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RE PU fashion

ISSUE Nº 2 2015 Spain 3.50€

THE FACES OF CARA

STELLA McCARTNEY Pure Style

SPRING & SUMMER TRENDS Pure Runway

OSCAR de la RENTA

You are truly missed


YSL.COM CLASSIIC 11


CHANEL.COM


Photography by: Sebastian Faena For: John Hardy

PURE fashion

PURE THOUGHTS! ISSUE Nº 2 2015 Spain 3.50€

THE FACES OF CARA

We won’t bother you with loads of witty words to explain what’s inside the magazine... Best way to find out is to open it and have a look. Although it is packed full of your essential fashion must haves so what ever you do don’t put it down!! We hope you enjoy reading our second issue of Pure Fashion Yours Stan

STELLA McCARTNEY Pure Style

SPRING & SUMMER TRENDS Pure Runway

OSCAR de la RENTA

You are truly missed

PUBLISHER: SIMPLY MEDIA GROUP S.L. MANAGING DIRECTOR & EDITOR: Stan Israel stan.israel@simplymedia-group.com ASSISTANT EDITOR & PRODUCTION MANAGER Lisa Brown administration@simplymedia-group.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR, DESIGN AND LAYOUT: Sherelisa Bossi sherelisa.production@simplymedia-group.com GRAPHIC DESIGN: Jackie McAngus jackie.production@simplymedia-group.com ADMINISTRATION ASSISTANT: Alissa Heilbron info@simplymedia-group.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Dawn Gudging, Stephanie McGraw, Lily Templeton, Plum Sykes FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT Rachael Jones accounts@simplymedia-group.com SIMPLY MEDIA GROUP S.L Tel: +34 951 127 200

The views and opinions expressed by contributors of Pure Fasion may not represent the views and opinions of the publishers. Pure Fashion takes no responsibility for cl a i m s m ad e i n ad ve r tis n g o r ad ve r to r i a ls i n t h is m ag a z i n e. No part of Pure Fashion may be reproduced or copied in anyway without prior witten consent of Sunsearch Magazine. © Simply Media Group S.L. for Pure Fashion Magazine

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Photography by: Sebastian Faena For: John Hardy

Deposito Legal Nº MA 1252-2014


RE PUCONTENTS

14 Feature

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Herb Ritts - Photography at it’s Best

Stella McCartney- Pure Stella

24 Pure Beauty Feature Estee Lauder - New faces of the Future

32 42

164

Feature Carmen dell’ Orefice - The Oldest Top Model

60 Pure Runway Summer 2015 68 Ralph Lauren, Moschino, Chanel, Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, Michael Kors, Calvin Klein,Donna Karan

100 Feature

Sarah Jessica Parker - Pure Fetish

Feature Oscar de la Renta - An True Icon

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Pure Profile WE DON’T KILL ANIMALS - New Hot Designers

Brows - Bigger, Thicker and Better 2015 Spring Summer Hair Style Trends

Pure Photography

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Feature Vogue Editor’s - Powerful Women in Fashion

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Pure Top Model Bio Cara Delevingne - The Faces of Cara

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Feature

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Feature

Louis Vuitton - The Iconclasts Winnie Harlow - Changing the Face of Fashion

114 Feature Pure Victoria - A look into her new Shop Pure Fashion

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Blue Hues for Tiffany & Co.’s Jewels Tiffany & Co. seems to have a case of the blues, and that’s not to say that the American jeweller is in any way sad – how can they be after such a successful showing at this year’s Oscars. The blue in Tiffany’s case refers to the nearly infinite shades of the cool colour in the precious gemstones used in its latest crop of creations.

Tiffany Diamond and Montana Sapphire Pendants Tiffany medallion pendants of diamonds and Montana sapphires in platinum

Tiffany diamond and gemstone rings with diamond and platinum settings (from top): Lucida® diamond with diamond and sapphire border, princess-cut diamond with sapphire and tsavorite border, Lucida® diamond with diamond and sapphire border.

Tiffany Diamond and Gemstone Bracelet Tiffany bracelet of emerald-cut aquamarines, diamonds and black onyx in platinum


Tiffany Diamond and Gemstone Earrings Tiffany diamond and gemstone drop earrings in platinum (from left): cushion-cut green tourmalines, pear-shaped aquamarines, pear-shaped green tourmalines with 18 karat gold, cusion-cut blue tourmalines, pear-shaped green tourmalines with 18 karat gold. PRICE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST www.tiffany.com Photo Credit: Š Tiffany & Co.

Pale blue aquamarines spring to life amidst onyx and diamond accents while icy blue tourmalines and sapphires chill with diamonds in an assortment of pendant earrings. One of my favorite pieces is a turquoise and diamond tassels necklace designed by Jean Schlumberger, one that definitely makes a vivid statement.


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PURE STELLA 14

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Born and raised in London and the English countryside, Stella McCartney became interested in designing clothes as a youth. At age thirteen, she made her first jacket. Three years later, she interned for Christian Lacroix, working on his first fashion design collection, honing her skills working for Edward Sexton, her father’s Savile Row tailor for a number of years. She studied her foundation at Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication, fashion design at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in the early 1990’s. Her graduation collection in 1995 was modelled by friends and supermodels Naomi Campbell, Yasmin Le Bon and Kate Moss – for free – at the graduation runway show. The collection was shown to a song penned by her famous father, called “Stella May Day. ”The show made front-page news, and the entire collection was sold to Tokio, a London boutique. The designs were licensed to Browns, Joseph, Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus. In 1998, she designed her sister Mary’s wedding dress for her wedding to television producer Alistair Donald. Stella McCartney graduated from Central St Martins in 1995. A signature style of sharp tailoring, natural confidence and sexy femininity was immediately apparent in her first collection and after only two collections, in 1997, she was appointed the Creative Director of Chloe in Paris and enjoyed great success during her tenure. A lifelong vegetarian, Stella McCartney does not use any leather or fur in her designs. She supports PETA. Some of McCartney’s designs have text that elaborates on her “no animal” policy; for example, one of her jackets for Adidas says, “suitable for sporty vegetarians” on the sleeve. Stella does use wool, silk, and other animal-derived fabrics in her designs. Stella McCartney launched her own fashion house under her name in a partnership with Kering as a 50/50 joint venture and showed her first collection in Paris in October 2001. Her collections include women’s ready-towear, accessories, lingerie, eyewear, fragrance and kids. Stella McCartney now operates 33 freestanding stores in locations including Manhattan’s Soho, London’s Mayfair and Brompton Cross, LA’s West Hollywood, Paris’ Palais Royal, Milan, Tokyo, Shanghai and Beijing. Her collections are now distributed in over 70 countries through 600 wholesale accounts including speciality shops, and department stores, as well as shipping to 100 countries online.


In 2003, Stella McCartney launched her first perfume “Stella.” In addition to the main line collection, a long-term partnership with adidas was introduced in September 2004.

The critically acclaimed sports performance collection adidas by Stella McCartney, has since successfully grown to include several athletic disciplines including running, gym, yoga, tennis, swimming, winter sports and cycling.

In Winter 2010 Stella McCartney introduced the Falabella handbag, distinguish by a braided chain detail the bag has since become one of the designer’s best-selling items.


In 2008, a new lingerie collection of aspirational styles that reflect a modern woman’s needs was launched.

In 2010 the first Stella McCartney Kids collection debuted, capturing the spirit and energy of kids today for boys, girls and babies ages newborn to 14 years.

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This far into the season, shopping lists have started to take shape. Knit dressing, seriously roomy pants, and a military something or other are developing stories. All of them made appearances on Stella McCartney’s runway this morning, but she has a knack for making that fact look like happenstance. McCartney is a striver—as a mother of four with an international, multimillion-dollar business, doesn’t she have to be? Yet she injects her clothes with an offhand sense of ease. Life’s not a breeze, she knows, but dressing for it should be. McCartney has situated her brand at the profitable place where directional and functional meet. Hip-slung sailor pants were cut extra-wide, but not so big you’d trip over your feet. A ribbed knit tunic and calf-length skirt in a gorgeous shade of indigo followed the lines of the body without clinging. They were more graceful than a sweaterdress with

cutouts on either side of the waist, and sexier for their subtlety. Most relaxed of all were the parachute silk flight suits and the matching sweeping coats, like slipping into a pair of pastel pyjamas and a robe, and staying that way all day. A tempting thought on Day 26 (give or take) of fashion month. Models were unfettered by bags. There were just a handful on the runway, and you got the sense that McCartney would’ve edited them out altogether if she could’ve gotten away with it. The effortlessness and fluidity of that notion extended into her evening pieces: not just slipdresses but also separates, in which relaxed shapes and organic prints were spliced with Rorschachs of lace windows. Sexy without trying too hard—exactly the way McCartney likes it.


SPRING | SUMMER 2015 COLLECTION


SPRING | SUMMER 2015 COLLECTION

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SPRING | SUMMER 2015 COLLECTION

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NEW FACES OF BEAUTY Joan Smalls, Constance Jablonski and Liu Wen in the Estee Lauder campaign 24

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he fashion  industry has long been criticized for promoting a narrow ideal of  beauty: the world’s highest-earning models have been predictably white and blonde, led by pneumatic Brazilian Gisele Bündchen, Heidi Klum and Kate Moss. Which is why the Three Graces chosen to front Estée Lauder’s latest product launch are so arresting: Chinese supermodel Liu Wen, Puerto Rican-born Joan Smalls and archetypal French beauty Constance Jablonski. The ad aims to convey that “diversity is beautiful”. The American beauty giant says the campaign is a nod to the late Lauder herself, who apparently had the “unshakeable belief” that “every woman can be beautiful” (the name of the ad campaign).


At the launch her granddaughter Aerin, the company’s creative director, burbled about a new chapter for the 65-year-old company: “Estée’s choice of models throughout the brand’s evolution was always extraordinary… we continue this legacy with a new group of diverse faces that truly represent a modern vision of beauty.” The message is not new. But the industry’s commitment to reflecting reality is often questioned, with even successful models like Naomi Campbell complaining of racism. She told Glamour  magazine two years ago: “You know, the American president may be black, but as a black woman I am still an exception in this business.” Geoffrey Jones, a Harvard Business School professor and author of Beauty Imagined, says the popularity of the “white, blonde and blue-eyed” look has been declining for some time as the global cosmetics industry, in which sales approached £240bn last year, adapts to the growing markets such as China and Latin America. The latter is expected to overtake North America in size within four years. “When China first liberalised and cosmetics companies first entered, consumers wanted western brands because they were associated with success and aspiration,” says Jones. “But in recent years they have become increasingly concerned with the local; they want brands like Estée Lauder or L’Oréal Paris, but they also want them to have a distinctive Chinese appeal.” The cosmetics industry was battered by the financial crisis, and sales tumbled particularly in mature western markets – a weakness that has made it all the more important to conquer emerging markets. When he took over this year, L’Oréal’s new chief executive Jean-Paul Agon set the challenge to add a billion new customers in the next decade. This year fashion editors have been hailing the arrival of the Asian fashion pack, pointing to Liu, who is now the 10th-highest-paid model in the world, as well as Du Juan – the first Chinese model to appear on the cover of French  Vogue  – and Godfrey Gao, a Taiwanese actor who is the face of Louis Vuitton. Their supposed success has been undermined somewhat by a recent blunder in British  Vogue, which confused pictures of Liu Wen and Du Juan in an article about their success. Sola Oyebade, the chief executive of Mahogany Models Management, Europe’s largest agency for models of colour, argues industry power brokers are not convinced of their selling power — although the “black issue” of Italian Vogue in 2008 was so popular that an extra 40,000 were printed.

Joan Smalls Joan Smalls Rodriguez is a Puerto Rican fashion model. In 2013, she ranked at #8 on Forbes magazine’s “World’s Highest-Paid Models” list. In 2011, the first Latina model to represent Estée Lauder cosmetics.


“I welcome that Estée Lauder has or is attempting to make the brand more visually acceptable to the global market,” he says, but adds: “I don’t think things are changing...this was a calculated business decision. It is well known that the economic downturn is having a serious effect on businesses who recognise that the new and emerging markets are Asia and Africa.” It is a “good thing” that Asian models are enjoying success, Oyebade says, but even they are few and far between: “When you look at them they are Asian models with strong European features... without a shadow of a doubt black models face discrimination.” You only have to look at the luxury goods market to see the pull of Asia: Prada this year opted to list on the stock exchange in Hong Kong rather than in its native Milan on the basis that 40% of its sales are already in Asia. The beauty market in China is put at £3bn and growing fast. Against that backdrop it is easy to understand the rise of Liu, who has graduated from an average adolescence in Yongzhou city, Hunan province, to international stardom. She got her big break in 2005 when her mother entered her in a modelling competition to stop her slouching. Since then she has become the first Chinese Victoria’s Secret girl and the first on Estée Lauder’s roster of “brand ambassadors”. Now based in New York, she has worked on her English by watching TV and films – particularly the teen vampire saga Twilight. She told one interviewer recently: “I didn’t think before that an Asian girl could do a beauty campaign. I do the campaign for the world, not only for Asia.” That beauty is in the eye of the beholder is a truism the beauty giants are all too aware of as they cash in on the hang-ups of different races. Estée Lauder’s larger rival L’Oréal spends more than £600m a year developing products to feed consumers’ hunger for new shampoos and lipsticks. It has more than a dozen “evaluation centres” around the world where, according to Patricia Pineau, its head of communication for research and innovation, it studies the idiosyncrasies of national beauty routines in mocked-up bathroom sets: “We ask women to come with their beauty case and we observe.” The results are surprising. “A Korean woman uses 23 products and will spend 45 minutes getting ready,” says Pineau. The lengthy session in front of the mirror involves the painstaking use of eyeshadow to “design a double eye to make eyes look more open”.

Liu Wen Liu Wen simplified Chinese: born January 27, 1988, is a Chinese fashion model. She is the first model of East Asian descent to walk the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show.

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When Lauder started building a cosmetics empire in the second half of the 20th century, only Hollywood actors and the French had global appeal. That is no longer true today and Leonard Lauder, the founder’s son who is credited with transforming the family firm into today’s near-£5bn business, talked of the arrival of “beauty pluralism” in an interview with Women’s Wear Daily. He described a “wave” of Chinese consumption at home and abroad, with almost half the cosmetics sold in Galeries Lafayette bought by tourists. “The Chinese are going there,” he said. “The Russians are coming to London. The people from the Middle East are coming to London. You advertise the right products with the right models in the right country.” L’Oréal has 25 faces, including Ethiopian model Liya Kebede, the athlete and double amputee Aimee Mullins, and Beyoncé. “We aim to show a depth of personality, not just a beautiful face,” says Gayle Tait, UK general manager for L’Oréal Paris. Some stars, such as Cheryl Cole in the UK, have local contracts, while others, including Beyoncé and Bollywood’s Aishwarya Rai, feature in global campaigns. The “every woman can be beautiful” ads are showcasing a range of face creams deemed suitable for all skin tones, but Estée Lauder is the owner of a cupboard full of brands including Clinique, Bobbi Brown and Jo Malone, and is not pushing a “one size fits all” approach. Last month it opened a research centre in Shanghai to reinforce its “strong commitment to local consumers by developing products tailored to the specific needs of Chinese and Asian skin”. Skin whitening creams, for example, are big business for women and men in Asian markets. In India alone, the desire for fair skin has created a £300m a year trade in creams led by Unilever’s Fair & Lovely. Estée Lauder’s products include Cyber White Lightening lotion. The altered image of the beauty industry is also about change closer to home, says Jones. “Major western markets have become multiracial in a way they weren’t 10 to 20 years ago and using models of different ethnicities is a way to hit those markets big time.”

Constance Jablonski Constance Jablonski is a French model. In 2006, she entered the French Elite Model Look Contest. As of 2010, she became one of the newer faces of Estée Lauder alongside Liu Wen and Joan Smalls 28

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A look at Spring 2015 from

Pastel Wash of Colour For reason that don’t need explaining, pink around the eyes is usually a no-no. But leave it to Wendy Rowe at Burberry (above) to make it oh so right.  To enhance eyes almost subliminally, she layered shades from the new Burberry Complete Palette in Rose Pink above and below them.

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COMPLETE EYE PALETTE A quartet of densely pigmented, coordinating eye colours that enrich the skin and remain vibrant all day. The formulation of each shadow has been customised to give a targeted texture for a specific use: luminising base highlighter, two medium colours to add shape, and an intense liner. The skin protecting, glide-on formula is blended with satin smooth silicones and enriching conditioners

Lip Glow Light reflecting Burberry Lip Glow adds a hint of colour for a fresh, moisturised glow and enhanced natural radiance The formula uses nourishing oils and ceramides that leave the lips hydrated, supple and naturally plumped. Apply with the applicator directly to the lips or on top of Burberry Lip Cover.

FRESH GLOW LUMINOUS FLUID BASE Discover Fresh Glow, our iconic Luminous Fluid Base The effortless formula gives a spectrum of skin benefits and multiple effects – from instant radiance to moisturisation – while gently protecting against the elements. Ultra-fine illuminators give natural luminosity and light diffusion, anti-agers help restore skin elasticity and wild rose extracts increase hydration levels. The multi-effect formula can be used in a multitude of ways: On nude skin for moisturising illumination. As a hydrating and luminising primer under foundation. Blended into foundation for a fresh radiance boost. To add highlights to nude or made-up skin – use it on cheekbones, the bridge of the nose, Cupid’s bow and chin.


BIGGER, THICKER & BETTER BROWS They frame your eyes and they are the ones to determine your expression, but ever since getting bigger, thicker and better, the bold eyebrows also grew to become a woman’s most treasured beauty accessory. Switching from fall’s call for drama, to spring’s longing for naturalness, the bold, strong brows for the upcoming seasons are all about mastering the highlighting effects meant to really showcase their beauty.

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yebrows are certainly having a moment. But, it can be hard out there for a girl in search of great brows – what with the zillions of products and pieces of advice. Whether you’ve got Cara Delevingne-envy or just want to grow out the results of a late-night pluck fest, here are some common myths–and facts–about those frames to the windows of our very souls.


MYTH: You just have to suffer with a red face after getting waxed or threaded.
 FACT: You can ease that redness (and ouchiness) without spending a ton of money. Applying Dickinson’s Original Witch Hazel Pore Perfecting Toner directly to your brow area post treatment will soothe skin and calm irritation. www.dickinsonbrands.com  MYTH: An eyebrow pencil is the best way to fill in your brows.


FACT: Eyebrow pencils can be great, but wax and powder-based products can actually help achieve a more natural look. “I like to awaken ‘sleepy’ brows with some powder and an angled brush,” says Estée Lauder’s Director of Global Makeup Artistry, Blair Patterson. “Powders are more forgiving than pencils and they blend more easily.” Patterson says Estée Lauder’s Pure Color EyeShadow in Chocolate Bliss is great for creating an opaque, flat look; she uses Estée Lauder’s  Brow Brush, a stiff, precision angled brush for good control: “I start at the interior of the brow and then underneath, where the brow is the cleanest, and work my way across the arch. www.estelauder.com

MYTH: There’s nothing you can do if you over-pluck.
 FACT: Everyone is different in how much their brows grow, but here are some holistic tips for encouraging brow growth: “Brush your brows with an eyebrow brush, always remembering to go upwards and then outwards,” “Then, moisturize your brows, making sure the hairs aren’t dry.” Sally Hansen La Cross Premier Brow & Lash Brush. This brush is made from the highest quality nylon fibres. www.sallyhansen.com Of course, you can also fill in those brows while they grow back. A great bargain pick is the e.l.f. Studio Eyebrow Kit, which includes defining wax to shape and fill, and a complementing setting powder to set and perfect. Available in 4 shades. www.elfcosmetics.com For a major brow boost, Benefit’s  Gimme Brow  is brush-on, voluminizing fiber gel that adheres to your skin and hairs to really fill them in. www.benefitcosmetics.com


MYTH:

All faces look great with strongly arched brows.


(YIKES.) “Done correctly this actually can emphasize a great brow!”

FACT:

Ramy’s pick for precision plucking: Ramy Beauty Therapy Tweezer by Tweezerman, which features a slanted, rounded, nopoint design that is ideal for the delicate skin around the eye. 

According to Malynda Vigliotti, aka “Boom Boom”, the founder of NYC’sBoom Boom Brow Bar, the brow shape that’s most flattering for you depends on the shape of your face. For example, do you have a round face like, say, Beyonce? “If so, NEVER get a rounded arch – it will mimic the shape of your face and make it look even rounder,” admonishes Boom Boom. “No, no, no, you need to enhance the natural angles in your brow and get a KILLER arch going to offset the roundness!” Boom Boom says that if you’ve got a heartshaped face (think  Vanessa Hudgens), a softer arch will soften the point of your chin. A “well-defined, angular arch” can help draw attention up and away from your jaw if you’ve got a square face (think  Kiera Knightly), and a “strong, defined brow” looks best on an oval face (ala  Marion Cotillard). Moral of the story? Find the shape that looks best on your  pretty face.

MYTH: Brows always match hair color.  

should your


 FACT:

Says who?! “Eyebrows do not have to match hair exactly,” says Ramy. “In fact, they can be lighter or darker than your hair color and still be extremely flattering!” He says it’s much more important to concentrate on brows that are are full and natural-looking.

MYTH:

MYTH: Different removal methods cause hair to grow back differently.  


FACT: “You CAN remove those hairs above

FACT: According to Ramy, any method that removes the hairs from the root will yield results that last equally long. However, something to keep in mind: “Any time you remove hair from the root you run the risk of damage,” says Ramy. “That said, bad tweezing isn’t as traumatic since the hairs are removed oneby-one, whereas a bad waxing can shock the hair follicle and cause it to stop growing.” www.ramy.com

You should never tweeze above the brow. 


the brow that are not part of the eyebrow and not quite part of your hairline,” says celeb makeup artist and brow expert, Ramy Gafni. “The key is not to remove hairs that are too close to the eyebrow, which can leave you looking expressionless,” Ramy explains.

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Vivid Red Lipstick

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pring makeup tends to look like bronze skin, glossy lips and soft, pastel eyes, but the beauty on the runway this season threw us a few surprises in the form of seriously smoky shadow, vivid red lips and strokes of brilliant color.

Chanel

Rouge Allure Luminous Satin Lip colour in Passion The plum coloured red will glide onto your lips leaving them velvety soft, with Chanel’s timeless signature appeal.

Tom Ford

Lip Color, Cherry Lush Specially treated color pigments are blended to deliver pure color with just the right balance of luminosity.

Revlon

Super Lustrous Crème Lipstick in Fire & Ice This unique red will make you the envy of many, moisturizing, long lasting, and perfect for the secret girly girl in us all.


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New. Micro Essence

The Micro Revolution has begun!

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Hair Trends

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S|S 2015

Although we love the fashions of Fashion week but sometimes it’s the hair and makeup trends that really catch our attention. After all, they’re often a teensie bit more attainable than a designer ball gown.

Side Bangs This season, we’ve spotted an easy-torecreate trend that’s swooping the runway. The side-swept bang has made an appearance at least eight times this season—and there are still more shows slated! Let’s take a peek at how the fashion world is doing the swooping bang. Plus, learn how to create the look yourself. Bobby pins everywhere! This season you don’t need to hide the pins, quite the contrary, you should show them as much as you can, because they are in the center of attention. Experiment with them and make different looks the way you want them to be.

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Hair trends 2015


60’s Tic-tack, we are going back in time with this gorgeous hairstyles. It is very simple do to, you just need to tease your hair to get the volume you want, just like in the 60’s. Look and feel amazing with this vintage gorgeous style.

Low Pony Tail This super easy hairstyle is just amazing. All you need to do is to tie your hair in a low ponytail. You can make it loose if you want, and to add more definition to it you can tease the ponytail to give it more volume.


Mermaid Waves The mermaid waves that everybody know so well. There are many ways to achieve them, heatless or with the help of your flat or curling iron, that can do miracles. Look as a magical mermaid.

Creative Braids Braids everywhere! Every type of braid can be accepted. Experiment with your braiding capabilities and make every braid you know, regular, inside braid, twisted or fishtail. Everything is allowed!


Pixie Short pixie hair is absolutely in! If you are short hair lover, just go ahead with this amazing look, the hair maybe is every girls treasure, but some girls just look good with or without it.

Center Parts The center part are here again, so if you already have one you will be instantly in fashion. And for the ones that want to give it a try, be sure that it will give you more sophisticated and classy look.


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COLLECTION

PRIVテ右 by COLOR RICHE

Made-to-measure nude couture

PARiS Pure Fashion

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There is no better way to enhance your style and your new makeup than a fresh hair color with Aveda’s new line of full spectrum color which offers you richer, fuller hues. Energize your hair with a deep chocolate, a warm blonde or a rich red.

Make a Major Change

Stamp Out Stereotypes

Aveda colour pros reported that nearly a third of guests seeking to get creative with color request a dramatic change to better reflect their individuality or to mirror fashion trends.

Forget about that old chestnut, “Blondes have more fun.” Our color pros reported that these days brunettes and redheads are regarded as every bit as exciting– thanks to celebrities like Christina Hendricks.

These color enthusiasts are likely to take the plunge and go from blonde to brunette, brunette to blonde or get red. Ombre, the dramatic two-tone tinting technique, is also high on that list.

Dream in Color

Express Your Inner Artist or Therapist

No matter what fuels your passion for color, an Aveda colorist can take you there with the customizable fade-resistant Full Spectrum™ hair color system, formulated with organic plant oils and manufactured with wind power.

Adding aesthetic appeal through highlights and pumped up dimension was the #2 reason for sitting in their colorist’s chair. But an equal number of dye-hards hue their hair to boost mood or self-esteem.

“Full Spectrum is hair color without limits,’’ says Ian Michael Black, Aveda Global Artistic Director, Hair Color. “It lets you create virtually any color imaginable with beautiful results that are kind to your hair and the environment.”

Photos: www. color-formula1.com, www.artwallpapers.com, www.womeninfashion.net, www. hair-color-trends.com

HUE KNEW...


Global Creative Director Antoinette Beenders and the Aveda Artistic Team transformed gothic romanticism of the past into silhouettes that accentuate raw beauty of the future for the new collection: Neo Goth. “Neo Goth captures the magic and sense of mystery of the Gothic darkness we’ve seen on the runways,” says Antoinette. “We captured the strength and emotion of the neo-gothic movement and reframed it by adding fragility and romance to the look. By pairing it with graphic futurism of Japanese manga and anime we created images that are almost otherworldly.” “The makeup focus this season is on a strong brow paired with rich and pigmented lips and luminous skin to craft a dynamic appearance,” says Janell Geason, Artistic Director for Aveda makeup. “Luxurious petal tones blended softly, sculpted brows and colour saturated lips cast features in a provocative new light.” The cuts featured in the Neo Goth Collection play with the silhouette of hair the same way clothing designers use belts—drawing the eye to a featured area. Hair colour plays with the illusion of shadow by melting unique colours together. By using deep, dark tones at the roots, and bright through the lengths, it accentuates the brightness and movement in lengths. When the hair is up all that is seen is bold, vibrant colour. “We took inspiration from Japan this season—the big eyes of manga cartoons, the brightness of anime traditional geisha silhouettes,” says Allen Ruiz, Artistic Director for Styling. “The styles are iconic in design, yet feel modern, even futuristic—and have our collection’s gothic edge.”


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Buttery Blonde This is perfect for blondes who want to change it up and still feel blonde. It is a simple colour with battery tones and therefore perfect for blondes. It is taking the country salons by storm and it has been getting positive reviews for many years now. The colour Champagne with a red twist. If you are a blonde or a brunette and wish to feel as sexy siren then this hair colour is the perfect choice. You can transform from other hair colours and you wont feel as if you have done too much change. It will brighten your face and make you feel much attractive than ever. Very trendy!


COPPER CUTIE Red hair can look mysterious, elfin, romantic, young and alluring all at the same time. A touch of copper adds a regal aura to red hair. Copper hair is a broad term for so many variations of hair colour. From fiery copper to soft strawberry, deep ginger to copper penny, copper hair will draw attention and turn heads everywhere you go! Picking the right combo will brighten your skin and give life to your tresses

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CARAMEL COATED A warm, caramel tone is one of those that can be used to create an absolute hair masterpiece. No matter what your complexion, hair type or natural hair colour may be, a warm caramel hue can complete your look! Whether it be a subtle pop of caramel against some darker pieces, or an all over colour, there’s always a way to add caramel highlights into your life This is an absolutely magnificent solution for those dark haired beauties who are looking to change up their look a little bit, but not add in a ridiculous maintenance schedule.

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KÉRASTASE PA R I S

Introducing

Couture Styling

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www.kerastase.com Pure Fashion

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Carmen Dell’Orefice, the 82-year-old Top model reveals the secrets to her lasting success While most models have a short career window, the legendary Carmen Dell’Orefice has been strutting her stuff for nearly 70 years (the knee replacement notwithstanding). Here she tells the secret of her lasting success ‘I want to show the world what it is to be a so-called natural beauty’ ‘Being on the cover of Vogue at 15 meant nothing to me,’ confesses Carmen Dell’Orefice. She doesn’t mean to sound ungrateful; it was more that she was baffled by it all. ‘I never really understood what it was they were looking at, what they saw in me,’ she shrugs. Whatever it was, she’s still very much in possession of it; Carmen has been modelling – albeit with a few brief attempts at retirement – for almost 70 years now. At 13, she was spotted by the wife of a photographer, getting off a bus in her native New York City; the following year, she sat for Salvador Dalí – who gave her a painting in addition to the $7 she officially earned for modelling for him – before going on to work with the most celebrated photographers of the 20th century, including Cecil Beaton, Norman Parkinson and Richard Avedon. And at an age when many of her contemporaries are long forgotten or sadly deceased, she is still fronting campaigns for luxury brands such as Rolex and walking the runway for Gaultier, Galliano and Mugler. ‘I’ve had more covers in the past 15 years than I had in all the years before that’

Harper’s Bazaar 1957 Photograher: Richard Avedon

“I wanted it to be triumphant”, says Carmen, speaking of her first shoot with Richard Avedon, done to showcase the 1957 couture collection for harper’s bazaar. “I wanted to prove that Dick could use me as effectively as he had my predecessors like Dovina and Dorian Leigh.” As shown in this image, the grace and confidence that Carmen had developed through ballet and swimming were apparent although she actually thinks that the low heels made her feet look unattractive in this position. But is was Avedon idea to jump so she jumped for him.


She’s still incredibly striking: tall and slim, with her trademark silver hair tied back in a neat, low bun, high, smooth cheekbones and tight, firm skin – not a sagging inch of neck or jawline. She openly admits to having enhanced her god-given bone structure with regular silicone injections for decades, and undergone a fearsome-sounding ‘medical dermabrasion’ almost 50 years ago to banish wrinkles and sun damage, but that is all she is willing to discuss until she writes her memoirs. She refuses to be frail; in spite of a painful double-knee-replacement operation just three months ago, she wore high heels a few days after we meet, for her 82nd birthday. But more than her looks and her impressively lengthy and illustrious career, it’s Carmen’s personal life that should surely have Hollywood scriptwriters salivating. The only child of an Italian immigrant father and Hungarian mother, Carmen modelled initially only to help support both her impoverished parents, who lived apart but never divorced. She herself has been married three times: first, at 21, to Bill Miles, after five years of dating and three illegal abortions. Carmen has been modelling ¿ albeit with a few brief attempts at retirement ¿ for almost 70 years now Carmen has been modelling albeit with a few brief attempts at retirement - for almost 70 years now The couple eventually had a daughter, her only child, Laura, but Bill was unfaithful, so they divorced. At 28, she married the photographer Richard Heimann, but he left her soon after because he decided he wasn’t ready for marriage or bringing up another man’s child. Her third marriage to Richard Kaplan, an architect, who she met in early 1963 and married later that year, fizzled out after 11 years. ‘You don’t have to like me, but I’m not going to please someone for the sake of their approval’ Outside matrimony, her lovers have been many, varied and not all entirely single, from the photographer Norman Parkinson to the US talk show host David Susskind and the multimillionaire Norman F Levy. The latter introduced her to Bernie Madoff, who defrauded Carmen to the tune of several million dollars in his infamous Ponzi scheme. ‘Sure I might feel more secure with my little fortune at my disposal in my old age, but the loss of it doesn’t change who I am as I never changed my lifestyle,’ she reasons. ‘How many beds can I sleep in, in one night? How many roofs over my head do I need? I don’t need that much.


‘I do want to live every day though, rather than fear the inevitable.’ Certainly, nobody could ever accuse Carmen of a life half-lived… My dream was to become a ballet dancer, but after a year in bed with rheumatic fever at 13, I had grown too tall, and had no muscle tone left. I tried a ballet class and couldn’t even do a plié without falling over. It was my first death. I have an iMac and an iPad, but I can’t do texting – I have arthritis. Technology should serve us, rather than us serving it. If you think you don’t need something, you probably don’t. I didn’t marry to have children. I married to have a relationship and I was blessed with one child. I was an only child, too – my mother was smarter than most women today; she just had me. I nurtured my own daughter’s ambitions the best way I knew how [she was 22 when she had Laura, who is now 60]. Laura always knew that she was a wanted child; she got all of me and she still has me. My mother taught me how to sew, how to upholster, how to cook, how to wallpaper, how to count the pennies. Our rent was $30 a month, and we’d often be a few dollars short, so at the end of the month, we would sometimes have to pawn the sewing machine, which was a tragedy. As a model, I didn’t have an identity; I was a chameleon, a silent actress. I was an amorphous thing. I wasn’t full of personality, I was full of solitude and solemnity. I wasn’t a cover-girl type. I’ve had more covers in the past 15 years than I had in all the years before that. ‘I have an iMac and an iPad, but I can’t do texting’. There’s no way I would have got to see so much of the world, with my humble background, without modelling. We were penniless and hungry for most of my youth. I washed the sheets in the bathtub in my bedroom and hung them out of the window on the clothes line, which in winter was difficult as the sheets would freeze and get stuck to the line. These young models are taught to walk a certain way – it’s all about sex. There is a lack of refinement, there is no romance. Everything is a vulgar description of life – it is so sad. It took me half my life to find satisfaction. I have been there for a while now, though I can’t pinpoint it exactly. And satisfied is the word. Happiness is a quiet indulgence I do on my own. I never married unless I was in love. I am an incurable romantic. These days, everyone wants a formula, and a list – they want this, they want that, yadda yadda yadda. People today have their list of demands, and they miss connections, they miss empathy. Life is chemistry.

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I was 16 when I fell in love with my first husband. He was 26 and had a young son from a previous marriage. He was also in love with someone else, an older woman. I had little self-esteem. Just because those men put me on the cover of Vogue, I didn’t have the insight about my own needs and desires to help my partners treat me the way I wanted to be treated. But we all tried. We just didn’t know how to stay together. Dieting, or watching your figure, is not that complicated. You just have to have selfdiscipline, and understand what you have been given genetically. I always wanted to be smaller than I am; I’m a typical woman in that sense. It took me half my life to understand who I was. How could I be true to anything when I didn’t know myself? I am able to be truer and truer with myself the older I get, but I am still a work in progress. You don’t have to like me, but I’m not going to please someone for the sake of their approval. If a man has a relatively good experience with his mother growing up then, in some way, his subconscious will pick a partner who will do for him what his mother did. I am not talking about making their dinner, but emotional support. I love all men, because I have a need to mother them. I always have a male friend, if I can find one who is suitable. If it doesn’t suit you to have one, that’s fine, but I always do. My mother was very hands-on; so were the nuns at my school. If I didn’t learn my catechisms, I’d get physically punished by them. Did I regret my abortions? Frankly, no. I got over Catholicism and guilt when I was eight. I made my Holy Communion, but by the time I made my Confirmation, I had resolved that it was a crock. Women need to wake up. If the US rescinds Roe v Wade [the landmark 1973 decision by the US Supreme Court that effectively made abortion legal], women don’t realise what it will mean for the rest of their lives. And what it will cost the government, to deal with all those unwanted children dumped on society. I live alone and enjoy doing most domestic things myself. I like living simply and cooking occasionally for small groups of friends. I had double-knee-replacement surgery recently, and the doctor let me bring my video biographer – who is making a film about my life – into the operating room. He also came to the dentist with me, and to see my dermatologist of 45 years. I want to show the world what it is to be a so-called natural beauty. I broke my nose on a diving board when I was a kid, and my first husband said: ‘I know the

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best doctor in the world and, for your 18th birthday, I’m going to give you a nose job.’ He didn’t like my nose. I’ve never told anyone that before. ‘I moisturise my skin with anything that comes to hand, but nothing on the outside is going to make a blind bit of difference unless you take care of the inside’. ‘I moisturise my skin with anything that comes to hand, but nothing on the outside is going to make a blind bit of difference unless you take care of the inside’. People are always asking me what I’ve had ‘done’. The treatment I had [to eliminate sun damage] is not available to the public any more. It wasn’t a peel; it wasn’t a lift. The doctor used the finest wire brush, and he planed off my skin. It brings you right down to baby skin, and those layers of skin never grow back so you have to be so careful in daylight. I go to sleep with sunblock on, in case I forget to put it on in the morning. I was never a big shopper, but I have some wonderful Calvin Klein suits that I have bought in the past ten years, all for under $100. He is a tall man and designs for tall people. Donna Karan does that too – the sleeves actually come to my wrist. Do I like the idea of travelling? Yes. The reality, no – the hours at the airport, the awful way the airlines treat you. I am just so grateful I got to see the world when it was all still prop planes and it took 24 hours to get from New York to Paris. Diana Vreeland [the late legendary Harper’s Bazaar fashion editor] was a good friend and a great champion. She knew everything about my life and respected the way I conducted it. Once when I was called into her office, she stood behind me and said: ‘I want you to do this collection in Paris with Avedon, but you have to grow your neck.’ She told me to think tall and stretch my neck, and she’d see me next week – if my neck was longer, I’d go to Paris. And I did. In business, I didn’t always know how to take advantage of events and opportunities that were right in front of me, so I missed that boat a few times. Then, over the decades, a few men of great substance wanted to marry me, but alas I was not in love with them, so my lifestyle in the end stayed happily in my hands. I have come to realise that love is not the narrow thing I thought it was. If you can find it all in one lovely person with marriage and sex and lust, that is fabulous – and I came pretty close with my last husband. But when one of my oldest friends died recently – we had been friends for 60 years – I realised that you can find your soulmate in friendship, too. There is nothing I didn’t tell her – good or bad – and that is real friendship.

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2015

Ralph Lauren launched Polo for Women in a big way. Big as in a first-of-its-kind 4-D holographic light show projected onto a fountain of water shooting out of the lake in Central Park. It seems the experience of working on the sportier, more affordably priced Polo left an impression on the designer, because there was a discernible casual spirit to the high-end collection he showed on the runway today. The first look out summed up the mood: fitted cargo pants and an amethyst-colored silk scarf top accessorized with dangling gemstone earrings. Call it haute safari gear for the wilds of the Hamptons. As the show moved along, Lauren worked that high/low, chic/sportif conceit in different ways. Safari jackets came in bright orange gazar or fatigue green metallic organza. There was a jumpsuit in shimmery silk charmeuse. And jodhpurs, a Lauren staple, trotted out for day and evening. Lauren wasn’t rewriting fashion history here. All of this has been done before at just about every price point, including, of course, by his truly. Lauren’s been elevating American sportswear for 40-plus years now, and the fact that he practically invented this look certainly gives him the license to revisit it. But he was thinking at his most creatively for evening. Epaulets and patch pockets on a white silk cady T-shirt gown looked modern and fresh. And a snug, cropped black sweater worn with a black gazar skirt that laced up the hip was one of the most seductive after-dark proposals of the week. 68

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Source: Nicole Phelps, Style.com Photos: Fabio IonĂ


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All about Spring | Summer 2015

Fashion has ripped up the denim rulebook, and with fresh ideas (tailoring, military jackets, shirtdresses) and lavish new details (shearling, cutwork, crystals), the blues are on winning form.

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Super Clean Like the shrink-to-fit jeans you might find at a workwear outlet or surplus store, these looks— from Saint Laurent to Stella McCartney to Michael Kors—have a mint quality to them. No fading. No whiskers. No wear-and-tear; just pure, clean indigo, in shades that range from raw (at Chloé) to powder blue (at Lacoste and Rodarte).

Stella McCartney

Source: Lucy Olivier

Chloé

Valentino

Michael Kors

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Wider Legs | Shorter Hems

Designer Frida Giannini took her end-of-show bow wearing a pair of the cropped wide-leg jeans she did for Gucci. Gucci

Dsquared² boyfriend jeans that are a Caten classic. Pants slouched to reveal branded briefs “borrowed from a boyfriend.”

Dsquared²

Longer Skirts

Spring sees skirts with much longer, and in some cases fuller, silhouettes. At Kenzo and Chloé, where designer Clare Waight-Keller showed a cargo-pocket floor-sweeper with a luxe sweatshirt and strappy, wrappy sandals, ease was everything.

Kenzo

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Chloé


Frayed Look Hood by Air

Hood By Air and Roberto Cavalli (if these aren’t opposites, we don’t know what are) showed their own effective versions of distressed denim.

Roberto Cavalli

Patchwork Embellishment

One of the best things about denim is that it takes embellishment so beautifully. Patchwork at Tommy Hilfiger and jewels at Dolce & Gabbana made it clear that clean isn’t the only look we’ll be wearing next season.

Tommy Hilfiger

Dolce and Gabbana

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FROM CO - AXIAL TO MASTER CO - AXIAL In 1999 we set out to revolutionize the art of mechanical watchmaking through the industrialization of the first practical watch escapement in 250 years. In 2008 we introduced the silicon balance spring in our exclusive OMEGA Co-Axial calibre. And today, we’ve pushed the boundaries once again with the new Master Co-Axial calibre, combining Co-Axial performance and reliability with resistance to magnetic fields greater than 15,000 gauss.

GUIDED BY OUR PIONEERING SPIRIT, DRIVEN BY OUR COMMITMENT TO INNOVATION


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2015

Jeremy Scott’s

Moschino

is hot, the show instantly killed them dead. It took a good 20 minutes to get past the throng at the door, the standing section was three rows deep, and the crowd whooped and hollered as the lights dimmed. “Hiya, Barbie!” rang out from the loudspeakers, and delivering on the promise of the giant plastic comb that was included in the invitation, the first model emerged in a huge platinum blond wig, bubblegum pink lipstick, shrunken fuchsia leather jacket and miniskirt, and (what else?) mules. For Fall it was McDonald’s and Budweiser; this season it was Mattel’s iconic plastic toy that got Scott’s low-high treatment. “Like every girl and gay boy, I loved Barbie,” Scott said backstage afterward, sporting a “Moschino for Ages 5 and Over” T-shirt. “It’s hard not to; she’s practically perfect,” he went on. “She’s a good big sister, she’s had every job in the world, worn every outfit. And it’s just joyful. Her and I share the same things: We just want to bring joy to people.” See Charlotte Free, roller-skating to the very edge of the runway in “Moschino”-in-Barbie-bubble-letters logo bra, track shorts, and sweatband, then shimmying her way back. See the pool-floaty “Chanel” handbags. See the Spa Barbie French terry Perfecto and icon print maillot. Sure, there were holdouts in the crowd, and there were some industry bigwigs within Milan’s city limits who skipped the show altogether. But they were far outnumbered by the Jeremy Scott fanboys and -girls waiting on tiptoe at the exits. Fashion hasn’t seen anything like this in years—maybe since Franco Moschino himself was thumbing his nose at the fashion elite. You heard yourself complain, “But some of it looked sort of cheap…” Or, “Where does he go from here?” Then you thought, “There she is, the sourpuss again.” And finally, “What’s wrong with me? Loosen up, have some fun. Feel the joy.”


Source: Nicole Phelps, Style.com Photos: Alessandro Garofalo


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2015

Chanel

Boulevard , a street scene immaculately recreated down to the last puddle on the asphalt and pane of glass in the apartment buildings, but when Karl Lagerfeld’s models took to that street in protest, toting feminist placards and chanting slogans, there were some in the audience who blanched at what they saw as political passion co-opted by fashion artifice, especially in light of the current events in Hong Kong. Lagerfeld said he conceived the show within 24 hours of his last epic, so today’s headlines weren’t as relevant to his concept as the manifestations—or demonstrations—that bring bits of Paris to a standstill on an almost daily basis. Taking it to the streets is a timehonored French tradition. “I thought it was fun to make a demonstration about a subject I can very well adapt to,” he said. “My mother was a feminist, and I was brought up with a history of that.” He was also thinking about the turbulent events of May 1968, when Paris took to the streets in one of the definitive popular protests of recent history. “There was an air of freedom I never felt before in Paris,” he recalled. “There was one line I loved: ‘It’s not allowed to tell people that things are not allowed.’ Today, everything is forbidden. Political correctness killed everything.” Bearing in mind that he is inclined to show at least twice as many outfits as any other designer on the calendar, the broad gamut of today’s collection offered so much that the cumulative impact was energy tempered by fierce intelligence. Release and restraint, in other words. So there were exuberant psychedelic splotches of watercolor shading everything from coat linings to boots, but there were also pristine white lace yokes that recalled Lagerfeld’s days as creative director at Chloé, whose founder, Gaby Aghion, died this week. “I normally never dig in my past, but suddenly I had a vision,” he said. There was va-voom sweater dressing (and who else are you going to put in a va-voom sweater dress than Gisele Bündchen?), but there was also sober navy tailoring, with seams outlined in white. Lacquered pinstripes, Art Deco organzas, chain mail…don’t even bother looking for a narrative thread; the fact is, as Lagerfeld said, “They’re all pieces everyone can play with. No ‘60s, no ‘70s, no whatever, more mode de vie than mode.” And, in that, they embody a fashion vision where everything is permitted. Coming from a fashion house as august as Chanel, that’s pretty radical. Almost worth taking to the streets for.

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Source: Tim Blanks, Style.com Photos: Marcus Tondo


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S A R A H JESSICA PARKER SJP’s

collection is just as dreamy as the debut range she has spent the past few months promoting – and we think the names she has given each pair of shoes is one of the main reasons why.


Sarah Jessica Parker has designed a collection of shoes, handbags and a trench coat for Nordstrom. The SJP Collection aims to make shoe-aholics swoon with pumps and flirty, strappy stilettos in a variety of colors such as mint, purple and mauve. They’re made in Italy and named after Ms. Parker’s fashion influences, including a pair dubbed “Carrie”. “I’ve taken inspiration from things in my life such as the grosgrain ribbons I tied in my hair as a girl to the flower accents from the ‘Sex and the City’ wardrobe to references to classic styles from the late ’70s and early ’80s,” Ms. Parker said in a statement.

Have you ever imagined being the character Carrie Bradshaw in “Sex and the City” or at least day dreamed about what it would be like to have her shoe collection in your closet? Well, now you can.   Parker worked with the CEO of  Manolo Blahnik, George Malkemus, on the new collection. 102

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Naming her shoes after people she knows and admires is a nice personal touch.

Pola

Maud

Carrie

Etta

Slim

Stella

Anna

Diana

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2015

Gucci’s

Kate Moss starred in the fall campaign for new Jackie bag: In a case of advertising imitating life, the paparazzi chase her through an airport. Frida Giannini’s terrific Spring collection caught some of Moss’ rock-chick look in the way it mixed denim, kimono silks, and shaggy furs. The supermodel has always been a vintage shopper to beat the band, and Giannini often approaches her Gucci collections in a similar way, picking up the best bits of the past and giving them a contemporary spin. After last season’s sharp swing through the ‘60s, today’s show had more of an early-’70s thing going on. It looked like the love child of Jimi Hendrix and Ali MacGraw—glam with a touch of the good girl. The glam came through in the gold bullion embroidery of the bandleader jackets and the multicolor Mongolian lamb on boleros and vests (collectibles all). You caught glimpses of the good girl in the sailorstyle jeans, or a short-sleeve space-dye sweater worn with a neat, A-line suede skirt. Hair and makeup (from the new Gucci beauty range, launching with a party tonight) were both minimal, contributing to the innocent impression. What made these clothes better than a trip to the vintage store, of course, was the Gucci quality. A bottle green glove-leather shirtdress inset with broderie anglaise was undeniably precious, but it retained an easy, offhand quality that made it desirable. Same goes for the treasure that was the jacket pieced together from antique Japanese silks. Its patchwork pattern inspired the collection’s print, which Giannini used for a shirtwaist dress and a pajama set, both equally relaxed. If the show relied a touch too much on jeans for a designer offering, that’s a small detail. Giannini is at her believable best when she embraces everyday luxury. The good life, after all, is what the Gucci mythology is all about. This season she eschewed the usual parade of red carpet numbers for a trio of cocktail dresses in chinoiserie print silks trimmed with crystals. Couture workmanship with casual vibes—Kate could tell you, it’s hard to resist a combo like that.


Source: Nicole Phelps, Style.com Photos: YMarcus Tondo


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Muelle Benabola, 3, Puerto Banus, Malaga, Espa単a, 29660 T. +34 952 811 872 www.tods.com


RE PU

VICTORIA

H “

ome to Rei Kawakubo’s cult fashion emporium and a host of fine-art galleries, Dover Street might just be one of the coolest streets in all of London, and yet there’s something remarkably unassuming about this tiny shopping enclave.

row of her minimalist purses, the first thing you’ll notice as you walk into the space is an overwhelming sense of calm. “I’m not about making a big song and dance of things,” she says. “You kind of have to come inside and experience it all for yourself.”

I love being across from one of my favorite shops in the city,” says Victoria Beckham, standing at the monolithic concrete door of her soon-to-be-opened boutique—just skipping distance from Dover Street Market.

Looking from the outside in, and it’s hard to imagine that place encompasses a whopping 6,000 square feet in shopping real estate.

As one of the most photographed women on the planet, it isn’t easy for the designer and former Spice Girl to keep a low profile. It’s perhaps why she’s chosen to open her very first store in the world with hush tones—you won’t find any flashy awnings or look-atme window displays here. Besides a neat

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And given the epic mirrored ceiling that greets you at the door, the effect is a bit like stepping inside a very chic version of Doctor Who’s TARDIS. Beckham worked with celebrated Iranian-born architect Farshid Moussavi, a woman more known for building museums than fitting rooms, and a modern-art sensibility comes through in the space.


written by Chioma Nnadi, Sorce: Vogue, Photos: Victoria Beckham


Take a closer look at the details, and it’s easy to spot the designer’s hand—chains hanging from the ceiling echo the ones on Beckham’s handbags right down to the muted shade of gold, and fans of the label might even recognize the ceiling’s diamond motif. “Do you remember the patterned sweaters from fall?” Beckham says, looking skyward. “I’m always quite surprised when my inspiration comes through. I think it shows my involvement—or maybe you could call it an obsessive eye!” The intricate latticework took seven masons, who toiled around the clock, a full nine weeks to finish. And although you could never tell from the sleek and sparkling interiors, the store was still very much under construction up until a couple of weeks ago. “They didn’t want to tell me to put on a hard hat, they just kept walking around with it. And eventually I said, Is that for me?” she says, laughing. “Honestly, I’d rather get hit over the head! Let’s try and keep this chic!” And with all of the Victoria Beckham lines under one roof—including an edit of runways looks made by VB herself—the only damage likely to occur is the one on your credit card.


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2015

Dolce & Gabbana,

The idea of getting “dressed to kill” (or be killed) originated with bullfighters. Are you for one second surprised that for them, Spain is the new Sicily? Those two points on the compass share a wealth of inspirations for Domenico and Stefano. In the show there was a black net sheath, a black corset paired with thigh-high black stockings, a black jacket and pencil skirt combination that had the sexy severity of the racy widow— all of it adding up to enough Catholic guilt to choke a pope. There were also flamenco polka dots. But at the same time, the corrida opened up a new world of possibilities for the designers. The silhouette and embellishment of a matador’s jacket inspired an entire passage of the collection. It was aired with rompers to bring it up to this decade. Then there was the color red: the color of blood in the bullring, the color of the carnations that were Domenico’s mother’s favorite flowers. They were embroidered everywhere, but were most effective as the streamlined adjunct to a body-conscious striped top. The show was huge, but inside, fighting to get out, was a straightforward story of leggy silhouettes, romantic full skirts, and ornate embellishment on simple shapes. The finale nailed that. The Dolce army marched in white bullfighter shirts and high-waisted, embroidered shorts in red duchesse. Olé!

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Source:

Tim Blanks, Style.com

Photos: Yannis Vlamos


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2015

Michael Kors

new Spring collection delivered on Kors’ sunny reputation, and then some. Daffodils, wisteria, and geraniums were picked out in sequins on tulle dancer skirts, embroidered on a strappy sundress, or printed on a breezy natural linen skirt suit. Gingham, which we’ve been seeing everywhere, was paired with marinière stripes. And for every navy outfit, there was another in bright yellow. Happy yet? The flower-averse needn’t worry: Kors had plenty on offer here that registered in a lower key. Simplicity is trending; shirt-and-skirt combos are one of the week’s dominant motifs on the runways and off. This is a good moment to be Michael Kors. As the king of American sportswear, he excels at such things. We’re betting a plaid taffeta button-down tucked into a black wool gabardine sarong will be one of the show’s most popular outfits. Another nice look: a crisp white poplin shirt with French cuffs that inched past the fingertips, worn with a hands-in-the-pockets full black silk mikado skirt. Show us a girl who didn’t light up at the sight of that one.

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Source: Nicole Phelps, Style.com Photos: Yannis Vlamos


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The label Dorhout Mees was founded by Dutch designer Esther Louise Dorhout Mees. After her studies at ArtEZ Academy of Arts in Arnhem and many years of working as a designer for established labels, such as Bruuns Bazaar and Tommy Hilfiger, it was time to start her own label. Dorhout Mees is distinctive in its elegant style. It is feminine and conceptual, but wearability is always an important element. Organic forms contrasted sharp next to constructual forms. The base of all collections are prints, silk, wool and delicate knits. Combined with the use of wearable unconventional materials. Fasinaction of the constant connection between body and material, covering and uncovering of the female body is always the starting point. Contradictions in structures, silhouette and textures are the essence of the collections.

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“Nothing is softer or more flexible than water, yet nothing can resist it “ -LaoTzu

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The Spring Summer 2015 collection entitled “O” is inspired by the miraculous power of water crystals to transform under the influence of its environment. Esther Dorhout Mees became fascinated by studies of microscopic differences between water crystals that came from a spring with simple geometric shapes, versus water crystals which was meditated next to, raising complex mathematical forms. The same matter has changed in essence. The same applies to the crystals of tears of happiness and sadness. If the intention is positive, you see beautiful, balanced crystals and when the intention is negative it created disjointed, almost broken shapes. “All our thoughts actually affect the cells in your body. I thought it was so special that something that seems so elusive suddenly became ​​visible to the naked eye, that it shaped the vorm of my collection says Esther. The ideais reflected in the collection in geometric shapes that suddenly change their shape under the influence of the wearer. Trousers from two geometric pattern pieces with mirrored organic folds. Hard forms besides liquid lines. Prints with layered patterns, which in the body refer to organs. And asymmetrical geometric shapes in the shoes where low water seems to be; wet versus dry of soft suede.

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LADY

c/ Ribera - Local 15 - B, Casa F 29660 Puerto BanĂşs - Marbella Tel.: 952 906 525 - Fax: 952 907 607

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The Fashionvilla Experience Visit Fashionvilla Marbella For All the Style You Want Under the Sun.... Like shopping? Then you are going to love Fashionvilla Marbella - a unique luxury establishment in Marbella, where shopping for clothes is an absolute dream. One of the last remaining multi-brand boutiques in the Marbella area, Fashionvilla provides a professionalized and personal shopping experience with more than a touch of Marbella glamour. Paseo de Suiza 394 | E l v i r i a | 29604 | Marbella T. +34 952 85 05 01 email: fashionvilla@telefonica.net | w w w. fashionvillamarbella.com


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2015

Calvin Klein,

“New York, sleek, Tina Chow.” Those were Francisco Costa’s bullet points after his Calvin Klein Collection show. Like last season, Costa’s message was about knitwear. But where back in February he was thinking warm and cozy, sending the models out in flat, lug-sole boots, here the look was bare and elongated. In their Lucite platform sandals, with metal belts cinched high on the waist Empire-style over tunic-length tanks and longer skirts, or the occasional pair of swingy culottes, the models were skyscraper tall, as narrow as a sliver. There are plenty of us who would like to look like that, but Costa’s knits have other advantages. They’ll feel good against the skin: formfitting but not constricting. Sweater dressing was one of the key messages of New York fashion week, and knits make particular sense at this label. Back in the day, tees, tanks, and racerbacks formed the basis of the Calvin Klein vocabulary. On the other hand, the subtle geometric embroideries and graphic color-blocking (navy and cream, navy and black) were pure Costa. The art-loving designer said the lacquer red of a laser-cut leather coat came from Andy Warhol’s Mao Zedong portraits. There was a cool elegance to this collection, though the narrow focus on a single silhouette and restrained palette did become a bit repetitive. Overall, the clothes would’ve benefited from a little more of that red heat.

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Source: Nicole Phelps, Style.com Photos: Kim Weston Arnold


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Donna Karan’s

show notes declared “Time to show your colors and paint the town with urban chic,” . The designer was looking at art this season—street art in particular. There were shades of Jean-Michel Basquiat in the scribbled doodle print of a structured bra top and high-waisted pants, and echoes of a certain influential Paris collection (inescapable this week) in the brushstrokes on a V-front dress. In the age of Instagram, everything is up for grabs, available for our repurposing. But in any case, this was one of Karan’s most vital collections in a while: vibrant, uncomplicated, desirable. The fact that the silhouettes looked fresh was key. Karan invented bodysuit dressing back in the day, and her new bra tops were particularly convincing. Elsewhere, belted shirtdresses had an offhand ease, and even the wiggle skirts registered low key when paired with rolled-sleeve, popped-collar camp shirts. But really, it was the prints and embroideries—in shades of black, ivory, red, and indigo—that were the stars here. Well, the prints and those towering straw hats. Karlie Kloss must’ve topped 7 feet in hers. Pharrell Williams’ stylist has no doubt already made an inquiry. The collection’s must-have piece: a “billboard coat,” as the notes described it, swirling with painterly scribbles and graffiti.

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Source: Nicole Phelps, Style.com Photos: Yannis Vlamos


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Photography

RE PU

HERB RITTS

He really revolutionized fashion photography, modernized the nude, and transformed celebrities into icons.

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H

erb Ritts was born in Los Angeles in 1952, and grew up living and working among the celebrities of the day.

In 1970, he left California to attend bard college and study economics, he later returned to west Hollywood and worked as a sales representative for the family business selling rattan furniture, often to movie sets. This job allowed Ritts to travel and to pursue one of his interests, photographing his friends. Ritts’ hobby soon became a self-taught career. The photographer himself attributes his first success to shots of actor Richard Gere taken on a desert excursion that ended with a flat tire. It was the tender machismo captured in the photograph of the young Gere — rising star of the 1980 movie ‘American Gigolo’ — that launched Ritts’ career as a commercial photographer. Ritts looks back on the late ‘70s and early ‘80s as apprentice years, mastering his craft and developing a personal aesthetic photographing men’s and women’s fashions, Simultaneously, he was building his reputation as a celebrity portraitist.


I Like Form & Shape & Strength in pictures

While working for ‘interview’ magazine in 1985, Ritts exhibited his photographs in a gallery setting for the first time. Since then his career has escalated, moving from fashion photography for the top national and international fashion magazines such as ‘Harper’s Bazaar’, ‘Vogue’, ‘Elle’, ‘Vanity Fair’, and ‘Rolling Stone’, among others, to album covers and music videos for Madonna, Elton John and Cher (in 1991, two of his videos won MTV awards for best female video of Janet Jackson and best male video of Chris Isaak). Donna Karan, Calvin Klein, the Gap, Versace, Valentino, Gianfranco Ferre and Giorgio Armani are among his many corporate clients. It was for his portraits for ‘The Gap’ that he received the infinity award for applied photography from the international center for photography, New York. To date, he has directed several international commercial campaigns. Chanel, Calvin Klein, Levi’s, Rochas, Lancome, Guess perfume, Revlon, Guy Laroche and Cartier are only a few examples of his work in this area. Fine art, design, fashion, photographic media, and global marketing are all dynamically connected in today’ s complex culture, and Ritts’ s work exemplifies our broadening notion of artistic activity.

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Through hard work and a distinctive vision, Herb Ritts (1952–2002) fashioned himself into one of the top photographers to emerge from the 1980s. Ritts’s aesthetic incorporated facets of life in and around Los Angeles. He often made use of the bright California sunlight to produce bold contrasts, and his preference for outdoor locations such as the desert and the beach helped to separate his work from that of his New York-based peers. Ritts’s intimate portraiture, his modern yet classical treatment of the nude, and his innovative approach to fashion brought him international acclaim and placed him securely within an American tradition of portrait and magazine photography that includes Richard Avedon, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Irving Penn. His ability to create images that successfully bridged the gap between art and commerce was not only a testament to the power of his imagination and technical skill but also marked

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the synergistic union between art, popular culture, and business that followed in the wake of the Pop Art movement of the 1960s and 1970s. In his life and work, Herb Ritts was drawn to clean lines and strong forms. This graphic simplicity allowed his images to be read and felt instantaneously. They often challenged conventional notions of gender or race. Social history and fantasy were both captured and created by his memorable photographs of noted individuals in film, fashion, music, politics and society. Ritts was committed to HIV/AIDS related causes, and contributed to many charitable organizations, among them amfAR, Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, Project Angel Food, Focus on AIDS, APLA, Best Buddies and Special Olympics . He was also a charter member on the Board of Directors for The Elton John Aids Foundation. Ritts’s untimely death from AIDS-related complications in 2002,


FINE JEWELRY

1932 Ring in 18K white gold and diamonds

www.chanel.com SUNSEARCH MAGAZINE

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RE PU He was one of the world’s leading fashion designers. Famous for his women’s evening wear and suits, his line is distinctly modern yet feminine.

Born on July 22, 1932, Oscar de la Renta was raised alongside six sisters in a middle-class household in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. At the age of 18, he left the Caribbean island to study painting at the Academy of San Fernando in Madrid. While in Spain, he dreamed of becoming an abstract painter but instead became wooed by the world of fashion design. His obvious talent for illustration opened doors for him, and he quickly landed an apprenticeship with Spain’s most renowned couturier, Cristobal Balenciaga. In 1961, while on vacation in Paris, he was hired for his first real fashion job at Lanvin-Castillo. Within two years, he had moved to New York and joined the American design house of Elizabeth Arden. Firm in his footing, he began his own signature ready-to-wear label in 1965.


Sarah Jessica Parker


A Fashion Legend While de la Renta expanded his lines and took them in a new direction in the 1990s, his pieces remained feminine and flattering. By the late ‘90s and early 2000s, his work became the preferred wear of American first ladies. He dressed first lady Nancy Reagan in the 1980s, and then provided the gowns for inaugural events for both Hillary Clinton in 1997 and Laura Bush in 2005. Besides his passion for haute couture, de la Renta has been a tireless patron of the arts. At one time or another, he has served on the boards of The Metropolitan Opera, Carnegie Hall and Channel Thirteen/WNET. He also supports several cultural institutions, including New Yorkers for Children, the Americas Society and the Spanish Institute.

Jennifer Biel

Liza Minnelli

Anna Wintour

Jennifer Lopez

Carla Bruni-Sarkozy

Anne Hathaway

Oprah Winfrey

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Fashion is a trend, Style is within a person..

Oscar de la Renta

Amal Alamuddin - Clooney

Personal Life De la Renta married Francoise de Langlade, an editor-in-chief of French Vogue, in 1967. Francoise introduced her husband to some of the most influential members of fashion society and invited many of the rich and famous to his shows. His line—identified by its delicate silk prints, use of ruffles, soft silhouettes and vibrant palette—soon became synonymous with casual luxury. Women of means couldn’t get enough of his distinctly modern yet romantic looks, and for those who couldn’t afford his gowns, he offered a scent. His first perfume debuted in 1977. Respected by his contemporaries, de la Renta served as president of the Council of Fashion Designers of America from 1973 to 1976, and from 1986 to 1988. De la Renta suffered a great tragedy when his wife Francoise died in 1983 of bone cancer. Shortly after her death, he adopted a son he found in an orphanage in his native country. Moises was born in 1984. At the time his dad thought he wouldn’t marry again, he thought he and his son would have each other. That’s how he came to adopt Moises, he had known him since he was 24 hours old, Moises who at the time attended F.I.T., convinced his father to give him the lowest position possible at his studio, that was in the pattern room. His first steps at designing was a hipster-looking T-shirt emblazoned with the logo ROCK AND ROLL, HEART & SOUL that his father featured in his fall runway show of that year and ended up selling for over $100 Moises has a communications degree and “honed his fashion talent with extensive internships at Phat Farm and, of course, with his father. De la Renta married for a second time in 1990, to philanthropist and socialite Annette Engelhard Reed.

Francoise de Langlade - de la Renta


Raised in Oxford, England, Peter Copping moved to London at the age of eighteen to study fashion design at Central Saint Martins. He then went on to receive his Graduate degree from the Royal College of Art. During

his graduate studies, Peter was invited to work for Christian Lacroix in Paris, his first studio experience in high fashion. Peter then accepted a position at Sonia Rykiel which would prepare him for a twelve-year tenure at Louis Vuitton where he oversaw the women’s ready-to-wear collection as Studio Director under Marc Jacobs. In 2009, Peter joined Nina Ricci as Artistic Director. There, he spent five years finessing the house’s legacy of supreme femininity and romance. For his work at Nina Ricci, Copping received the Fashion Group International Fashion Star award in 2014. In October of 2014, Peter Copping was appointed Creative Director of Oscar de la Renta. Handpicked by Mr. de la Renta before his passing, Peter is responsible for setting the design direction across all product categories in the New York based company. Fall 2015 is Copping’s first collection for Oscar de la Renta.

Annette de la Renta

Moises de la Renta with father Oscar

De la Renta had been diagnosed with cancer during the first decade of the 2000s. He died of complications from the disease on October 20, 2014 at the age of 82 in Kent, Connecticut. Pure Fashion

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The collection hit all of Oscar’s signature marks: feminine, unfailingly polished, lush with color. Less conventional, perhaps, was its youthful spirit. Kloss wore fringed brogues with her lace tee, shorts, and gingham coat, and there was no shortage of midriff-baring looks, best

among them an abbreviated A-line top and full three-quarter-length skirt in white and black broderie anglaise. De la Renta found inspiration in the outdoors, setting the scene with oversize gingham in pink, baby blue, or black, before launching into florals, which were positively everywhere—pinned to the neckline of a subtly sensational petal pink dress; hand-tatted in bright shades of yellow and red on an airy crocheted shift; and, because the house has embraced seasonless-ness, planted intarsia-style on a mink bolero or embroidered in whole bouquets on a white Persian lamb coat.

Source: Nicole Phelps, Style.com Photos: Fabio Ionà

“There is no one on earth who makes a woman feel more beautiful than Oscar de la Renta,” thus said Karlie Kloss on her Instagram feed postshow. So far, the supermodel’s selfie with the designer has more than 23,000 likes. But, really, who’s going to argue with her after seeing his gorgeous Spring ‘15 lineup?

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SPRING DREAMS

Berta’s avant-garde designs have taken over the bridal world by storm. Her artistic approach to bridal fashion have managed to surprise even the most veteran fashion editors and bloggers. Her collections are considered among the most praised and anticipated in the world. Berta’s leading line of work is based on high quality, uniqueness and premium level finishes. The luxurious fabrics, which are imported from fashion capitals around the world, go through a handmade development process in Berta’s studio. By doing this, Berta consistently has new and unique textures of fabrics for her line of bridal dresses. With more than 17 years of experience as a bridal designer, and with more than 50 locations around the world, Berta is situated today as one of the world’s top-notch bridal designers. When you try on a Berta gown, everything falls into place. The cut, the fit and the silhouette are all unlike anything else. 174

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Profile

RE PU The Idea One evening my 7-year-old son arrived home from school full of such energy and enthusiasm that he couldn’t contain himself. While the first is quite usual for him, I quickly learnt from him the reason for his additional excitement. He had a new project - together with his other school mates they were adopting endangered animals through the social fund “Wild Life�. They had a plan to undertake various initiatives to raise funds and achieve their financial goal and thereby their target number of adoptions. The first stage was to create objects related to endangered animals to be sold at a school event. My son decided to make fridge magnets, post cards and T-shirts. He worked really hard on it for a whole week, getting the rest of our family involved in the team effort. It was worth it. All our creations sold out in 30 minutes. We even had to go into extra production of certain items to fulfil the demand. He was so proud; and so was I. So this is how the whole idea was born. Why not design collections contributing to this cause; why not show the world how it is possible to be elegant, trendy and alternative without hurting or killing any animals. 176

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2015 THE YEAR OF THE INDEPENDENT THINKER, THE VISIONARY RENEGADE AND REVOLUTIONARY

The project To design and produce quality garments for our target customers with a unique concept across the collection: WEDONTKILLANIMALS we can realise our goal without using real animal skin, feathers or fur. We produce our collections at reasonable prices by streamlining the whole process, outsourcing non-core competencies, including logistics, production and the sales network; and by partnering with the best suppliers who understand and support our concept and share our long-term goals.

Photography: Sharon J. Mcaulay

Our commitment is to pay close attention to details, stitching, patterns, the quality of materials and accessories whilst following the very latest worldwide trends in fashion. Also, to offer great service with speed and punctuality in deliveries to our customers, wherever they are. The high quality of our internal core team, external collaborators and agents provide great value and form an essential element to our potential. We are creating a positive and enthusiastic team of professionals, who want to invest their ideas and experience in the growth of the brand. Photography: Erdem Akkaya

Susan J. Denia Founder and Creative Director

Model: Naima Bossi


I designed this collection with these basic premises. For you, for me, and all those who believe that this is possible and can help preserve our planet and animal life, our passion for fashion.

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Our customers are contemporary, committed, passionate, dynamic and sexy with perhaps a hint of rebellion.Â

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Where you can find WEDONTKILLANIMALS

OZOGUL SOKAK, 35 Cihangir Beyoglu 34432, Istanbul, TURKEY

JACK BORN Santa Maria, 6, 08003, Barcelona, ESPAÑA

DICK DE VRIES MODEAGENTUREN Kon. Wilhelminaplein 13 World Fashion Centre 1.01.06 1062 HH Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS

CASANOVAS Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, 721, 08013, Barcelona, ESPAÑA

RESET SRL Via Giulio de Marzio, 12 00188 Roma ITALY

IMI Calaf, 25, 08021, Barcelona, ESPAÑA

M´¨ENKANTA Bolivar, 22, 28045, Madrid, ESPAÑA

VANZETTI Francesc Layret, 25, 08903, Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, ESPAÑA

LA TIENDA DE MINA Paseo de la Habana, 23, 28036, Madrid, ESPAÑA

LA NINA BONICA Ruben Dario, 29, 08030, Barcelona, ESPAÑA

ESPAÑALOLITAS Avda. Barcelona, 128, local 1, 43892, Miami Playa, BARCELONA, ESPAÑA

MAIN OFFICES. HHQQ WEDONTKILLANIMALS C / Marques de Riscal, 11 28010 Madrid, ESPAÑA

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Photography: Sharon J. Mcaulay

For each item sold, we will donate a percentage to internationally recognised organisations that support the protection of wildlife and environmental sustainability.

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‘SECRET GARDEN III - VERSAILLES’ THE FILM ON DIOR.COM


“Genius is the word” “They all have genius in them, and they all have a deep, deep understanding of what makes a great photograph.”

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Vogue editors in chief around the world Here’s the who’s who from left to right: Yolanda Sacristan, Spain (seated), Kirstie Clements Australia (middle), Anaita Adajania – India (back), Christiane Arp, Germany (seated), Angelica Cheung, China (standing), Franca Sozzani, Italy (seated), Mitsuko Watanabe – Japan (standing), Anna Wintour, America (seated), Emmanuelle Alt – France (reclining), Alexandra Shulman – Britain (seated), Victoria Davydova, Russia (standing), Anna Harvey, representing Brazil and Greece (seated), Seda Domanic – Turkey (seated), Myung Hee Lee – Korea (seated), Rosalie Huang -Taiwan (standing), Eva Hughes (standing), Paula Mateus – Portugal (seated) Now we take a look at 4 of the most powerful women in fashion.... Pure Fashion

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AMERICAN

ANNA WINTOUR ’“I want Vogue to be pacy, sharp, and sexy, I’m not interested in the super-rich or infinitely leisured. I want our readers to be energetic, executive women, with money of their own and a wide range of interests,”

Wintour’s sharp critiques and lack of patience soon earned a few memorable nicknames: “Nuclear Wintour” and “Wintour of Our Discontent.” The editor, though, relished it. “I’m the Condé Nast hit man,” she told a friend. “I love coming in and changing magazines.” In 1988 she was named editor-in-chief of Vogue, allowing for her return to New York. The move by Condé Nast came at a time when its signature fashion publication was at a crossroads. A magazine that had been at the forefront of the fashion world since the early 1960’s, Vogue suddenly found itself losing ground to a three-year-old upstart, Elle, which had already reached a paid circulation of 850,000. Vogue’s subscriber base meanwhile, was a stagnant 1.2 million. Fearing that the magazine had become complacent or worse, boring, Wintour was placed atop the editorial masthead with all the freedom, not to mention financial backing, that she needed to revitalize the publication. In her more than two-decade reign at the magazine, Wintour more than accomplished her mission, restoring Vogue,’s preeminence while producing some truly mammoth magazines. The September 2004 edition, for example, clocked in at 832 pages, the most ever for a monthly magazine. Along the way, Wintour demonstrated fearlessness about forging new ground. She decisively called an end to the supermodel era, showcasing a preference for celebrities rather than models on her covers. Wintour was also the first to truly mix low-end fashion items with more expensive pieces in her photo shoots. Her debut cover in November 1988 included a 19-year-old Israeli model outfitted in a pair of $50 jeans and a $10,000 jewelencrusted t-shirt. 186

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ITALIAN

FRANCA SOZZANI Franca Sozzani, the powerhouse behind Italian Vogue, has made a singular mark on the world of fashion over the last 30 years.

After serving as an editor at both Vogue Bambini and the influential Italian fashion magazine Lei, Sozzani took over Italian Vogue in 1987, and since then, has transformed the magazine into a platform for celebrating the power of the image and of photography. In the process, she has helped reimagine the medium of the fashion magazine as a kind of cultural lightning rod, and has consistently used both fashion and fashion imagery as a vehicle for tackling social, political, and even environmental issues. Sozzani herself has served as a bit of a lightning rod, always capturing, recording, and at times preempting the zeitgeist. In the ’90s, she helped create the phenomenon of the supermodel with one of her closest long-term collaborators, Steven Meisel, and she has championed a tight-knit group of photographers such as Bruce Weber, Peter Lindbergh, and Paolo Roversi, working with them to develop a visual language for the magazine that continues to provide a mood board for the moment. Sozzani’s controversial 2008 “Black” issue, which featured only black models, was hotly debated and dissected both within the fashion world and beyond it, reigniting the conversation about racial diversity in fashion. In the aftermath of the BP spill in 2010, she published a story featuring model Kristen McMenamy wearing a fur coat and covered in oil. She has commissioned provocative studies of subjects such as the paparazzi and rehab clinics that have fearlessly taken on the obsessions, addictions, and crises of contemporary culture with a lightness and humor that only serves to magnify the message behind them. Pure Fashion

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BRITISH

ALEXANDERA SHULMAN She began her fashion journalism career in 1982 at The Tatler, working subsequently for The Sunday Telegraph, Vogue and the British edition of GQ, where she became editor in 1990.

As Shulman took on the role as editor-inchief of Vogue in 1992, some speculated that she was not experienced enough for the role. Furthermore, others commented that her personal appearance did not conform to previous Vogue editors. So....... Her tenure at Vogue has been marked with various iconic issues of the magazine. Her December 1999 “Millennium Issue”, possessing a simplistic page layout and a reflective, mirror-like cover – giving the illusion that its reader was on the front cover – became the highest selling issue of Vogue, with circulation of 241,001, including a newsstand sale of 142,399. The “Gold Issue,” a December 2000 edition with Kate Moss on the cover in silhouette, also became a wellknown cover. A 1997 cover in memoriam of Diana, Princess of Wales was included in a poll deciding the UK’s best ever magazine cover. As The Guardian noted, “Vogue stood out with a simple bare cover using a Patrick Demarchelier photograph of Diana in a red dress”. Contrary to expectations, Shulman describes her own life as work-dominated and not particularly glamorous. In an October 2004 newspaper column on her Telegraph portrait, she said: “Leaving aside the obvious but unlikely criteria of beautiful and thin, I realised that there was no look that was achievable which was going to make me happy. In my mind I am a free spirit of about 25 wafting around in second-hand cocktail dresses; in reality I am a 47-year-old businesswoman and journalist. The pictures unfortunately, tell the whole story.” In February 2013 she was assessed as one of the 100 most powerful women in the United Kingdom by Woman’s Hour on BBC Radio 4. 188

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FRENCH

EMMANUELLE ALT Emmanuelle Alt (born May 18, 1967 in Paris, France) is the editor-in-chief of Vogue Paris since February 2011, succeeding Carine Roitfeld. Alt had been fashion director of the magazine from 2000, when Roitfeld assumed the chief editor’s position and hired Alt directly from Mixte magazine. Alt, who studied at the Assomption-Lübeck school (Institut de l’Assomption) in Paris, has a makeup free youthful appearance and often wears jeans while eschewing dresses and skirts. She is often found dressed in her signature blazers or jackets, paired with skinny jeans and towering heels. About her intentions for the future content of French Vogue, she has stated: “I don’t think there should be radical changes”. And she intends to remain with the magazine’s past stable of photographers, such as David Sims, Mert and Marcus, Mario Testino, and Bruce Weber. In July 2013 she declared to Huffingtonpost that “London and Paris are worlds apart”. During Roitfeld’s tenure the publication’s 2010 circulation rose from 100,000 to 140,000, during the global financial crisis. The increase was probably encouraged by the magazine’s content — much of it styled by Alt as well as Roitfeld — in a provocative manner that included a great deal of nudity and sadomasochistic appurtenances.[8] Alt’s first issue at the helm was April 2011. Prior to Mixte, she held positions at French ELLE (starting in 1984, she was only 17 years old) and then at 20 when she became the editor-in-chief in 1993.

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YOUR

M&S

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a first look at next year’s Spring/ Summer collection reveals a mixture of stylish and sophisticated pieces with just the right amount of smouldering sexiness thrown in. The clothes here demonstrate a confidence we haven’t seen in a long time – although it takes a brave lady to wear their lace and sheer panelled frocks – one of the key looks.

www.marksandspencer.com Pure Fashion

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RE PU Top bio

The

Faces of

CARA

In the 90’s we had Naomi and Kate and now it is 21-year-old Cara who is stealing the supermodel crown......

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The New York Post dubbed her the new Kate Moss – high praise for the girl who is already the face of Burberry, DKNY, Fendi, Saint Laurent and Chanel.

Photography by: Sebastian Faena For: John Hardy

F

rom stumbling out of clubs with celebrity pals to posting endless selfies online, there is rarely a day goes by that we don’t see Cara Delevingne’s face. In the 90s we had Naomi and Kate – but now it is 21-year-old Brit Cara who is fast stealing the supermodel crown.


There is a childishness about Cara, which comes out in the funny faces she often pulls in photos. Friends also say she leaves clothes strewn all over and loves to play X Box.

designer. “She turned up to the Vuitton show wearing a zebra outfit from Madagascar, a onesie. She’d been traipsing round Paris all evening in it; you’ve got to love a girl like that.”

When she talks about the fans who contact her, you can’t help feeling she sees herself in some of them. Speaking in Industrie magazine, she says she often finds herself acting as an agony aunt, after seeing her own mum battling a heroin addiction. She says: “It’s so hard when you’re young and you feel so alone.

The fashion world agrees with Vogue’s verdict that she has “a quietly captivating beauty”. In 2012, the covergirl featured in shows in every major fashion capital in the world and was named model of the year at the British Fashion Awards.

Asked if she knows how much money she has, she shrugs: “No, I want to stay young and not to have to deal with the stupid tax man.“I wanted to keep it all simple but then I realised I have to be involved as much as possible and not let other people do it. “It’s hard finding people you trust, or who aren’t going to take your money. Everyone wants to get a piece of whatever you’re doing. It’s a nightmare.” The fashion world is piling praise on the star – Elle magazine’s creative director Joe Zee said recently: “She is this generation’s Kate Moss in an era where the supermodel is so few and far between.” Known for her sharp, angular beauty and those covetable eyebrows, she is one of the strikingly fresh new faces of Burberry, alongside Edie Campbell and Jourdan Dunn. And together the trio have conquered the global fashion landscape. According to Marc Jacobs the blonde is “a silly goose”. “She has great energy,” says the

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But reports on the London-born beauty suggest cracks may already be beginning to show.“She is often seen looking worse for wear and in June was snapped giving a car-crash performance with “wifey” Rita Ora. Afterwards, the pair reportedly fell out. She was seen overindulging at Glastonbury and had to be helped to her Winnebago by model sister Poppy. Perhaps tellingly, for all her partying, Cara still lives at home with family in London, regularly posting pictures of herself with her parents, grandmother and sisters online. She says she is saving up – surprising, given her earnings and her family’s wealth. Far from Kate Moss’s working-class background, Cara’s family are “old money”. Her grandfather Sir Jocelyn Stevens was chairman of English Heritage and her ­grandmother was lady-in-waiting to Princess Margaret. Her dad Charles is a property developer and her mum Pandora is an 80s It girl who counts the Duchess of York among her closest friends. Oh, and her godmother is Joan Collins.

She says: “When I was younger I liked money, the feel of it. I would sit with my dad and count his coins and be like YEAH. “I’d saved £700 by the age of 10. I thought: ‘What the hell am I hoarding this for?’ So I bought a drum kit.” Cara, who has two older sisters, Chloe, 29, and Poppy, 26, started modelling at 10, appearing in an Italian Vogue shot and walking catwalks for Harrods. Her career was forged by family friend Sarah Doukas, MD of agency Storm Models, which spotted Kate Moss. But Cara admits her big loves are acting and music. Perhaps that is why she felt so bold when she first met pop megastar Rihanna. She explains: “We were at a Victoria’s Secret show. “I went up to her and was like, ‘Maaam, you are so amazing, I love you, you look so hot out there performing. You put us all to shame’.“Then I slapped her on the bum.” She might not be the most mature model on the catwalk – but there’s no doubt she knows how to make an entrance.


“I was such a tomboy,” says Cara Delevingne. “The first time I was a bridesmaid, to my auntie, I refused to go down the aisle without my football shorts on underneath my dress.” There is no secret to the model’s popularity. Friends with Rihanna, Rita Ora, Annie Lennox’s daughter Tali and the Jaggers, she is the successor to Kate Moss’ crown. Like the Croydon superbabe, Cara’s success comes as much from her fun-loving personality as her astonishing looks. Over time, she has outgrown the tomboy style without losing her carefree spirit. “Even if I’m exhausted, I always try to go into a show with a smile on my face,” she says. “If I’m in a bad mood, people are going to act bad. The energy you give off is the energy you receive.” She also starred in a series of luxurious campaigns from Chanel, lying on a golden chaise-longue in a series of Bo Peep-inspired frocks, and graced the covers of cutting edge style bibles i-D, Jalouse and Love. But it was the March issue of Vogue in 2013 that made sure her face was splashed across the world. “I didn’t really believe it at first,” she says. “I think it’s something that as a kid you look up to so much. It’s one of the most shocking things that has ever happened to me. “It doesn’t really sink in until you actually see it, that cover, that actual magazine – Vogue – it’s so great. I’m running out of the shop with 20 copies in my hands, going: ‘Oh my God, this is me! Oh my God!’” 198

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Cara and Kate for My Burberry Perfume Campaign

Cara lands her first major film role There’s no official description of Margo Roth Spiegelman’s eyebrows in John Green’s young adult favourite Paper Towns. But based on the casting announcement that 22-yearold British model Cara Delevingne will play the female lead in the film adaptation of Green’s bestseller, they’re sure to stand out when Margo comes alive onscreen. Delevingne will star alongside Nat Wolff, who also starred in Green’s The Fault In Our Stars. Set in Orlando, Florida, Paper Towns trails Quentin Jacobsen (Wolff) as he follows clues left by his missing neighbour Margo–with whom he happens to be smitten.

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www.hermes.com

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In 1854, Louis Vuitton founded his House. In 1896 his son, Georges Vuitton, created The Monogram in honour of his late father. An icon was born. The Monogram was revolutionary when it appeared. This most particular and personal of signatures was instantly transformed into a universal symbol of modernity in the hands of Georges Vuitton: it is one of the first exercises in elevated branding and a defining sign of a global culture to come. In 1965 Gaston-Louis Vuitton, recounted how his father, Georges, had created the motifs on The Monogram canvas: ‘First of all, the initials of the company – LV – are interlaced in such a way as to remain perfectly legible. Then a diamond. To give a specific character to the shape, he made the sides concave with a four-petal flower in the centre. Then the extension of this flower in a positive image. Finally, a circle containing a flower with four rounded petals.’ The Monogram is now recognised globally as a defining signature, both literally and metaphorically, of the House of Louis Vuitton. As it has travelled through time, certain of its features and meanings remain the same. Blurring the boundaries between craftsmanship, art and design, Louis Vuitton has repeatedly embraced the notions of innovation, collaboration and daring throughout The Monogram’s history.

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I

t is within this context that Louis Vuitton’s ‘Celebrating Monogram’ project appears this year. It is a collection of works that shows the distinctly personal side of the Monogram; re-presenting something we think we all know in an extraordinary, individual and idiosyncratic way. Six creative iconoclasts – the best in their individual fields – who blur the lines between fashion, art, architecture and product design, have been given carte blanche to dictate and make whatever they see fit in the patterned canvas.

Marc Newson

Cindy Sherman

Karl Lagerfeld

Echoing the special Louis Vuitton centenary collection of 1996 – where Azzedine Alaia, Manolo Blahnik, Romeo Gigli, Helmut Lang, Isaac Mizrahi, Sybilla and Vivienne Westwood contributed individual and distinct designs. And now the participants have progressed even further. Here, Christian Louboutin, Cindy Sherman, Frank Gehry, Karl Lagerfeld, Marc Newson and Rei Kawakubo radically, personally and playfully realise an unparalleled collection.

Rei Kawakubo

Christian Louboutin

Frank Gehry

THE ICONCLASTS

SHOPPING TROLLEY CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN $23,300.00 What happens when Christian Louboutin applies his glamorous aesthetic to the humble French market cart? Combining iconic Monogram canvas with Vuitton heritage codes and his own signature embellishments, he has created this spectacularly seductive Shopping Trolley. It abounds with delightful details and allusions, from the rounded Toron handles and red calf-hair back panel, to the brass corners inspired by House trunks and the metal Siamoise ornament that is “so Louboutin.” Inside the Trolley’s studded front pocket, a red-calf and Monogram Lace clutch displays a graphic LV logo, echoed on the leather luggage tag.


CAMERA MESSENGER CINDY SHERMAN $4,300.00 For her Camera Messenger, visual artist Cindy Sherman drew on memories of the colourful hotel labels affixed to vintage Vuitton trunks. The bag evokes Sherman’s own journey as a photographer, with nine embroidered patches that incorporate images from her personal oeuvre. This statement piece is practical too: a detachable strap and leather handles lend themselves to a multitude of carry options – indeed, the artist imagined herself wearing the Messenger cross-body as she biked around town on photo shoots.

TWISTED BOX FRANK GEHRY $4,400.00 Renowned for his designs on a grand scale – the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, the Vitra Design Museum near Basel, among many others – architect Frank Gehry applies his avant-garde mastery to the construction of this sculptural bijou of a bag in Monogram canvas. For all its delicacy, the Twisted Box was the most technically challenging piece of the entire “Celebrating Monogram” collection, owing to the combination of rigid lines – typical of iconic Vuitton trunk – and the graceful curves that make the bag such a pleasure to wear. A press of the golden-brass clasp reveals a surprising blue lambskin interior, embossed with a Monogram pattern hand-drawn by Frank Gehry.

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PUNCHING BAG BABY KARL LAGERFELD $3,400.00 This is the smallest piece from Karl Lagerfeld’s extravagant Boxing suite – and with its longer, curvy silhouette, it is surely the most flirtatious. The “Baby” Punching Bag brings a fresh, feminine allure to iconic Monogram canvas. The material is supple and body-friendly, beautifully enhanced with double chain handles in aged golden brass. A special tanning process gives the cowhide leather trim an appealingly lived-in, vintage look.

FLEECE PACK MARC NEWSON $5,900.00 Acclaimed as the most influential industrial designer of his generation, Marc Newson’s work ranges from concept jets to jewellery.

When he accepted the invitation to join “Celebrating Monogram” project, he set out to create a truly functional object; the result is this pure, sculptural backpack. Monogram canvas provides structure (the bag can stand on its own, without losing its

shape) while soft shearling lends comfort and accents the biomorphic shape. Inside, the roomy central space and a host of pockets keep belongings organised. Also available in blue.


BAG WITH HOLES REI KAWAKUBO $2,790.00 Upon seeing Japan’s first Louis Vuitton store in 1978, Rei Kawakubo discovered the allure of French craftsmanship and art de vivre. Today, the creator of Comme des Garçons applies her radical, refined aesthetic to a House icon, revisiting the Sac Plat with boldly conceived asymmetrical cutouts and raw-edged details to produce this provocative “Bag with Holes.” Sleek and capacious, the bag is a natural for travel in durable Monogram canvas. The practical insert pouch keeps belongings secure.

THE ICONCLASTS In many ways it means The Monogram has come full circle: looking at its handcrafted roots once more, its direct connection to a person, its daring and genre defying audacity and, above all, its journey into the future for Louis Vuitton. This is a collection that is both universal and personal, and in the cherished traditions of the house, once again defies expectations. www.louisvuitton.com


Giorgio Armani Spring | Summer 2015 Campaign

Minimal Elegance Conjuring up images of a journey suspended in time, the new Giorgio Armani SpringSummer 2015 advertising campaign was created in London by Norwegian photographer Sølve Sundsbø. Featuring model Josephine Le Tutour, the campaign is shot against an abstract pictorial backdrop. “The soft yet intense light suggests a scorched, almost otherworldly desert atmosphere giving the images that unmistakable Armani iconography and timeless elegance,” explained the fashion house the philosophy behind the new visuals. The 80-year-old designer’s spring collections for women present the python and diaphanous pieces...


Changing the face of fashion: Model with vitiligo stars in two major fashion campaigns

Winnie Harlow 19-year-old Canadian model Winnie Harlow (real name Chantelle Young-Brown) is the star of two major spring/summer 2015 fashion campaigns. A sufferer of the skin pigment disorder vitiligo, Winnie is changing the face of fashion one campaign at a time. She was unveiled as the face of Spanish brand Desigual’s spring/summer 2015 campaign entitled Say Something Nice. She was also confirmed as their official brand ambassador. She also stars in Diesel’s SS15 ads, which aim to promote ‘tolerance, equality and unconditional love’. Diesel’s campaign was conceived by creative director Nicola Formichetti and styled by Anna Trevelyan (Picture: Diesel) Winnie, a former America’s Next Top Model contestant, was diagnosed with vitiligo around the age of four. Growing up, she was bullied and called ‘zebra’ and ‘cow’ because of the white patches on her face and body. She’s since become a spokesperson for vitiligo – the same condition which is believed to have affected Michael Jackson – and has over 430,000 followers on Instagram. She says it’s ‘a skin condition, not a life changer’. Winnie believes things began to take off for her when she embraced her unique look and used it to her advantage. ‘I loved myself. And with that, opportunities start to fall into my lap. And I thank God for all of them. Try loving yourself,’ she says. A spokesperson for Desigual said of their model spokeswoman: ‘She is pure inspiration, a whirlwind of positive energy, an example of strength and achievement, who demonstrates that we are all special and can achieve what we set out to do.’


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IT SPEAKS FOR YOU. Samsung Galaxy S with Android 2.2 operative system. By


www.guess.com

Profile for ClearVision Marketing

Pure Fashion Magazine  

Issue 2

Pure Fashion Magazine  

Issue 2

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