13 special appointments............................................... 115 Speech courses........................................................ 114 sports........................................................................ 29 State University of New York....................... 124-125 Administration.................................................. 125 Board of Trustees.............................................. 124 Community Colleges........................................ 125 Doctoral Granting Institutions.......................... 125 University Centers............................................ 125 University Colleges........................................... 125 Stockade Building....................................................... 6 student activities....................................................... 30 student activity fee.............................................. 16, 30 Student Affairs, Division of........................................ 28 student body profile.................................................... 9 student classifications................................................ 35 student code of conduct........................................ 2, 39 Student Consumer Information................................... 2 Student Development................................................ 28 Student Government Association (SGA).................... 30 Student Handbook.......................................... 2, 32, 39 Student Housing....................................................... 32 student I.D................................................................ 32 student information, release of.................................. 41 Student Life............................................................... 29 student loans........................................................24-25 student obligations...................................................... 2 Student Resources................................................31-32 Student Services...................................................29-30 student status, dependent, independent.................... 19 student trustee.................................................. 30, 121 Study Skills, College (CSS), courses.......................... 92 SUNY College and Career Counseling Center.............. 9 SUNY General Education Requirement........................ 8 Supplemental Educational Opportunity Program (SEOG), Federal Program..................... 20 support, College.......................................................... 2 support staff, College........................................119-120

t table of contents.......................................................... 3 Teaching Assistant Certificate.................................... 83 Teacher Education Transfer A.S................................. 57 Teacher Education Transfer courses......................... 114 Teaching Faculty..............................................115-116 Telecommunications courses................................... 114 telephone directory............................ inside front cover Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)......... 13

130

Title IX Coordinator............................................ 2, 115 Tourism and Hospitality Management A.A.S.............. 75 Tourism and Hospitality Management courses......... 114 Tourism, Sales and Convention Management Certificate...................................... 84 transcript requests..................................................... 37 transfer counseling.................................................... 29 Transfer Curricula and Programs......................... 43, 45 transfer, from armed services..................................... 11 transfer, from other schools....................................... 12 transfer, relationships with other schools................... 15 transfer, to other schools........................................... 15 transfer statistics........................................................ 44 TRIO......................................................................... 34 Trustees, SCCC.................................................... 2, 121 tuition and fees.................................................... 18, 27 Tuition Assistance Program (TAP).............................. 24 tuition deferrals......................................................... 26 Tuition Incentive Program, NY National Guard......... 24 tuition, New York State resident................................ 18 tuition, out-of-state resident...................................... 18 Tutor Services............................................................ 34 tutoring..................................................................... 34

U University in the High School.................................... 18

v Van Curler Hotel......................................................... 6 verification procedures, financial aid......................... 21 veterans benefits........................................................ 20

w waiver of requirement .............................................. 36 warnings, mid-term................................................... 40 Web Distance Learning (online)................................ 10 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program........... 24 withdrawal from classes............................................. 36 word processing...................................................32-33 Workforce Development.............................................. 9 Work Study Program, Federal................................... 26


Schenectady County Community College

Catalog Updates 2010-2011


Visit Our Web Site www.sunysccc.edu PROGRAMS Transfer Programs

Associate in Arts A.A. Liberal Arts: Humanities and Social Sciences* Individual Studies**

Associate in Science A.S. Aviation Science Business Administration* Computer Science* Criminal Justice Human Services* Individual Studies** Mathematics and Science Performing Arts-Drama Performing Arts-Music Science* Teacher Education Transfer*

Career Degree Programs Associate in Occupational Studies A.O.S. Culinary Arts*

Associate in Applied Science A.A.S. Accounting* Air Traffic Control Alternative Energy Technology Business Administration* Chemical Dependency Counseling Computer Information Systems Computer Networking Systems and Cyber Security Criminal Justice* Early Childhood Emergency Management* Fire Protection Technology* Hotel and Restaurant Management* Human Services* Music/Business Nanoscale Materials Technology Paralegal* Tourism and Hospitality Management*

Certificate Programs

Assistant Chef* Computer Desktop Support Specialist Computer Repair and Networking Criminal Justice* Early Childhood Fire Science* General Business* Health Studies* Music Storage Battery Technology Teaching Assistant Tourism, Sales and Convention Management*

Collaborative Programs

Business and Technology Management (B.B.A.) through SUNY Delhi College (on the SCCC campus) Hospitality Management (B.B.A.) through SUNY Delhi College (on the SCCC campus) Nursing (A.S.) - Joint program through Ellis Hospital School of Nursing * Program may be completed by attending evening classes only. ** Not available to first-semester students.

Schenectady County Community College does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, creed, color, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, veteran status, religion, or marital status in admissions, employment, or in any aspect of the business of the College. For more information, contact: Carolyn Pinn, Affirmative Action Officer (Title IX and Section 504 Coordinator), Elston Hall, Room 128, Schenectady County Community College, 78 Washington Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12305, Phone: (518) 381-1331, pinnct@gw.sunysccc.edu


2010-2011 Academic Calendar Revised July 23, 2009

Fall Semester 2010

Spring Semester 2011

Summer Session 2011

Tuesday, July 6 General Registration Begins

Thursday, December 2 General Registration Begins

Wednesday, March 30 General Registration Begins

Monday, August 30– Friday, September 3 Faculty Institute New Student Orientation

Monday, January 10– Friday, January 14 Faculty Institute

Monday, May 23 Early Start Summer Classes**

Tuesday, August 31– Thursday, September 2 General Registration

Tuesday, January 11– Thursday, January 13 General Registration

Monday, September 6 Labor Day–College Closed

Monday, January 17 Martin Luther King Day– College Closed

Tuesday, September 7 Classes Begin (Last Day for 100% Refund)

Tuesday, January 18 Classes Begin (Last Day for 100% Refund)

Tuesday, September 7– Monday, September 13 Late Registration/Add

Tuesday, January 18– Monday, January 24 Late Registration/Add

Tuesday, September 14 Last Day for 75% Refund

Tuesday, January 25 Last Day for 75% Refund

Tuesday, September 21 Last Day for Drop/50% Refund

Tuesday, February 1 Last Day for Drop/50% Refund

Tuesday, September 28 Last Day for 25% Refund

Friday, February 4 Last Day to Apply for Graduation

Monday, November 8– Friday, November 19 Spring Semester Advance Registration

Tuesday, February 8 Last Day for 25% Refund

Tuesday, November 23 Last Day to Withdraw from Fall Semester Classes Thursday, November 25– Saturday, November 27 Thanksgiving Recess Monday, December 20– Thursday, December 23 Final Week (See Final Week Class Schedule) Monday, December 27 Final Grades Due December 24–January 14 Winter Recess (College Closed December 24 and December 31

Monday, March 14– Saturday, March 19 Spring Recess Wednesday, March 30– Tuesday, April 12 Fall Semester (and Summer) Advance Registration Tuesday, April 12 Last Day to Withdraw from Full Semester Classes Monday, May 9– Thursday, May 12 Final Week (See Final Week Class Schedule) Monday, May 16 Final Grades Due Tuesday, May 17Thursday, May 19 Professional Days Saturday, May 21* Commencement

* Subject to change due to availability of Proctors

1

Tuesday, May 31– Thursday, June 2 General Registration Monday, June 6 Classes Begin (Last Day for 100% Refund) Monday, June 6– Tuesday, June 7 Late Registration/Add Wednesday, June 8 Last Day for 75% Refund Monday, June 13 Last Day for 50% Refund Wednesday, June 15 Last Day for 25% Refund Monday, July 4 College Closed Monday, July 18 Last Day to Withdraw from Full Session Classes Friday, July 29 Summer Session Ends Monday, August 1 Final Grades Due

Fall Semester 2011: Tuesday, September 6 Classes Begin

Note: For courses offered in a shortened session or a special time frame, the equivalent registration periods, refund dates, etc. will be determined and announced by the Office of Academic Services. ** Early Start Summer Classes begin before Summer Session 2011


Introduction

The current Schenectady County Community College Catalog is a two-year edition, covering the years 2009-2011. However, SCCC is a dynamic institution whose programs and courses are under constant review and evaluation, and subsequently, subject to change. In order to provide our students with the most current information possible, the College has developed this update to highlight major changes in policies, programs and courses. Where a program, course or policy has changed in its entirety, all new information is provided. Where only a portion has changed, only the specific change is noted. For example: new courses are listed with all pertinent information, including course number, title, course description and prerequisite or co-requisite. However, for revised courses, only the element that has changed is noted, such as title, number or prerequisite.

Curricula/Programs

Changes are made to the individual curricula and programs on an ongoing basis. Minor program changes are included in annual editions of the curriculum worksheets, available on the SCCC Web site, www.sunysccc.edu, and through departmental offices, the Admissions Office, the Student Development Center or through your faculty advisor.

SUNY General Education Requirement (for A.A. and A.S. Programs)

Schenectady County Community College complies with the SUNY Board of Trustees General Education Resolution applicable to students matriculated in an A.A. or A.S. program who intend to transfer to a SUNY college or university. The SUNY General Education Requirement mandates candidates for a baccalaureate degree, as a condition of graduation, complete an academically rigorous and comprehensive core General Education curriculum of no fewer than 30 credit hours. The 30 credit hours are to include, but are not limited to, at least three credit hours each of course work to instill knowledge and skills in mathematics and basic communication as well as at least three credits each in at least five of the following eight academic areas-natural science, social science, American history, Western Civilization, Other World Civilizations, humanities, the arts and foreign languages-and overall competency in the areas of critical thinking and information management. The approved SUNY - General Education courses offered in each category at SCCC are listed on the right. SCCC graduates in A.A. or A.S. degree programs planning to transfer to A SUNY four-year institution are required to take a minimum of seven (7) knowledge and skills area courses. Students transferring courses from another college or who have received “credit by examination” may find that one or more of them fulfill their SUNY General Education requirements (consult with an advisor). The SUNY General Education Course Plan is not a requirement to graduate from SCCC. Students intending to transfer to non-SUNY institutions with different general education requirements should consult with their advisors. Students who do NOT intend to complete a minimum of seven (7) knowledge and skill area courses are required to sign a SUNY General Education Waiver Form, available from the Registrar’s Office (Elston Hall, Room 212) or from the Advisement Center (Elston Hall, Room 223).

2

SUNY General Education Requirement – Knowledge and Skills Areas Basic Communication - ENG 123 Mathematics - MAT 145; MAT 147; MAT 149; MAT 160; MAT 167; MAT 180 Natural Sciences - AST 123; AST 125; AST 127; BIO 111; BIO 112; BIO 115; BIO 141; BIO 151; CHM 113; CHM 115; CHM 121; ENV 100; GEO 143; GEO 145; GHY 121; NMT 150; PHY 106, PHY 120, PHY 121, PHY 153; PHY 221 Social Sciences - ANT 121; ANT 135; ECO 211; ECO 221; ECO 223; POL 123; POL 125; PSY 121; SOC 121; SOC 122 American History - HIS 227; HIS 229 Western Civilization - HIS 125; HIS 127 Other World Civilizations - HIS 150; HIS 232; HIS 234; HIS 235; HIS 237 Humanities - ENG 124; HON 124 Arts - ART 127; ART 128; ART 133; ART 135; DRA 123; DRA 133; DRA 143; DRA 181; MUS 115; MUS 121; MUS 127; MUS 131; MUS 147; MUS 257 Foreign Languages - ASL 121*; ASL 122*; FRE 121; FRE 122; ITA 121; ITA 122; SPA 121; SPA 122 * Applies only to Human Services and Teacher Education Transfer programs.


New Degree Programs Air Traffic Control A.A.S.

The Air Traffic Control A.A.S. degree program will provide students with a foundation in air traffic control basics and skills for the continuous safe flow of aircraft in the airspace system. Students will effectively handle normal and emergency situations through simulated scenarios and actual control of live aircraft traffic at the Schenectady County Airport Control Tower. The College developed this new program to help fill a need locally and nationally for qualified air traffic controllers as identified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), with an expected shortage of qualified controllers over the next decade. The Air Traffic Control A.A.S. program provides training in the application of air traffic control procedures and simulator and over-the-shoulder control tower operation training and experience.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must: • possess a current, Class-2 medical certificate issued through an FAA certified examiner; • be an U.S. citizen; • have a record free of any convictions which may disqualify them from obtaining an FAA security clearance, and • have no speech impediments. • Students enrolled in the Air Traffic Control A.A.S. program will receive instruction to prepare for the: • FAA Control Tower Operator written exam; • Schenectady Airport FAA Facility Rating, and • FAA Air Traffic Aptitude Test (AT-SAT) entrance exam to the FAA ATC Training Facility in Oklahoma City, OK. The FAA Control Tower Operator exam will be administered at the end of the ATC 110 – Air Traffic Basics course. Students must pass this Certified Tower Operator written exam with a grade of 70% or higher and pass a pre-training drug screen (and are subject to random testing) to continue training in ATC 205 Ground Control Laboratory and ATC 255 Local Control Laboratory. Students must also be 18 years of age in order to participate in the over-the-shoulder, hands-on tower training included in ATC 205 and ATC 255. During their second year of the program, students will prepare for the FAA Facility Rating at the Schenectady County Airport Control Tower. In order to complete the program requirements for the A.A.S. program at SCCC, students will be required to successfully complete their Facility Rating for Schenectady County Non-Federal Control Tower (NFCT) and/ or successfully complete the FAA AT-SAT exam with a score of 85% or higher. The Facility Rating for Schenectady County NFCT meets established hiring requirements for NFCT control towers only. NFCT towers have no maximum age restriction for initial hire; whereas, the entrance exam requirement for employment in FAA control towers is restricted to those 18 to 31 years of age. Completion of the Air Traffic Control degree program is not a requirement to take the FAA AT-SAT exam which is required for entrance in the FAA ATC Training program in Oklahoma City, OK.

• Students who do not successfully complete any one of the these exams but are in good academic standing at the College may transfer into SCCC’s Aviation Science (non-pilot option) A.S. degree program and receive up to 45 credits of completed course work toward the Aviation Science degree. First Year/Fall Semester AER 102 Aviation History 3 AER 103 Introduction to Flight 4 ATC 101* Flight for Controllers or AER 101** Intro to Flight Lab (a) 1

3

ENG 123 College Composition MAT 129 Algebra II w/Trigonometry or MAT 160 Discrete Structures or higher PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology First Year/Spring Semester PHY 106 Meteorology AER 140 Elements of Instrument ATC 110 Air Traffic Basics ENG 211 Technical Writing MAT 147 Statistics Second Year/Fall Semester AER 150 Airport Management & Security AER 210 Aviation Law ATC 200 Ground Control Operation ATC 205* Ground Control Lab CIS Elective (b) Second Year/Spring Semester AER 236 Flight Safety ATC 250 Local Control ATC 255* Local Control Lab ATC 260 Enroute Control Humanities Elective ETH 221 Professional & Applied Ethics Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 61

3 3-4 3 17-18 3 4 3 3 3 16 3 3 3 2 3-4 14-15 3 3 2 2 3 1 14

Advisement Notes: (a) ATC 101/AER 101 Laboratory: Students have the option of completing either AER 101 Intro to Flight to achieve their private pilot’s license, or completing a minimum of ATC 101 Flight for Controllers at reduced flight time and experience. A private license is not a requirement for the program, but is recommended. (b) CIS Electives: CIS 129 or higher. * Lab fees are required for these courses. ** Lab fee: $8,400

Alternative Energy Technology A.A.S.

The Alternative Energy Technology A.A.S. degree program will provide students with both a theoretical and hands-on foundation in the core principles of the design, operation, and maintenance required to work in the production and technical areas of renewable energies. Graduates of the program will be prepared for employment as qualified technicians in the emerging energy fields of solar and wind energy technology or battery and fuel cell energy technology. The College developed the Alternative Energy Technology degree in response to the need for trained technicians to work in the emerging renewable energy technologies. Students will choose one of two focus areas: Wind Power and Solar Energy or Storage Battery and Fuel Cell Technology. The program was developed in consultation with GE’s Renewable Energy business, based in Schenectady, New York. First Year/Fall Semester ELT 110 Electrical Circuits I ENG 123 English Composition MAT 129 Algebra II with Trigonometry or MAT 167 Precalculus Focus Area Course (a)

4 3 4 3 14


First Year/Spring Semester AET 118 Lean Manufacturing 1 CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications or CIS 240 Internetworking Fundamentals 3 ELT 121 Electrical Circuits II 4 NMT 150 Introduction to Materials 3 MAT 147 Statistics 3 Focus Area Course (a) 3 17 Second Year/Fall Semester AET 210 Power Generation 3 ELT 231 Electronics 4 ELT 122 Electrical Schematics 2 ENV 100 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 ETH 100 Ethics 1 13 Second Year/Spring Semester AET 272 Power Transmission 3 ELT 270 Power Electronics 3 ENG 211 Technical and Professional Writing 3 Focus Area Course (a) 4 Restricted Humanities Elective 3 16 Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 60 (a) Focus Area Course Sequence: Wind Power and Solar Energy First Year: AET 110 (Introduction to Wind Power Technology) AET 114 (Introduction to Solar Energy Technology) Second Year: ELT 256 (Process Control and Instrumentation)

OR

Storage Battery and Fuel Cell First Year: AET 112 (Introduction to Storage Battery Technology) AET 116 (Introduction to Fuel Cell Technology) Second Year: ELT 261 (Programmable Logic Controls) (b) Restricted Humanities elective should be chosen from ENG 124 or one of the art, drama or music courses approved as humanities electives.

Criminal Justice A.S.

The Criminal Justice A.S. degree program will prepare students for transfer into related programs at a four-year college or university. The program provides introductory level instruction in the six course areas recommended by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences: administration of justice, corrections, criminological theory, law adjudication, law enforcement, and research and analytic methods. The College consulted with members of the Zone 5 Law Enforcement Training Police Academy, the SCCC Criminal Justice Advisory Committee, and SUNY Delhi to develop this program. First Year/Fall Semester CRJ 113 Intro to Criminal Justice CRJ 131 Criminal Law CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications ENG 123 College Composition PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology First Year/Spring Semester CRJ 133 Criminology CRJ 143 Criminal Evidence & Procedure ENG 124 Introduction to Literature SOC 121 Sociology

3 3 3 3 3 15 3 3 3 3

Restricted Liberal Arts Elective (c) 3 15 Second Year/Fall Semester CRJ 219 Corrections 3 Criminal Justice Elective (a) 3 MAT 147 Statistics 3 Lab Science Elective 4 Restricted Liberal Arts Elective (c) 3 16 Second Year/Spring Semester CRJ 117 Police Organization & Supervision 3 Criminal Justice Elective (a) 3 Liberal Arts Elective (b) 3 Restricted Liberal Arts Elective (c) 3 General Elective (b) 3-5 15-17 Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 61 NOTES: (a) Criminal Justice electives should be selected based on transfer considerations and student interest. An advisor should be consulted. (b) Liberal Arts and General Electives should be selected based on transfer considerations and student interest. An advisor should be consulted. (c) Restricted Liberal Arts Electives should be chosen to satisfy SUNY General Education Requirements.

Storage Battery Technology Certificate

The Storage Battery Technology certificate program was developed to produce qualified technicians for General Electric’s new sodium storage battery plant in Schenectady. Technicians in this facility will build sodium metal halide batteries needed for the emerging renewable energy technologies. The program will provide students with a foundation in the battery technology, electric circuits, fuel storage principles and mathematics. All course work will be applicable to the Alternative Energy Technology A.A.S. degree program in the Storage Battery and Fuel Cell focus area. Students who decide to continue their studies in this program will be able to pursue the A.A.S. degree with no loss of credit. First Year/Fall Semester AET 110 Intro to Storage Battery Technology ELT 110 Electrical Circuits I ENG 123 English Composition MAT 129 Algebra II with Trigonometry or MAT 167 Precalculus NMT 150 Introduction to Materials First Year/Spring Semester AET 116 Introduction to Fuel Cell Technology AET 118 Lean Manufacturing CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications ELT 121 Electrical Circuits II ELT 261 Programmable Logic Controls MAT 147 Statistics Minimum Credit Hours required for certificate: 35

3 4 3 4 3 17 3 1 3 4 4 3 18

Degree Program Modifications Accounting A.A.S.

MAT 128 Algebra or higher replaces MAT 126 Descriptive Statistics

Chemical Dependency Counseling A.A.S.

HUS 254 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs (3 credits) replaces HUS 252 Addictive Drugs: Issues & Topics (4 credits) HUS 157 Substance Abuse Counseling (4 credits) replaces HUS 155 Substance Abuse Counseling (3 credits) A Restricted Elective replaces PSY 228 Behavioral Change

4


Computer Networking and Systems A.A.S. Name changed to:

Computer Networking Systems and Cyber Security A.A.S. New course CIS 263 Introduction to Computer Forensics added CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications required CIS 261 Network Security (4 credits) replaces CIS 262 Introduction to Network Security (3 credits)

PHY 154 Physics II OR PHY 222 College Physics II 4 NMT 254 Introduction to Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology 3 Social Science Elective 3 17-18 Minimum Credit Hours required for degree: 64 NOTES: (a) CIS elective can be CIS 129, CIS 133, CIS 134, or CIS 140

Performing Arts: Drama A.S

Total minimum credits required for degree increased to 64 credits

Six credits required in Rehearsal and Production courses (DRA 240, 242, 244)

Early Childhood A.A.S.

DRA 150 Introduction to Acting replaces two Literature electives.

ENG 124 Introduction to Literature or SPE 121 Introduction to Speech replaces LIT 210 Children’s Literature; Restricted Humanities Elective replaces Restricted Elective

Nanoscale Materials Technology A.A.S.

The mission of the Nanoscale Materials Technology A.A.S. program is to provide a foundation in materials science, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and electronics. With strong supporting courses in computer aided drafting, vacuum science and technology, and thin film deposition techniques, students will be prepared for employment as highly qualified technicians in the emerging and highly technical semiconductor and superconductor manufacturing and research and development companies. The Nanoscale Materials Technology program enables graduates to: • Qualify for employment as technicians in highly technical semiconductor and superconductor manufacturing and research and development companies; • Identify the major and potential applications of nanodevices made from materials; • Design circuits used in control systems and measurement; • Apply computers and digital systems to the solution and implementation of process control algorithms; • Be familiar with the processes and the importance of quality controls in manufacturing and; • Understand the basics of computer programming. First Year/Fall Semester CHM 121 General Chemistry I 4 MAT 129 Algebra II w/ Trigonometry OR MAT 160 Discrete Structures OR higher 3-4 NMT 150 Introduction to Materials Science 3 ELT 110 Electrical Circuits I 4 14-15 First Year/Spring Semester CHM 122 General Chemistry II 4 MAT 147 Statistics 3 NMT 152 Introduction to Nanoscale Materials 3 ENG 123 English Composition 3 ELT 121 Electrical Circuits II 4 17 Second Year/Fall Semester NMT 252 Integrated Nanotechnology Lab 2 CIS 221 Advanced Computer Applications 3 NMT 225 Introduction to Vacuum Science & Technology 4 ENG 211 Technical and Professional Writing 3 PHY 153 Physics I OR PHY 221 College Physics I 4 16 Second Year/Spring Semester NMT 280 Introduction to Thin Film Deposition 4 CIS Elective (a) 3-4

5

New Courses

AET 110 Introduction to Wind Power Technology (3-0-3) This course is an introduction to wind energy technology. Topics include wind characteristics, wind energy resources, the yaw orientation system, the mainframe, the tower structure, the supporting foundation, and the control system for the wind turbine. The principle subsystems of the wind turbine will be studied. These include the blades, the supporting hub, the rotating parts such as the shafts, gearbox, coupling, mechanical brake, and the generator. The integration of wind turbines into the power system and wind-energy systems’ economics will also be addressed. AET 112 Introduction to Storage Battery Technology (3-0-3) This course is an introduction to storage battery technology. Topics include electrochemistry (oxidation-reduction reactions), simple voltaic cells with aqueous electrolytes, primary or non-rechargeable batteries, and secondary or rechargeable batteries. The course will particularly focus on the Zebra Nickel-Sodium chloride battery to be manufactured by GE in Schenectady. The chemistry, cell characteristics, and in particular the ceramic electrolyte, electric data, energy density, capacity retention, and cycle life of the Zebra battery are described. AET 114 Introduction to Solar Power Technology (3-0-3) This course is an introduction to solar power technology. Topics include diffuse and intermittent sources of sunlight, the conversion of sunlight into electricity using the physics of the photoelectric effect in photovoltaic cells, the integration of solar power plants into the electrical grid, and solar energy systems’ economics. The photovoltaic cells studied include crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, silicon wafer photovoltaic cells, amorphous thin film silicon photovoltaic cells, dye-sensitized organic semiconducting solar cells, semiconducting polymer/metal oxide photovoltaic cells, polymer photovoltaic diodes and nano solar cells. AET 116 Introduction to Fuel Cell Technology (3-0-3) This course is an introduction to fuel cell technology. Topics will include the operating features of a fuel cell, the underlying thermodynamics and physical factors that determine their performance, and the integration of the fuel cell itself with other key components such as fuel processing, heat exchange, power conditioning and control systems. Six main types of practical fuel cells will be discussed – the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), the alkaline electrolyte fuel cells (AFC), the direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), the phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC), the molten carbonate fuel cells (MVFC), and the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The progress of the development of hydrogen fuel cells and the problems involved in producing and storing hydrogen will also be discussed. AET 118 Lean Manufacturing (1-0-1) This course will utilize TPS (The Toyota Production System) for implementation of Lean Manufacturing. Using 5S and Standard Work, students will study the importance of establishing visual management to enable the recognition of abnormal conditions (defects), so that they can be addressed and resolved. In addition, students will learn about kaizen (continuous improvement) and a problem solving approach (PDCA) involving all employees with the ultimate goal of supplying the right


part, in the right quantity with the right quality, at the right price, and at the right time. Some classes may be held at the Schenectady GE plant. AET 210 Power Generation (3-0-3) This course examines the generation of electrical energy by renewable energy sources. This course details the principles of operation of the two main classes of generators used extensively in wind power systems: the synchronous generator and the asynchronous or induction generator. The generation of direct current by photovoltaic cells and fuel cells is also discussed. PR: ELT 121 AET 272 Power Transmission (3-0-3) This course is an introduction to the methods by which alternate generated power is transmitted and distributed to the consumer using the existing power grid. The connection of electrical transformers, wind turbines, and photovoltaic cells to the electrical grid will be discussed. Examples will be taken from systems used by General Electric. PR: AET 210 ATC 101 Flight for Controllers (0-3-1) This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to integrate flight and air traffic control sequences. This primary flight training includes dual instruction only in basic flight maneuvers, air traffic control procedures at controlled and uncontrolled airports, introduction to cross country procedures and air traffic control at terminal and enroute facilities. Students are introduced to navigational facilities and procedures including traffic sequencing takeoff and approach at normal and high density airports. PR: FAA Second Class Medical Certificate, proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 103 A lab fee is required for this course. ATC 110 Air Traffic Basics (3-0-3) This course covers the knowledge areas for a Control Tower Operator Certificate. Subjects covered include: a review of the ATC System and the National Airspace System, aircraft separation minima requirements, fundamentals of radar, introduction to FAA orders and manuals (7110 manual), Letters of Agreement, Search and Rescue Operations, Pilot/Controller Glossary and mandatory phraseology, stripmaking and clearance requirements. Students will be required to complete the FAA Control Tower Operator’s Exam in order to continue in subsequent ATC program laboratories. PR: AER 103 and ATC 101 CR: AER 140 ATC 200 Ground Control (3-0-3) This course covers the required knowledge for ground and clearance delivery controllers. Students will learn aircraft recognition features and performance material, airport utilization and console instruments specific to ground control and clearance delivery. Students will be exposed to and determine best course of action procedures for handling emergency and unusual situations as a function of the ground control position. PR: ATC 110 CR: ATC 205

6

ATC 205 Ground Control Laboratory (0-6-2) This course is an application of the knowledge information gained in ATC 110 and ATC 200 through a laboratory setting for control of aircraft during ground operations. Students will gain experience through the use of low fidelity training simulation, observation of ground control and clearance delivery operators and hands-on, over-the- shoulder aircraft control. Students will be required to utilize knowledge of the air traffic system, proper terminology and phraseology in all facets of aircraft control during taxi, clearance and ground operations. PR: ATC 110 and FAA Second Class Medical Certificate CR: ATC 200 A lab fee is required for this course. ATC 250 Local Control (3-0-3) This course covers the required knowledge for local tower controllers. Students will learn VFR and IFR separation rules and apply rules to separating departing and arriving aircraft in visual and instrumental conditions, VFR on-top and special VFR conditions. Students will learn helicopter and special flight operations for numerous aircraft types and configurations. Students will apply weather theory and instrumentation to the various effects on inflight aircraft including LLWSAS, runway condition advisories and hazardous weather advisories. Students will be introduced to primary and secondary radar tower equipment. PR: ATC 200 and ATC 205 CR: ATC 255 ATC 255 Local Control Laboratory (0-6-2) This course is an application of the knowledge gained in ATC 250 through a laboratory setting for control of aircraft during flight operations. Students will gain experience through the use of low fidelity training simulation, observation of flight control operators and hands-on, over- the-shoulder aircraft control. Students will be required to utilize knowledge of the air traffic system, proper terminology and phraseology in all facets of aircraft control during VFR and IFR departure and arrival operations. Upon completion of this laboratory, students will have gained the experience to complete a Control Tower Operator Facility Rating at the Schenectady County Airport. PR: ATC 200 and ATC 205 CR: ATC 250 A lab fee is required for this course. ATC 260 Enroute Control (2-0-2) This course is a study of the required knowledge for Enroute Control Operations. Students will be introduced to subject areas involving a career in the FAA as an air traffic controller. Subjects covered include: a review of the ATC System and the National Airspace System, airway facilities, role of the air traffic controller, locations and office facilities. Students will gain insight into entry level positions within the FAA and training at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City, OK. Students will be exposed to primary and secondary radar control operations including DBRITE radar indicator tower equipment. Students will gain strategies for satisfactorily completing the FAA entrance exam (Air Traffic Selection and Training AT-SAT test). PR: ATC 200 CR: ATC 250 CIS 263 Introduction to Computer Forensics (3-0-3) This course is designed to introduce students to topics necessary to initiate and complete a successful computer investigation. Students will set up a forensics lab, acquire the proper and necessary tools for a successful investigation, and conduct the investigation with subsequent digital analysis. The materials covered in this course are identical to the International Association of Computer Investigation Specialists (IACIS) and the Certified Forensic Computer Examiner (CFCE) Certification exam. PR: CIS 111 and CIS 225


DRA 240 Rehearsal and Production I (1-5-3) Rehearsal and Production I is designed to introduce and develop students’ performance, management and/or technical skills through participation in productions. The course will provide entry level instruction in appropriate performance, management and technical skills, utilizing production processes to expand students’ skill levels. Skills and techniques will be honed in professionally supervised practice sessions. The course will culminate in a fully staged theatrical production open to the general public. DRA 242 Rehearsal and Production II (1-5-3) Rehearsal and Production II is designed to further develop students’ performance, management and/or technical skills through participation in productions. The course will provide students with active roles in the areas of performance, management and technical skills. Skills and techniques will be honed in professionally supervised practice sessions. The course will culminate in a fully staged theatrical production open to the general public. PR: Permission of the Department DRA 244 Rehearsal and Production III (1-5-3) In Rehearsal and Production III, students take the responsibility for developing expertise and leadership in one area of theatrical production, either performance, direction, design, stage management, house management or technical production. They will hone their skills in professionally supervised practice sessions. The course will culminate in a fully staged theatrical production open to the general public. PR: DRA 240 or 242 and Permission of the Instructor ELT 123 Electrical Schematics (2-0-2) The course offers a broad overview of schematics and diagrams. Topics include electrical symbols, component identification, Block diagrams, pictorial diagrams, three-dimensional drawings, and print reading PR: ELT 121 ELT 231 Electronics (3-3-4) This course is an introduction to the electronic building blocks that are used in all modern silicon based integrated circuitry. Component operations, applications, and the use and troubleshooting of these components is covered. Topics include an overview of semiconductor materials and the P-N junction, various diodes (rectifier, switching, zener) and their uses, an overview of basic power supply circuits, characteristics and operations of pnp and npn bipolar junction transistors (BJT), bjt amplifier circuits and uses, the operation and use of mos and cmos field-effect transistors, inverting and non-inverting operational amplifiers and their use in analog and digital applications, LC and RC sine-wave oscillators and crystal oscillators, silicon rectified controller (SCRs), diac and triac thyristors, and optoelectronics. PR: ELT 121 ELT 261 Programmable Logic Controls (3-3-4) This course is an introduction to the Logic and Programming of Logical Devices used in system controls. The course covers Binary, Octal and Hexadecimal number systems and introduces the elements of Assembly Programming, Logical gates, and the operations of Boolean algebra using standard digital waveforms. This course also includes Shift Registers and Counters, Adders and triggering clocks using specialized software, Digital-to-Analog conversion methodology, decoders, and multiplexers. PR: CIS 221 and ELT 110 CR: MAT 129

7

ELT 270 Power Electronics (3-0-3) This course introduces linear integrated power amplifiers, switches, and regulators. Component operations and applications and the use and troubleshooting of these components is covered. Topics include power parameter calculations, principles of power electronics prototype and printed circuit board (pcb) layout, linear integrated circuit power amplifiers for intermediate audio signal amplification, discrete linear power amplifiers for signals with higher power requirements, power switches, switching power, thyristor uses in commercial power line applications, power conversion, and permanent magnet motor drivers. PR: ELT 231 HIS 241 European Witch Trials (3-0-3) This course surveys the history of the persecution of accused witches from the Middle Ages through the Early Modern era in Europe, and including New England. The focus is on the anthropological, religious, legal, political, and socio-economic contexts in which beliefs about magic and witches arose and were widely accepted. Attention is given to regional variations in witch beliefs and trial procedures. The course also surveys the growth of skepticism, toleration, and the gradual decline of witch persecution to the end of the seventeenth century. PR: HIS 125 or HIS 232 HUS 157 Substance Abuse and Counseling (4-0-4) (formerly HUS 155 (3-0-3) This course focuses on alcoholism and substance abuse dependency counseling. Current research, theoretical models, and methods in the treatment process are examined. The practical development of counseling skills is emphasized. PR: HUS 150 HUS 254 The Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs (3-0-3) This course examines how alcohol and other psychoactive drugs affect the body, the brain, behavior, and influences all areas of human development. Psychoactive drug categories are discussed with emphasis on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drug action. Current theories about the etiology of major psychological and addictive disorders and the rationale for substance abuse drug treatment are examined. PR: HUS 150 LIT 215 Introduction to Poetry (3-0-3) This course is an introduction to poetic genres, forms, and modes. It fosters appreciation for and critical analysis of poetry, and acquaints students with the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of that poetry. This course also introduces students to poetics, prosody, and poetry criticism. PR: ENG 123 MUS 178 Audio Recording I (3-0-3) This course is an introduction to the basic elements of sound as well as sound generation and recording. The course will primarily focus on the routing of sound in a virtual mixing console environment and the principals of recording and tracking. Equipment used for tracking such as preamps, various types of microphones, compressors and limiters will be introduced. This course also presents the basic Pro Tools software principles required to complete a recording project from initial set up to final mix. Industry-specific terms used by recording engineers to describe and measure sound levels and frequency content will be covered. PR: MUS 152 and MUS 156


NMT 252 Integrated Nanotechnology Laboratory (0-3-2) This laboratory course is designed as the second of a two-semester sequence in the field of nanoscale materials. It focuses on advanced laboratory training to demonstrate the principles of nanoscale materials technology. This laboratory will promote hands-on synthesis of nanoscale materials as well as use of characterization techniques including microscopy, and spectroscopy. Topics will include self-assembly, lithography, quantum dots, fullerenes, and functional nanomaterials. PR: NMT 152 and CHM 121 NMT 254 Introduction to Semi-Conductor Manufacturing Technology (3-0-3) This course introduces students to the integrated circuit (IC) chip manufacturing process in semiconductor fabrication. It focuses on the newest IC fabrication technologies and describes the older technologies to provide a better understanding of the historical development. The processes studied in this course are similar to those in real fabrications, especially in process troubleshooting and process and hardware relations. PR: NMT 152

COURSE REVISIONS

BIO 161 Basic Principles of Nutrition (3-0-3) description and pre-requisite change This course is designed to explain the role of nutrition in health maintenance. The food sources, functions and interrelationships of the six major nutrient categories are discussed as well as energy requirements and balance. The principles of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle are applied to nutritional assessment, menu planning and food preparation. PR: Two years of high school science CIS 129 Programming Fundamentals (3-0-3) description and pre-requisite change This course provides an introduction to computer programming using a modern, object-oriented programming language. It is intended to be an introductory programming course focusing on programming concepts and fundamentals. PR: MAT 128 CIS 133 Programming in Java (3-0-3) new description This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming using the Java programming language, with a focus on developing high quality, functional solutions to problems. Topics include data types, input/output, control structures, GUI interfaces, methods, classes, inheritance, and polymorphism. Students will use computer facilities to complete programming assignments. PR: CIS 129 CIS 134 C++/UNIX (4-0-4) new description Students are introduced to commonly used algorithms. Students employ object-oriented design and object- oriented principles in problem solving using the C++ programming language. Students are introduced to the UNIX operating system and shell scripting. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 129 or equivalent

8

CIS 229 Systems Analysis and Design (3-0-3) description and pre-requisite change This course places an emphasis on a disciplined approach to software development using the application of software engineering principles. Students are provided with a systematic introduction to software development. The course introduces the student to the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC), including a general overview of a typical business-oriented software system, the analysis of the system, an approach to the design of the system, and a plan for system testing and future maintenance. Students work collaboratively on a computer information systems project encompassing all phases of the SDLC. PR: CIS 223 CIS 236 Advanced Web Design (3-0-3) new description This course provides a practical introduction to JavaScript and the design of dynamic web pages. The student will enhance the functionality and interactivity of web pages by learning to create and utilize embedded and external JavaScript source code. PR: CIS 129 and CIS 136 CIS 237 Advanced Web Programming (3-0-3) pre-requisite change This course is for the student who wants to learn advanced web site programming techniques using contemporary development tools and languages. Concepts relating to server-side programming are explored. PR: CIS 129 and CIS 136 CIS 238 XML (3-0-3) description and pre-requisite change This course focuses on XML (eXtendable Markup Language) and the supporting technologies of XML used in person-to- computer and computer-to-computer communications. Some of the technologies covered will include using DTDs, Schema, Namespaces, XPath, DOM, SAX, Data Models, XSLT, SVG, and SOAP, as well as web services and the Semantic web. PR: CIS 136 CIS 240 Internetworking Fundamentals (3-0-3) description change This course provides an introduction to networking. Topics include basic concepts and terminology relating to LANs and WANs including: data communications, types of networks, networking models and theory, protocols, and equipment. There is a strong emphasis on the OSI Model. The material covered in this course is applicable to sections of the Network+ certification exam. Please note that this is not a review course for the Network+ certification exam. CR: CIS 221 or equivalent DRA 123 Introduction to Theatre (3-0-3) description change This course introduces the student to the essential elements of theatre. It will explore the historical and contemporary production processes and the artisan roles in concert with audience interaction, aesthetics and ethical, artistic and/or cultural issues. DRA 133 Theatre Workshop (2-2-3) description and lecture/lab hours change This course focuses on direct student participation in the creation, design, rehearsal, production and performance of short, in-process theatrical works.


ECH 123 Curricular Methods I and Assessment (3-0-3) description and no co-requisite This course focuses on curriculum development and assessment in early childhood education. It introduces students to the important frameworks for planning, implementing, and evaluating curricula as it impacts child development and the various content areas. In-depth studies of developmentally appropriate curriculum models provide emphasis on the methods and strategies that inform the development of meaningful and relevant curriculum. Assessment driven learning, environment and curriculum development is applied. Students spend a minimum of ten hours observing in an early childhood environment.

ECH 255 Administration of Early Childhood Programs (3-0-3) description change and no pre-requisite The purpose of this course is to provide administrative management training in the field of Early Childhood Education. The course addresses issues and techniques involved in the organization and administration of early childhood environments. Focus is placed on the initiation and maintenance of an early childhood program including skills necessary to perform effectively and competently as a director. Students will complete ten hours of field work in this course. PR: ECH 121

ECH 131 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar I (1-8-4) description change This course allows students the opportunity for direct practical teaching and learning in early childhood education within community agencies and/or the SCCC Early Childhood Program Laboratory Preschool. Additionally, in a seminar setting, students reflect on and share their experiences. Students will spend eight to ten hours per week in their field placement to accumulate a minimum of 130 hours. PR: ECH 121 and ECH 123

ECH 260 ECH Portfolio Seminar (1-0-1) description and pre-requisite change This capstone seminar is intended for ECH majors who are about to graduate from their two-year ECH program. Students will review the knowledge and skills they have already acquired and begin to demonstrate their proficiency in a pre-professional portfolio. Opportunity is provided for technical assistance on an individual basis. Each student will assemble a portfolio as a summative experience to be presented to a professional review team. PR: ECH 231

ECH 223 Curricular Methods II and the Development of Inquiry Skills (3-0-3) description change The course focuses on the early developmental abilities of children ages birth to eight years in social studies, math and science. Sensory, preoperational and concrete operational thought processes of conservation, seriation, observation, comparison, classification, and number concepts will be examined through the use of concrete social studies, math, and science materials and experiences that foster student quantitative and analytical thinking. Students implement developmentally appropriate social studies, math, and science activities which address diversity in children’s learning styles. PR: ECH 123

ELT 110 Electrical Circuits I (3-3-4) description and pre-requisite change This course is an introduction to direct current (DC) circuits. Digital systems and circuits using logical gates will also be studied. Basic DC circuits entails a study of Ohm’s Law and use of the law to theoretically predict measured voltages, currents, resistances and power through resistors connected in series, parallel and series-parallel circuits. This course uses voltmeters, ammeters, ohmmeters, multimeters, and oscilloscopes for measurement and troubleshooting. PR: MAT 128

ECH 225 Fostering Emergent Literacy (3-2-4) description change The course examines the development of literacy skills in children ages birth to 8 years. Multiple opportunities to recognize the developmental stages in literacy acquisition, to identify factors that influence literacy development, and to discuss how to design and implement a literacy program are provided. Genre of literature, curricular themes, and resources for children of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are emphasized. Guidelines for the design and implementation of literature- based activities are applied throughout the course. Students will observe for a minimum of 15 hours in an early childhood literacy environment. ECH 227 Guidance of Young Children (3-0-3) description change; no co-requisite or pre-requisite This course focuses on the early developmental abilities of children ages birth to eight years and appropriate utilization of guidance strategies to enhance children’s self esteem and consequently increase children’s selfdiscipline skills. The correlation between children’s environments and behaviors will be researched. The importance of play, social interactions, and family expectations on children’s development will be analyzed. ECH 252 Care of Infants and Toddlers (3-0-3) description change This course examines infant and toddler development with an emphasis on the importance of the first thirty-six months in relation to human development. Attachment, early brain research and developmentally appropriate practices will be emphasized as critical factors which impact a caregiver’s role in meeting individual children’s needs. Students complete ten hours of observational field work in this course.

9

ELT 121 Circuits for Digital Systems II (3-3-4) description and pre-requisite change; no co-requisite This course is a continuation of circuits including AC circuits as applicable to digital systems and controls. Basic AC circuits are covered, along with single and 3-phase AC power and distribution. Series and parallel RLC circuits are covered, along with the use of an oscilloscope in troubleshooting and measurement. Digital systems are covered, with the examination of three state busses and the chips needed to interface with them in personal computer applications. PR: ELT 110, MAT 129 ELT 256 Process Control and Instrumentation (3-3-4) description, co-requisite and pre-requisite change This course is an introduction to process control fundamentals and the application of the PC in a process environment. Analog and digital signal conditioning is covered, along with the interfacing of personal computers and PLCs to analog and digital systems. The basics of automatic process control are also covered with emphasis on the application of computers and digital systems to the solution and implementation of process control algorithms. PR: ELT 230, CIS 129 or higher CR: MAT 147 or higher ENG 123 College Composition (3-0-3) description and pre-requisite change This course provides a foundation in academic discourse by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing. Students use electronic environments to write multiple essays, including a researched and documented paper; they also deliver an oral presentation. PR: Exemption from placement testing as defined by the Academic Code or successful completion of CSS 123 and/or CSS 125


ENG 211 Technical and Professional Writing (3-0-3) description and pre-requisite change This course applies the principles of effective writing to the specific forms of professional and technical writing. It emphasizes designing texts and oral presentations for professional audiences after analyzing the needs of those audiences. PR: ENG 123 HON 281 Sociology of Power and Class (3-0-3) description and pre-requisite change This course examines stratification systems and their effects upon different groups within those systems. Emphasis is placed upon class stratification systems, but other systems such as caste and feudal are discussed as well. Early and modern theories of stratification and their origins are discussed in light of their influence on the development of sociology as a discipline. Cross cultural analysis of stratification systems is also covered PR: SOC 121 or SOC 122 and permission of instructor or department. HOT 225 Commercial Baking I (2-3-3) course description change This course introduces students to the management and operation of a commercial retail bakery. Through a combination of lectures and labs, students will acquire the manual skills and product knowledge necessary to produce and market a range of products. The students in the class will be rotated through seven production stations and one sales/ packaging position to operate the College’s Pane e Dolci bakery. The production stations are: quick breads, yeasted bread, rich dough breakfast items, laminated breakfast pastry, cookies and candy, tarts and pies, and cheesecake and cakes. Emphasis is placed on scratch baking, but students also work with mixes, bases, and frozen dough products. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the NYS Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 119 HOT 226 Commercial Baking II (2-3-3) course description change The class is a continuation of HOT-225 Commercial Baking I and will build upon the techniques learned previously. Students will learn about merchandising and sales, ingredient function, and baking chemistry through lectures and bakery visitations. Students will gain experience in puff pastry, e`clair paste, breads and rolls, flatbreads, bagels, doughnuts, tarts, and petit fours sec as they bake for the College’s Pane e Dolci Bakery. A rotation through all stations in the bake shop will ensure that students gain production experience in all of these areas as well as practical experience in sales and marketing. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the New York State Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 225 HOT 259 Regional American Baking and Pastry (2-3-3) description and pre-requisite change This course introduces the basic theory, techniques and recipes of classical pastry making. Students will produce regional desserts, pastries, and breads from across the United States to be served in the Casola dining room and the Pane e Dolci bake shop. A variety of decorating techniques will be taught and utilized to finish the cakes and pastries. Proper use of baking tools and equipment is also covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the NYS Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 119

10

HOT 260 International Baking and Pastry (2-3-3) course description change This course provides students with the opportunity to expand and refine their baking skills and builds upon the methods learned in previous baking classes. Students will produce breads and desserts to be served in the Casola dining room and the Pane e Dolci bake shop. The emphasis is on European baking, though baked goods from other parts of the world may be included as well. Advanced techniques in cake decorating, chocolate work, and sugar boiling are also covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the NYS Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef’s uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 259 HOT 277 Planning and Development of Tourism (3-0-3) course description change This course explores the basics in tourism planning and development. Topics include protecting environmental and cultural assets; ensuring less culture shock between host and guest; enhancing, not detracting from local ways of life; and guaranteeing future populations the ability to enjoy the experience of travel. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of tourism development as it relates to economics, business, ecology, government, law, psychology and sociology. HUS 150 Introduction to Chemical Abuse and Dependency (3-0-3) course description change This course examines alcoholism and substance abuse from historical, biological, psychological, social and cultural perspectives. It presents theoretical frameworks that help students understand the nature and course of chemical abuse and dependency, as well as strategies to prevent its onset. The course introduces the assessment and diagnostic process as well as treatment approaches. LIT 256 American Literature to 1865 (3-0-3) course title, description and pre-requisite change This course surveys writing in America from pre-colonial times through 1865, focusing on how the historical growth of the country contributed to the emergence of a distinctly American literature. The course will cover key literary figures and movements within the diverse range of American literary history, including those historically under-represented. PR: ENG 124 LIT 258 American Literature Since 1865 (3-0-3) course title, description and pre-requisite change This course surveys American Literature from 1865 through the present, focusing on the growing diversity in authorship and formal experimentation during this period. Literature by key literary figures, representative of major movements, will be examined. The course will also introduce more experimental works and emerging authors. PR: ENG 124 MAT 128 Algebra I (3-0-3) course description change This course focuses on the real number system, polynomials, solving first degree linear equations, solving linear inequalities in one variable, the Cartesian Coordinate System, graphing linear equations by point plotting, slope, equations of lines in general form and in slope-intercept form, factoring polynomials, solving polynomial equations by factoring and the zero property, rational expressions, integer exponent and problem solving. PR: CSS 120 or equivalent Note: Credit for this course does not satisfy the A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements


MAT 129 Algebra II with Trigonometry (4-0-4) course description change This course focuses on functional notation, linear functions, absolute value functions, quadratic functions and equations, other basic algebraic functions and the graphs of those basic algebraic functions with the translations of those graphs. Also included are linear equations and inequalities, methods of solving polynomial equations, the basics of radicals and rational exponents, the basics of exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs, geometry, and right triangle trigonometry. PR: MAT 128 MAT 145 Mathematical Topics (3-0-3) course description and pre-requisite change This course is designed to acquaint the student with various areas of mathematics. Topics may include mathematical systems, groups, logic, truth tables, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, probability, statistics, and modeling with linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent MAT 147 Statistics (3-0-3) course description and pre-requisite change This course focuses on the following topics: descriptive statistics, an introduction to probability, random variables and probability distributions, the binomial and normal probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square distributions, linear correlation and regression. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent MAT 160 Discrete Structures (3-0-3) course description and pre-requisite change Topics in this course include sets, relations and functions, equivalence relations, sequences, recursively defined sequences, recursively defined sequences, recurrence relations, logic, truth tables, techniques of mathematical proof, mathematical induction, the Binominal Theorem, counting techniques, and algorithms. Also covered are graph theory and networks. Additional topics may include Boolean algebras, partial orders, and Hasse Diagrams, or basic group theory. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent MAT 240 Calculus III (4-0-4) course description and pre-requisite change Topics covered in this course include three- dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, calculus of functions of several variables, partial differentiation and multiple integration. Additionally, The Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals and Green’s Theorem, as well as vector fields are covered. PR: MAT 181 MAT 242 Linear Algebra (3-0-3) course description change This course covers the following topics: vector spaces, the structure of Rn, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, determinants, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and applications. Linear transformations and inner product spaces are also covered. PR: MAT 180 MAT 244 Differential Equations (4-0-4) course description and pre-requisite change This course introduces students to techniques to solve ordinary differential equations. Topics covered are first- order differential equations and applications, higher-order linear differential equations and applications, differential equations with variable coefficients (power series), liner differential equations with constant coefficients revisited via Laplace transforms. In addition, the instructor may choose to cover numerical methods or solutions around singular points, Bessel and Legendre equations. PR: MAT 181

11

MUS 121 The Enjoyment of Music I (3-0-3) description change This course in the appreciation of art music of the Western world examines major styles, examples of the great musical works and composers, and relationships with the other arts. The vocabulary and materials of music are presented with examples from major style periods of music. This is followed by a survey of music beginning in the Middle Ages and continuing into the 21st Century. The development of listening skills is emphasized. MUS 131 African American Music Survey (3-0-3) description change This appreciation and literature course is a survey of African American musical genres and styles. Topics of study range from the slave and folk songs of 19th century America to the popular and classical compositions of the 20th and 21st century African Americans. An emphasis will be placed on the development of listening skills. MUS 147 Music Fundamentals (3-0-3) description change The basic course in fundamentals of tonal music is designed to develop competencies in the reading and writing of notes, scales, key signatures, intervals, chords, and rhythmic elements. MUS 180 Introduction to Music Therapy (1-0-1) description change This course is an orientation to the music therapy career field. It presents the historical background and philosophical bases of music therapy and functions of music therapist as a health-field professional. MUS 232 Jazz Improvisation I (2-0-2) description and pre-requisite change This course provides an introduction to the study of jazz improvisation. Topics include chord scales, modes, arpeggios and harmonic formulae. Special emphasis will be placed on common compositional structures including AABA and blues forms. Material to be studied will include jazz standards by Gershwin, Ellington, Charlie Parker, and others. PR: MUS 152 MUS 270 Studio Literature (1-0-1) description, co-requisite and pre-requisite change This course is presented as a series of one-on-one sessions with the student’s performance concentration instructor. The student will be guided through the study of historically, theoretically and technically significant literature for the student’s concentration. Recorded performances will be studied to reinforce the student’s understanding of style and performance practices. This course is intended to prepare the student for MUS 212 (Recital). The student will be guided through the process of selecting an appropriate recital program for performance in a subsequent semester. Aspects of the program may include works that feature a variety of composition and performance styles as well as works from appropriate historical periods. PR: Approval of music department faculty and studio instructor CR: MUS 163, 164, 263 or 264 MUS 272 Recital (1-0-1) description and co-requisite change This course is presented in a series of one-on-one sessions with the student’s performance concentration instructor. The student will be guided through the process of planning, preparing and performing a solo recital. Repertoire selections will be the end result of MUS 270, Studio Literature. In addition to the musical preparation, the student will be guided through the coordination of each aspect of the recital, from the facilities arrangements to the actual performance. PR: MUS 270 CR: MUS 163, 164, 263 or 264


NMT 150 Introduction to Materials Science (3-0-3) description change This course is a general introduction to the study of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, and electronic materials. This course investigates the relationship between bonding, structure (crystals and microstructure) and properties of these materials. The course examines elementary principles of thermodynamics as they apply to materials, mechanical properties of materials, and the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials. NMT 152 Introduction to Nanoscale Materials (3-0-3) description change; no co-requisite This course introduces students to the field of nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials have chemical and physical properties that are significantly different from those of bulk materials. Students will be able to recognize the underlying principles of the resulting size-dependent properties and the processing and fabrication of these materials at the molecular level. This course will cover the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale materials based on top-down and bottom-up approaches. The applications of nanodevices made from nanoscale materials will also be discussed. PR: NMT 150 NMT 225 Introduction to Vacuum Science and Technology (3-3-4) description and pre-requisite change This hands-on laboratory course will provide an introduction to vacuum equipment and instrumentation and will consist of three major parts: 1) the basics of various pumps, including rotary pumps, dry pumps, turbo pumps, and cryo pumps; 2) the physical and chemical principles underlying the design and use of high vacuums; and 3) vacuum measurements, leak detection, calibration and standards, and safety issues related to vacuum equipment. PR: NMT 152 NMT 280 Introduction to Thin Film Deposition (3-3-4) pre-requisite change; no co-requisite This hand-on laboratory course will introduce thin film deposition processes, measurements, and controls in a high- tech manufacturing environment. Advanced applications such as superconductor and semiconductor processes will be used to illustrate fundamentals of thin film deposition processes. Physical vapor deposition and chemical vapor deposition will be compared and contrasted. Key measurements in thin film deposition processes and properties, both during and after deposition, will be illustrated. Process and quality controls in manufacturing will be discussed. PR: NMT 152 CR: NMT 225 PHI 141 Survey of Major Western Philosophers (3-0-3) description change This course provides an introductory survey of the major trends and developments in Western philosophical thought- particularly in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, theology, aesthetics, and political philosophy-from the ancient Greeks to the present. By adopting a historical perspective, the course traces that development through the contributions of major representative thinkers and movements. Students will be encouraged to examine and revise their own philosophical positions or beliefs.

12

PHI 143 Introduction to Philosophical Problems (3-0-3) description change Focusing on issues in epistemology, ontology, philosophy of religion and freedom, ethics, political and social philosophy, and philosophy of art, this course introduces students to the most important questions that have preoccupied Western philosophers and to representative attempts by those philosophers to answer those questions. The course will also consider significant contributions to the discussion of those questions by experts from other fields, such as physics and biology. Students will be encouraged to examine and revise their own philosophical positions or beliefs. TAT 133 Airline Reservation and Ticketing (3-0-3) description change This course studies domestic and international airline history and ticketing. The impacts of world events (terrorism, consolidation and economics) on the airline industry are studied. Creating passenger name records, inquiry into seat availability, airline schedules, airfares and reservations are executed through computer simulation. Students learn industry specific terms and jargon used by the airlines, travel agents, and tour operators. Current events in the airline industry are discussed. TAT 140 Event Management (3-0-3) description change This course explores the logistics involved in event planning. Scope and size of events will be examined in detail. Topics include concept, design, feasibility, marketing, financial management, risk management, staging, staffing, leadership, ethics, safety and security, and careers in this area of the hospitality industry.

COURSE CORRECTION MAT 126 PR: CSS 120

Descriptive Statistics

(3-0-3)


2010-2011 Tuition and Fee Schedule Tuition

Full Time

Part Time

$3,280 per year

$136.50 per credit hour

$6,560 per year

$273 per credit hour

New York State Resident (at least one year prior to registration) New York State Resident (less than one year prior to registration) or Out-of-State Resident

Insurance

Accident Insurance Sickness Insurance

$9 per year (required) $4 per year (optional) $8 per year (optional) None

Fees Student Activity Fee Technology Fee Music Laboratory Fee (if applicable) Late Registration Fee (not to exceed $25) Transcript Fee (each transcript) Credit by Examination (Challenge) per exam Return Check Fee (each time) Credit for Previous Experience Processing Fee Graduation Ceremony Fee (for students wishing to participate in the ceremony) Aviation Laboratory Fees (per course) Science/Culinary Lab Fees* EMS Course Fee (EMS 210) EMS Course Fee (EMS 220) Online Course Fee (for online and hybrid course offerings) Parking Fine Fee–First Offense Additional Parking Offenses Unauthorized Disabled Area Parking Fine Fee

* See Web site for specific courses.

13

$52 per semester (Matriculated students) $70 per semester $465 $25 per semester

$3 per credit hour, per semester

$3 $25 $20 $15 per credit hour

$3 $25 $20 $15 per credit hour

$30 AER 101 $8,400 AER 141 $8,200 AER 228 $6,700 AER 229 $7,200 $30 per course $100 $50

$30 AER 101 $8,400 AER 141 $8,200 AER 128 $6,700 AER 129 $7,200 $30 per course $100 $50

$12 per credit hour $10 $20 $50

$12 per credit hour $10 $20 $50

$7 per credit hour $465 $10 per course


REFUNDS Refunds to either full-time or part-time students are made by mail only to the address shown on the student’s registration form. Full refunds will be made for each course canceled by the College. However, if a course is canceled, it is the student’s responsibility to add other courses, if necessary, to maintain full-time status. No refunds are made of the following fees: • Late Registration Fee • Accident Insurance Fee • Sickness Insurance Fee • Parking Fine Fees Schenectady County Community College’s Refund Policy For Credit Courses: Students who withdraw from all of their courses or reduce their credit load, either from full time to part time or within part-time status, will receive a refund, provided they submit forms containing all the required signatures to the Registrar’s Office as follows: • Prior to 7 p.m. of the first day of the semester..............100% Refund • Through the first week of the semester...........................75% Refund • Through the end of the second week of the semester.....50% Refund • Through the end of the third week of the semester.........25% Refund • After the end of the third week of the semester................No Refund For Non-Credit Courses: Refunds will be provided according to the following schedule unless the class is specified as non-refundable. • Up to 48 hours prior to the first class meeting..............100% Refund • 48 hours up to the first class meeting......................... 100% less $10 • After first class meeting....................................................No Refund

Federal Financial Aid Refund Policy The U.S. Department of Education has implemented a new refund policy for federal financial aid programs (Pell, SEOG and Student Loans). When a student withdraws from or stops attending all classes in the first 60 percent of a term, federal regulations require that the college calculate the percentage and amount of federal financial aid the student did not “earn” by their attendance and return those funds to the federal programs. For example, if a student withdraws after attending only 30 percent of the term, then that student is only entitled to 30 percent of his federal financial aid (grants and loans). Students who attend classes after the 60 percent point in the term are considered to have earned all federal funds. If a student received more federal financial aid than the amount earned, the College is required to return the unearned funds to the U.S. Department of Education. Students need to be aware that if this unearned federal assistance was used to pay College charges for tuition, fees and books, they may now owe the College for the portion of tuition, fees, and books that was previously covered by the unearned portion of their federal financial aid. If students received a cash disbursement of a Federal Pell Grant and/or Federal SEOG grant funds, they may also be required to repay a portion of these unearned federal grants to the U.S. Department of Education.

TAX CREDITS AMERICAN OPPORTUNITY TAX CREDIT The American Opportunity Tax Credit is a new change to the federal tax code that replaces the Hope Tax Credit for 2009 and 2010 Eligibility Criteria: Single taxpayers with adjusted gross income under $80,000, and married taxpayers with adjusted gross income under $160,000, are eligible for the maximum credit. Eligibility for single tax payers decreases with adjusted gross income $80,000 - $90,000 (160,000 to $180,000 for married couples filing a joint return). Tax payers with incomes over $90,000 (or $180,000 if filing joint) are not eligible. n A student who has paid for his/her tuition, fees and course materials ( textbooks, supplies, software and equipment needed for a course of study) by cash, check, credit card or a student loan may be eligible to receive a federal tax credit for 2009 and 2010 The tax credit is for tuition, fees and course materials less any financial aid grants (TAP, Pell, ACG, APTS, EOP, and SEOG, etc.), scholarships, veterans educational assistance or any type of tuition reimbursement. n The American Opportunity Tax Credit of up to $2,500 per year would cover 100% of the first $2,000 and 25% of the second $2,000 in tuition, fees and course materials paid in that tax year. This credit may only be claimed on the 2009 and 2010 federal tax returns, but it can be used for attendance in any of the first four years of postsecondary college (freshman through senior year).

14

n Students must be enrolled for at least six credits per semester and matriculated in a degree or certificate program. Example: A student’s bill that was paid in 2009 for tuition, fees, and course materials came to a total of $4,000. The student was eligible for a total of $1,000 in financial aid grants and scholarships. The student had $3,000 of qualified expenses paid in 2009. Since the family is within the income requirements, the student (and/or parent) is eligible for 100% of the first $2,000 and 25% of the balance in this case the remaining $1,000. The student would be eligible for a tax credit of $2,000 + $250 = $2,250. This tax credit is available to students and their spouse, or to the taxpayer entitled to claim that student as an income tax exemption. The full tax credit can only be used as a credit to reduce the tax liability on the Federal tax return. If you do not owe federal tax, this tax credit is partially refundable up to 40% or $1,000. It is not necessary to itemize deductions to take this tax credit. A taxpayer may not claim the American Opportunity Tax Credit, a Life Time Learning Tax Credit, or the tuition and fees tax deduction in the same tax year for the same student. The students and parents will need to retain copies of all appropriate receipts. QUESTIONS SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO YOUR TAX ADVISOR OR THE IRS.


78 Washington Avenue • Schenectady, New York 12305

518-381-1200 Admissions: 518-381-1366

Visit our Web site at www.sunysccc.edu