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NOTES ON THE SUFFOLK LIST OF COLEOPTERA: 10 23 SPECIES NEW TO THE SUFFOLK LIST WITH SIGNIFICANT RECORDS FROM THE YEAR 2002 DAVID R. NASH This paper discusses 23 species of beetle which should be considered New to Suffolk for the Index to these Transactions; records of 14 of these are reported here for the first time whilst details of nine others which have been published relatively recently in the national literature are presented, with additional records for these species if available. These species are all asterisked. Noteworthy records from 2002 (and one from 1999) are reported and three species are deleted from the list. All records are my own except where indicated. Records are allocated to vice-county (v.c. 25, East; v.c. 26, West) and National Grid references are provided, with those assigned by me to earlier records being placed in square brackets. The national status for scarce and threatened species is given, following Hyman (1992; 1994) for terrestrial species and Foster (2000) for aquatic ones, with an explanation of these categories in an appendix. The national status assigned in English Nature’s “Recorder” database is provided for all other species. Unless specifically mentioned, there are no Suffolk specimens of any of the species discussed in the Claude Morley/Chester Doughty collection at Ipswich Museum. CARABIDAE *Notiophilus aesthuans (Motschulsky) Nb Notiophilus aesthuans is a locally distributed ground beetle which occurs chiefly in the Scottish Highlands and the Pennines with a few scattered records from elsewhere including the Suffolk Breck (Luff, 1998). It is a rather xerophilous species which lives in open, dry country on gravelly or sandy soils as well as being found in this country on spoil heaps of mines. The species is difficult to separate from N. aquaticus L. and reference to securely named material is essential. The map of this species from Luff (op. cit.) is reproduced and updated here. Reference to the Monks Wood dataset shows that the two Suffolk open dots represent specimens determined by Martin Luff in the collection of the late Rev. C. E. Tottenham now in the Natural History Museum, London. Howard Mendel kindly arranged for me to study all this Suffolk Tottenham material as well as other specimens. As a result, I can provide precise details of all known Suffolk records of aesthuans (all from the Breck, v.c. 26): 21 July 1924, one ex. and 26 July 1924, three exx., Freckenham [TL 67]; 20 August 1924, one ex., Barton Mills [TL 77]; 13 August 1927, one ex., Mildenhall [TL 77]. In addition, I have examined what seems to be a previously overlooked specimen from Cambridgeshire in Tottenham’s collection – 22 February 1945, Fulbourn [TL 55]. This appears to represent a new county record and is added to the map as a plus symbol.

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10-km Distribution of Notiophilus aesthuans  1900–1970,  post 1970, + ‘new’(1945) record mentioned in text

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Given the continuing popularity of the Breck with coleopterists and the large number of individuals who now record Carabidae (many of whom regularly use pitfall traps to secure large numbers of specimens) it is extremely surprising that the species has not apparently been recorded from the area in recent times. Notiophilus quadripunctatus Dejean Nb (Deletion from list) This ground beetle, typically found in gravel pits etc., was added to the Suffolk list by Elliott (1936) as a result of Morley rearranging his collection and discovering some misidentifications. A single specimen is reported from the Brandon Waterworks heath, v.c. 26 [TL 78], 22 June 1928. This specimen will previously have almost certainly been standing as biguttatum. As there was only a single donated specimen from W. West standing over the name quadripunctatus in the Morley collection, I checked all the specimens of Notiophilus in case the Brandon beetle had been misplaced during the amalgamation of Morley’s collection with those of Doughty and Adams, but it appears no longer to be extant. I therefore recommend the deletion of the species from the Suffolk list although there is no reason why it should not eventually be found with us. It should be noted, in passing, that there are other examples in Elliott’s 1936 paper, of species being added to the Suffolk list based on misidentifications (see Mendel, 1980; Nash, 1984). *Bembidion (=Chrysobracteon) argenteolum) Ahrens RDB K Whilst collecting in a disused sand extraction site near Cavenham, West Suffolk (TL 77) on 3 September 2002, I came across a large, dead Bembidion in a small sand pocket on a low bank rising from the damp floor. In the fading autumnal light, I assumed from the obscure elytral marks and size, that it was probably Bembidion dentellum (Th.). Later, under the microscope, I was amazed to find that it was B. argenteolum, one of our two members of s.g. Chrysobracteon, a group characterised by shiny “mirrors” on the third elytral interval. A return visit to the site on 26 June 2003 failed to turn up further examples although two specimens of Bembidion pallidipenne (Illiger) were found (see below). B. argenteolum is a boreo-temperate species which occurs widely but locally across north and central Europe to eastern Siberia. Its only known British locality was Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland where it was discovered by the Rev. W. F. Johnson in 1899 and where it continued to be found until 1923. As a B.A.P. priority species it was the subject of a survey by Roy Anderson in 1997–1998 (see Key, 1998) but he failed to rediscover the beetle and it is now presumed extinct in the British Isles. It used to occur in areas of fine, loose sand behind the shorelines of the lough and although suitable areas still exist there, it has been suggested that it may be a victim of prolonged genetic isolation in an area peripheral to its main European range (Anderson, McFerran & Cameron, 2000). The only other known capture of the beetle in this country since 1923 is that of Mendel (1991), who found a single specimen under a piece of wood on damp bare sand in a flooded gravel pit near Dungeness, Kent in August, 1987.

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The failure of other coleopterists to find further examples at the site in the ensuing years suggests that this specimen was a migrant from across the Channel; the beetle occurs widely in Belgium and the Netherlands. The occurrence of a single dead specimen of this beetle far from the coast but in an appropriate habitat is puzzling. Recent enquiries have revealed that some of the considerable number of lorry loads of sand which are being transported around Suffolk and Norfolk are actually bringing sand into a pit from another pit elsewhere, either to improve the quality of the sand leaving that pit or else to regrade it before redistribution. It is possible, therefore, that the species arrived at the site as a result of importation from elsewhere. Bembidion pallidipenne (Illiger) Nb This local ground beetle is predominantly coastal (see map) occurring on bare sand by freshwater springs and flushes although it is sometimes found on the edges of gravel pits and lakes close to the coast. Morley (1899) added the beetle to the county list on the strength of Stephens’ (1827–1835) citation of it having been found at Aldeburgh, East Suffolk [TM 45] by the Rev. F. W. Hope and states (op. cit. p.11): “I fancy I have seen this species at Benacre Broad”. There has been no subsequent confirmation of Morley’s supposition. As the species had not been re-found in Suffolk since Hope’s capture, E. A. Elliott would, without doubt, have meant for it to be included in the ms. of his list of beetles still awaiting confirmation (1936). Unfortunately, his paper was published posthumously and it would appear that an error crept in, probably via Morley’s editing for publication. Reference is made on p. 25 to “Tachypus” at the end of one line with “pallidipes” (sic.) starting the next. Both Tachypus (now Asaphidion) pallipes and B. pallidipenne were in need of confirmation with both species next to each other systematically, so it would appear that a lapsus calami occurred and a single hybrid name was sent to the printer. It is also stated that there are 104 beetles listed, but this should have read read 106 as the calculations preceeding the list are wrong; with the addition of B. pallidipenne, the totals balance. All subsequent writers until Luff (1998) appear to have used this historic record as the sole basis for the occurrence of the beetle in Suffolk. Luff, however, in his “Atlas” shows the species occurring in TG 50. The B.R.C. dataset for the map shows that this record is based on material from Gorleston in the Tottenham collection. The two specimens from Cavenham detailed above appear to represent the only truly inland English record of the beetle and provide further evidence of the probable translocation of beetles to this site. Bembidion (=Cillenus) laterale (Samouelle) Nb This local species found on the mud of tidal saltmarshes was added to the Suffolk list by Elliott (1929) who referred to the capture of several examples by Morley’s mentor, E. A. Newbery at Felixstowe on 1 July 1911. I can now add the following records all, of course, from v.c. 25: 3 January 1975, one under bark 2 m up a dead oak sapling on high bank of tidal R. Deben, Melton (TM 2950); 13 April 1976, abundant on foreshore mud of R.

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10-km Distribution of Bembidion pallidipenne  1900-1970,  post 1970, + new (2003) record mentioned in text

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Stour, Holbrook Bay (TM 1634); 19 July 2002, several immature adults and larvae under stones on the R. Stour foreshore, Stutton (TM 1433). Bembidion quinquestriatum Gyllenhal Local When Dawson wrote his monograph (1854) on the British ground beetles, B. quinquestriatum was considered to be chiefly associated with sandy localities with most of those cited being coastal sites. In most northern parts of its range at the present time, B. quinquestriatum is a predominantly synanthropic species and in Britain it occurs locally in dark places such as cellars, stables, and under ivy on walls but in Northern Ireland it is a coastal species primarily found on natural rocks (Anderson, McFerran & Cameron, 2000). Interestingly, in the Camargue and Gard region of southern France, the species appears to exploit other niches, occurring most often under tree bark like its close relative B. harpaloides (Serville) as well as beside pools, ponds and streams and under pebbles in the bottom of dried up, temporary pools (ThĂŠrond, 1975). Stephens (1839) cited the species from Suffolk without details and his record was not confirmed until Morley found a single specimen in Brandon churchyard v.c. 26 [TL 7786] in May, 1924 (Elliot, 1936). This specimen is still extant in his collection and I am aware of no other finds of the beetle in the county. This record is not mapped in Luff (1998) and apart from a pre1970 record for Essex, the species appears otherwise to be unrecorded from East Anglia. On 22 June 2002, whilst moving some wooden planks which had been piled up and left undisturbed for some years in my garden at Brantham v.c. 25 (TM 1134), I found a single example of B. quinquestriatum. Diligent searching failed to reveal further specimens. *Perigona nigriceps (Dejean) Naturalised This cosmopolitan species originating from south Asia has been distributed by trade to all parts of the world. It has occurred in Europe since 1902 but was not formally added to the British list until much later (Allen, 1950). From a probable initial foothold in the London area it has slowly been extending its range and is now known from as far north as Yorkshire. The beetle normally occurs in vegetable rubbish and grass heaps but also turns up at light. It usually occurs as singletons or in small numbers, a feature which Allen (1991) suggests is indicative, at least in this case, of a native of a warm country struggling to establish itself in the open in Britain. I sieved a single specimen from a straw heap at White House Farm, Great Glemham v.c. 25 (TM 3562) on 1 October 2002. *Amara fusca Dejean RDB 1 Amara fusca is found on sandy or gravelly heaths including dunes and is one of our very rarest British beetles. At the turn of the 19th century the species was only reliably recorded from Kent, Sussex and Glamorgan. The species was not reported in the 20th century until 1942 when a specimen was taken in West Kent (Browning, 1943). During a survey of Suffolk Breckland SSSIs in 1993 and 1994, A. fusca was found commonly on a sandy roadside at Wangford (TL 7583) and at the

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S. W. T Artemesia Reserve, Brandon (TL 7785). A single specimen was also found during the survey at Maidscross Hill, Lakenheath (TL 7282) (Telfer & Eversham, 1994; Telfer & Eversham, 1995) and it occurred there not uncommonly in the autumn of 2002 (pers. comm., Mark Telfer). *Amara strenua Zimmermann RDB 3 Amara strenua is a very rare and local ground beetle, reliably known from only Kent, Essex, the Isle of Wight and around the Bristol Channel with doubtful records from Derbyshire and Somerset. Most Amara species are more or less xerophilous and restricted to open country, but A. strenua is unusual in that it is an exclusively saltmarsh insect. During a pitfall trapping programme carried out by Malcolm Ausden on Church Farm Marshes, an area of the RSPB’s North Warren reserve between 2 May and 6 July 1993, specimens of A. strenua (det. S. A. Williams) were recorded from two sites (TM 4658 and TM 4659). In the carabid “Atlas” (Luff, 1998), reference is made to the occurrence of A. strenua in East Anglia in 1995 but this would appear to be a slip for 1993 since the dot on the accompanying map clearly indicates the North Warren Reserve. Lionychus quadrillum (Duftschmid) RDB 3 Lionychus quadrillum is a very local and rare little ground beetle which occurs in shingle and sand by rivers and on coasts. On 29 April 1897, Claude Morley took the first Suffolk specimen which was running on mud by the edge of a stream at Felixstowe (Morley, 1899); this specimen is still extant in his collection. The species was then lost sight of in the county for the next 78 years until a second specimen was found at Landguard Common, Felixstowe (TM 2831) on 8 September 1975, this time under beach rejectamenta (pers. comm., A. Warne). This is the record mapped in Luff’s “Atlas” (1998). A third record, this time from a new locality and 10 km square, can now be added: 14 August 2002, a single specimen on the beach at Aldeburgh (TM 4676) (N. Cuming). In its typical colour form the species is black with four white spots (maculae) on the elytra; the Aldeburgh beetle has very obscure humeral maculae (only visible when an elytron is detached) and approaches the rather rare immaculate form. HYDROPHILIDAE *Helophorus longitarsis Wollaston IUCN LOWER RISK (near threatened). Formerly RDB 3 Rare. Foster (2000) has reviewed the current status of this species. It is predominantly a southern English species and has been recorded since 1990 from seven English hectads and one Welsh hectad. It is mainly found in recently created muddy ponds linked to industrial extraction and is considered an extreme form of pioneer species. On 30 November 2001 a female Helophorus longitarsis (teste Garth Foster and Bob Angus) was taken by John Bratton on the edge of the long-established lake in Great Glemham Park, v.c. 25 (TM 3461). The habitat is atypical and I have have not met with other specimens there. The species is unlikely to be breeding at the site.

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*Cryptopleurum subtile Sharp Local Cryptopleurum subtile, originally described from Japan, was added to the British List by Johnson (1967) who found specimens in Cheshire and Merioneth in 1966; the species had first been recorded in Europe (Germany and Scandinavia) a few years earlier. The beetle is now widespread in both this country and at least northern and central Europe, as well as in North America. It is found in decaying organic matter such as compost, dung and dungheaps with specimens also being frequently attracted to light. Whilst sieving rotten potatoes from a heap in a field at Wangford (TL 7583) on 25 September 2002, I took a single specimen of C. subtile. PTILIIDAE I do not accept the view of Hyman & Parsons (1994) who suggest the downgrading in status of the two species discussed below on the grounds that the species are very small and difficult to identify. Accordingly, the status originally assigned them by Welch in Shirt (1987) is maintained here. *Microptilium pulchellum (Allibert) RDB 1 Microptilium species occur in damp marshy places. M. pulchellum was originally included in older British lists purely on the basis of two 18th century specimens without data taken by G. R. Waterhouse, but its status was confirmed when four specimens were taken at Bradfield, Berkshire in 1906 (Joy, 1906). After this, the species was not found again until 1980 when it was rediscovered in a flooded gravel pit at Earith, Hunts by John Owen (two exx.) and Colin Johnson in 1981 (many exx.) (Johnson, 1987). In addition to the above captures, Johnson (loc. cit. and pers. comm.) reports identifying three specimens sieved by Paul Hyman from damp leaf litter around a dried up pond at Red Lodge Warren near Barton Mills (TL 67) on 14 June 1985. *Acrotrichis cephalotes (Allibert) (=chevrolatii (Allibert) RDB 1 Johnson (2003) has recently shown that the species for long known as chevrolatii Allibert does not fit that author’s original description of his species and has designated the name chevrolatii auctt. as a synonym of cephalotes (Allibert). Acrotrichus cephalotes is a grassland species associated with old dungheaps by farms and is one of the rarest British beetles. It was only known from late 19th century specimens from Knowle and Edgbaston in the W. G. Blatch collection at Manchester Museum until three specimens were found by Colin Johnson in an old dung heap near Greno Wood in West Yorkshire on 1 October, 1974 (Johnson pers. comm.; Johnson, 1990). On 8 August 1980, Michael Darby found a male and female in a garden compost heap (cow, rabbit and pig dung, straw and grass) at Ilketshall St. Margaret v.c. 25 [TM 38] but failed to find the beetle in a neighbouring, older farmyard heap (chiefly cow dung and straw) (Darby, 1981). SCYDMAENIDAE *Euconnus duboisi Méquignon (=murielae Last) Vagrant This tiny little beetle was originally described as new to science from specimens found in Surrey in 1942 and 1944 (Last, 1945) but was later discovered to be conspecific with E. duboisi, a species found by M. Dubois at Versailles and described by Méquignon (1929). Following Last’s discovery,

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the beetle was found in Kent and South Lancashire. The most recent captures known to me are both from Surrey: in flight interception trap at Headley Warren in 1994 (Owen, 1997) and in stable sweepings at Little Bookham in 1999 (Owen, 2002). In 2002 I found Euconnus duboisi at three sites as follows: 4 July, sieved abundantly from old farmyard straw, White House Farm, Great Glemham, v.c. 25 (TM 3562); 3 September, one sieved from gilled fungus (including soil, etc. underneath) growing at base of poplar beside the A1065, Wangford, v.c. 26 (TL 7583) and two from old straw heap at Canada near Icklingham v.c. 26 (TL 7775). Allen (1969b) suggests that the beetle may lead a subterranean existence. If this is true (although I do not recollect it being found in hypogean traps), it could be that captures above ground occur when the beetle is in the process of dispersing to new sites. STAPHYLINIDAE Xylostiba monilicornis (Gyllenhal) Nb Stephens (1839) recorded this little omaliine beetle (as Omalium monilicorne) from “Boleti: London district; Suffolk; Bristol “ and, on the strength of this record repeated in the same author’s “Illustrations” (1827–1835), was included in Morley (1899). Fowler (1888), however, appears not to have accepted Stephens’ record, writing “Under bark, Highlands, rare, Tay and Dee districts. It was first taken in Britain by Mr. Foxcroft at Rannoch in 1855.” I sought Mr. A. A. Allen’s advice on this matter and he writes (in. litt. 22.vii.2003): “Fowler and perhaps others had an unjustifiably low opinion (it appears) of Stephens’ reliability in such matters, but the latter’s reputation has to a large extent been restored since those days and I would be disinclined to doubt his record unless a better reason for so doing can be found”. Joy (1932) in his “Handbook” also refers to it as an exclusively Scottish insect as does Tottenham (1954) in his “Handbook” covering the subfamily. Since the latter work appeared, the distribution would appear to have altered dramatically with Hyman & Parsons in their “National Review” (1994) considering the species to be widespread but local and recording it from seven N.C.C. regions, including central England and mid Wales. Unfortunately, I have been unable to trace the source of this new information on the species’ distribution and Mr. A. A. Allen and Professor J. Owen (both in litt.) are equally puzzled. The only non-Scottish published records of which I am aware have both appeared since the “National Review”. They are those of Heal (1994), who found a single specimen near Dover (new to Kent) in 1991, and Lane and Forsythe (2000) who found the beetle new to Warwickshire at Stretton-underFosse in 1999. The species was listed as still in need of confirmation for Suffolk in Elliott’s “Critical notes” (1936). At long last, its presence can be confirmed: I tapped a single example from a fungus in the long-disused woodyard beside Rougham Park near Bury St Edmunds, v.c. 26 (TL 9163) on 28 October 1997.

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*Lathrobium fovulum Stephens Common Species of Lathrobium occur in moss and litter beside ponds, lakes, streams and other damp places. Although the present species was not known from Suffolk until now, the beetle occurred in Little Fen, Lopham on the Norfolk side of the R. Waveney in the survey of Redgrave and Lopham Fens (Pope, 1968–1969). The species is unrepresented in the Morley collection and its apparent rarity and localisation in the county is enigmatic. I sieved a single specimen from reed litter beside the R. Lark, Icklingham Plains, v.c. 26 (TL 7573) on 31 March 1998. Lathrobium quadratum (Paykull) Local Included on our list on the basis of Stephens’ (1827–1835) statement that it occurred in Suffolk, Lathrobium quadratum was on Elliott’s (1936) list as still in need of confirmation as a Suffolk species. The beetle is nationally not uncommon but is not represented in the Morley collection and it is very surprising that it has not until now been redetected in the county. On 16 May 2002 I found L. quadratum commonly in Juncus litter close to a large roadside pond at Mellis Common v.c. 25 (TM 1074). Knowing that the extremely closely related species Lathrobium fennicum Renkonen (a beetle for long only known from the Scillies) had just been found in Norfolk, I dissected a number of males, but all proved to be the current species. *Scopaeus sulcicollis (Stephens) Local Although Fowler (1888) confused Scopaeus sulcicollis with S. minutus Er., the localities which he gives for it are correctly attributed as is his description of it as occurring in moss and vegetable refuse as well as on the banks of streams and under stones in fields and gardens (see Allen, 1969a). It is the only one of our five species of the genus which is generally distributed, with all others being rare and highly localised. Allen (loc. cit.) observes that, when found inland, it is usually as single specimens although quite why this is so, seems not to be known. Morley never met with any members of this genus and none have until now been recorded from Suffolk.This situation is now rectified thanks to the following records from East Suffolk by Martin Collier, of single beetles taken on paving slabs or paths in the gardens of his houses: 12 June 1988, Homersfield (TM 2885); 13 July 2002 and 3 August 2003, Syleham (TM 2179). These beetles may have been developing in sand on which the slabs were laid. Beetles like the tiny carabids Elaphropus parvulus (Dejean) (see Nash, 2002) and Tachys scutellaris Stephens, as well as staphylinids of the genus Bledius, have recently been found in similar situations, leading to the coining in this country of the term “Patio Beetles”. These species, when found in manmade habitats, however, usually occur in numbers indicative of on-site breeding.

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CLAMBIDAE *Clambus simsoni Blackburn Status unspecified Species of Clambus are tiny beetles which feed on moulds and are found in grass and straw heaps, and on damp twigs etc. Clambus simsoni is an Australian adventive recently added to the British List by Johnson (1997) on the strength of specimens found in two Welsh localities, and which appears to be gradually spreading into new areas. Following the Welsh captures, the beetle was next taken in a flight interception trap operated between July, 1998 and May, 1999 at Silwood Park, Berkshire (Booth, 2000). It has subsequently been reported as follows: four exx. in mouldy hay at Box Hill, Surrey in November and December 1999 (J. Owen pers. comm.; Owen, 2002); December, 2000, one in a garden grass heap in Middlesex (Prance, 2002); June, 2002, one in a heap of pine chips,Yarner Wood N. N. R., South Devon (Welch, 2003). To the above captures can now be added: 25 September 1998, four exx. sieved from a small heap of grass cuttings in the grounds of Brantham Glebe, Brantham v.c. 25 (TM 1134). Johnson (loc. cit.) refers to the distinctive pale colouration and darkened head; in my examples, just the area encircling the eyes is darkened. ELATERIDAE Aulonothroscus brevicollis (Bonvouloir) RDB 3 This rare little click beetle was for long only known from three ancient pasture woodland sites – Moccas Park (Hereford), Shute Park (South Devon), Windsor Forest ( Berkshire) – until it was added to the Suffolk List by Mendel (1983) who found specimens on the Icklingham Plains, West Suffolk in 1981. Mendel & Clarke (1996) mapped its national distribution as then known (it has been recorded elsewhere since) and showed its occurrence in TM15 on the basis of my Coddenham records detailed below. I currently have nine records as follows: Shrubland Estate, Coddenham, v.c. 25: 30 May 1984, one ex. beaten ivy on isolated oak on arable edge (TM 1153); 28 May 1986, one ex. on cut wood in woodyard (TM 1252); 21 July 1998, one ex. beaten near red-rot of old oak (TM 1252). Rougham Park, near Bury St Edmunds, v.c. 26 (TL 9163): singletons beaten oak , 28 May 1997 and 12 June 1998; five exx. beaten oak, 17 June, 1998. Ickworth Park, v.c. 26 (TL 9163): singletons beaten oak, 25 July, 1998 and 2 July 1999. Mellis Common, v.c. 25 (TM 0974): 16 May 2002: six plus beaten from ivy on old dead willow and nearby. Apart from the last record, all my captures are from pasture woodland sites. The beetle’s occurrence at Mellis Common is probably indicative of the site’s antiquity, with its occurrence on an ancient willow providing support for Mendel’s (1989) comments on the importance of the ancient willows, poplars and alders on the Icklingham Plains site, for the saproxylic beetles normally associated with pasture woodland which are found there.

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*Athous campyloides Newman Nb This click beetle has a predominantly south eastern distribution in this country although there are a handful of scattered modern records from Cornwall, Dorset, Devon, Worcestershire and Wales (Mendel & Clarke, 1996). Whitehead (1998) has recently speculated upon this distribution pattern suggesting that the beetle colonised Britain slowly via the pre-English Channel land bridge and that the outlying populations may not be recent dispersions but could be “old” populations isolated by weak female dispersiveness caused by this sexes apparent geophilism or photophobism. As a result of overhauling the collection of Elateroidea at the National Museum of Wales, Howard Mendel was able to add Athous campyloides to the Suffolk List when he found a specimen collected in May 1924 at Mildenhall v.c. 26 [TL77] by J. R. Le B. Tomlin (Kirk-Spriggs & Mendel, 1994). After a gap of 75 years, a second record can now be added for the western vice-county: 18 June 1999, one ex. swept in the early evening from a dry roadside verge near Hadleigh (TM 0143). Morley never encountered the beetle and the first known Norfolk specimen was only taken as recently as 2002 (Collier, 2003). CANTHARIDAE Malthodes brevicollis (Paykull) RDB 3 (Deletion from list) The tiny cantharid M. brevicollis was added to the Suffolk List by Tomlin (1910) who, in describing his capture at Glemsford, West Suffolk [TL 84] writes “one specimen beaten from a hedge; my determination of this specimen is confirmed by Ganglbauer who says that the name nigellus, Kies. falls as a synonym before brevicollis, Payk.” Morley (1915) in his First Supplement to his “Coleoptera”(1899) records this capture (as nigellus Kies.) and gives June, 1905 as the capture date. Alexander (2003) recommends the deletion of the species from the British List following his finding that all British material standing as brevicollis (Pk.) is a mixture of pumilus (Brébisson) (=atomus Thomson) and crassicornis (Mäklin). Of the Tomlin specimen now housed in the National Museum of Wales in Cardiff he writes “This is unfortunately a female with a deformed pronotum but Ganglbauer was sufficiently convinced that it is indeed a M. brevicollis that he placed his own hand-written determination label with the specimen – it is still there. The specimen is in poor condition and is not convincingly identifiable in my opinion.” As a postscript to Alexander’s work it is perhaps worth noting that Tomlin (loc. cit.) also reports M. atomus Th. as “common in long grass” at Glemsford. Morley in adding atomus to the Suffolk List in his First Supplement on the basis, presumably, of this published record together with two others,writes “Foxhall, Bentley Woods and Glemsford, singly, in June (Elliott, Tomlin, Morley)”. Given that pumilus (=atomus) occurred commonly to Tomlin at Glemsford in June, it would appear not unlikely that the putative brevicollis was in fact merely another pumilus.

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MELYRIDAE *Troglops cephalotes Olivier Vagrant On 6 July 1991 a single example of Troglops cephalotes was caught in flight outside the isolated public house “The Four Horseshoes� at Thornham Magna v.c. 25 (TM 1070) (Collier, 1992). The first British specimen of this little malachiine had been taken in Buckinghamshire in 1979 (Key, 1983), with a second turning up in Hertfordshire a few years later (James, 1987). Following the Suffolk capture the beetle was reported from Essex (Twinn, 1993). All these first four captures were from developed areas and of singletons which tends to support the view that the species is a recent importation which is gradually dispersing from its point of origin, rather than an overlooked native. Evidence that it is now well-established in at least two of the named counties, is provided by the recent capture of two examples on different dates at another Essex locality (Twinn, 1998) and by other Hertfordshire specimens in a night light (James, 2002). *Malachius vulneratus Abeille RDB 3 Malachius vulneratus is a very local saltmarsh insect and was believed to be confined to sites in Essex and Kent on the Thames estuary (Hyman & Parsons, 1992). On 22 June 2001, however, a single specimen was taken by John Bratton crawling on the exposed mud of a tidal saltmarsh pool by Home Reach, Aldeburgh, v.c. 25 (TM 4654). This first Suffolk capture of M. vulneratus was followed by that of Peter Hodge who swept three specimens from saltmarsh vegetation further up the coast in Delquit Marsh, Walberswick N. N. R. (TM 4775) on 16 July 2002. The Aldeburgh site was visited in the early evening of 16 June 2003 by Martin Collier and myself, and we were able to ascertain that M. vulneratus was well established in the area, with about a dozen specimens being swept, mainly from Sea-purslane (Atriplex portulacoides L.), Thrift (Armeria maritima (Mill.) and Sea Lavender (Limonium vulgare Mill.). Now that the beetle has been detected in Suffolk it is highly probable that additional records will be forthcoming. RHYZOPHAGIDAE *Monotoma testacea Motschulsky Status unknown This little beetle probably feeds on moulds. According to Peacock (1977) it is locally distributed, sometimes abundant but often scarce and principally occurs in the south east and midlands. It is found in decaying vegetable matter and in granaries and has been found swarming in decayed sacks which had contained bones from glue and chemical works. Morley never met with the beetle and it is only represented in his collection by a specimen donated by Henlow. Peacock (loc. cit.) reports seeing it from v.c. 25 but without details.

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I have the following records: 29 August 1972, sieved from an old straw stack, Wangford, v.c. 25 [TM47] (Aubrook, n. d.); 26 March 2002, one ex. sieved from cut grass by pond on the edge of the park at Thornham Magna Field Centre near Eye, v.c. 25 (TM 1071). CRYPTOPHAGIDAE *Cryptophagus angustus Ganglbauer Nb Cryptophagus angustus is one of our scarcer Cryptophagus species and is associated with coniferous woodland where it chiefly occurs under the bark of pine. It is found widely in Scotland and has been recorded from East Anglia and South East England. Hyman & Parsons (1994) suggest that it may be a species of our native Scottish pine forests which has colonised pine plantations in the south of the country. I beat a single example from ivy clothing an ancient isolated oak in an arable field close to a pine plantation on the Shrubland Estate, Coddenham, v.c. 25 (TM 1153) on 28 October, 1983. The species is unrepresented in the Morley collection PHALACRIDAE *Phalacrus brunnipes (=championi Guillebeau) Na The larvae of Phalacrus species inhabit smutted grasses and sedges. P. brunnipes is the rarest and most localised of our five British species. It is principally (but not exclusively) a saltmarsh insect, occurring predominantly in south eastern England and East Anglia although also occurrring in Scotland (Hyman & Parsons, 1992). These authors cite its post-1970 occurrence in East Suffolk but I have so far been unable to trace the source of their information. I have the following records from East Suffolk: 16 June 2002, several on smutted grass by R. Stour saltmarsh, Brantham (TM 1233); 29 May 2002, two exx. swept in the woodland garden of Higham Lodge, Higham (TM 0336); 16 June 2003, one swept in saltmarsh, Aldeburgh (TM 4654) (M. Collier). The beetle is unrepresented in the Morley collection. COCCINELLIDAE Scymnus schmidti Fursch Nb This recently described, small and rather scarce ladybird associated with lowgrowing vegetation on well-drained soils (sand dunes, chalk downland, heathland) was added to the Suffolk list by Mendel (1989) who found a single specimen under a fallen fence post on the Icklingham Plains, West Suffolk in 1981. On 7 July 1998 I took two examples of S. schmidti by grubbing around Sheep’s sorrel (Rumex acetosella L.) etc. in an area of sandy rabbit scrapes and burrows at East Bergholt, v.c. 25 (TM 0934). ENDOMYCHIDAE Sphaerosoma pilosum Panzer (=piliferum auctt. Brit.) Local This little beetle associated with mouldy twigs and branches was included (as Alexia pilifera Mull.) in Morley (1899) on the strength of Stephens’ record of it from oak in Suffolk in his “Illustrations” (1827–1835). Later, in his

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“Manual” (1839), Stephens only cites the beetle from the New Forest so perhaps the beetle was recorded erroneously from Suffolk. Although many beetles are often taken away from their normal habitat as strays, I would consider it unusual to beat a specimen from oak. Sphaerosoma was one of the 104 beetles listed by Elliott (1936) as still in need of confirmation as occurring in the county. That confirmation was finally obtained when I beat a specimen from the mouldy needles of recently cut pine branches on the ground in the woodyard on the Shrubland Estate, Coddenham v.c. 25 (TM 1252) on 28 June, 2002. Morley never met with the species anywhere and although the species is not accorded any special status, I have only met with the beetle once before – a single example tapped from sappy conifer bark strippings in Grovely Wood, near Salisbury, Wiltshire in August, 1980. CISIDAE *Cis punctulatus Gyllenhal Local Species of this genus breed in fungi with several species feeding on encrusting fungi (e. g. Stereum spp.) growing on trunks and branches. On 25 July 1981, Howard Mendel took this local and essentially northern species in large numbers by beating the dead needles on a recently fallen Corsican Pine with an encrusting fungus on Lower Hollesley Common, East Suffolk (TM 3445) (Mendel, 1987). At that time, this appeared to be only the second reported capture of this beetle south of Cumberland. I have recently received details of a much earlier Suffolk capture: 31 March 1964, Brandon v.c. 26 (TL 78) (Martin Luff; det. C. Johnson). Following Mendel’s capture, the species was found new to Norfolk by Martin Collier who beat a specimen from a cut conifer branch on the Stanford Training Area, Norfolk (TL 8591) on 10 May 1991 and three others from a dead conifer at Two Mile Bottom, Thetford (TL 8586) on 17 July 1994 ( pers. comm., M. Collier). I am not aware of any other southern captures of the beetle. TENEBRIONIDAE *Tenebrio obscurus Fabricius Synanthropic The large (12–17 mm), common, blackish beetle Tenebrio molitor (L.) is the adult of the well-known Yellow Mealworm which is popular as food for pets such as birds and reptiles. Both adults and larvae feed chiefly on cereals and their products in premises where these are stored, although the beetle is often found in ordinary houses where it has bred in the nests of birds such as starlings and house sparrows (here, probabling feeding on food scraps, dead insects and dessicated remains of dead fledglings). It frequently turns up at light at night. The second Tenebrio species on the British list, obscurus F., is believed to have a cosmopolitan distribution similar to that of molitor but it is a much scarcer insect associated chiefly with flour-mills, grain stores and stables and seems rarely, if ever, to occur away from these. Its larva is popularly known as the Dark Mealworm because it is tinged with brown whilst that of molitor is

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shining yellow. The species is not infrequently found with molitor but always in much smaller numbers. It is slightly less cold-hardy than T. molitor but well able to overwinter in cool climates. Both Tenebrio species appear to be recorded equally regularly on imported cargoes (chiefly grain and grain products from the Nearctic and Mediterranean regions) (Aitken, 1975). It may well be that obscurus is unable to maintain itself as a persistent population for any length of time in our climate once these imported products are distributed to British warehouses. Until 24 May 2002 I had searched for T. obscurus without success. On a visit to the now redundant Nestlé-Purina cat food factory at Great Cornard near Sudbury, West Suffolk (TL 883401) I was examining a dark area of a recently fumigated and swept, small, cereal storeroom when I came across three almost dead adults of T. obscurus at the base of a wall, together with a fairly mature brownish larva. Recognising the beetles in the field by their dull, microsculptured surface (T. molitor is relatively shiny as it lacks microsculpture), I collected the larva for rearing. It was fed on floor sweepings from the factory, including dead adults of other beetles of stored products such as Tenebrioides mauritanicus (L.) and Tribolium spp., and produced an adult obscurus in May, 2003. I am not aware of a previously published Suffolk record although I have not searched the specialist journals devoted to stored product pests and their control. The only other county record known to me is on a card index held at the Central Science Laboratory at Sand Hutton where the beetle is recorded as occurring in a mill at Lavenham, v.c. 26 [TL 94] on 21 October 1942 (pers. comm. J. Ostojá-Starzewski ). In common with many present day coleopterists, Morley never found the beetle and it is only represented in his collection by a single non-Suffolk specimen collected by the well-known coleopterist James Keys who printed many of Morley’s publications, including his 1899 “Coleoptera of Suffolk”. SALPINGIDAE *Lissodema cursor (Gyllenhal) Na This little saproxylic beetle is believed to breed in the topmost branches and twigs of ash. It appears to be widely distributed but rarely recorded, probably because it is only usually found when these boughs fall or when it is blown from its host tree and is then swept from the vegetation underneath. On 19 July 2002 I beat five exx. from the dead bough and twigs on an old ash in Chestnut Spinney, Stutton v.c. 25 (TM 1433) and a further three exx. on 22 July. The species is not represented in the Morley collection. MELANDRYIDAE Anisoxya fuscula (Illiger) RDB 3 This widely distributed but very localised and rare beetle which breeds in dead twigs of ash, willow, beech etc. was added to the Suffolk List by Mendel (1989) who beat the beetle from Grey Poplar on the Icklingham Plains, West Suffolk in 1983.

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Two further captures can now be added, including the first for the eastern vice-county: 12 July 1997, beaten dead sallow twigs, Pashford Poors Fen v.c. 26 (TL 7383) (H. Mendel); 19 July (three exx.) and 22 July (two exx.) 2002, beaten dead ash bough and twigs, Chestnut Spinney, Stutton v.c. 25 (TM 1433). Phloiotrya vaudoueri Mulsant Nb This scarce saproxylic beetle which breeds in the dead sapwood wood of oak, birch, sweet chestnut etc. was added to our list on the basis of specimens found in East Suffolk at Staverton Park in 1960 and Shrubland Park in 1970 (Nash, 1973). Since that time, there have been no further published county records despite my own regular recording at the latter site. A detailed survey of Shrubland Park was commissioned by English Nature in 1995, specifically targeted at rediscovering Phloiotrya and nine other dead wood species I had recorded in the 1970s and 1980s (Plant, 1995). This involved nine full days of intensive recording but none of the ten species involved were found; this is in many ways more indicative of the elusive nature of many such beetles rather than their actual absence from the site. Whilst recording on the edge of Shrubland Park, Barham (TM 1252) on 28 June 2002 I was pleasantly surprised to sieve a single specimen of P. vaudoueri from a mass of fungus growing on a recently fallen mature beech, confirming, after a gap of over thirty years, the continued presence of the beetle in the locality. SCRAPTIIDAE Scraptia testacea Allen RDB 3 This rare species was added to the Suffolk list by Howard Mendel during his study of the saproxylic beetles of Icklingham Plains, West Suffolk (Mendel, 1989). To the information provided there, can be added: 29 June 1986, beaten Grey Poplar; June 1987, reared out of rot hole debris collected from Grey Poplar on 7 December 1986. I can now add a modern record for the eastern vice-county: 19 July 2002, one beaten old oak, Chestnut Spinney, Stutton (TM 1433). In the Second Supplement to the county list of Coleoptera (Elliott, 1929), Scraptia fuscula Müller is included on the strength of three specimens taken on various dates between 1914–1929 on the windows of Morley’s house at Monks Soham. These three beetles (all males) are still extant in his collection and are referrable to S. testacea, Morley evidently not having re-checked them after Allen described his new species (1940). S. fuscula should therefore be deleted from the county list. ANTHICIDAE *Anthicus angustatus Curtis Nb Species of this genus are popularly known as ant beetles because of the large, more-or-less quadrate head and narrow thorax. Some occur widely in decaying vegetable matter such as compost, straw and old dungheaps whilst others are more localised and found exclusively in saltmarshes.

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I sieved a single specimen of Anthicus angustatus from tidal refuse on Orford Beach v.c. 25 (TM 4046) on 2 July 1983. This species, known only from salt marshes in the south and south east of England, is represented in Morley’s collection by a single non-Suffolk specimen donated by Keys. CURCULIONIDAE *Orthochaetes insignis (Aube) Nb Two species of Orthochaetes occur in the British Isles, Orthochaetes insignis and O. setiger. The larvae of these beetles are polyphagous leaf miners but the adults are rarely found sitting on the host plants and are chiefly taken by sweeping, by grubbing at the roots of plants, or in pitfall traps, especially in sandy or chalky areas. O. setiger is the most frequently recorded of the two species and has been known from Suffolk since 1834 when it was found not uncommonly in moss at Belton, East Suffolk [TG 40]( Paget, 1834). O. insignis, however, is a much scarcer insect with published records from only some nine British counties (Ostojá-Starzewski, 2002; Eyre et al., 2002). In April, 2000 larvae of both Orthochaetes species were found mining the leaves of cultivated Cyclamen in a Bury St Edmunds garden, v.c. 26 (TL 8463) (Ostojá-Starzewski loc. cit and pers. comm.). This is not only the first Suffolk record of O. insignis but also the first time it has been recorded mining Cyclamen leaves. It is also the first record of a mixed population of the pair of species from a single host. APPENDIX RDB 1 (Red Data Book Category 1 – Endangered): Species in danger of extinction and whose survival is unlikely if causal factors continue operating. Estimated to exist in five or fewer 10 km squares. RDB 3 (Red Data Book Category 3 – Rare): Species with small populations that are not at present Endangered or Vulnerable but are at risk. Estimated to exist since 1970 in only fifteen or fewer 10 km squares. RDB K (Red Data Book Category K – Insufficiently known): Species that are suspected but not definitely known to belong to any of the above categories, because of lack of information. Na (Nationally notable; scarce): Species which do not fall within RDB categories but which are none-the-less uncommon in Great Britain and thought to occur in 30 or fewer 10 km squares of the National Grid or, for less wellrecorded groups, within seven or fewer vice-counties. Nb (Nationally notable; scarce): Species which do not fall within RDB categories but which are none-the-less uncommon in Great Britain and thought to occur in between 31 and 100 10 km squares of the National Grid or, for less well-recorded groups between eight and twenty vice-counties. CORRECTION In a previous paper in this series (Transactions Suffolk Nat. Soc. (2001), 37: 73), I erroneously assigned a record of the ladybird Nephus quadrimaculatus Herbst from Syleham, v.c. 25, to the western vice-county. The beetle is currently still not known from v.c. 26.

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Acknowledgements I thank: Mr. A. A. Allen for his comments on Xylostiba monilicornis; the late Ted Aubrook for ms. lists of his and Colin Johnson’s Suffolk captures; Dr. John Bratton for lists of his Suffolk captures and permission to publish his records of M. vulneratus and H. longitarsus; Martin Collier for allowing me to include his unpublished records and for information on the Norfolk status of some species; Nigel Cuming and Peter Hodge for their unpublished records; Dr. Martin Luff for helpful discussion and correspondence and a ms. list of his Suffolk captures; Professor John Owen for elaboration of his published records and helpful correspondence; Colin Johnson, Manchester Museum for elaboration of his published records; Howard Mendel, The Natural History Museum, London for his unpublished records, helpful correspondence and for organising the loan of material from the Tottenham collection; Dr. Joe OstojáStarzewski, Central Science Laboratory, D.E.F.R.A., York, for records of stored product beetles from their files, helpful correspondence and photocopies; Dr. A. Warne for a computer file of all his Suffolk records; Rob Macklin, R.S.P.B. Area Manager, North Warren, for lists of the reserve’s beetle records including maps of the Amara strenua sites; David Lampard (Curator, Natural History, Ipswich Museum) for access to the Morley/Doughty collection and associated documentation; Alex Williams for confirming my determination of Clambus simsoni and for much help with checking or naming staphylinids. I am grateful to the following for permission to record on their property: Lord Cranbrook and his son Jason (Great Glemham Farms Ltd.); Lord de Saumarez (Shrubland Park Estate); The Rt. Hon. Peter Strutt (Stutton Estate); Major C. Gurney (Higham Lodge); Mr. G. Agnew (Rougham Estate); Mr. O. Eley (East Bergholt Estate); Jim Rudderham, Conservation Officer (Elveden Farms Ltd.); Helen Siblings (Thornham Magna Field Centre); Nestlé-Purina Pet Foods and Stuart Read (Great Cornard Mill); Suffolk Wildlife Trust and Andrew Excell (Mellis Common). Finally, I thank the following staff at the Biological Records Centre, I.T.E., Monks Wood: Paul Harding, on behalf of N.E.R.C., for permission to reproduce the maps from the carabid “Atlas”; Mark Telfer for a copy of the Suffolk carabid dataset; Henry Arnold for up-dating and sending copies of the maps. References Aitken, A. D. (1975). Insect Travellers. Vol. 1. Coleoptera. MAFF. Technical Bulletin 31. London: H. M. S. O. Alexander, K. N. A. (2003). Is Malthodes brevicollis (Paykull) (Cantharidae) a British beetle? Coleopterist 12: 35–39. Allen, A. A. (1940). Scraptia testacea nom. nov. and S. fuscula Müll. (Col. Scraptiidae). Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 76: 56–58. Allen, A. A. (1950). Two species of Carabidae (Col.) new to Britain. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 86: 89–90. Allen, A. A. (1969a). Notes on some British Staphylinidae (Col.) 1. – The genus Scopaeus Er. with the addition of S. laevigatus Gyll. to our list. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 104 (1968): 198–207.

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Allen, A. A. (1969b). Notes on some British Scydmaenidae (Col.), with corrections to the List. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 81: 239–246. Allen, A. A. (1991). A second capture of Perigona nigriceps Dej. (Col. Carabidae) in N. W. Kent (S. E. London). Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 103: 46. Anderson, R., McFerran, D. & Cameron, A. (2000). The Ground Beetles of Northern Ireland (Coleoptera – Carabidae). Belfast: Ulster Museum/ National Museums and Galleries of Northern Ireland. Aubrook, E. A. (n.d.). Ms. list of Suffolk Coleoptera recorded August 26–31st 1972 by E. Aubrook and C. Johnson. Booth, R. G. (2000). Report of an exhibit at the Annual Exhibition of the B. E. N. H. S. November, 1999. Br. J. Ent. Nat. Hist. 13: 173–174. Browning, F. R. (1943). Amara complanata Dej. var. fusca Dej. (Col., Carabidae) in Kent. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 79: 232. Collier, M. J. (1992). Troglops cephalotes (Olivier) (Melyridae) in Suffolk. Coleopterist 1: 6. Collier, M. J. (2003). Field Meeting Report: Norfolk (5–7 July 2002). Coleopterist 12: 76–77. Darby, M. (1981). Acrotrichis chevrolatii (Allibert) in Suffolk. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 117: 155. Dawson, J. F. (1854). Geodephaga Britannica. A monograph of the carnivorous ground-beetles indigenous to the British Isles. London: John van Voorst. Elliott, E. A. (1929). The Coleoptera of Suffolk. Second Supplement. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 1: 121–126. Elliott, E. A. (1936). Critical notes on our beetles. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 3: 121–128. Eyre, M. D. , et al. (2002). Rare and notable Coleoptera from post-industrial and urban sites in England. Coleopterist 11: 91–101. Foster, G. N. (2000). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 3. Aquatic Coleoptera. Peterborough: Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Fowler, W. W. (1888). The Coleoptera of the British Islands II. Staphylinidae. London: L. Reeve & Co. Heal, N. F. (1994). Xylostiba monilicornis (Gyllenhal) (Staphylinidae): first record in Kent. Coleopterist 3: 43. Hyman, P. S. (revised Parsons, M. S. ) (1992). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 1. U.K. Nature Conservation No. 3. Peterborough: Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Hyman, P. S. (revised Parsons, M. S. ) (1994). A review of the scarce and threatened Coleoptera of Great Britain. Part 2. U.K. Nature Conservation No. 12. Peterborough: Joint Nature Conservation Committee. James, T. J. (1987). A further record of Troglops cephalotes (Olivier) (Col., Melyridae) in Britain. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 123: 179–180. James, T. J. (2002). Some Coleoptera from Hertfordshire, mostly new to the county. Report of an exhibit at the 2001 Annual Exhibition of the society. Br. J. Ent. Nat. Hist. 15: 178.

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Johnson, C. (1967). Cryptopleurum subtile Sharp (Col., Hydrophilidae): an expected addition to the British List. Entomologist 100: 172–173. Johnson, C. (1987). Additions and corrections to the British List of Ptiliidae (Coleoptera). Entomologist’s Gaz. 38: 117–122. Johnson, C. (1990). The feather-wing beetles of Yorkshire (Coleoptera: Ptiliidae). Naturalist 115: 57–71. Johnson, C. (1997). Clambus simsoni (Blackburn) (Col., Clambidae) new to Britain, with notes on its wider distribution. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 133: 161–164. Johnson, C. (2003). Further notes on Palaearctic and other Ptiliidae. Entomologist’s Gaz. 54: 55–70. Joy, N. H. (1906). Microptilium pulchellum All. from Berkshire. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 42: 180. Joy, N. H. (1932). A Practical Handbook of British Beetles. London: H. F. & G. Witherby. Key, R. (1983). Troglops cephalotes (Olivier) (Col. Melyridae), from Buckinghamshire, possibly a new British species. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 119: 71–72. Key, R. (1998). Conservation News. Coleopterist 7: 99–102. Kirk-Spriggs, A. H. & Mendel, H. (1994). A Catalogue of British Elateroidea (Coleoptera) in the National Museum of Wales. Entomology Series No. 3. Cardiff: National Museum of Wales. Lane, S. A. & Forsythe, T. G. (2000). Noteworthy beetles found in Warwickshire (v.c. 38) in 1999. Coleopterist 9: 102–104. Last, H. R. (1945). Euconnus (Napochus) murielae sp. n., a new British Scydmaenid (Col.). Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 81: 275. Luff, M. L. (1998). Provisional atlas of the ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) of Britain. Huntingdon: Biological Records Centre. Mendel, H. (1980). Notes on Suffolk Carabidae (Coleoptera) including two species new to the county list. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 18: 141–143. Mendel, H. (1983). Beetles (Coleoptera) new to Suffolk. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 19: 337–341. Mendel, H. (1987). Cis punctulatus Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Cisidae): a northern species established in Suffolk. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 99: 156. Mendel, H. (1989). Saproxylic beetles (Coleoptera) of the Icklingham Plains, an area of Suffolk Breckland with a remarkable dead-wood fauna. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 25: 23–28. Mendel, H. (1991). Bembidion argenteolum Ahrens (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in the British Isles. Br. J. Ent. Nat. Hist. 4: 139–141. Mendel, H. & Clarke, R. E. (1996). Provisional Atlas of the Click Beetles (Coleoptera: Elateroidea) of Britain and Ireland. Ipswich: Ipswich Borough Council Museums. Méquignon, A. (1929). Description d’un Euconnus nouveau de France. Bull. Soc. Ent. Fr. 1929: 297–298. (not seen). Morley, C. (1899). The Coleoptera of Suffolk. Plymouth: J. H. Keys.

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Morley, C. (1915). The Coleoptera of Suffolk. First Supplement. Plymouth: J. H. Keys. Nash, D. R. (1973). Four species of Coleoptera probably new to the Suffolk County List. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 16: 211–214. Nash, D. R. (1984). Notes on the Suffolk List of Coleoptera: 4. Scolytidae. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 20: 32–37. Nash, D. R. (2002). Notes on the Suffolk List of Coleoptera: 9. 18 species new to the Suffolk list with significant records from the year 2001. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 38: 107–123. Ostojá-Starzewski, J. C. (2002). Orthochaetes insignis (Aubé) (Curculionidae: Erirhininae) mining the leaves of cultivated Cyclamen spp. in the British Isles. Coleopterist 11: 83–88. Owen, J. A. (1997). Some uncommon beetles from Headley Warren, Surrey. Entomologist’s Rec. J. Var. 109: 301–307. Owen, J. A. (2002). Report of an exhibit at the November, 2001 Annual Exhibition of the B. E. N. H. S. Br. J. Ent. Nat. Hist. 15: 179. Peacock, E. R. (1977). Coleoptera : Rhizophagidae. Handbk. Ident. Br. Insects V, Part 5 (a). London: Royal Entomological Society. Paget, C. J. & J. (1834). Sketch of the Natural History of Yarmouth. London: Longman Rees. Plant, C. W. (1985). Dead-wood Coleoptera and other invertebrates at Shrubland Park Estate, Ipswich. Report no. BS/022/95. Unpublished report for English Nature. Pope, R. D. (1968–1969). A preliminary survey of the Coleoptera of Redgrave and Lopham Fens. Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 14: 25–40; 189–207. Prance, D. A. (2002). Clambus simsoni Blackburn (Col., Clambidae) recorded from Middlesex. Entomologist’s mon. Mag. 138: 198. Shirt, D. B. (ed.) (1987). British Red Data Books : 2. Insects. Peterborough: Nature Conservancy Council. Stephens, J. F. (1827–1835). Illustrations of British Entomology. (Mandibulata). London: privately published by the author. (not seen). Stephens, J. F. (1839). A Manual of British Coleoptera. London: Longman. Telfer, M. G. & Eversham, B. C. (1994). Amara fusca Dejean established in Britain. Coleopterist 3: 35–36. Telfer, M. G. & Eversham, B. C. (1995). Invertebrate recording on Suffolk Breckland Sites of Special Scientific Interest during 1993 and 1994. Report no. 592 (426.4) held by English Nature (unpublished). Thérond, J. (1975). Catalogue des Coléoptères de la Camargue et du Gard. Première Partie. Memoire no. 10. Nîmes: Société d’Etude des Sciences Naturelles de Nîmes. Tomlin, J. R. Le B. (1910). Coleoptera in Suffolk. Entomologist’s mon Mag. 46: 191–192. Tottenham, C. E. (1954). Coleoptera. Staphylinidae section (a). Piestinae to Euaesthetinae. Handbk. Ident. Br. Insects IV part 8a. London: Royal Entomological Society. Twinn, D. C. (1993). A further British record of Troglops cephalotes (Olivier) (Melyridae). Coleopterist 2: 26.

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Twinn, D. C. (1998). A further Essex record of Troglops cephalotes (Olivier) (Melyridae). Coleopterist 7: 6. Welch, R. C. (2003). Clambus simsoni Blackburn (Col., Clambidae) from Yarner Wood, South Devon. Entomologist’s mon Mag. 139: 190. Whitehead, P. F. (1998). Observations on the British population of Athous campyloides Newman, 1833 (Elateridae). Coleopterist 7: 94–95. David R. Nash 3 Church Lane Brantham Suffolk CO11 1PU

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NOTES ON THE SUFFOLK LIST OF COLEOPTERA: 10 23 SPECIES NEW TO THE SUFFOLK LIST  

David Nash

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