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NATHAN SLATE JOSEPH


Installation, 2009, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York


Gallery Mission Established in 2000, Sundaram Tagore Gallery is devoted to examining the exchange of ideas between Western and non-Western cultures. We focus on developing exhibitions and hosting not-for-profit events that encourage spiritual, social and aesthetic dialogues. In a world where communication is instant and cultures are colliding and melding as never before, our goal is to provide venues for art that transcend boundaries of all sorts. With galleries in New York, Beverly Hills, and Hong Kong, our interest in cross-cultural exchange extends beyond the visual arts into many other disciplines, including poetry, literature, performance art, film and music.


Installation, 2008, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Beverly Hills


Nathan Slate Joseph: An Artist and His Language By Patrick Lawrence

T

HE TWO DOZEN PIECES Nathan Slate Joseph sends

just last year, are especially dynamic pieces drawn from this

from New York to Hong Kong this spring are so reserved

strand in Joseph’s output. The motifs, which extend back to

in their demeanor, so quietly what they are, that it is only over

works completed in the mid–1980s, are either a boat or a fish.

a little time with them we are able to discern the tensions—the

The technique is similar to the grid reliefs—pigment applied to

commotions, even—that they record. We should take this time.

galvanized steel—and the effect is one Joseph has honed for much

Sundaram Tagore and his colleagues have put before us the

of this decade in pieces such as Blue Green and Night Rush (both

mature work of an artist intent on breaching barriers—between

from 2006, not on view in this show). There is, finally a selection

painting and sculpture, plainly enough, but also between the old

of free-standing pieces Joseph began producing only in the last

and new, the particular and the universal, East and West, “self ”

several years. The technique, again, is pigment on steel. But in

and “other.” Does one have to note—here in Hong Kong, no

the series titled Urbana, we find a new direction. This is sculpture

less—that erasures of this kind describe the quintessential project

pushing toward painting rather than the other way around.

of our moment? Joseph himself is hidden everywhere in these pieces. He lurks, a little in the way Beckett is to be found buried within fictions that seem entirely devoid of the authorial detail. The tendency

J

OSEPH HAS ENVIABLE artistic bloodlines, an inheritance reaching back to that splendid era in New York—the 1950s

and 1960s—when Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism, and

is evident by way of color, shape, and pattern in all three of

numerous other schools of postwar American art jostled against,

Joseph’s principal aesthetic strategies. The grid-pattern relief

replied to, and fertilized one another. But Joseph’s story began

paintings here, such as Sari Blossom II, Spring Hall, and Silk Route

earlier and elsewhere. His mother was of Uzbeki background,

Cuts of India III, were all executed within the past two years and

and he was born in Israel in 1943—five years before it became a

represent refinements of a technique evident in Joseph’s earliest

state. Much history passed before he arrived in New York at the

productions. We can now look back at pieces such as Books and

age of sixteen. When he did he bore within the consciousness not

Thoughts (1988), Construction Site (1994), and Venezia’s Child (2000)

only of the newcomer but of all a newcomer from the Middle

and understand (in hindsight, admittedly) the kind of stripping

East would leave behind: Asiatic pattern; a relentlessly imposing

down toward which Joseph was working—much as Mondrian,

nature made of desert, infinite sky, and bleaching sun; an almost

who is plainly referenced, stripped his work to essential elements

instinctive love of construction, which must have been everywhere

and so its essential meaning.

in the country he left behind; an idea of daily life as an outside,

While works in the grid pattern are prevalent in the present

rather than inside, endeavor. And then there were the historical

collection, the show also includes examples of Joseph’s work

circumstances of the life he left: This was made of desolation,

based on forms. Kimono Evening and Night at Kimono, both done

war, wreckage, the burning of things.

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Already we begin to recognize the imagery Joseph conveys

and innate self-referenced subject is what infuses these works with

in abstract form. The “burnt” colors, the welded, worn, “worked

their understated but compelling vitality. Tension: In any art all is

on,” and rusted metals, the grid pattern present in many of the

slack without it, and we note instantly that there is nothing slack

pieces: These derive from the print on Joseph’s unconscious, which

in anything Joseph has to show us.

is the wellspring of his work. The recurring grid, for instance, now developed to an a kind of minimal essence in pieces such as Spices and Silk (2009): Joseph did not understand the grid’s persistent presence until an Israeli poet of his acquaintance told him it had

pieces. Apart from vocabulary and subject, there is the

evident tension between sculpture and painting. It is a key to the

come from the old walls—Jewish, Christian, Islamic—that make

work: Each piece seems to struggle to move from the one to the

up so much of the Jerusalem cityscape. Then, he said, he knew.

other. Which are these, we must ask—knowing, even, there is no

“Who was it who said this—was it Pollock?” Joseph mused as

useful answer, for they can be said to be neither or both. Joseph’s

we talked about his formative years. “ ‘Making art is like an act of

materials give another source of enlivening tension. He chooses

arrested memory.’ The more you do, the more you re-enter your

galvanized steel—the ordinary steel found so commonly all over

own subconscious, all that has happened to you.”

the developing world in corrugated huts, merchants’ stalls, the

Biography is fate, we may say, and in these pieces biography

roofing of schools or hospitals or any other everyday edifice. It is

is a kind of secret autobiography, paradoxically enough. In New

universal, this stuff, which is precisely what Joseph loves about it,

York Nathan studied at Pratt, the New School, and the Art

and with it he makes art that aspires to greatness. “I like Third

Students’ League. His other classrooms—of equal importance—

World materials, taken from the things you see everywhere,”

were Figaro Cafe, Max’s Kansas City, the Spring Street Bar,

Joseph said. “In New York I learned to take the things I came

and similar New York establishments of the time where the

across in the street—not ‘found objects’ so much as chosen

conversation was earthy and elevated all at once. Joseph is

objects. I didn’t want to work with bronze, the classical material,

a touch nostalgic for the period (although he does not use the

and get involved in lifts and all sorts of equipment—art as an

term), and we cannot wonder why. “The language I was speaking

aristocratic experience. The material gives an essential element

was suddenly very different,” he recalled. “To make art you had

of the primitive but in a modern way—almost like collage, one

to learn the language of art. It was a gut language—nothing

next to the other.”

particularly effete. Rauschenberg, Chamberlain, Rivers: They showed me in my work that I didn’t see myself.”

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T

ENSIONS OF VARIOUS KINDS run all through these

Tensions often involve ambiguities, and we find these in Joseph’s work, too. His colors, for instance: Apart from his

The remark goes to the core of Joseph’s pieces—and to

brilliant sky blues, all are mixed and muted. This derives, one

how we should see and understand them. They are a record of

suspects, from Joseph’s preoccupation with the natural world and

an artist’s quest for a language—a universal language—through

the “outside” life lived in warm climates—“I want to bring the

which to articulate the particular, the personal, the remembered,

outdoors indoors,” he says—and also from Joseph’s experiments

the unconscious as it does its formidable work. New York gave

with process. He lets pieces rust and react. There is less that is

Joseph the vocabulary, and his own life gave him all that needed

fixed in them than is customary in Western art. He gives nature

to be said with it. The grid reliefs are quintessentially New York in

a hand in the man-made, so embracing methods the outcome of

their aesthetic. In their color and pattern, they are quintessentially

which is unknown.

the work of an artist who has emerged from a more complex and

Art as an act of becoming: It is perhaps the best summation

cosmopolitan milieu. This juxtaposition of acquired language

of Joseph’s work. There is something emergent inscribed in it,


which lends the entire body of work a compelling dynamism.

two years. Equally, these pieces are coming off the walls, one

We may find in this an essential lesson drawn from the Abstract

might say: They are rendered with a more pronounced three-

Expressionists: Art is a record of its moment, the recording of its

dimensional aspect. It is an effective strategy: Retaining the lyrical,

own creation. This attribute suspends all of these pieces in a kind

“worked on” look of his flatter pieces, the colors are all the more

of eternally kinetic state. Each is as it is but seems about to become

vivid when presented to us on different planes. A certain Cubist

something else. Thus there is a certain immanence suffused into

reference is implied, and a certain new power is achieved.

Joseph’s art. We sense that we see each piece only at one instant

The free-standing pieces in the series entitled Urbana

of its life, and that later on, when we are no longer present, it will

represent another recent innovation. Here the genesis of the

have subtly transformed. It is, perhaps, most fundamentally the

pieces is interesting—deeply revealing of the springs that feed

art of someone in transit in our time—a person whose life itself

all of Joseph’s work, as if a light has been shined into otherwise

has been fundamentally an act of becoming. No one else, we may

unknowable places in the artist’s consciousness. He had been

speculate, could have produced it.

playing, a few years ago, with his young son’s wooden sticks, the

N

Lego-like toys with which great towers are to be built and built ATHAN SLATE JOSEPH BEGAN exhibiting in the

until they collapse. Those intimate moments have now passed

United States in 1971, the moment when the ferment of

from the playroom to the studio—not so long a journey, we may

the postwar scene in New York was yielding some of its most

consider as we stand before pieces such as Urbana XL and Urbana

interesting flowers, and he has shown regularly since. He is also

XIII, the latter an exquisite, earthy red.

something of an artist’s artist, we find, in that Larry Rivers, John

“The child learns form, balance, structure by way of those

Chamberlain, and others among his colleagues have also acquired

little sticks,” Joseph recalled with an evident fondness. “It gave me

some of Joseph’s work.

an idea. It let me recreate with the materials I use. I always have

The Sundaram Tagore Gallery first presented Joseph’s art in

the problem of taking what I do and making sculpture out of it.

New York not quite a decade ago and has mounted numerous

And those recent pieces are architectural, structural. All art has

shows since. This is Joseph’s premiere in Hong Kong, however.

to have balance and form if it is to stand, like the little wooden

And as the Tagore Gallery has done with other artists in the

sticks.”

past, it once more brings world-class work to our attention. It is a tribute to Sundaram Tagore’s discriminating judgment that he

— Hong Kong, March, 2010

injects into the Hong Kong scene an artist whose work transcends so many of our assumptions and boundaries. Is it American or

Patrick Lawrence was a correspondent abroad for many years and is now a

something else? Is it Western or Eastern in some of its aspects—

critic, essayist, and lecturer. His new book, Somebody Else’s Century:

or something in between? Once again we cannot quite say. And

East and West in a Post–Western World, will be published shortly by

it is precisely in this respect that Joseph contributes to a salutary

Pantheon Books in New York.

evolution in our “conversation” toward a more global idea of the art that matters to us. These pieces mark an interesting departure in Joseph’s work. Organic forms are emergent in, for instance, the pieces identified in their titles with kimono—apart from Night at Kimono, there are Baby Kimono, and Sari Kimono Suite II, piece also done in the last

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Sari Blossom II, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 84 x 48 inches 9


Blue Moe, 2005, pigment on galvanized steel, 36 x 36 inches 10


Silk Route Cuts of India III, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 24 x 24 inches 11


Left: Baby Kimono, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 42 x 15 x 13 inches Right: Sari Kimono Suite II, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 48 x 14 x 9.5 inches 12


Night at Kimono, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 67 x 17 x 12.5 inches 13


Yoga Man, 2007, pigment on galvanized steel, 48 x 66 inches 14


Spring Hall, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 84 x 48 inches 15


Spices and Silk, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 60 x 180 inches 16


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Time for Prayer, 2003, pigment on galvanized steel, 96 x 60 inches 19


Sun See Moon, 2007, pigment on galvanized steel, 84 x 60 inches 20


Top: Eppe Man, 2003, pigment on galvanized steel, 36 x 36 inches Bottom: Orange Blossom, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 36 x 36 inches 21


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Taj Silks, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 84 x 48 inches 23


Buchara, 2007, pigment on galvanized steel, 60 x 84 inches 24


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1: Spice Market Suite, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 17 x 17 inches 2: Spice Market Suite VI, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 12 x 19 inches 3: Spice Market Suite III, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 12 x 19 inches 4: Silk Route Cut of India XXIV, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 10 x 11 inches 5: Corn Chip I, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 18 x 18 inches 6: Spice Market XXVI, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 18 x 13 inches 7: Silk Route Cuts of India I, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 24 x 24 inches 8: Acre of Green, 2007, pigment on galvanized steel, 23 x 32 inches 9: Silk Route Cut of India XXII, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 11 x 10 inches 10: Spice Market Series II, 2007, pigment on galvanized steel, 21.5 x 26.5 inches

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11: Corn Chip III, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 17 x 12 inches 12: Silk Route Cuts of India V, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 24 x 24 inches 13: Spice Market Suite VII, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 20 x 12 inches 14: Sponts V, 2004, pigment on galvanized steel, 12 x 12 inches 15: Little Punjab, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 17 x 9 inches 16: Red Cut of India, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 17.5 x 11 inches 17: Untitled, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 19 x 11 inches 18: Capricorn Plume, 2005, pigment on galvanized steel, 24 x 24 inches 19: Spice Market Suite IV, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 21 x 11 inches 20: Blue, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 24 x 20 inches 21: Spice Market XXIX, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 19 x 12 inches 28

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Kimono Kimono, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 51 x 51 inches 29


Punjab Mist, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 48 x 73 inches 30


Top: Man Red Sea, 2006, pigment on galvanized steel, 48 x 48 inches Bottom: Silks I, 2005, pigment on galvanized steel, 48 x 48 inches 31


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Line Drawing Yellow/Green, 2006, pigment on galvanized steel, 48 x 40 inches 33


Silk Man Journey, 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 48 x 60 inches 34


Rajasthan Blue, 2006, pigment on galvanized steel, 48 x 32 inches 35


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Kimono Evening, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 97 x 28 x 14 inches 37


Untitled Earthtone, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 60 x 60 inches 38


Scarf Spring, 2006, pigment on galvanized steel, 36 x 36 inches 39


From left to right: Urbana XL (Yellow), 2008, pigment on galvanized steel mounted on marble base, 74 x 12 x 12 inches Urbana XXXVIII (Silver), 2008, pigment on galvanized steel mounted on marble base, 69 x 12 x 12 inches Urbana XIII (Red), 2007, pigment on galvanized steel mounted on marble base, 74 x 10 x 10 inches Urbana XXI (Silver), 2008, pigment on galvanized steel, 32 x 10 x 10 inches Urbana XVI (Blue), 2007, pigment on galvanized steel mounted on marble base, 48 x 9 x 9 inches 40


Curriculum Vitae Born in Israel, 1944

SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2010 2009 2008 2006 2004 2002 2001 2000 1997 1995 1994 1992 1991 1990 1987 1986 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1980 1971

Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Hong Kong New Work, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Spices and Silk, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Beverly Hills, CA Building a Picture, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Lizan Tops Gallery, East Hampton, NY Talking with the Walls, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Perimeter Gallery, Chicago, IL Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Heritage House, Caples Jefferson Architects, NY Steuben Glass, Adam Tihany Architect, New York, NY Keys Gallery, Sag Harbor, NY W.W.F. Center, Chris Smith Architect, New York, NY Renée Fotouhi Gallery, East Hampton, NY Perimeter Gallery, Chicago, IL Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem, Israel Perimeter Gallery, Chicago, IL Christopher Leonard Gallery, New York, NY Guggenheim Gallery, Miami, FL Clocktower Gallery (sponsored by PS 1 Contemporary Art Center), New York, NY Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY The Grayson Gallery, Chicago, IL The Grayson Gallery, Chicago, IL Jon Leon Gallery, New York, NY Jon Leon Gallery, New York, NY Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY O.K. Harris Works of Art, New York, NY Jon Leon Gallery, New York, NY Stanford Gallery, San Francisco, CA

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2010 2009 2008 42

The Reason for Hope, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY The Reason for Hope, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Beverly Hills, CA The Reason for Hope, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Hong Kong Here and Now, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Hong Kong Here and Now, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Hong Kong In Your Mind’s Eye, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Hong Kong

2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1973 1972

Dimensions of Color, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Beverly Hills, CA Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Hong Kong In Your Mind’s Eye, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY East/West, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Hong Kong Lights and Shadows, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Beverly Hills, CA Inner Journey, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Next Level, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY New York–Milano, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Time and Material, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Continuous Connections, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Compass Points, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY Perimeter Gallery, Chicago, IL Felissimo Foundation, New York, NY Sundaram Tagore Gallery, New York, NY Exit Art Photo Show, New York, NY Perimeter Gallery, Chicago, IL Imago Gallery, Palm Desert, CA The Fanelli Show, O.K. Harris, New York, NY Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY Guild Hall Museum Invitational, East Hampton, NY Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY Renée Fotouhi Gallery, East Hampton, NY Art et Industrie, New York, NY Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, NY Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY Renée Fotouhi Gallery, East Hampton, NY Imago Gallery, Palm Desert, CA Johnson Atelier Sculpture Park, Princeton, NJ Kristina Wasserman Gallery, Providence, RI Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY O.K. Harris Gallery, New York, NY Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY O.K. Harris Gallery, New York, NY New York City Gallery, New York, NY Wichita Art Museum, Wichita, KS National Metal Ornamentation Museum, Memphis, TN Attitude Art, New York, NY Mitchell Museum, Mount Vernon, IL Squibb Gallery, Princeton, NJ Bard College, Croton-on-Hudson, NY Light Gallery, New York, NY One University Place, New York, NY Jon Leon Gallery, New York, NY Butler Institute of Art, Youngstown, OH University of Hartford, Hartford, CT One University Place, New York, NY O.K. Harris Gallery, New York, NY Flats Fixed Gallery, New York, NY Gold Gallery, New Hope, PA


SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

SELECTED COLLECTIONS

2007 Art in America, April 2006-07 “Ahead of the Curve,” Art & Antiques, Volume XXIX 2006 “A Tectonic Language,” Asian Art News, September/October “Off the Wall,” Hong Kong Tatler, September Asian Art News, July/August “The Essence of Light,” Architectural Digest, July “Indian Art Blooms in New York,” Namaskaar, July “East/West Dialogue,” Asian Art News, May/June Robb Report, March 2002 In Style, special issue, fall Chicago Tribune, May “At Sundaram Tagore,” Art in America, April “Artists of the Hamptons,” Blue Sand, spring 2001 Architectural Digest, June 1998 “160 Blue,” Esquire, December Architetture d’interni, October 1996 Danielle Siers review, Lifestyles, fall “New York Reviews,” ARTnews, January 1994 Grace Glueck review, New York Times, November 1993 Vivien Raynor review, New York Times, August Vivien Raynor review, New York Times, July 1992 Ava Gal review, Ma’ariv Jerusalem, July 1991 Alan Artner review, Chicago Tribune, February 1990 Helen Harrison review, New York Times, June 1986 Tony Towle review, Art in America, November Alan Artner review, Chicago Tribune, October Valentin Tatransky, Arts Magazine, March 1985 William Zimmer review, New York Times, August 1986 Art in America, November 1984 ARTnews, January 1982 Art in America, January

Albright-Knox Museum, Buffalo, NY The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, New Brunswick, NJ Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH Mitchell Museum, Mount Vernon, IL Art in Embassies Program, Permanent collection of the United States Art in Embassies Program, exhibition for the U.S. Embassy in Nicosia, Cyprus Consulate General, Istanbul, Turkey Lexis-Nexis Collection, Edison, NJ Penny McCall Collection, Bridgehampton, NY Lisa de Kooning Collection, Springs, NY Larry Rivers, New York, NY John Chamberlain, New York, NY Joni Mitchell, Los Angeles, CA Johnson and Johnson Collection, Racine, WI Kemper Insurance Collection, Chicago, IL Prudential Insurance Collection, New York, NY Kevin Klein, New York, NY Greenberg Collection, Palm Springs, CA Beth Rudin DeWoody, New York, NY Flannery Collection, Palm Desert, CA Jessica Swift Collection, Chicago, IL Eli Broad, Los Angeles, CA Adam Tihany, New York, NY Irving Schneider, Palm Beach, FL Milton Dresner, Detroit, MI Beppi Pattitucci, Venice, Italy Prof. Yehuda and Ruti Danon, Bene Atarot, Israel Zeev and Sara Lahat, Herzeliya, Israel Meira Geyra, Tel Aviv, Israel Sana Saburgh, New York, NY

ARCHITECTURAL ART COMMISSIONS 2002 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996

Main wall mural, private airport, Scottsdale, AZ Dockside restaurant, wall mural, building designed and piece commissioned by Adam Tihany, Sag Harbor, NY Outer building facade, Heritage Health & Housing, Inc., New York, NY The Time Hotel, New York, NY Art and architecture installation Spectra, LaGuardia Place, New York, NY Remi restaurant, New York, NY one sixtyblue restaurant, Chicago, IL Jean Georges restaurant, Trump International Hotel and Tower, New York, NY Inagiku restaurant, The Waldorf Astoria hotel, New York, NY Jerry’s restaurant, New York, NY Lobby installation and corresponding work for guest suites, Dan Eilat hotel, Eilat, Israel

HONORS & DISTINCTIONS 2002

The American Institute of Architects Honor Award for architecture, Washington, DC

Guggenheim fellowship nomination by John Chamberlain; ARTnews, “Artist’s Artist”; Larry Rivers’s selection, 1982; Teacher, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem, Israel.

EDUCATION 1970-72 Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY 1971 New School for Social Research, New York, NY 1968-70 International School of Photography, New York, NY 1965-67 Art Students League, Woodstock, NY 1964-67 Art Students League, New York, NY

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Nathan Slate Joseph’s studio, 2009, Brooklyn, New York Sundaram Tagore Galleries New York 547 West 27th Street New York, NY 10001 Tel 212 677 4520 Fax 212 677 4521 gallery@sundaramtagore.com

Beverly Hills 9606 South Santa Monica Blvd Beverly Hills, CA 90210 Tel 310 278 4520 Fax 310 278 4525 beverlyhills@sundaramtagore.com

Hong Kong 57-59 Hollywood Road Central, Hong Kong Tel 852 2581 9678 Fax 852 2581 9673 hongkong@sundaramtagore.com

www.sundaramtagore.com First published in the United States of America in 2010 by Sundaram Tagore Gallery President and curator: Sundaram Tagore Director, New York: Susan McCaffrey Director, Hong Kong: Faina Goldstein Assistant director, Beverly Hills: Rebecca Costanzo Designer: Russell Whitehead Printing: CA Design, Hong Kong

Art consultants: Joanna Berman Diana d’Arenberg Joseph Lawrence Benjamin Rosenblatt

Text © Sundaram Tagore Gallery Photographs © Sundaram Tagore Gallery © Sundaram Tagore Gallery All rights reserved under international copyright conventions. No part of this catalogue may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any other information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Cover: Orange Step, 2009, pigment on galvanized steel, 28 x 9 x 7 inches Back cover: Scarf Spring, 2006, pigment on galvanized steel, 36 x 36 inches



Nathan Slate Joseph