Issuu on Google+

LANTRA GUIDE

School Leavers guide to Enviromental and Land-Based industries brought to you by Lantra...

Sectors included: Working in the dairy beef and poultry Agricultural crops Agricultural livestock Aquaculture Environmental Conservation Equine Farriery Fisheries Management Floristry Game and Wildlife Production horticulture Fencing


Advertorial // Royal Parks

GROW IN THE PARKS The Royal Parks Apprenticeship Programme The Royal Parks Apprenticeship Programme is an award winning three year Apprenticeship combining College-based learning and workplace training placement. It’s an ideal way to begin a career in horticulture and open space management. As an Apprentice Gardener, you’ll work and learn in one of seven Royal Parks and get paid while you complete your education. The Programme is run by The Royal Parks in conjunction with Capel Manor College, together with The Royal Parks Landscape Maintenance Contractors. At the end of the three years, Apprentices will be well qualified, to include: • Royal Horticultural Society Level 2 Certificate in Horticulture • Diploma in Work-based Horticulture (Levels 2 & 3) • Functional Skills Levels 1 & 2 (English and Maths)

How does it work?

Apprentices are employed by one of the Landscape Maintenance Contractors (currently Fountains plc, Veolia plc, Enterprise plc and Turfsoil Ltd) at one of the Royal Parks. Apprentices spend four days per week learning landscape and horticultural techniques at their assigned Park and one day per week in the classroom at Capel Manor College at Regent’s Park. Training involves all aspects of plant maintenance, cultivation

2

and landscape development. They also learn about pest control through chemical, biological and cultural methods, operation and maintenance of a wide range of machinery, and soil science. Starting salary is approximately £12,000-£13,000 dependent on age, skills, and experience. All training costs are covered by The Royal Parks and the contractors.

How do I apply?

• Complete the application form online or download the form here and return it to the Parks by 15th March 2010. Alternatively, phone, e-mail, fax or write and we’ll send you all the information you need to apply. • Shortlisted applicants will be invited to attend an interview in Spring of 2010. • Successful applicants will be appointed during JulySeptember. Studies will commence at Capel Manor College in September 2010.

Who should apply?

Ideally, applicants will hold at least four GCSEs at Grade A to C, preferably in Maths, English and Science and will have an interest in horticulture and gardening.

Applications are welcomed from all backgrounds and age groups but the programme is particularly suitable for school leavers or people at the beginning of their careers. Due to the way the Apprenticeship is funded, we cannot accept applications from holders of degree-level qualifications and above, nor from those who have not been a resident in the UK for a continuous three year period prior to joining the Apprenticeship Programme.

What happens at the end of my Apprenticeship?

At the end of the three years, Apprentices will be ideally placed to continue their career in the horticultural industry either in a ‘hands-on’ role, or by progressing to a management or supervisory post. This could be within open space management, landscape construction or design industries. Many past Royal Park Apprentices are now employed as Park Managers with The Royal Parks, Supervisors or Contract Managers for The Royal Park contractors and key posts within local authorities. Apprentices may be offered a job with The Royal Parks on completion of their Apprenticeship.

Still have questions? Feel free to contact the Apprentice Programme Coordinator on +44 (0)207 298 2119 or email grow@royalparks.gsi.gov.uk

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

STUDY ADVICE

ENTERTAINMENT

4 Landex – Get a head start 6 So what’s it all about

PUBLISHER Ian Thomas EDITOR Charlie Whitworth MANAGING DIRECTOR Paul Cocciadiferro SALES DIRECTOR Stephanie Matthews SALES MANAGER Gavin Wright SALES EXECUTIVE Laura Thrasher and Ben Whitworth ART DIRECTION AND DESIGN Jon-Paul Daly – Entwurf.co.uk

LEAVING SCHOOL IS PUBLISHED BY STUDENT MEDIA AND MARKETING LTD © CONTACT Student Media and Marketing Limited, Third Floor, Wellington House, 90-92 Butt Road, Colchester, Essex CO3 3DA Tel: 01206 546 777 DISCLAIMER No material in this publication may be used without permission from the publisher. The views expressed in Leaving School are not necessarily the views of the editor or the publisher.

FREQUENCY Bi-Monthly

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

Advic e

INDUSTRIES LIFEBYTE 12 Land-based Engineering 16 Working in the dairy beef and poultry industry 24 Agricultural crops 26 Agricultural livestock 28 Aquaculture sector 30 Environmental Conservation sector 34 Veterinary Nursing 35 Equine sector 40 Farriery 42 Fisheries Management 43 Floristry 46 Game and Wildlife 47 Production horticulture 49 Fencing 51 International opportunities 54 The National Student Database 3


Landex Get a head start

4

Many people now see the environmental and land-based industries as having a vital role to play in addressing the challenges of, and providing some of the solutions to, climate change and ensuring people have enough to eat in future. If you’re interested in a career in these industries and playing your part in that, then one of the best ways of gaining the knowledge and experience you need to give you a head start, is by taking a college course or qualification. Deciding where to study can possibly be one of the most important decisions that you could make for your future. Landex is a membership organisation for colleges that specialise in highquality education and training in environmental and land-based industries across the UK. Most colleges with a specialist emphasis on land-based work are Landex

members, and they provide approximately 70% of land-based higher education training up to graduate level. These land-based colleges offer a wide range of learning options, including higher level courses, which help you to progress. Each college offers excellent facilities to provide you with everything needed to study your chosen subject successfully. Golf courses, reptiles and other animals, modern agricultural and ground care

“Landex is a membership organisation for colleges that specialise in high-quality education and training in environmental and land-based industries across the UK.� LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

machinery, dedicated laboratory spaces, indoor and outdoor horse arenas are just some of the facilities that might be available. The tutors are passionate about their subjects, so you can be confident that you will learn from the best and get a first rate college experience. Finding suitable employment after your course should be an important factor in your choice of course. That’s why each college has close links to industry and some undertake their own commercial activities so you are learning from people who have practical work experience and knowledge of the industry. Most of the colleges have

campus accommodation. Living STUDY ADVICE on-campus provides you with the opportunity to become more independent, to live with people who share interests and who could become friends for life. It also gives you easy access to all the college’s facilities including the library, sport ENTERTAINMENT facilities and your student union with clubs and societies catering for a range of interests. Advi The campuses stay alivece and busy during the evenings and weekends with lots of social and sporting activitiesLIFEBYTE to provide you with a break from al that studying!. LS

NEWS & VIEWS

LAND BASED

TRAVEL

FASHION

Vic Croxson Chief Executive, Landex

Where else would you look for great courses working on the land, with animals and a whole lot more? Everything from introductory level to apprenticeships and degrees at a college that makes first class learning fun!

Askham Bryan College • Askham Bryan • York • YO23 3FR Tel: 01904 772277 • email: enquiries@askham-bryan.ac.uk • www.askham-bryan.ac.uk Centres at Bedale, Guisborough, Harrogate and Thirsk

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

5


So what’s it all about?

The environmental, food chain and rural sector uses about 77% of the UK’s total landmass (18.4 million hectares) and employs over a million people. Of the million-plus people employed in this sector, the majority work in 17 main industries. Agricultural crops Agricultural livestock Animal care Animal technology Aquaculture Environmental conservation Equine Farriery Fencing Fisheries management Floristry Game and wildlife management Land-based engineering Landscape Production horticulture Trees and timber Veterinary nursing Other related Almost 90% of all businesses in the land-based and environmental sector employ less than ten people. This means that large intakes for traditional graduate management positions are rare. Most of the smaller businesses are interested in graduates who

6

can ‘hit the ground running’, without a structured training scheme. Self-employment is a key feature of the environmental, food chain and rural sector. Approximately 80% of the total workforce are proprietors and 20% are employees.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

NEWS & VIEWS

STUDY ADVICE

LAND BASED

ENTERTAINMENT

TRAVEL

A service-orientated sector? Like many other sectors in the UK, the land-based sector is becoming more service oriented. There has been major growth in the use of land for leisure and tourism as opposed to purely productionbased purposes. This is particularly evident in the growth of the horticultural, landscaping, equine and environmental sectors. For graduates, this means that many higher-level jobs are located on the ‘agribusiness’ side, as opposed to direct production. Areas of employment The environmental and land-based sector can be divided into five areas for graduate employment: • agriculture and science; • animal-related; • environmental conservation and rural management; • fresh produce, nurseries and garden centres; • gardens, landscape and design.4

Advic e

LIFEBYTE

FASHION

Ullapool

Full time, work-based and short courses in: i Agriculture i Fisheries i Animal Care i Forestry and Arboriculture i Engineering i Horticulture i Equine i Veterinary Nursing For more information or to request a prospectus please call 01387 860251

Inverness

Fort William

Aberdeen

Dundee

Perth Stirling Glasgow

Edinburgh

Ayr Moffat

Stranraer

Barony College, Parkgate, Dumfries DG1 3NE Tel: 01387 860251

Newcastle

Dumfries Carlisle

Web: www.barony.ac.uk Leeds

Liverpool

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

Manchester

7

Hull


Agriculture and science

Careers in agriculture and science include production, agri-services, engineering, teaching and research.

Examples of graduate-level job vacancies in agriculture and science include: • farm managers; • trainee managers; • unit managers; • trainee agronomists. If you are interested in a less production-oriented role, then you could consider agriculturalrelated services and businesses and there are many varied and inter-linked sectors from which to choose. Below is a list of possible production and related service roles to help get you started: • agronomy – grain merchanting; • agrochemicals – land management; • animal genetics – management consultancy; • city and public farms – pig marketing and research; • commodity trading – recruitment consultants; • feed production – research and (animals) development; • food processing – seed production. For graduates interested in research, there are a range of research-focused organisations. They are usually involved in: • plant breeding; • crop protection; • plant trials; • plant genetics; • biotechnology; • residue analysis; • technical sales; • other research. Some graduates in land-based disciplines consider teaching or lecturing. There are general and specialist land-based Postgraduate Certificates in Education (PGCEs) available.

8

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

NEWS & VIEWS

Animal-related There are over 55,000 people employed in: • animal retail; • breeding; • behaviour; • welfare; • zoos; • wildlife parks; • related public services. This figure does not include those employed in science, research, animal health, animal feed and livestock. These individual sectors can be very large in their own right. For example, there are 42 member companies listed with the National Office of Animal Health (NOAH)

professional and collectively the total UK STUDY ADVICE LAND BASED organisations, animal health market is worth over equestrian £420million per annum. The Pet equipment suppliers, bloodstock Food Manufacturers Association agents, horse racing, transporters, (PFMA) lists 50 member insurance, feed, health products, companies, presenting around research and journalism. 95% of the British pet food market. The animal insurance industry The total market for cat and dog TRAVEL ENTERTAINMENT has grown over the past 20 years. food alone is currently worth over Graduates can find openings with £1.6billion per annum. brokers and insurance companies, It is estimated that over 50,000 Adv e whichiccan lead to further career people are working in the equine opportunities in the wider insurance sector. Around 87% of equine market. businesses are based in England, An increased need inFASHION the equine and the total horse industry’s gross LIFEBYTE sector is predicted for graduates output is worth over £3.4billion per with business management skills, annum. Many jobs are of a practical health and safety awareness, and nature, with the bulk of graduate knowledge of business law.4 jobs in ancillary equine-dependent industries and services, such as

Our Equine and Land-Based Departments offer a wide range of full-time and part-time courses from: First Diploma to Higher National Diploma level in the following subject areas: • Animal Care • Countryside & Environmental Management • Horse Care • Horticulture For more information or to arrange a visit, please contact Sarah Allen: Tel.: 01656 302631 or E-mail: sallen@bridgend.ac.uk

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

9


Fresh produce, nurseries and garden centres

Environmental conservation and rural management Conservation and rural management is a growing part of the sector, especially for graduates. There are currently 56,000 people working for around 5,000 businesses, with a large proportion based in the South West of England. Around 200,000 volunteers also work in this sector, mainly for personal reasons or for gaining work experience. Employment can be found not only with small businesses but also with larger trusts and public bodies. Some of the most commonly advertised roles are: • countryside conservation; • environmental education; • project work; • promotion; • fundraising; • research

10

“There are currently 56,000 people working for around 5,000 businesses, with a large proportion based in the South West of England.”

There has been real growth in fresh produce over the past few years. The retail fruit and vegetable market is only one part of the total fresh produce sector. This market alone was worth over £8.5billion in 2005 and is expected to increase to £9.8billion by 2010. A range of factors, including year-round product availability, interest in organic and pre-packed produce, health issues and the popularity of TV cookery programmes, are supporting the market’s development. Fruit consumption has proved increasingly popular, with the net effect that the fresh fruit and vegetable market is forecast to make steady growth. The overall effect of these changes is that fresh produce is a strong area both in terms of job supply and salary levels. The garden centre and nursery sector has also seen recent growth. The total UK market for gardening products was worth £5.18billion per annum in 2005, and is predicted to fall slightly to £5.14billion by 2010. Visiting garden centres and nurseries is now considered a leisure activity in its own right, with more estimated visitors than properties of The National Trust. This means that the garden centre and nursery sector is expanding and has a steady supply of jobs for graduates.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Gardens, landscape and design Gardens remain popular with members of the public. The top five botanic gardens alone generate over three million visitors per annum. Nearly 140,000 people are employed in this sector. The amenity horticulture sector includes jobs in local government parks departments such as: • arboricultural officer; • landscape officer; • parks manager.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

CONTENTS

NEWS & VIEWS

STUDY ADVICE

LAND BASED

and construction, interestTRAVEL in careers Some graduates pursue careers ENTERTAINMENT in landscape and design continues with botanic gardens or choose to to grow. work in horticultural therapy. Self-employment is quite Although not a traditional Advic e common, although there are graduate job, some graduates some jobs in local government, pursue an interest in gardening and landscape practices and private restoration at stately homes and design private houses, for example with LIFEBYTEand build operations, FASHION making recruitment very The National Trust, the National Trust for Scotland, English Heritage competitive. The key to success in this field, therefore, is to make and Historic Scotland. speculative approaches to potential The increased concern for employers. LS environmental issues in land use

11


Land-based Engineering Engineers in this sector may choose to specialise in one particular area: •m  anufacturing - designing and developing new products such as tractors, combine harvesters, ploughs and sprayers as well as forestry, horticultural, groundcare and amenity equipment • fi eld engineering - developing new equipment to deal with problems relating to soil erosion, irrigation and drainage and to protect and manage crops

12

• service engineering - training operators and installing and maintaining machinery •e  nvironmental control - designing electronic systems to control the conditions inside buildings that are used to house livestock or to dry and store crops •e  nvironment - working on land reclamation and the creation of habitats. In the UK there are nearly 4000 land-based engineering businesses. Land-based engineering is a growing sector consisting of large

and medium-sized manufacturing, sales and service companies and smaller specialist firms, as well as consultancies. There is a national shortage of people with engineering skills at all levels, so job opportunities are good. It is possible to enter landbased engineering by studying for a degree in agricultural engineering or a related subject. Apprenticeships are also available, and some of the larger manufacturers provide their own specialist apprentice training.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

NEWS & VIEWS

STUDY ADVICE

LAND BASED

while you learn! Land-based engineers complete a period of initial professional NVQs/SVQs development when they start NVQs (National Vocational work. Large employers may offer TRAVEL ENTERTAINMENT Qualifications) and SVQs (Scottish structured training schemes, allowing entrants to gain experience Vocational Qualifications) are also work-related qualifications that in different departments. Through Advi enablece you to gain the skills and the Institution of Agricultural knowledge you needed to do a Engineers (IAgrE), professional job. You can do an NVQ or SVQ land-based engineers with at different levels, depending on the required experience and LIFEBYTE FASHION your ability and what sort of job you qualifications can register with the want to do. These qualifications are Engineering Council UK at one of based on national standards agreed three levels: by the land-based engineering • Engineering Technician industry, so they are recognised by • Incorporated Engineer employers throughout the UK. You • Chartered Engineer. could consider: There are generally good promotion • NVQ/SVQ in Land-based Operations Level 1 (equivalent prospects within both large to GCSEs or a Standard Grade multinational companies and General) smaller specialist firms, where • NVQ/SVQ in Land-based Service experienced engineers may move Engineering at Levels 2 and 3 into management. It is possible to (Level 2 is equivalent GCSEs, a become self-employed and work on Standard Grade Credit, a First a consultancy basis. Diploma or a National Certificate. Level 3 is equivalent to A-levels, Apprenticeships an Advanced Higher, a National • Apprenticeship in Land-based Diploma or a National Certificate). Service Engineering Apprenticeships are government Further and higher education backed training schemes aimed If you would rather do a college primarily at people aged between 16-24, although funding is available or university-based course to give you the skills and knowledge you for those over the age of 24 in need, there are also lots of options some regions. They enable you to available to you at different levels learn practical skills and achieve depending on your abilities and nationally recognised qualifications, your aspirations. They include: including a relevant NVQ/SVQ and • First Diploma, National Diploma technical certificate. You will spend and Higher National Diploma part of your time ‘on-the-job’ getting • National Certificate, Advanced real experience and some of your National Certificate, Higher time in college learning the theory National Certificate you need to know. You also have • BSc, MSc, PhD LS the opportunity to earn a wage

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

13


Advertorial // Bishop Burton College

NEW Year NEW Courses NEW Facilities NEW Bishop Burton College NEW YOU! As one of the country’s leading land-based colleges Bishop Burton is set in stunning parkland on the edge of the picturesque Yorkshire Wolds. The College has a national reputation for quality and was the first land-based College in the UK to achieve both parts of the LSC’s new Training Quality Standard in recognition of the excellent work it does with industry.

What courses are on offer?

The College offers a wide range of land-based and non landbased courses for those looking for Further or Higher Education and many courses offer clear progression routes from BTEC First Diplomas through to Honours Degrees and beyond. The College also offers a wide range of apprenticeships and work-based learning opportunities for those who would prefer to earn while they learn. Many of our apprentices attendcollege on a day or blockrelease basis. Careers advice and courses

14

are available in the following areas: • Agriculture • Animal Management • Art • Business Management • Art & Design • Early Years • Engineering • Equine • Floristry • Fisheries Management • Food • Foundation Studies

The College offers a wide range of land-based and non land-based courses for those looking for Further or Higher Education and many courses offer clear progression routes from BTEC First Diplomas through to Honours Degrees and beyond.

• Gamekeeping • Garden Design • Horticulture • Sport • Planning and Development • Professional Development • Public Services • Fashion and Textiles • Travel and Tourism • Environmental Conservation.

New courses for 2009/10

•F  oundation Degree Applied Science •F  oundation Degree Travel, Tourism and Hospitality Management •F  oundation Degree Equine Sports Coaching •F  oundation Degree Equine Sports Performance •F  oundation Degree Waste Management •F  oundation Degree Sports, Coaching ad Fitness •B  Sc Animal Behaviour and Welfare •B  Sc Equine Sports Coaching •B  Sc Equine Sports Performance •B  Sc Equine Studies •P  rofessional Graduate Certificate in Education Bishop Burton College also has an effective support network for all learners including welfare officers, sports development, chaplaincy and a warden service.

What else is available on campus? The main campus in Bishop Burton village is home to a 360 hectare mixed farm which includes a Freedom Food assured, high-welfare pig unit

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


and brand-new dairy parlour and sheep facilities. The College also boasts a state-of-the-art equine unit and therapy centre, which incorporates the new Olympicstandard Bishop Burton Arena, and animal management facilities. Amenities include residential accommodation for more than 300 students including two brand-new hostels, numerous catering establishments, bar, varied social calendar, sports hall and gym. Sports teams include football, rugby, hockey, netball and clay pigeon shooting.

Campus developments

The College has recently invested £25million in an ambitious campus redevelopment scheme, which includes the College’s Centre for Sport & Fitness complex. Completed projects also include: • A Learning Resource Centre and library • State-of-the-art sports centre and fitness suite • Traffic management system, car park and main entrance • Classrooms and workshops • Floodlit, all-weather pitch • Student residential

accommodation • Equine centre including Olympic-standard arena, stabling, hacking track, practical unit and therapy rooms • Sheep, dairy and arable units • Animal Management facilities

To find out more about Bishop Burton College and for details of all of our courses, contact us on: Tel: 0800 731 82 81 Email: enquiries@ bishopburton.ac.uk www.bishopburton.ac.uk

Find out more about our wide range of Land-based courses. Open Days held throughout the year. To book your place call: 0800 731 82 81 or visit www.bishopburton.ac.uk

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

15


Working in the Beef and Poultry Industry Working in the dairy industry If you interested in working in a diverse industry where you could be involved in the production of food products ranging from milk to cheese, and from butter to yoghurt? Working in agriculture could give you the opportunity to work in the dairy industry. The dairy industry in the UK is a vast and important industry. The nutritious pint of milk is the end product of an operation carried out by thousands of people with a variety of skills. The industry is split into 4 main areas: • Milk production on farms • Processing of milk used for liquid consumption • Development and manufacture of products such as cheese, butter, yoghurt and desserts • Delivery to homes and shops through a wholesale and retail network. New technology is used at all stages of the industry, and new products are constantly being developed to meet the demands of a challenging and competitive future.

16

As you might expect from an industry of this size and complexity there is a wide range of career opportunities for people with different skills, qualifications and abilities. These include dairy farming, working in milk processing or manufacture or in retailing milk to the customer; each area relying on people such as technicians, engineers, laboratory and research staff, sales, marketing, administration, finance, management and computer personnel. The dairy industry offers opportunities for school leavers and graduates of further and higher education alike. There are many ways to enter a career in the dairy industry. If you have no formal qualifications but can demonstrate your enthusiasm for working in this industry, there are opportunities for you.4

Working in the beef industry If you interested in working in a diverse industry where you will be working with cows everyday and involved in the production of high quality beef? Working in agriculture could give you the opportunity to work in the beef industry. Britain has more than one million suckler cows producing calves for beef. Some breeds of cattle are known as ‘dual purpose’ because they are suitable for producing milk and beef. But modern farming divides cattle into either beef or dairy breeds aiming at high productivity through specialisation. British beef breeds include Hereford, Galloway, Beef Shorthorn, Aberdeen Angus and South Devon. A recent trend in the UK has been the introduction of large Continental breeds such as Charolais, Limousin and Simmental. The dairy industry needs cows to calve once a year in order to maintain milk production; each cow produces an average of four offspring in her life, thus creating a surplus of calves. In theory only one of these calves is needed to replace the cow when her milk yields start to decrease. This means the remaining three calves are available for meat production. Dairy farmers plan in advance which calves will be reared for beef and cross the selected cows with a beef sire, i.e. a bull from a beef herd. Cattle breeding for beef production is concentrated mainly in the upland areas, with the young

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Advertorial // Otley College

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

www.otleycollege.ac.uk 01473 785543

Otley College has built its reputation in land and countryside studies over many years and is heavily involved in the latest innovations in these subject areas.

land cou & ntry side stud ies

We are hosting a variety of events next year to celebrate our fortieth anniversary and it would be great if you got involved. Aside from our attendance at The Suffolk Show and other county shows, we will also be hosting our sixth Big Day Out event in May. Last year over 4500 people attended this family fun day. In 2009 we had a variety of free business occasions including an event with Claire Young who came second on 2008’s BBC television show, The Apprentice. If you wanted to get involved in future business events at Otley, just contact Verity of 01473 784177 and we will put your name on our mailing list. Other new projects that will be launching next year include a DVD about college life, a student magazine and our new prospectus has just come out – if you are interested in having a look at the all courses that we teach, you can either order a copy by calling 01473 784248 or download a copy via our website – www.otleycollege.ac.uk Whilst Otley has changed a great deal since we opened in 1970, we are still in touch with our farming origins. Most recently we have joined forces with The Chadacre Agricultural Trust and the Felix Cobbold Trust to promote farming to young people in schools. We have just appointed a new member of staff who will be actively going to schools to promote farming and talk about how the industry can be incredibly diverse and exciting. Feel free to get in touch and we would be delighted to hear from you – jnice@otleycollege. ac.uk Finally, aside from our fun courses within leisure learning, we are also playing a central role in the development of University Campus Suffolk (UCS). UCS Otley currently has a number of foundation degrees, teacher training options and an honours degree in professional studies for those who are interested in higher education. We also have a variety of management courses – some that are specifically related to rural and farming issues aside from our work as UCS Otley. One such course – that commences in January – will include input from Simon Clegg who is the current Chief Executive at Ipswich Town Football Club. All the best to you all for the New Year. We hope to see you in 2010.

Land & Countryside Studies

17


Advertorial // Hartpury College

Hartpury College - Celebrating 60 years Celebrating its 60th Anniversary this year, Hartpury College, one of the largest land-based colleges in the UK, has a growing reputation for excellence and its continual growth and campus development makes it a popular choice for students from all over the country. Hartpury offers excellent teaching and unrivalled facilities, in many cases unmatched by any other college or university in the UK, and a vibrant, expansive campus in which to study. Located on a beautiful 400 hectare estate in the heart of the Gloucestershire countryside, Hartpury has made significant investment to develop the

“Hartpury offers a range of study options and its Further Education provision is ranked in the top 10% of colleges in England offering courses in Agriculture, Countryside and Conservation, Animal Science and Veterinary Nursing, Equine Studies, Horticulture, Sport, Outdoor Adventure and Uniformed Public Services.”

18

outstanding facilities and accommodation available. The superb teaching facilities include: extensive grounds, including rose borders, mixed shrub borders, formal bedding schemes, rock features and access to conservation and woodland areas around the college and a nine hole pitch and putt golf course. The Home Farm Dairy Unit is complemented by Home Farm shoot, trout lake, woodland and CLAAS workshop. The Hartpury Arena has three outdoor and three indoor arenas, including the recent international arena which hosts affiliated and unaffiliated dressage and showjumping competitions and the Equine Therapy Centre, with treadmills and modern therapy equipment. Hartpury’s Animal Care Centre provides an animal hospital, grooming parlour and operating theatres and the Sports Academy Centre includes a fitness suite, sports hall, squash court, sports rehabilitation suite and physiotherapy consulting centre. There is also on-site modern residential accommodation and a range of social activities and events are arranged through the Student Union, giving students the opportunity to make new friends, fill their free time and most importantly, have fun! There are also a number of venues to eat, drink, socialise and chill-out on campus. Hartpury offers a range of study options and its Further Education provision is ranked

in the top 10% of colleges in England offering courses in Agriculture, Countryside and Conservation, Animal Science and Veterinary Nursing, Equine Studies, Horticulture, Sport, Outdoor Adventure and Uniformed Public Services. In addition, it offers 13 A level subjects across a wide range including Arts, Business, Science, Maths and English. Hartpury recognises the importance of the ‘student experience’ and works hard to ensure that students are fully supported throughout their time at college, and have every opportunity to develop academically, while also creating a safe, welcoming place to study and gain valuable life skills. The College also provides a wide range of generous scholarships and bursaries to ensure that students who qualify for a place will not be deterred by financial concerns. The College has also recently become one of the few learning providers in the country to be awarded Outstanding following an inspection by OFSTED. Hartpury’s Overall Effectiveness, Outcomes for Learners, Leadership and Management, Capacity to Improve and Quality of Provision were all graded Outstanding (Grade 1).

Visit the website at www.hartpury.ac.uk to find out more about Hartpury College and the courses on offer.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Get ahead in a land-based career with Hartpury College Deciding your next step after leaving school is one of your most important decisions. Hartpury College can offer you a range of full time courses as well as apprenticeships in Agriculture and Amenity Horticulture. We pride ourselves on offering a supportive, welcoming environment coupled with fantastic facilities and a unique, vibrant campus in which to live and study. We are in the top 10% of Colleges in England offering courses in: • Agriculture • Equine Studies • Countryside Management • Horticulture • Farm Mechanisation • Sport • Animal Care • Outdoor Adventure • Veterinary Nursing • Uniformed Public Services

Hartpury has recently been assessed as Outstanding by OFSTED Read the full report at www.hartpury.ac.uk/ofsted

Why not come along to Hartpury and see what we can offer you. Experience life on campus at one of our two day residential courses or our regular course information mornings held throughout the year. Please check the website for further details at www.hartpury.ac.uk Hartpury College, Hartpury, Gloucestershire, GL19 3BE Tel: 01452 702345 Fax: 01452 700629 Email: enquire@hartpury.ac.uk


animals moved to lowland areas for fattening before sale. These cows are usually crosses of a number of breeds and chosen to meet the farming conditions. Many cows are mated using artificial insemination (AI). This allows farmers to choose

www.kmc.ac.uk Course Helpline 01305 215215

the best animals to breed. In 2000 there were 2.3 million breeding dairy cows and 1.8 million beef cows. There are several methods of rearing beef. Some animals are housed all the year round while others are housed only in the winter when the grass has stopped growing. Beef animals are slaughtered in a modern abattoir where the conditions are strictly supervised and every effort is made to ensure that the operation is humane. In 2001, beef accounted for 22% of the meat eaten in the UK. There are many ways to enter a career in the beef industry. If you have no formal qualifications but can demonstrate your enthusiasm for working with cattle, there are opportunities for you.

Step into a great future

Kingston Maurward College near Dorchester offers full-time further education courses in: ● Countryside Management ● Horticulture ● Agriculture ● Animal Conservation ● Outdoor Adventure ● Equine Studies and Welfare and Sports Coaching ● Floristry ● Business, Administration ● Apprenticeships in a wide ● Foundation Learning and Finance range of subjects Check out our full-time courses and facilities for post-16 learning and get moving into a great future. Visit www.kmc.ac.uk or phone 01305 215215 for a new FE prospectus. LANTRA Ad 93x128.indd 1

20

7/12/09 10:16:43

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

NEWS & VIEWS

STUDY ADVICE

LAND BASED

ENTERTAINMENT

TRAVEL

Advic e

LIFEBYTE

FASHION

Working in the sheep industry Are you interested in working in a diverse industry where you will be working with sheep everyday and involved in the production of high quality lamb and wool products? Working in agriculture could give you the opportunity to work in the sheep industry. Britain is one of the European Union’s biggest sheep producers, with a national flock of approximately 35 million sheep and lambs. As well as meat, British sheep farmers produce about 35 million kilograms of wool every year. Wool is still an important source of cloth but it competes with cotton and artificial fibres. Sheep are hardy animals that are suited to a wide range of conditions. They can be kept in the open for much, if not all, of the year. Britain’s most important sheep

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

product is meat, particularly lamb. Wool is a by-product and now forms less than 5 per cent of the income from sheep. Over 70 breeds of sheep are found in Britain, which is more than any other type of livestock. The major breeds can be classified into three groups: •M  ountain and Moorland/ Upland – These are small, hardy sheep which are sure-footed and exhibit good mothering abilities, reflecting the harsh, damp climate and rugged terrain which is their native home. •L  ongwool – Larger in size than the mountain breeds these sheep are best suited to good quality grassland. •T  erminal Sire Breeds – These are compact, muscular types of sheep, which are suited to good quality grassland and kinder

lowland environments. Sheep dogs are vitally important to the sheep farmer. Without them he would have great difficulty in rounding up sheep, particularly on large hill farms. Training and handling sheep dogs is a very skilful job and many competitions, known as sheep dog trials, are held to find the best dogs and handlers. The most common breed of sheep dog is the Border Collie. All-terrain vehicles (four wheel motorbikes) are also increasingly used to help the modern shepherd check his stock and care for them correctly. There are many ways to enter a career in the sheep industry. If you have no formal qualifications but can demonstrate your enthusiasm for working with sheep, there are opportunities for you.4

21


Working in the poultry industry Are you interested in working in a diverse industry where you could be involved in the production of high quality poultry and poultry products? Choosing a career in agriculture could give you the opportunity to work in the poultry industry. Many potential entrants into the UK poultry industry will be unaware of the huge opportunities that exist for graduates and non-graduates alike. This is a vibrant dynamic industry full of highly committed, talented and ambitious people. Career paths are in place in almost every aspect of the business - the

good news is there is a distinct shortage of good, capable people entering the industry. The industry is a multi-billion pound operation, employing over a hundred thousand people throughout the country. There are good opportunities within every sector, e.g: • Management/Production • Sales and Marketing • Research and Development • Breeding & Genetics • Finance • Planning • Technical Advice • Product Development

Working in the pig industry Are you interested in working in a diverse industry where you will be working with pigs everyday and involved in the production of high quality food products like pork, ham and bacon? Working in agriculture could give you the opportunity to work in the pig industry. British pigs enjoy some of the highest welfare standards in the world. Pig farming is a specialised business and the major pigproducing areas in the UK are found in East Anglia, Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. Pigs are clean, intelligent animals that keep their areas for dunging and sleeping separate. These traits mean that they are well suited to modern farming. By providing a regular supply of food and shelter in the form of modern housing, pigs thrive and are highly productive. Today’s consumer demands lean meat with minimum fat. Farmers have therefore selected the leanest animals for breeding. In this way pigs have become progressively

22

less fat to the extent that pork is now about as lean as chicken. Some pigs are kept within buildings in indoor systems. Pregnant sows are kept either in groups in yards, which may be environmentally controlled, or most often have open sides and natural ventilation. Individual sow stalls for pregnant sows are banned in the UK. Sows give birth in a maternity

unit, which contains individual farrowing crates. This is to protect the baby pigs, which weigh a little over 1 kg at birth, about one 250th of their mother’s size. Fresh drinking water is piped to each pen so that the pigs have access to it at all times. A significant number of UK pigs are kept outdoors in open fields. Since the pigs must withstand extreme conditions, particularly in winter, sturdier, often slightly fatter breeding stock is used. In summer sows must be provided with plenty of water to form wallows in order to keep cool. It is also essential to provide shade so that they do not get sunburnt. Pigs sleep in groups in huts with straw bedding and at farrowing are provided with individual arks for each sow and litter. There are many ways to enter a career in the pig industry. If you have no formal qualifications but can demonstrate your enthusiasm for working with pigs, there are opportunities for you.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

• Food Science • Food Safety • Human Resources • Operations Management Many graduates entering the industry, given hard work and dedication, end up on the board of directors of many of our leading companies. In the modern ‘global’ business world, our British poultry breeders are operating at the leading edge of the world’s expanding markets. The state of the art technology employed by the leading breeding companies owes much to the dedication of the highly trained and qualified personnel working within the industry. Today scientists working in the poultry-breeding sector are continually striving to

e.g. nutrition and improve the birds potential to resist pharmaceutical disease and build a good skeletal companies, structure. They are also aiming to STUDY ADVICE LAND BASED equipment meet the demands of consumers manufacturers for safe, healthy, nutritious and etc. innovative food products through The poultry industry is the most the professional application of highly specialised and sophisticated science. sector of British agriculture. The Many opportunities exist for skills and experience required to enthusiastic people to establish TRAVEL ENTERTAINMENT keep the national poultry flock careers in the field of Research and Development relating to poultry. The healthy and productive do not come easily. Veterinary surgeons operating poultry industry enjoys the support Adv c e in the ipoultry industry are some of of research and development the best practitioners in any sector programmes carried out at both of agriculture. independent research centres and There are many ways FASHION to enter a the ‘in house’ research facilities LIFEBYTE career in the poultry industry. If you of many commercial operations. have no formal qualifications but Many large companies conduct can demonstrate your enthusiasm in-house development work, which for working with poultry, there are is usually carried out in conjunction opportunities for you. LS with the relevant commercial sector

If you have a passion for agriculture and are considering studying any agricultural course at College or University, then you need the NFU on your side from day one. Here at the NFU we all remember those student days, hours of researching and slaving over assignments, so much so that we want to help… NFU Student membership is FREE and is specifically aimed at students studying a full or part time agricultural, horticultural, land based or related course within England and Wales. Join Online NOW at www.nfuonline.com. We need you, the future generation of farming. If you want to progress within Britain’s best industry then this is your direct link to the largest agricultural organisation in the UK. Make sure your assignments are informed by the latest industry developments. Student Membership offers a fantastic package designed exclusively to support you through your studies and prepare you for a career in farming, whilst giving you loads of money saving discounts!

Terms and Conditions apply, for more information please visit www.nfuonline.com

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

NEWS & VIEWS

To help with your studies… • Over 200 Business Guides giving you up to the minute information on the rules and regulations affecting agriculture, horticulture and rural affairs • Sector specific newsletters are an invaluable resource to assist with your assignments covering loads of sectors - crops, sugar, livestock, poultry, horticulture, food chain and dairy issues. • NFU Bulletin is a weekly email bulletin containing the hottest news and information to keep you in the agriculture loop!

Sign me up and WIN a case of NFU Centenary cider!

Membership is totally FREE and it is so easy to join online. All you have to do is fill out a two minute application form, visit www.nfuonline.com and we will send you your very own password so that you can access the member’s area online. If you join online before the 28th February 2010 you will be entered in a prize draw to win a case of NFU Centenary Cider, so what are you waiting for, join today! All entries must be 18 or over. For full terms and conditions please email studentmembership@nfu.org.uk

23


The Agricultural Crops sector The crops industry offers a huge range of opportunities for anyone of any age. Crop farms and businesses vary enormously, so you could find yourself producing and managing food groups such as vegetables, cereals and root crops. You could also be producing non-food and industrial crops such as energy crops, crops for paper and materials like hemp, specialist oils like lavender and pharmaceuticals. The UK crops industry contributes £3.6 billion to the country’s economy. People working in the crops industry are also responsible for managing the land in an environmentally friendly and sustainable way. Arable farmers spend an average of eleven hours a month carrying out environmental work.

Did you know…?

• There are 60,700 crops businesses in the UK • These businesses employ an estimated 121,900 people… would you like to be one of them?

What opportunities are there for me?

Farms vary enormously, so there are plenty of opportunities to pursue a particular interest. Businesses can be small, so each employee has an important role to play. The more skills you can develop, the more you will be able to contribute.

24

Education and qualifications Crops businesses need employees who can combine technical knowledge with practical skills. There are a range of courses available that will help you achieve the skills and knowledge you need to work at different levels in the crop industries. Work-based or vocational training These qualifications combine practical work-based experience with classroom-based training. Some enable you to earn while you learn! They will give you the skills and knowledge you need to do a job effectively and show that you can actually do it - not simply that you know how to do it in theory. They include: Apprenticeships •A  pprenticeship in Agricultural Crops and Livestock Apprenticeships are government backed training schemes aimed primarily at people aged between 16-24, although funding is available for those over the age of 24 in some regions. They enable you to learn practical skills and achieve nationally recognised qualifications, including a relevant NVQ and technical certificate. You will spend part of your time ‘on-the-job’ getting real experience and some of your time in college learning the theory you need to know. You also have the opportunity to earn a wage while you learn!

NVQs/ SVQs NVQs (National Vocational Qualifications) and SVQs (Scottish Vocational Qualifications) are also work-related qualifications that enable you to gain the skills and knowledge you need to do a job. You can do an NVQ or SVQ at different levels, depending on your ability and what sort of job you want to do. These qualifications are based on national standards agreed by the crops industry, so they are recognised by employers throughout the UK. You could consider: • NVQ/SVQ in Agriculture Level 1 (equivalent to GCSEs or a Standard Grade General) • NVQ/SVQ in Agricultural Crop Production at Levels 2 and 3 (Level 2 is equivalent GCSEs, a Standard Grade Credit, a First Diploma or a National Certificate. Level 3 is equivalent to A-levels, an Advanced Higher, a National Diploma or a National Certificate). Further and higher education If you would rather do a college or university-based course to give you the skills and knowledge you need, there are also lots of options available to you at different levels depending on your abilities and

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Moreton Morrell & Pershore

Working together to bring you the best in land-based learning Full-time and distance learning courses Further and higher education study options A wide choice of courses including niche markets your aspirations. They include: • First Diploma, National Diploma and Higher National Diploma • National Certificate, Higher National Certificate, Advanced National Certificate • BSc, MSc, PhD

First class teaching staff A friendly and relaxed atmosphere On demand training for employers

Technical and professional qualifications

Once you are working in the crops industry, if you want to improve your skills and knowledge in a specific area, you could do additional technical courses and professional qualifications. These could include: • Proficiency Tests and Craftsman’s Certificates

What can I aspire to?

There are many ways to enter a career in the crops industry. If you have no formal qualifications but can demonstrate your enthusiasm for working in crops, there are opportunities for you. Opportunities exist for qualified people to progress to careers in areas linked to the crops industry, such as sales, research and policy development. Work on larger farms offers the opportunity to specialise in a particular area. LS

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

Horticulture, Tree Surgery & Floristry Equine, Farriery & Blacksmithing

Agriculture & Countryside Management

Animal Welfare & Veterinary Nursing

For more information visit:

www.warkscol.ac.uk Including


The Agricultural Livestock sector

The livestock industry offers a huge range of opportunities for anyone of any age. Livestock farms and businesses vary enormously, so you could find yourself working in areas as diverse as dairy, beef, sheep, pigs or poultry. Many lowland farms combine livestock production with growing crops. Farmers Markets are increasing, providing farmers with a direct route to market for their products and creating a shopping experience that is vibrant and upbeat.

Are you interested in working in a diverse What opportunities are there industry where animal health and welfare for me? Farms vary enormously, so there are is increasingly important, and that covers plenty of opportunities to pursue a a range of specialist areas including particular interest. Businesses can be small, so each employee has dairy, beef, sheep, pigs and poultry? an important role to play. The more skills you can develop, the more you will be able to contribute

Emma McGowan, Veterinary Nurse From an early age Emma McGowan had an interest in working with animals, particularly horses. After leaving school she initially attended an equine college for 2 years, before deciding to concentrate on a career in veterinary nursing. Emma completed the veterinary nursing course at the College of Agriculture, Food and Rural Enterprise’s Greenmount Campus. During this time Emma had the opportunity to undertake practical based vocational training which incorporated administering treatment under supervision; this work was also supported by theoretical studies. Emma believes the experience she gained at the equine college was invaluable for the training she undertook within veterinary nursing.

26

Education and qualifications Livestock businesses need employees who can combine technical knowledge with practical skills. There are a range of courses available that will help you achieve the skills and knowledge you need to work at different levels in the livestock industries.

Emma’s day is varied; she assists the veterinary surgeons in caring for and treating the animals through a range of tasks such as taking and analysing blood and urine samples, undertaking physiotherapy and hydrotherapy and by placing intravenous and urinary catheters in patients; alongside this Emma also assists with administrative work. The highlight of Emma’s career to date was achieved through her work with the British Veterinary Nursing Association.

Work-based or vocational training

These qualifications combine practical work-based experience with classroom-based training. Some enable you to earn while you learn! They will give you the skills and knowledge you need to do a job effectively and show that you can actually do it - not simply that you know how to do it in theory. They include: Apprenticeships • Apprenticeship in Agricultural Crops and Livestock

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

Apprenticeships are government backed training schemes aimed primarily at people aged between 16-24, although funding is available for those over the age of 24 in some regions. They enable you to learn practical skills and achieve nationally recognised qualifications, including a relevant NVQ and technical certificate. You will spend part of your time ‘on-the-job’ getting real experience and some of your time in college learning the theory you need to know. You also have the opportunity to earn a wage while you learn! NVQs/SVQs NVQs (National Vocational Qualifications) and SVQs (Scottish Vocational Qualifications) are also work-related qualifications that enable you to gain the skills and knowledge you needed to do a job. You can do an NVQ or SVQ at different levels, depending on your ability and what sort of job you want to do. These qualifications are based on national standards agreed by the livestock industry, so they are recognised by employers throughout the UK. You could consider: • NVQ/SVQ in Agriculture Level 1 (equivalent to GCSEs or a Standard Grade General) • NVQ/SVQ in Mixed Farming at Levels 2 and 3 (Level 2 is equivalent GCSEs, a Standard Grade Credit, a First Diploma or a National Certificate. Level 3 is equivalent to A-levels, an Advanced Higher, a National Diploma or a National Certificate). • NVQ/SVQ in Livestock Production at Levels 2 and 3 (as above) Further and higher education If you would rather do a college or university-based course to give you the skills and knowledge you need, there are also lots of options available to you at different levels

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

depending on your abilities and your aspirations. They include: •F  irst Diploma, National Diploma and Higher National Diploma •N  ational Certificate, Advanced National Certificate, Higher National Certificate •B  Sc, MSc, PhD Technical and professional qualifications Once you are working in the livestock industry, if you want to improve your skills and knowledge in a specific area, you could do additional technical courses and professional qualifications. These could include: •C  ertificates of Competence

NEWS & VIEWS

but can demonstrate your enthusiasm for working with livestock, STUDY ADVICEthere LAND BASED are opportunities for you. Opportunities exist for qualified people to progress to careers in areas linked to the livestock industry, such as sales, research and policy development. TRAVEL Work on ENTERTAINMENT larger farms offers the opportunity to specialise in a particular area. LS Advic e

LIFEBYTE

FASHION

What can I aspire to?

There are many ways to enter a career in the livestock industry. If you have no formal qualifications 00375 wnsc Open Day ad 100x70_lst

1/12/09

Not sure what to do when you leave School? Come along to our Open Day and let us help you decide We have an extensive range of courses to choose from: • Agriculture and Engineering • Animal Management and Welfare • Apprenticeships • Countryside Management • Equine • Foundation Learning Tier • Floristry and Horticulture • Motor Vehicle Open Day - Saturday • Outdoor Adventure 6th February 2010 • The Football Scholarship 10am-2pm • Uniformed Services

For more information, help or advice, call 01939 262100 or e-mail enquiries@wnsc.ac.uk www.wnsc.ac.uk

27

10


Are you interested in working in an industry that will provide you with lots of practical and technical skills, and where the welfare of fish and of the environment is extremely important?

The Aquaculture Sector If you like the idea of planning your own workloads and being your own boss, then a job in aquaculture could be for you. In this diverse industry, you could be involved in breeding and rearing anything from shellfish to finfish, either for sale or for restocking lakes and rivers for angling. The work of a fish farmer varies considerably and requires a wide range of skills. This includes knowing how to maintain equipment and cages, and ensuring the health and welfare of fish.

What opportunities are there for me? You could find yourself breeding or rearing stocks of fish for wholesale or retail trade or for restocking lakes and rivers used by anglers.

28

You could also be involved in habitat management, ensuring the health and welfare of stock, and poaching control.

can actually do it - not simply that you know how to do it in theory. They include:

Education and qualifications

Apprenticeships • Scottish Modern Apprenticeship in Aquaculture

Work-based or vocational training

Apprenticeships are government backed training schemes aimed primarily at people aged between 16-24, although funding is available for those over the age of 24 in some regions. They enable you to learn practical skills and achieve nationally recognised qualifications, including a relevant NVQ and technical certificate. You will spend part of your time ‘on-the-job’ getting real experience and some of your time in college learning the theory you need to know. You also have the opportunity to earn a wage while you learn!

Aquaculture businesses need employees who can combine technical knowledge with practical skills. There are a range of courses available that will help you achieve the skills and knowledge you need to work at different levels in the aquaculture industry.

These qualifications combine practical work-based experience with classroom-based training. Some enable you to earn while you learn! They will give you the skills and knowledge you need to do a job effectively and show that you

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

NEWS & VIEWS

university-based NVQs/SVQs course to give NVQs (National Vocational STUDY ADVICE LAND BASED you the skills and Qualifications) and SVQs (Scottish knowledge you Vocational Qualifications) are also need, there are also lots of options work-related qualifications that available to you at different levels enable you to gain the skills and depending on your abilities and knowledge you needed to do a your aspirations. They include: job. You can do an NVQ or SVQ • First Diploma, National Diploma at different levels, depending on TRAVEL ENTERTAINMENT and Higher National Diploma your ability and what sort of job you • National Certificate and Higher want to do. These qualifications are National Certificate based on national standards agreed Advi • B Sc,ceMSc, PhD by the aquaculture industry, so they are recognised by employers throughout the UK. You could What can I aspire to? consider: There are many ways to enter a LIFEBYTE FASHION •S  VQ in Aquaculture at Levels 2 career in aquaculture. If you have and 3 no formal qualifications but can demonstrate your enthusiasm Further and higher education for working with fish, there are If you would rather do a college or opportunities for you. LS

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

29


NEWS & VIEWS

CAREER ADVICE

£ LAND BASED

MONEY

I WANT TO WORK IN...TOURISM

NEWS

Environmental Conservation TRAVEL

SEXUAL HEALTH

SPORT

Are you interested in making a difference to the environment you FASHION COMPETITIONS live in, and working in a profession where you’ll get the chance to help find solutions to complicated problems? Working in environmental conservation could give you the opportunity to: • Discover more about, and help tackle, environmental issues • Work as part of a team with other people who care about the environment • Learn lots of practical skills • Make the best use of your knowledge to help find solutions • Help provide a sustainable environment for us all • What is environmental conservation?

landscapes, birds, animals and plants, countryside recreation, and waterway conservation. Environmental conservation overlaps with areas such as heritage conservation, archaelogy and environmental management. A career in this profession is not only about ‘green’ issues, but is also about making the best use of your knowledge and understanding to provide solutions that will lead to a more sustainable environment for us all.

If you care about environmental issues and want to make a difference to the environment you live in, a career in environmental conservation could be for you. Professionals in this industry are involved with the conservation of rural and urban

There are environmental conservation opportunities in areas including community recycling, habitat management, countryside recreation, planning and parks, the protection of animals and plants, and even dealing with international

30

What opportunities are there for me?

issues such as global warming. These opportunities exist in a range of organisations from government departments to the voluntary sector. It is really useful to gain experience through voluntary work, as competition for jobs in this profession has increased.

Education and qualifications Conservation organisations and businesses need employees who can combine technical knowledge with practical skills. There are a range of courses available that will help you achieve the skills and knowledge you need to work at different levels in conservation.

Work-based or vocational training

These qualifications combine practical work-based experience with classroom-based training.4

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


This design remains the copyright of Walters Snowdon Advertising Ltd and cannot be used or reproduced without the authorisation of the above company.

MOULTON COLLEGE Nothamptonshire

A University Qualification plus Preparation for Employment Moulton College aims to produce who are College work ready by Grade graduates 1 OUTSTANDING – Ofsted 2008 combining first class higher education with vocational skills development.

Full time courses in Daventry

For those who have completed an NVQ 2009-10 3, National Diploma or ‘A’ Levels: Prospectus • Agriculture & Countryside Management

available NOW

• Foundation Award in Carpentry & Joinery Applied Conservation Biology – B.Sc(Hons) Agriculture – Foundation Degree • Intermediate Award in Carpentry & Joinery Countryside & Wildlife Management – Foundation Degree

• Foundation • Animal Welfare & Veterinary Health

Certificate in Plumbing

Animal Welfare – M.Sc • Technical Certificate in Plumbing Applied Animal Studies – Foundation Degree, Higher • Foundation Award in Brickwork National Certificate, Higher National Diploma, B.Sc(Hons)

• Construction Services•

Intermediate Award in Brickwork

Construction Management – Foundation Degree, Higher National Certificate Civil Engineering Management – Foundation Degree, Higher National Certificate Building Services Engineering – Foundation Degree, Higher National Certificate

Apprenticeships (Part time study with employment)

• Business Administration Service Equine Behaviour•& Customer Management – M.Sc Equine Management – B.Sc(Hons), Foundation Degree • Brickwork • Interior Design – BA (Hons), Higher National Diploma • Arboriculture – B.Sc (Hons), Foundation Degree • Carpentry & Joinery • Horticulture & Garden Design For more information • Plumbing Horticulture & Garden Design – or to request a B.Sc(Hons), Foundation Degree • Roofi ng and Tiling prospectus, please Sports Turf Management – Foundation Degree contact Student • Horticulture • Sports Studies Services on: Academies – Football, Rugby, Dressage, • Floristry Tel: 01604 491131 Hockey, Basketball, Cricket and Golf Fax: 01604 491127 • Animal and Veterinary Nursing Sports Performance & CoachingCare – Email: enquiries@ Foundation Degree, BSc(Hons) moulton.ac.uk • Equestrian studies • Equine Studies

Sports Therapy – Foundation Degree Sports Management & Coaching – Foundation Degree Outdoor Adventure – Foundation Degree

For full details of all courses available visit: Are you looking for staff? Have you considered www.moulton.ac.uk Also available in most subjects, a one-year topthe benefi ts of employing an Apprentice? Moulton College, up honours degree course for students who already Benefi ts include – Staff procedures, West Street, Moulton, hold a HND or Foundation Degree. Courses at First trained in your own Northamptonshire, NN3 7RR Diploma, National Award,free Certificate and Diploma. training from the College (for under 18’s), Nationally

Calling all Employers

recognised qualifications, support from a Training

The college boasts exceptional practical facilities on its

Daventry Vocational Adviser and regular information on developments taking 500 hectare campus, including a commercial garden Skills Academy place in the industry.wellcentre, pet store, florist and nursery, arboretum, 23 High March, equipped workshops, commercially operated farm, stabling Contact: Moultonpractice, College Daventry, NN11 4EZ arenas, and indoor/outdoor equine veterinary equine therapy centre, small animal veterinary practice NN3 Moulton, Northampton, and small animal therapy centre. There are a large variety Tel:pitches 01604and 491131 of artificial and grass sports 2 sports halls.

www.moulton.ac.uk

7RR

En-suite self catering andEmail: cateredenquiries@moulton.ac.uk residential places available with subsidised transport available from many areas.


Some enable you to earn while you learn! They will give you the skills and knowledge you need to do a job effectively and show that you can actually do it – not simply that you know how to do it in theory. They include: Apprenticeships • Apprenticeship in Environmental Conservation Apprenticeships are government backed training schemes aimed primarily at people aged between 16-24, although funding is available for those over the age of 24 in some regions. They enable you to learn practical skills and achieve nationally recognised qualifications, including a relevant NVQ and technical certificate. You will spend part of your time ‘on-the-job’ getting real experience and some of your time in college learning the theory you need to know. You also have the opportunity to earn a wage while you learn! NVQs/SVQs NVQs (National Vocational Qualifications) and SVQs (Scottish Vocational Qualifications) are also work-related qualifications that enable you to gain the skills and knowledge you needed to do a

job. You can do an NVQ or SVQ at different levels, depending on your ability and what sort of job you want to do. These qualifications are based on national standards agreed by the conservation industry, so they are recognised by employers throughout the UK. You could consider: NVQ/SVQ in Environmental Conservation at Levels 2 and 3 (Level 2 is equivalent to GCSEs, a Standard Grade Credit, a First Diploma or a National Certificate. Level 3 is equivalent to A-levels, an Advanced Higher, a National Diploma or a National Certificate).

out for. They are validated by universities and are a degree in their own right. Once completed, the foundation degree will provide a stepping stone to a full honours degree should you wish to continue with higher education. With no nationally set entry requirements, foundation degrees are open to anyone with the right ability. Offered on both a full-time and part-time basis, accessibility is a key point of the foundation degrees, with learning in the workplace forming a major part of the qualification.  

Further and higher education If you would rather do a college or university-based course to give you the skills and knowledge you need, there are also lots of options available to you at different levels depending on your abilities and your aspirations. They include:

• National Certificate, Higher National Certificate and Advanced National Certificate • First Diploma, National Diploma and Higher National Diploma • B Sc, MSc and PhD

Foundation degrees •F  oundation Degree in Applied Ornithology Foundation degrees are a new employment-related higher education qualification designed to equip you with the higher-level skills that employers are crying

You may also consider:

What can I aspire to?

There are many ways to enter a career in environmental conservation. If you have no formal qualifications but can demonstrate your interest and enthusiasm for working in this areas, you could develop your skills and knowledge through voluntary work with a relevant environmental organisation. LS

There are environmental conservation opportunities in areas including community recycling, habitat management, countryside recreation, planning and parks, the protection of animals and plants, and even dealing with international issues such as global warming. 32

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Green thinking? Capel Manor College is London’s only specialist college for landbased studies. Full and part-time courses in Animal Care, Countryside & Arboriculture, Floristry, Horticulture and Garden Design are offered at our centres across London. If you’re a green thinker and love the outdoors APPLY NOW for courses starting in September. Call us TODAY on 08456 122122 or email enquiries@capel.ac.uk for a prospectus or view it online at www.capel.ac.uk/prospectus

Advice Sessions

Centres across London...

take place at all our centres between February and July. Come along to discuss your course options with staff and find the right course for you. For dates and times see the website.

Capel Manor College

www.capel.ac.uk


Veterinary Nursing Veterinary Nurses (VNs) work alongside Veterinary Surgeons in order to provide a high standard of care for animals. Veterinary Nurses normally work within a veterinary surgery or veterinary hospital and are involved in a wide range of care and treatment. Veterinary Nurses provide skilled supportive care for sick animals as well as undertaking minor surgery, monitoring during anaesthesia, medical treatments and diagnostic tests under veterinary supervision. Veterinary Nurses also play an important role in the education of owners on good standards of animal care. As with any worthwhile job, the training required takes time, hard work and commitment - but those willing to put in the effort will be rewarded with a career offering variety, interest and daily contact with animals and their owners. Positions outside veterinary practice includes work in research establishments, laboratories, universities, colleges, zoological/ wildlife parks, charities, pharmaceutical companies and breeding/boarding kennels.

34

Enrolling as a Student Veterinary Nurse You must be employed at a Veterinary Nurse Approved Centre (VNAC) or at an RCVS registered Training Practice (TP). For up-todate details of practices please consult the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons website. www. rcvs.org.uk. Have 5 GCSE’s at grade C or above including English Language, Mathematics and one science subject

Or Have passed the Animal Nursing Assistant qualification and Key Skills Level 2 in Application of Number and Communication. Please refer to the information contained within this section and the education section of this website for more information on the ANA qualification. More information on Key Skills can be found at www. dfes.gov.uk/keyskills

Or Alternative qualifications of a comparable or higher standard may be accepted in lieu of the usual requirements at the discretion of the RCVS. If you are unsure whether you can meet the entry requirements, please contact the RCVS directly. Alternatively, if you wanted to undertake a BSc Honours in Veterinary Nursing degree, the minimum requirements are as above plus at least:• two A Levels, BTEC National Diploma in a science subject or Advanced GNVQs. •E  quivalent qualifications (including the VN Certificate) will also be considered. If you are over 21 without formal qualifications and can show high levels of ability and experience then you can also apply. LS

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

Working in the equine industry could give you the opportunity to: • Work in specialist areas from riding schools to racehorse training • Be part of a dedicated team caring for the welfare of horses • Develop your horse care knowledge • Be responsible for supervising or even riding horses for a living • Take part in a growing and exciting industry

What is the equine industry?

If you love horses, care about their welfare, and would love a job where you could work with them everyday, then a career in the equine industry could be for you. Opportunities to work with horses are incredibly diverse, so you could be working in areas ranging from riding schools and livery yards to racehorse training. The UK spends over £2 billion on the equine industry each year. There are approximately 900,000 horses and ponies in the UK and 2 million riders, which demonstrates the country’s love of horses and the potential for making money in the equine industry. Riding lessons alone are worth over £500 million. Horses are a major asset for their owners, and need the skilled attention of devoted and well-trained staff.

Equine businesses need employees who can combine technical knowledge with practical skills. There are a range of courses available that will help you achieve STUDY ADVICE the skills and knowledge you need to work at different levels in the equine industry.

NEWS & VIEWS

LAND BASED

Work-based or vocational training

These qualifications combine practi- ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL cal work-based experience with Are you are interested classroom-based training. Some enin horses, care able you to earn while you learn! They Advic e will give you the skills and knowledge about their welfare, you need to do a job effectively and and would like an show that you can actually do it - not simply that you know how to do it in LIFEBYTE enjoyable and varied FASHION theory. They include: Apprenticeships • Apprenticeship in the Equine Industry 4

career working in an exciting, competitive environment?

The Equine sector

What opportunities are there for me?

There are opportunities to work with horses in areas including riding schools, livery yards, events and competitions, clubs and hunts, and racing yards in careers ranging from grooms, to riding instructors, to horse breeders and jockeys. Many equine establishments have multiple functions e.g. riding schools can also be livery yards, and breeders can also be trainers.

Education and qualifications LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

35


Apprenticeships are government backed training schemes aimed primarily at people aged between 16-24, although funding is available for those over the age of 24 in some regions. They enable you to learn practical skills and achieve nationally recognised qualifications, including a relevant NVQ and technical certificate. You will spend part of your time ‘on-the-job’ getting real experience and some of your time in college learning the theory you need to know. You also have the opportunity to earn a wage while you learn! NVQs/SVQs NVQs (National Vocational Qualifications) and SVQs (Scottish Vocational Qualifications) are also work-related qualifications that enable you to gain the skills and knowledge you needed to do a job. You can do an NVQ or SVQ at different levels, depending on your ability and what sort of job you want to do. These qualifications are based on national standards agreed by the equine industry, so they are recognised by employers throughout the UK. You could consider: • NVQ/SVQ in Horse Care at Levels 1 and 2 (Level 1 is equivalent to GCSEs or a Standard Grade General. Level 2 is equivalent GCSEs, a Standard Grade Credit, a First Diploma or a National Certificate) • NVQ/SVQ in Horse Care and Management at Level 3 (Level 3 is equivalent to A-levels, an Advanced Higher, a National Diploma or a National Certificate) • NVQ/SVQ in Racehorse Care at Level 2 • NVQ/SVQ in Racehorse Care and Management at Level 3 Qualifications offered by the British Horse Society: • Fellow FBHS (International expert)

36

• B HS Instructor BHSI (International Instructor level 3) • BHS Stable Managers • B HS Intermediate Instructor BHSII (International Instructor level 2) • B HS Assistant Instructor BHSAI (International Instructor level 1) • B HS Groom’s Certificate Horse Knowledge and Care • BHS Riding Stage 3 • B HS Stage 2 Horse Knowledge and Care • B HS Stage 1 Horse Knowledge and Care • Horse Owner’s Certificate • The Riding and Road Safety Test

Further and higher education

If you would rather do a college or university-based course to give you the skills and knowledge you need, there are also lots of options available to you at different levels depending on your abilities and your aspirations. They include: Foundation degrees • Foundation Degree in Equine Studies Foundation degrees are a new employment-related higher education qualification designed to equip you with the higher-level skills that employers are crying out for.

They are validated by universities and are a degree in their own right. Once completed, the foundation degree will provide a stepping stone to a full honours degree should you wish to continue with higher education. With no nationally set entry requirements, foundation degrees are open to anyone with the right ability. Offered on both a full-time and part-time basis, accessibility is a key point of the foundation degrees, with learning in the workplace forming a major part of the qualification. You may also consider: • National Certificate, Higher National Certificate and Advanced National Certificate • First Diploma, National Diploma and Higher National Diploma • BA, BSc, PgDip and MSc

What can I aspire to?

There are many ways to enter a career in the equine industry. If you have no formal qualifications but can demonstrate your interest and enthusiasm for working with horses, there may be opportunities for you. It is a good idea to get some experience by taking riding lessons or assisting at stables or on a farm. This could be followed by full-time work experience, training, or a course leading to a qualification. LS

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Anthony O’Donnell, Assistant Race Planner Anthony joined Horse Racing Ireland (HRI) as an Assistant Race Planner. Anthony said: “I really enjoyed my time studying at Enniskillen Campus and feel that the combination of academic study, practical skills and IT experience really helped me to get my job in HRI and undertake the tasks involved.” He continued: “The social aspect of being at Enniskillen Campus was great with lots of study tours, fundraising events and nights out regularly organised throughout the year. All in all it was a great experience, one that I would recommend to anyone who is interested in pursuing a career in the equine sector.”

Anthony O’Donnell graduated with a Foundation Degree in Equine Management in June 2008. While studying at the College of Agriculture, Food and Rural Enterprise’s Enniskillen Campus he regularly rode out and represented CAFRE in numerous point-to-point races demonstrating the practical knowledge gained during the course. During his work placement, Anthony was based in England at the yard of the famous British champion racehorse trainer, Paul Nicholls. There he worked as a key member of this successful training team. He also got ample opportunity to visit leading racing festivals. On graduating from CAFRE,

Easton College offers subjects in various areas including: Agriculture Land based Technology Ecology and Conservation Gamekeeping Horticulture Arboriculture Equine

Various courses available:

First Diplomas National Diplomas NVQs Apprenticeships Foundation Degrees Short Courses

Come and see the campus and meet our staff at the forthcoming information sessions: 17th March 4.30pm7.30pm 20th March 10.00am1.00pm

Easton, Norwich, Norfolk, NR9 5DX 01603 730200 www.easton.ac.uk info@easton.ac.uk

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

37


Grow your car

Rural and Countryside Management • Agriculture Food • Floristry • Equine • Agricultural Engineering Horticulture • Communication • Farriery Veterinary Nursing


reer at CAFRE

CAFRE Open Days Enniskillen Campus: Greenmount Campus: Loughry Campus:

Saturday 20 March 2010 Wednesday 28 April 2010 Tuesday 27 April 2010

www.cafre.ac.uk

For more information and details contact: Freephone 0800 028 4291 Tel from RoI 048 9442 6624

Textphone 028 9052 4420 E-mail enquiries@cafre.ac.uk Or visit our Website www.cafre.ac.uk


NEWS & VIEWS

CAREER ADVICE

£ LAND BASED

MONEY

TRAVEL

SEXUAL HEALTH

FASHION

COMPETITIONS

Farriery or the shoeing of horses and similar animals is an ancient craft. It is defined in the Farriers (Registration) Act 1975 as ‘any work in connection with the I WANT TO WORK preparation or treatment of the foot of a horse IN...TOURISM for the immediate reception of a shoe thereon, the fitting by nailing or otherwise of a shoe to the foot or the finishing off of such work to the foot’. Farriery is hard work and it is practised on animals, some of which may be fractious. A farrier is a skilled craftsperson who has a sound knowledge of both the theory and practice of the craft, SPORT capable of shoeing all types of feet, whether normal or defective, making shoes to suit all types of animal and working conditions and of devising corrective measures that will help to compensate for faulty limb action. A ‘farrier’ should not be confused with a ‘blacksmith’. Farriers and blacksmiths both work with metal but only a farrier is permitted to fit shoes to horses.

What is Farriery? Are you interested in working in a diverse industry where animal health and welfare is increasingly important, and that covers a range of specialist areas including dairy, beef, sheep, pigs and poultry? 40

NEWS

Why Become a Farrier? When you become a farrier you become a member of an old, traditional and well respected profession. After completing the apprenticeship and becoming registered, you can become your own boss and work hours that suit you and your clients. You will be out in the open air visiting a variety of people and places, working with their animals and practising a craft that is in high demand. It is very possible that any experiences and knowledge you gain will lead you to become involved in other areas and further professional development, such as taking extra qualifications and improving your knowledge, and being able to specialise in different areas of farriery, you could eventually train an apprentice yourself and help to pass on the knowledge that you have gained and you could become an examiner or tutor at a college and help train the next generation of farriers. LS

How to become a Farrier To become a farrier it is necessary to qualify for entry into the Register of Farriers. To achieve this requires completion of a course of training and a minimum period of experience approved by the Farriers Registration Council (FRC). The course currently approve is an Advanced Apprenticeship, including an NVQ Level 3 in Farriery and a Technical Certificate which is the Diploma of the Worshipful Company of Farriers. The prescribed period of experience is 4 years and 2 months.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Advertorial // Easton College

Easton College has Been Expanding! The end of December 2008 saw the Learning Skills Council approve Easton College’s application for expansion. Situated 7 miles from Norwich City Centre and within its own 245 hectares of countryside, Easton College has almost had all of its development work completed. The projects include an equestrian and animal science and welfare centre, a tennis centre, accommodation block and a classroom block. These exciting new developments will enable students to use the very best of modern technology and courserelated facilities. The Equestrian and Animal Care Centre, official opened this month by Pippa Funnell MBE and Sir Nicholas Bacon contains an international sized indoor and outdoor riding arenas with a viewing gallery, internal stabling equipped with high tech facilities, training equipment, a lorry park as well as a cafeteria, horsewalker and solarium. The classroom block, to be named ‘Jubilee 3’ is an expansion on the already existing ‘Jubilee 1’ and ‘2’. Due for completion by February 2010 this will host lecture rooms, demonstration rooms and be equipped with technology to enable staff to support and teach students in the wide range of courses on offer.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

The new Tennis Centre saw Jamie and Judy Murray official open it in September. Students and the public regularly use the facility which is available for pay and play. The centre holds evening and weekend classes for all ages and abilities and often hosts tournaments. Student residential accommodation has expanded too – the college now has 122 bedrooms including those in halls of residences and houses. Accommodation allows students who live a considerable distance from the college to study there, and make use of all the facilities such as the gym, refectory, sports bar, library and other sports facilities. David Lawrence, Principal, says “The expansion will benefit all of our students towards achieving

their qualifications, and together with skilled industry inputs and concentration of specialist areas, this expansion will help Easton College to give the best possible start to a student’s career.” Easton College currently offers courses within 16 different areas, including: Agriculture, Sustainable Engineering, Countryside Management, Horticulture, Sport, Land-based Industries, Equestrian and Animal Management. The course levels range from Entry Level through to Foundation Degree, so really the College has something for everyone. With its rapidly growing number of students, extra transportation links have been added for September 2009, providing access from locations including North Walsham, Thetford, Wells, Downham Market and Swaffham.

Further Details on courses, or general information, please contact the college on 01603 731292 or by visiting www.easton.ac.uk

41


Fisheries Management Are you interested in working in an industry that will provide you with lots of practical and technical skills, and where the welfare of fish and of the environment is extremely important? The fisheries management industry currently includes government-funded fisheries research, privately funded research (Fishery Trusts), commercial trout fisheries, District Salmon Boards, fishing guides and ghillies, and angling clubs. The industry covers the full spectrum of jobs from research biologists to manual workers. Angling is one of the nation`s biggest participation sports and the total number of coarse, game and sea anglers directly generates an annual expenditure of ÂŁ3.3 billion and 12,250 full-time jobs. What opportunities are there for me? There are plenty of opportunities to pursue a particular interest in government-funded fisheries research, privately funded research (Fishery Trusts), commercial trout fisheries, District Salmon Boards, fishing guides and ghillies, and angling clubs. Education and qualifications Fisheries Management businesses

42

need employees who can combine technical knowledge with practical skills. There are a range of courses available that will help you achieve the skills and knowledge you need to work at different levels in fisheries management. Work-based or vocational training These qualifications combine practical work-based experience with classroom-based training. Some enable you to earn while you learn! They will give you the skills and knowledge you need to do a job effectively and show that you can actually do it - not simply that you know how to do it in theory. They include: NVQs/SVQs NVQs (National Vocational Qualifications) and SVQs (Scottish Vocational Qualifications) are also work-related qualifications that enable you to gain the skills and knowledge you needed to do a job. You can do an NVQ or SVQ at different levels, depending on your ability and what sort of job you want to do. These qualifications are based on national standards agreed

by the fisheries management industry, so they are recognised by employers throughout the UK. You could consider: • NVQ/SVQ in Fisheries Management at Levels 2 and 3 (Level 2 is equivalent GCSEs, a Standard Grade Credit, a First Diploma or a National Certificate. Level 3 is equivalent to A-levels, an Advanced Higher, a National Diploma or a National Certificate).

What can I aspire to?

There are many ways to enter a career in the fisheries management industry. If you have no formal qualifications but can demonstrate your enthusiasm for working with fish, there are opportunities for you. You could work in governmentfunded fisheries research, privately funded research (Fishery Trusts), commercial trout fisheries, District Salmon Boards, fishing guides and ghillies, and angling clubs. Opportunities exist for qualified people to progress to careers in areas linked to the livestock industry, such as sales, research and policy development. Work on larger farms offers the opportunity to specialise in a particular area. LS

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Careers in Floristry A career in floristry is both challenging and rewarding. A good florist has creative flair, manual dexterity, a sense of colour and design and a thorough knowledge of flowering plants. Retail skills are also important and florists must be competent in customer care, selling floristry products, purchasing raw materials and handling payments.4

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

CONTENTS

NEWS & VIEWS

STUDY ADVICE

LAND BASED

ENTERTAINMENT

TRAVEL

Advic e

LIFEBYTE

FASHION

43


Such a broad range of practical skills can be taught through vocational training in the workplace, or at college.

Vocational qualifications

National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) and Scottish Vocational Qualifications (SVQs) in Floristry are established at Levels 2 and 3 and are awarded by City and Guilds and SQA. NVQs/SVQs give you the recognition that not only do you have the knowledge and skill that floristry requires, but that you can and have applied this to the level of performance required for working in a floristry business.

Apprenticeships

Apprenticeships and Advanced Apprenticeships are government backed training initiatives aimed at young people between the ages of 16 and 24. They have been designed in conjunction with floristry employers to ensure they are relevant to floristry businesses. In England and Wales young people are encouraged to follow an Apprenticeship before undertaking an Advanced Apprenticeship in

Useful Addresses The Society of Floristry Tel: 0870 241 0432 (office open from 10am – 2pm). Email: info@societyoffloristry.org Website: www.societyoffloristry.org The Flowers and Plants Association 266-270 Flower Market, New Covent Garden Market, London SW8 5NB Tel: 020 7738 8044. Email: info@flowers.org.uk Website: www.flowers.org.uk Growing Careers Writtle College, Chelmsford, Essex CM1 3RR Tel: 01245 424200 Website: www.growing-careers.com

44

floristry. Funding is available through Learning and Skills Councils (LSC). This is guaranteed for 16, 17 and 18 year olds. For those over 18 years, funding is at the discretion of the LSC and subject to the availability of resources. All funded Apprenticeships should be completed by the 25th birthday. In Scotland, where Apprenticeships are not available, Scottish Modern Apprenticeships are available through Skillseekers. Funding will be provided by Local Enterprise Councils (LEC) and will contribute toward the necessary training to meet the Modern Apprenticeship objectives. Entry requirements: Apprenticeships – There are no formal entry requirements, although young people need to demonstrate enthusiasm and

KEITS (Vocational Training Provider), Unit C, Houndswood Gate, Harper Lane, Radlett, Hertfordshire WD7 7HU Tel: 01923 854586 Fax: 01923 858016 Email: info@keits.com

Details on setting up a business can be obtained from: British Florists Association Ltd 68 First Avenue, Mortlake, London SW14 8SR Tel: 0870 240 3208 Fax: 020 8878 9983 Email: info@britishfloristassociation.org Website: www.britishfloristassociation.org See their publication “Opening a Florists Business”

commitment, and the ability to achieve an NVQ level 2. Advanced Apprenticeships – In England the requirement is three GCSEs or equivalent at or above grade D, to include English language and mathematics. In Scotland the requirement is attainment of at least three standard grades or equivalents at credit or general and including English and mathematics.

Professional qualifications

The Society of Floristry offers two professional qualifications: • Intermediate Certificate of the Society of Floristry (ICSF) • National Diploma of the Society of Floristry (NDSF)

Academic qualifications

Colleges offer courses leading to the following qualifications: Edexcel (formerly BTEC) qualifications • First Diploma • National Diploma • Higher National Diploma

City & Guilds qualifications

• National Certificate in Professional Floristry. LS

Details on recreational flower arranging courses can be obtained from: National Association of Flower Arranging Societies 21 Denbigh Street, London SW1V 2HF. Tel:020 7247 5567 Website: www.nafas.org.uk

Websites with job opportunities: Blooming Good Jobs www.bloominggoodjobs.com Flowers and Plants Association www.flowers.org.uk

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Dianne Annett, Florist, Fleuriste When Dianne’s exam grades were higher than expected, she took a degree course in Business Studies instead of following her original plan to train as a florist. After starting work for a supermarket as a Deputy Store Manager, she realised that she was not enjoying her work as much as she had hoped. Floristry was still beckoning, so she applied to Greenmount College and has never looked back. Dianne completed the National Certificate in Floristry, a one-year course involving one day a week at a work placement. “The course covers all the different aspects of the business.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

You learn a wide range of practical skills and get the chance to expand your creative talents. Being in a work placement for one day a week allows you to put what you have learned straight into practice.” Dianne’s placement was spent at Fleuriste in Belfast, where she now works full-time as a result of her course. On a daily basis, she deals with a mixture of orders preparing arrangements and bouquets for weddings, births, funerals and corporate events. Dealing with customers is a big part of the job, but again the training covered it. Telephone and face to face customer training was part of the course and weekly tasks had to be carried out at the work placement

and signed off on completion. As well as working full time, Dianne has recently completed the National Certificate for the Society of Floristry, the highest floristry qualification available. One day she would like her own floristry business. With all her skills and training, she is certainly equipped to achieve this.

45


Useful Addresses

Careers in Game Conservation Approximately 5,000 full-time and 10,000 part-time gamekeepers and stalkers work in game conservation. It is thought that under 100 new entrants are required for full-time posts each year. However, more farmers now have shooting rights on their land with either part-time keepers or a worker partly responsible for gamekeeping. This pattern has been made possible with the growth of game farms. These keep breeding stocks of pheasants, partridges and ducks. From incubator hatched eggs, many thousands of game birds are sold as day-olds or as poults released to the wild on estates and farms. Releasing the stock to the wild needs a thorough understanding of the farming in the shoot area. The gamekeeper’s year is from February to the end of January when the shooting season ends. February/March is the time when gamekeepers change jobs and take their holidays. During the spring and summer, the low-ground keeper’s work

46

is concerned with controlling predators and rearing young birds either from their own incubators or by buying in day old chicks. Maintenance and care of equipment and pens is a vital aspect of the work. Moorland keepers who look after grouse do not have game to rear but they will have heavy commitment to predator control and habitat management. Throughout the year the shoot habitat needs to be managed. This involves seasonal work such as heather burning, woodland clearing, hedgerow improvement and pond maintenance. Vermin control is also an important area of work. The shooting season is obviously one of the busiest time of the year for gamekeepers. Keeping game on a shoot can be a problem. Long hours are required to maintain a good stock of game for the shoot.

Vocational qualifications

NVQs/SVQs are available at levels 2 and 3. At level 2 and 3 the qualification covers gamekeeping and wildlife management. Apprenticeship in Game and Wildlife Management. LS

The Game Conservancy Trust Burgate Manor, Fordingbridge, Hampshire SP6 1EF Tel: 01425 652381 Fax: 01425 651026 E-mail: info@gct.org.uk Website: www.gct.org.uk British Association for Shooting & Conservation (BASC) Marford Mill, Rossett,Wrexham LL12 0HL Tel: 01244 573000 Fax: 01244 573001 Email: mem-enq@basc.org.uk Website: www.basc.org.uk The National Gamekeepers’ Organisation Charitable Trust PO Box 3360, Stourbridge DY7 5YG Email: ngo.charitabletrust@talk21.com Website: www.gamekeeperstrust.org.uk

See also Rural Pursuits Ltd Cwmgellifawr, Llanfynydd, Carmarthen, SA32 7TR Tel. 01558 668030 Fax. 01558 668861 Email: Rcottam2@aol.com Website: www.ruralpursuits.org

Websites with job opportunities: Countryside Job Service www.countryside-jobs.com Gamekeeping - www.gamekeeping.com Scottish Gamekeepers Association - www.scottishgamekeepers.co.uk National Gamekeepers Organisation - www.nationalgamekeepers.org.uk

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Careers in Production Horticulture

CONTENTS

NEWS & VIEWS

STUDY ADVICE

LAND BASED

ENTERTAINMENT

TRAVEL

Advic e

LIFEBYTE

Production horticulture is the large scale production and selling of plants whether for food or ornamental uses. This includes fruit, vegetables, plants, flowers, shrubs and trees for wholesale or retail through garden centres or nurseries, farm shops or pick-your-own. There are opportunities for research and innovation using technology and systems such as hydroponics and automatic watering and turning of plants in glass houses. There are an estimated 12,800 businesses employing 69,800 people in the UK. Businesses range in size from small private nurseries employing 2-3 people, to large commercial organisations employing hundreds of people in different locations. People are also employed in garden centres

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

attached to DIY stores where they might need to use transferable skills. Commercial horticulture provides a huge range of opportunities for anyone of any age entering the profession, and once experienced there is great opportunity for progression and diversification which could involve owning your own business.

Vocational qualifications

NVQs/SVQs are available at levels 1, 2, 3 and 4. At level 1 the qualification is general commercial horticulture. At levels 2 and 3 options are available for intensive or extensive crop production, or as part of a mixed farming NVQ/SVQ.

Apprenticeships and Advanced Apprenticeships (FMA and AMA) Apprenticeships and Advanced

FASHION

Apprenticeships are government backed training initiatives aimed at young people between the ages of 16 and 24. They have been designed in conjunction with horticultural employers to ensure they are relevant to horticultural businesses. Funding is available through Local Learning and Skills Councils (LSCs). In England and Wales, this is guaranteed for 16, 17 and 18 year olds. For those over 18 years, funding is at the discretion of the local LSC and subject to the availability of resources. All funded Apprenticeships and Advanced Apprenticeships should be completed by the 25th birthday. In Scotland, Scottish Modern Apprenticeships are available through Skillseekers. Funding will be provided by Local Enterprise Councils (LEC) and will contribute toward the necessary training

47


Useful Addresses The Institute of Horticulture in association with The Royal Horticultural Society publishes a booklet “Come into Horticulture” which provides comprehensive information about careers in all aspects of horticulture. Copies of the booklet can be obtained from The Institute of Horticulture at the address below. The Institute of Horticulture 14-15 Belgrave Square, London SW1X 8PS Tel: 020 7245 6943 Website: www.horticulture.org.uk Email: ioh@horticulture.org.uk The Royal Botanic Gardens School of Horticulture, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 3AB Tel: 020 8332 5000 Fax: 020 8332 5197 Website: www.rbgkew.org.uk Email: info@rbgkew.org.uk The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh School of Horticulture, 20A Inverleith Row, Edinburgh EH3 5LR Tel: 0131 552 7171 Fax: 0131 248 2901 E-mail: education@rbge.org.uk Website: www.rbge.org.uk The Royal Horticultural Society Wisley, Woking, Surrey GU23 6QB Tel: 01483 224234 Fax: 01483 211750 RHS publish ‘RHS Gardens’ (please send A4 SAE with 50p postage) E-mail: via the Website www.rhs.org.uk The Royal Horticultural Society 80 Vincent Square, London Tel: 020 7834 4333 Website: www.rhs.org.uk

48

to meet the Scottish Modern Apprenticeship objectives. Entry requirements: Apprenticeships – There are no formal entry requirements, although young people need to demonstrate enthusiasm and commitment, and the ability to achieve an NVQ level 2. Advanced Apprenticeships – While there are no formal entry requirements for the MA it is recommended that you have achieved GCSE passes at Grade C or above in English or Welsh, Maths and a science, or equivalent, in England and Wales. In Scotland there are no formal entry requirements, but it

is recommended that you have achieved three Standard Grade passes at 3 or above in English, Maths and science.

Academic qualifications

Colleges offer courses leading to the following qualifications: First Diploma RHS general examination National Certificate Advanced National Certificate RHS Diploma in Horticulture National Diploma in Horticulture HNC HND BSc / BA Master of Horticulture (RHS award) MA / PhD LS

Philip McKeown, horticulture While in employment, Philip McKeown is just about to complete his NVQ Level 2 Award in Amenity Horticulture at the College of Agriculture, Food and Rural Enterprise’s (CAFRE) Greenmount Campus, specialising in sportsturf. Philip has already completed the First Diploma course, during which he spent a period of placement with Ballyclare Golf Club. This gave him a desire to work in green keeping. Philip is now employed by Hilton Templepatrick Golf and Country Club and through his work applied to study for the Level 2 in sportsturf. With his increased knowledge and skills Philip hopes to get work in the USA at a golf club that hosts Major golf tournaments.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


CONTENTS

The Fencing Sector STUDY ADVICE

NEWS & VIEWS

LAND BASED

fencing or its related parts, or as a If you want to play TRAVEL ENTERTAINMENT contractor erecting fencing. There an important role in are even opportunities to start your protecting people, buildings, animals and vehicles, own business. Advic e then a career in fencing could be for you. The industry is made Education and qualifications up of specialist contractors, Fencing businesses need erectors and multi-skilled employees who can combine LIFEBYTE FASHION operators who carry out fencing technical knowledge with practical work. You could be working skills. There are a range of courses on anything from motorway available that will help you achieve barriers to public safety fencing the skills and knowledge you need at pop concerts, agricultural to work at different levels in the and forestry fencing, or zoo and fencing industry. animal enclosures. Businesses range from large Work-based or vocational commercial companies to small training self-employed contractors. With These qualifications combine the growth in road networks, practical work-based experience prison building and the increasing with classroom-based training. importance of environmental Some enable you to earn while you conservation, fencing opportunities learn! They will give you the skills also look likely to grow. and knowledge you need to do a job effectively and show that you can actually do it - not simply that Did you know…? you know how to do it in theory. •T  here are approximately They include: 15,800 fencing businesses in the UK Apprenticeships •T  hese businesses employ • Apprenticeship in Fence around 47,500 people… Installation would you like to be one of them? Apprenticeships are government What opportunities are there backed training schemes aimed primarily at people aged between for me? 16-24, although funding is available There are plenty of fencing for those over the age of 24 in opportunities in sectors including some regions. They enable you to landscaping, construction, local learn practical skills and achieve government and authorities, nationally recognised qualifications, airfields and prisons, the voluntary including a relevant NVQ and sector, forestry and agriculture. You technical certificate. You will spend could be involved in manufacturing

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

49


part of your time ‘on-the-job’ getting real experience and some of your time in college learning the theory you need to know. You also have the opportunity to earn a wage while you learn! NVQs/SVQs NVQs (National Vocational Qualifications) and SVQs (Scottish Vocational Qualifications) are also work-related qualifications that enable you to gain the skills and knowledge you needed to do a job. You can do an NVQ or SVQ at different levels, depending on your ability and what sort of job you want to do. These qualifications are based on national standards agreed by the fencing industry, so they are recognised by employers throughout the UK. You could consider:

•N  VQ/SVQ in Land-based Operations at Level 1 (equivalent to GCSEs or a Standard Grade General) •N  VQ/SVQ in Fencing at Levels 2 and 3 (Level 2 is equivalent GCSEs, a Standard Grade Credit, a First Diploma or a National Certificate. Level 3 is equivalent to A-levels, an Advanced Higher, a National Diploma or a National Certificate). FISS/CSCS joint card scheme in General Fencing and Vehicle Safety Fencing The FISS/CSCS joint card scheme is the hallmark of quality for fencing operatives who want to have their skills and work-based competences recognised throughout the UK. Administered by Lantra Awards and supported by industry employers,

manufacturers and contractors, the FISS/CSCS joint card is recognised by all Major Contractor Group (MCG) members. For more information, email awards@lantra.co.uk.

Additional training options

There are numerous off-the-job training courses for people new to the industry or wishing to skill themselves in a new trade, including: • Boundary Fencing Basic Training • Boundary High Security Fencing Training

What can I aspire to?

There are many ways to enter a career in fencing. There are opportunities available with large commercial companies and many opportunities for selfemployment. LS

Stewart Gallick, Agricultural Contractor, SJG Contracts Stewart Gallick is an Agricultural Contractor; he established SJG Contracts in February 2009. His main areas of work include slurry spreading, slurry ferrying, silage carting and vegetable and grain haulage. Although not from a farming background, Stewart spent considerable periods of time at his grandfather’s farm during his childhood, and when he was offered part time employment on a pig farm during his school years, he jumped at the chance. Through this employment, his interest in farming further developed, and it seemed like a natural progression for him to apply to the College of Agriculture, Food and Rural Enterprise to study a course in Agriculture. Gaining both theoretical and practical experience through completing a National Diploma and a Higher National Diploma in

50

Agriculture whilst at Greenmount Campus, Stewart states: “As well as gaining an insight into all the various divisions of agriculture, and studying areas such as engineering, tractor driving, business and marketing, the ‘hands on’ experience gained during my work placement year and during subsequent years was really beneficial to me.” On leaving college, Stewart initially worked in a freelance capacity for various farmers, before securing a position as a Stockman on a pig farm outside Newtownabbey. This role entailed helping with the management of sows and sucking pigs; it also included farrowing and occasional AI servicing. Having decided to establish his own business, and aware that good business knowledge and an update of his skills was required in order to ensure he would be able

to maximise production and profits, Stewart completed the ‘Good Business Sense’ course delivered by Invest NI. Aware that economic pressures and increasing competition have required many businesses in the land-based sector to refine their business skills, Stewart knew he needed to gain recognition and build his reputation within the industry, “I visited various farms and met with lots of people; I also designed labels which I attached to farm gates to help raise awareness of the services I offer.”

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


The environmental, food chain and rural sector is a global industry with products and job opportunities throughout the world. Different countries have different specialities. For example, the Netherlands are known for their strong horticultural sector, while Israel and Kenya are heavily involved in flower production. The British fresh produce sector has benefited from the conditions in other countries. For example, Spain has a strong fresh produce sector and some British companies have established bases there in order to ensure year-round production. Many British importers have also established links with the Caribbean and South Africa in order to source exotic produce.

CONTENTS

NEWS & VIEWS

STUDY ADVICE

LAND BASED

ENTERTAINMENT

TRAVEL

Advic e

LIFEBYTE

FASHION

Global agriculture

• The countries of southern and eastern Europe have larger agricultural sectors than the UK. • Agriculture is still the largest employer in the developing world. • Expanding global markets require the sector to address new business challenges and opportunities related to new technologies, customer service, competitive products and services, and exploitation of new routes to market.

Opportunities Abroad

Opportunities abroad Postgraduate opportunities There are postgraduate study and research opportunities in, for example: • agricultural development; • European farm business management; • European MBA in food and agribusiness; • international agriculture and food marketing; • international food and

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

agribusiness; • international horticulture; • international and rural development; • s ustainable rural development in the tropics; • transatlantic agri-food management; • tropical agriculture and environmental science; • tropical animal production; •h  ealth and world animal

production. Work experience abroad There are a large number of organisations offering further work opportunities abroad for graduates. Related work experience can be a useful stepping stone towards a graduate career in the land-based sector. The following selection of organisations show the range of opportunities that are available.4

51


Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO) Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO)’s programmes, The World Youth & Global Xchange and Youth for Development, last for six months and are aimed at 18-25 year-olds. Volunteer Jobs is a scheme for qualified and experienced professionals, and applicants should usually be able to spend up to two years overseas in the developing world. Potential roles include:

aquaculture, environmental, crop production, plant production and nursery management.

• agriculturist; • agronomist; • crop protection consultant; • environmentalist; • farm manager; • post-harvest technologist; • forester; • horticulturist; • livestock specialist; • agricultural engineer; • irrigation engineer.

AgriVenture Agriventure, run by the International Agricultural Exchange Association (IAEA), has opportunities in 12 different countries in agriculture and horticulture, usually from four months to over a year.

International Exchange Program UK The International Exchange Program UK offers international rural placements for 18-30 yearolds with one year’s practical experience. Placements are in agriculture, equine, horticulture, wine production, aquaculture, forest and ecosystem management, landscaping, golf courses and wildlife. Experience International Experience International provides six to 18 months’ practical work experience placements in the land-based sector in the Pacific North West of the USA. Typical placements include forestry management, tree production, seed orchard management, dairy production and management, golf course and turf management,

52

Student Conservation Association Student Conservation Association internships are available from three months in all USA states. Conservation corps interns volunteer on various conservation projects located in national parks, wildlife refuges, national forests and state conservation areas.

World-Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF) World-Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF) is an organisation dedicated to allowing people to volunteer and gain skills by working on organic farms throughout the world. Volunteers can work on long and short-term projects and generally get food and accommodation provided in return for volunteering. Future Developments within the Land based sector Changes in the environmental, food chain and rural sector are likely to be shaped through external factors such as: • regulation; • changes in policy; • globalisation; • sustainability; • rural regeneration; • technological advances; • consumer behaviour. Whilst there may be a requirement

for the non-graduate workforce to improve basic transferable skills, there will also be a demand for knowledge-intensive supervisors and managers with higher-level qualifications. In addition, an increase in the number of jobs requiring ICT skills is predicted. Land use It is likely that government policy will continue to encourage traditional farming landowners and managers to diversify into alternative and more profitable forms of land use. Land-based businesses are, therefore, expected to diversify into many different activities, such as: • industrial and business units; • off-road vehicle circuits; • bed and breakfast; • rural tourism; • riding schools; • trekking centres; • tea-rooms; • restaurants; • nurseries; • gardens; • farm shops; • golf courses; • countryside, heritage and environmental attractions. This diversification will lead to an increased crossover with other sectors such as food production, healthcare, research, business services, construction, retail, leisure and recreation, and it will become increasingly difficult to define the boundaries of the land-based sectors. Similarly, the rural/urban split will become less marked as some businesses respond to markets in large population centres. The growth of graduate opportunities in the services sector may not be reflected in some of the current industry forecasts.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK


Other Trends Environmental conservation Growing interest in the protection of the environment, the welfare of animals, gardening for leisure and the promotion of a healthy lifestyle will all have a positive impact, and, consequently, employment is predicted to expand in environmental conservation, equine and animal-related areas, landscaping, and commercial horticulture. The ageing workforce As the average age of workers in the land-based sectors is relatively high at present, it is thought that, as this ageing population retires, this will further develop demand for younger graduate entrants. Overall, there will be a greater demand for knowledge-intensive supervisors and managers with higher-level qualifications.

Common Agricultural Policy reform EU enlargement is accelerating reform of the Common Agricultural Policy, and this will have an effect on subsidies. Overall, the agricultural crops and livestock sectors are predicted to downsize for the next few years and a significant reduction in employment in the agricultural livestock and crops sectors is predicted.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.UK

“Volunteer Jobs is a scheme for qualified and experienced professionals, and applicants should usually be able to spend up to two years overseas in the developing world.�

Food safety The production industries are responding to consumer demands for traceability, food safety, and quality. As food prices drop in response to worldwide competition, this will increase the focus on better quality marketing, management and quality control. Niche markets are likely to become more important than mass markets. The high level of public interest in the land-based sector is predicted to continue. It is likely that the media will continue to focus on popular subjects such as animals, gardens and cookery, and it is thought that this continued media interest will continue to generate interest and support markets in the environmental, food chain and rural sector. LS

53


College students have a clearer pathway to becoming work-ready Lantra, the Sector Skills Council for the environmental and land-based industries strongly believes in helping students build desirable employment skills, and has developed the National Student Database to assist them on their career pathway within the sector. Lantra’s National Student Database provides students in further education with the opportunity to identify the exact skills, qualifications and workbased experience required for their desired profession. The system will provide students with a clear direction on their pathway to their chosen profession, allowing them

to work towards building the right skills. Students at specialist landbased colleges: Otley, Derby, Capel Manor, Barony, Elmwood and Oatridge colleges, are among the first to benefit from the system which closes the gap between education and industry. The system includes information on all the job roles within the 17 environmental and land-based industries, approved by the sector, and so students can develop their skills in line with those sought by employers. Otley College was the first land-based college to adopt the system and has 300 students currently registered. Rob Storer,

Director of Land-based studies at Otley College said: “The National Student Database has been in place since January 2009 and it has helped our land-based learners think more about what they want to do career wise after college.� Those land-based colleges implementing the National Student Database offer students studying within the environmental and land-based sector the opportunity to become ready and able for the world of work and enables employers to readily identify how well students are suited for vacant positions. LS www.nationalstudentdatabase. co.uk


Leaving School Magazine