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SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS MARTIN SANFORD This article is intended to update information given in the new Flora (Sanford & Fisk 2010). For the records listed below nomenclature follows Stace (2010); Clement & Foster (1994) is the authority for information on alien plants not covered by Stace. Nitella flexilis (L.) C. Agardh, Smooth Stonewort Thrandeston, Pond Meadow, Malting Farm, TM127762, 04/06/2011, Paul Read. There has been a renewed interest in charophytes in recent years which should result in more interesting finds. Lycopodiella inundata (L,) Holub, Marsh Clubmoss Westleton Heath, TM4569, 21/09/1978, R. P. Libbey. This record was overlooked for the Flora although this clubmoss had been found at Westleton as long ago as 1795. It has not been seen there recently, but should be looked for on the edges of ponds and in damp flushes. Oreopteris limbosperma (All.) Holub, Lemon-scented Fern Corton Woods, TM5496, 10/11/2010, Chris Romer. Newbourne Springs, TM2643, 24/07/2011, Howard Mathews. This species had been recorded at Ashby in the 1950s by Francis Rose, but the site at Corton is quite different and may have been the result of an introduction by a fern collector. Potamogeton acutifolius Link, Sharp-leaved Pondweed Flixton, TM318880, 1987, Sue Hooton. My apologies to Sue for omitting this record from the Flora. It is a difficult species to identify and I had flagged the record as needing confirmation. Heracleum sphondlylium L. subsp. angustifolium, a narrow-leaved form of Hogweed Bradfield Woods, TL9357, 2007, Barry Ruggles and Peter Payne. A further record of this rather striking, narrow-leaved form (see Plate 17). Achillea ptarmica L., Sneezewort Saxtead Green, mill side of the green, TM2564, 29/06/2011, Susan Stone Grove Farm, Thurston SWT Reserve, TL943652, 14/07/2010, Martin Sanford and Susan Stone. Milden Hall Farm, pond area, TL9446, 09/08/2010, Barry Ruggles. Plants at Thurston appeared to be the native, single-flowered form; the other two sites are likely to be the result of garden escapes. Tragopogon crocifolius L., a Spanish Goatsbeard Boxford, Ancient House, Club’s Lane, TL9640, 09/07/2011, Tina Loose. Three plants established from seed accidentally introduced on clothing after a holiday in the Spanish Pyrenees.

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Nonea lutea (Desr.) DC, Yellow Nonea Campsey Ash, TM3255, 2010, Toby Abrehart. Alton Water, by footpath, TM1535, April 2010, Geoff Knight. Two more sites for this occasional garden escape. Symphytum caucasicum M. Bieb., Caucasian Comfrey Hitcham Churchyard, by porch, TL985512, 13/04/2011, Martin Sanford. An attractive, blue-flowered species, rarely seen in gardens (Plate 18). Chenopodium giganteum D. Don, Tree Spinach Parham with bird seed-mix, TM3060, 05/08/2011, Daphne Culpan. 1st Suffolk record. Also known as Magenta Spreen, Purple Goosefoot or Giant Lambsquarters, this Indian species that can grow up to 2 m tall. The striking, bright purple young foliage is quite characteristic, as are the rather triangular, irregularly toothed leaves. Chenopodium chenopodioides (L.) Aellen, Saltmarsh Goosefoot Hollesley Bay RSPB Reserve, edge of fall.ow field and edge of ditch, TM3745, 2011, Graham Peck, conf. J. Akeroyd A second recent record for this easily overlooked RDB species. Cornus sanguinea L. subsp. australis (C. A. Mey.) Jáv., an introduced subspecies of Dogwood Halesworth, waste ground by Millennium Green, TM389769, 29/09/2010, Graham Peck 1st Suffolk record. This subspecies, native to Turkey and the Caucasus, has probably been present in planted hedgerows for some time, but recorders were not aware of it until a description appeared in the 3rd Edition of Stace’s Flora (Stace, 2010). Close examination of the hairs on the underside of the leaf is required to separate the subspecies. Both have two-armed hairs, but in subsp. sanguinea (the native type) the are often uneven with one arm pointing outwards and in subsp. australis the arm are equal in length and both pressed close to the leaf surface. Corydalis cheilanthifolia Hemsl., Fern-leaved Corydalis Hadleigh, near Church, TM0242 01/06/2011, Stephen Clarkson.

Several plants in pavement cracks and one ten foot up in a brick wall A second county record for this rare garden escape. Once established, it can easily spread by seed. Fumaria parviflora Lam., Fine-leaved Fumitory Ixworth, field edge Woolpit Rd, TL9469, 14/07/2010, Martin Sanford and Susan Stone. This is probably the eastern edge of the range for this scarce arable species. Erodium moschatum L’Hér, Musk Stork’s-bill Kessingland Denes, by River Hundred, TM5384, 22/08/2010, Colin Jacobs. Gunton Church Lane pavement crack and roadside verge, TM5495, 05/05/2010, Colin Jacobs.

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Felixstowe: Dellwood Ave, TM3035 and Ferry Road, TM3236, 08/04/2010 Barbara Mathews. This species is turning up more frequently in the coastal zone, partly as a result of more recorders recognising the pinnate leaves with lobed leaflets which are much less finely divided than those of the Common Stork’s-bill. Salvia pratensis L., Meadow Clary Hollesley, Stebbings Lane, TM3444, 15/05/2011, Laurie Forsyth. The owners of Vale Farm, the nearest garden for hundreds of yards, did not plant it, but have had it in their garden in recent years. Scutellaria altissima L., Somerset Skullcap Washbrook, Pigeon’s Lane, TM1142, 13/06/2010, Martin Woodcock. 1st Suffolk record. Found in a large ‘garden’ of about 12 acres at Washbrook. Some of it, bordering two streams which meet, has obviously been left wild for a long time. A garden escape, naturalised in N Somerset since 1929, but with very few other British records. Malva alcea L., Greater Musk-mallow Levington, track to Levington Hall, TM2439, 05/08/2011, Barbara Mathews. 1st Suffolk record. Some of the plants grown in gardens as ‘Musk Mallow’, including those in my own garden, are this European species and not the native M. moschata. M. alcea can be recognised by the presence of stellate hairs on all the vegetative parts (hairs are simple in moschata). These hairs can be easily seen with a hand lens by examining the calyx lobes. The two species hybridise to produce intermediates (with a mix of stellate and simple hairs). Pyrus pyraster (L.) Burgsd., Wild Pear Troston, edge of former heath, TL8972, 20/04/2010, Alec Bull. A single, old tree, which shows every sign of being the wild native species. Melampyrum cristatum L., Crested Cow-wheat Poslingford, protected verge U7323, TL7649, 10/06/2010, Tina Martin. A new site for this declining species. Possibly spread by seed from one of the nearby protected verges with cutting machinery. Scrophularia vernalis L., Yellow Figwort West Stow Country Park, TL7971, 23/05/2011, Chris Gregory. A new site but not very far from some long-established populations in the Bury area. Solanum triflorum Nutt., Small Nightshade Walberswick National Nature Reserve, track near Westwood Lodge, TM4573, 21/08/2010, Gill Perkins. Another new East Suffolk site Cotoneaster mairei H. Lév., Maire’s Cotoneaster Halesworth, waste ground, TM37Y, 2010, Graham Peck, conf. J. Fryer. 1st Suffolk record.

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Cotoneaster conspicuus C., Marquand Tibetan Cotoneaster Wangford Churchyard, TM4679, 2010, Graham Peck, conf. J. Fryer. 1st Suffolk record. Two more Cotoneasters to add to the Suffolk list. They are all capable of spreading through bird-sown seed though the record of C. conspicuus in the churchyard is probably a planted specimen. Carex binervis Sm., Green-ribbed Sedge Ashby Warren, TG4800, 07/06/2011, Chris Romer, Nick Blacker and Arthur Copping Carex canescens L., White Sedge (=C. curta Gooden) Ashby Warren, TG4800, 07/06/2011, Chris Romer, Nick Blacker and Arthur Copping. There are a number of species adapted to wet, acidic conditions found at Ashby Warren including these two rare sedges which are both quite frequent in north-west Britain. Eleocharis uniglumis (Link) Schult., Slender Spike-rush Carlton Marshes SWT Reserve, TM5091, 18/06/2010, Chris Romer. Determined by Arthur Copping. A scarce species of damp, often brackish, sites. Not recorded at Carlton before. Eriophorum vaginatum L., Hare’s-tail Cottongrass Waveney Forest, TG4500, 16/06/2010, Nick Blacker and Richard Fisk. 1st Suffolk Record, Specimens at SBRC. An interesting, native addition to the Suffolk Flora. This species is frequent in north-west Britain, but very scarce in E. Anglia with only one or two sites in North Norfolk. It is possible that the Cottongrass was introduced with conifers brought from Scotland but it seems more likely that this is a native site. Allium neapolitanum Cirillo, Neapolitan Garlic Felixstowe, cliff below Bartlett Hospital, TM3134, 13/05/2010 Barbara Mathews. Dozens at road level. Kessingland, Church Road, TM5284, 22/08/2010, Colin Jacobs. Pavement Crack. A rare garden escape that seems to be able to spread by seed rather than just from dumped bulbs. Allium subhirsutum L., Hairy Garlic Felixstowe, The Grove, TM3035, 27/05/2011, Barbara Mathews. A second Suffolk record for this rare garden escape. It can be easily recognised by the hairy margins on the leaves. Fritillaria persica L., a Turkish species of Fritillary Barnhamcross Common, TL8681, 01/04/2010, Stephen Clarkson. Five plants, well naturalised. Presumably garden throw-outs.

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Pseudomuscari azureum (Fenzl.) Garbari & Greuter (=Muscari azureum, Bellevalia azurea), a spring bulb Wangford, TM4679, March 2011, Colin Jacobs. Naturalised. First Suffolk record for this little-known spring bulb which looks like a cross between a Grape Hyacinth and a Bluebell (see Plate 19). Cephalanthera damasonium (Mill.) Druce, White Helleborine Near Hadleigh, TM04, 11/05/2011, Adam Gretton, conf. Martin Sanford. 1st confirmed Suffolk record. A really exciting find which suggests that old records from Mendlesham (c. 1910) and Shrubland Park, Coddenham (1970s) might have been correct. A single plant growing near a young Beech, which probably has some mycorrhizal connection. The nearest population is c. 35 miles ‘upwind’ near Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambs. The drought conditions in May caused the flowers to go over very quickly, but the species is well adapted to dry, chalky soils and should be able to survive here. See Plate 20. Himantoglossum hircinum (L.) Spreng., Lizard Orchid Badwell Ash, TL97, 12/07/2011 Richard Belson, confirmed Martin Sanford from photos. A single plant on an uncultivated field margin. The ability of orchids to colonise new sites by wind-blown seed means that, if soil conditions are right, they can turn up almost anywhere. This is a pleasing return to Suffolk for this species which had died out at its Lakenheath site in the 1990s after a long run of about 40 years. See Plate 21. Alopecurus aequalis Sobol., Orange Foxtail Polstead, TL9839, 22/06/2010, Juliet Hawkins, abundant by a pond. Found at the same site by John Digby in 1987, it is pleasing to see it is surviving here (see Plate 22). Poa infirma Kunth., Early Meadow-grass Bungay, Clay’s car park, Outney Rd, TM3389, 11/05/2011, Arthur Copping. Another inland site for this tiny grass. References Clement, E. J. & Foster, M. C. (1994). Alien plants of the British Isles. Botanical Society of the British Isles, London. Sanford, M. N. & Fisk, R. J. (2010). A Flora of Suffolk. D. K. & M. N. Sanford, Ipswich. Stace, C. A. (2010). New Flora of the British Isles 3rd Edition. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Martin Sanford S.B.R.C. Ipswich Museum High Street Suffolk IP1 3QH

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 47 (2012)


C. Jacobs

A. Gretton

M. Sanford

P. Payne Plate 17: Heracleum sphondlylium L. subsp. angustifolium, a narrow-leaved Plate 18: Symphytum caucasicum M. form of Hogweed, found at Bradfield Bieb., Caucasian Comfrey in Hitcham Churchyard (p. 94). in 2007 by Barry Ruggles (p. 93).

Plate 19: Pseudomuscari azureum, a Spring bulb found naturalised at Wangford in 2011 (p. 97).

Plate 20: White Helleborine Cephalanthera damasonium found near Hadleigh in 2011(p. 97).


J. Hawkins

R. Belson Plate 21: Lizard Orchid Himantoglossum hircinum found at Badwell Ash in 2011 (p. 97).

Plate 22: Orange Foxtail Alopecurus aequalis found by a pond at Polstead in 2010 (p. 97).

SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS  

Martin Sanford

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