Page 1

SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT

RECORDS

C o m p i l e d b y E . M . HYDE a n d F . W . SIMPSON

For each record the following information is given: locality and habitat, Ordnance Survey 10km square, vice-county, finder's name or initials (see key at end of article) and date of record. The comments are those of the compilers, based in some cases on information supplied by the finders. The nomenclature and order of the species are with very few exceptions those of Flora Europaea. Simpson's Flora of Suffolk is used as the authority for claiming first or second County records, supplemented by the large number of records received since its publication. The compilers wish to thank the specialists who determined or confirmed the identity of specimens, especially Mr. E. J. Clement, who has for many years generously given us the benefit of his time and extensive knowledge. A significant number of new records in this list stem from the Rev. R. Addington's survey of 10km square TM06. 1991 is to be the third and final year of his very interesting survey. New this year is the division of our list into two sections. At the suggestion of the Editor, we have listed, in the first section, native plants and established introductions and, in the second, bird-seed aliens and other casuals. Garden escapes and throw-outs are only included if it is known, or if the size of the population indicates, that they have persisted in their new habitat for several years. I Native plants and established introductions Polypodium x mantoniae Rothm., a hybrid Polypody. (P. interjectum Shivas x P. vulgare L.) Wetherden, roadside bank in single-track section of Plashwood Rd., TM06, v.c. 26, RA, 31/7/90. Det. R. H. Roberts, Sept. 1990. This hybrid requires expert determination. Third definite record for v.c. 26, but it is almost certainly more common than this suggests. Azolla filiculoides Lam., Water Fern. In the River Stour at Rodbridge picnic site, TL84, v.c. 26, GDH, 29/10/90. The east bank here is in Suffolk. Another good year for Azolla, especially in the east of the County. Rumex x pratensis Mert. & Koch, Curled x Broadleaved Dock. (R. crispus L. x R. obtusifolius L.) (i) Bramford, waste ground in chalk-pit, now largely filled-in, TM14, v.c. 25, EM-R, 28/6/90. (ii) Barnby, TM49, v.c. 25, JM and TA, 1989. Rumex maritimus L., Golden Dock. Alton Water, Tattingstone, TM13, v.c. 25, PLF, 12/9/89. Many plants along

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 27 (1991)


SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

23

a stretch of shore-line near Lemon Bridge. Abundant again in 1990 (EMH) with a host of seedling plants. This species is more widespread than was thought and is clearly able to colonise new sites. Carpobrotus edulis (L.) N. E. Br., Ice Plant, Hottentot Fig. LandguardCommon, Felixstowe,TM23, v.c. 25, GES, July 1990. Det. C. D. Preston, 9/90. An extensive colony has spread several yards on to the shingle from a derelict garden near Landguard Point. Covered in a mass of flowers, it was quite spectacular (GES, pers. comm.). Also recorded by FWS and BM. This species, a native of S. Africa, is naturalised on cliffs and sand dunes in Devon, Cornwall, the Channel Isles and other mild areas of the South coast. It is remarkable that on this short stretch of the Suffolk coastline from Landguard to Bawdsey, we have colonies of two Carpobrotus species. C. glaucescens survives at Bawdsey in very small quantity. Papaver argemone L., Prickly Poppy. (i) Wetherden, frequent at edge of arable field, occasional by roadside hedge, TM06, v.c. 26, RA, 30/5/90. (ii) Ipswich, in grounds of East Suffolk Hospital, TM14, v.c. 25, PGL, 16/5/90. (iii) Westleton, several separate colonies at edge of arable field, TM46, v.c. 25, GP, June 1989. Conf. PGL. In this same field grows also Valerianella dentata (L.) Poll., Narrow-fruited Corn Salad (PGL). It is encouraging to receive reports of several good colonies of Prickly Poppy, as it has become quite scarce in the County. Corydalis solida (L.) Sw., Purple Fumitory. Woodbridge, two colonies naturalised in Trust Woodland, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, 24/3/90. This interesting record was communicated by M. D. Crewe, who had observed it several years previously. It was obviously introduced and grows in association with native flora, Wood Anemone, Bluebell and other species. Very similar to C. bulbosa (L.) DC., Tuberous Corydalis, but not so large or with such attractive flowers. Fumaria densiflora DC., Dense-flowered Fumitory. Mildenhall, arable fields near Skelton's Farm, TL67, v.c. 26, JB and RF, 28/9/86. Abundant, with F. parviflora (see below), Chenopodium hybridum, Erucastrum gallicum and other arable weeds. This species, which has a preference for chalky soils, has always been rare in Suffolk. This is the first post-Flora record. Recorded during the BSBI Arable Weeds Survey, 1986-7. Fumaria parviflora Lam., Small-flowered Fumitory. Mildenhall, arable fields near Skelton's Farm, v.c. 26, JB and RF, 28/9/86. Abundant, with F. densiflora and other arable weeds (see above). Again, a weed of chalky soils rare in Suffolk. First post-Flora record. Recorded during the BSBI Arable Weeds Survey, 1986-7.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 27 (1991)


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Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 27

Lepidium heterophyllum Benth., Smith's Pepperwort. Reydon, by grassy track above marshes, TM47, v.c. 25, EWP, 20/5/90. Conf. M. N. Sanford. A rare plant in Suffolk. A perennial Pepperwort, superficially resembling the much commoner annual Field Pepperwort, L. campestre (L.) Br. Lepidium latifolium L., Dittander. Higham (near Bury St. Edmunds), TL76, v.c. 26, DEC, 4/9/89. A flourishing patch 2 - 3 metres long, at road level beside the A45(T), below the slip-road to Cavenham. Dittander, very common along the coastal strip, is moving steadily westwards along the A45(T) towards Newmarket. Sedum telephium L. ssp. telephium, Orpine. (i) Wattisham, small colony in Devil's Wood, TM05, v.c. 26, JH, 3/6/87. (ii) Parham, small colony in ancient wood, TM36, v.c. 25, FWS, 19/4/90. (iii) Ellough Churchyard, TM48, v.c. 25, FWS, c. 1985. This is a decreasing species which has disappeared from a number of sites in recent years, usually due to being smothered by other vegetation. However, a colony observed for a number of years on a hedge bank at Campsey Ash and surviving annual cutting, was completely removed by an unknown person during August 1989 (FWS). Cytisus striatus (Hill) Rothm., a species of Broom. Purdis Heath, on golf course, TM24, v.c. 25, NK, 15/8/90. Conf. E. J. Clement, 9/90. Hb. E & MH. Several bushes, 5 or 6ft. tall were found, bordering a path. This part of the golf course was very much disturbed during alterations a few years ago, but neither these bushes nor three or four variants of the Common Broom growing with them, are thought to have been planted ( N K p m . comm.). C. striatus closely resembles Common Broom (C. scoparius (L.) Link), but has paler yellow flowers and silky fruits, which stand out like white flowers on the twigs. Planted on many roadsides in Britain and now spreading by seed (Clement, 1978). It is a native of Portugal and Spain. First Suffolk record. Oxalis europaea Jord., Upright Yellow Sorrel. Wetherden, by kerb at entrance to new close, one large clump, TM06, v.c. 26, RA, 26/8/90. Det. E. J. Clement, 9/90. Hb. E & MH. A weed of cultivated ground throughout most of Europe. Differs from O. corniculata L., Procumbent Yellow Sorrel, exactly as their common names indicate. In addition it lacks stipules and its stems and petioles bear crisped septate hairs. An interesting find. Only three previous records. Euphorbia x pseudovirgata (Schur) Soo, a hybrid Spurge. (ÂŁ. esula L. X E. waldsteinii (Sojak) A. Radcliffe-Smith) Wyverstone, on broad roadside verge, TM06, v.c. 26, RA, 22/8/89. Det. A. Radcliffe-Smith, July 1990. Hb. E & MH. Another West Suffolk record of this rare hybrid, but, unlike the others, not in Breckland.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 27 (1991)


SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

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Euphorbia x pseudoesula Schur, Cypress x Leafy Spurge. (E. cyparissias L. X E. esula L.) A large colony in a grassy ride in the King's Forest, TL87, v.c. 26, EMH, 9/7/90. Det. A. Radcliffe-Smith, Oct. 1990. Specimen in Ipswich Museum Herbarium. Frequent in C. and E. Europe. A fairly widespread weedy adventive in S. and Central England (D. H. Kent, pers. comm.). Neither parent species is native in Britain, but both, particularly E. cyparissias, are naturalised in the Breckland. First Suffolk record. Impatiens capensis Meerb., Orange Balsam. Beccles, banks of River Waveney, TM49, v.c. 25, TA, 1989. Also EWP, August 1990. First Suffolk record. Known for some time on the Norfolk side of the river, so a record from our side was only a matter of time and of somebody noticing it! Viola pensylvanica Michx., a Violet. Gt. Bealings, one plant on a roadside bank in village, TM24, v.c. 25, FWS, April 1988. Det. E. J. Clement. A leafy yellow-flowered perennial Violet, occasionally grown in gardens. Mr. Clement states that it is part of the very variable Viola pubescens Ait. species and is what Hortus 3 rd calls var. eriocarpa. Also known under the name Viola eriocarpa Schur. It is a native of N. America. First Suffolk and British record. Mentha pulegium L., Penny Royal. Woodbridge, naturalised in Porter's Wood, TM24, v.c. 25, JR, August 1990. Det. and comm. MNS. Certainly an introduction here, but apparently wellestablished. As a native plant it is thought to be extinct in the County. Veronica anagallis-aquatica L. x V. catenata Pennell, Water Speedwell x Pink Water Speedwell. Shipmeadow, by ditch S. of River Waveney, TM39, v.c. 25, CDP and NFS, 12/8/89. Growing with V. catenata. Det. CDP. Specimen in Cambridge University Herbarium. An uncommon hybrid in Suffolk with few recent records. Mr. Preston informs us that there are other earlier Suffolk herbarium specimens in BM. Details held at Suffolk Biological Records Centre. Hieracium aurantiacum L., Fox and Cubs. (i) Wickham Skeith (v.c. 25) and Wyverstone (v.c. 26), established in lawns, TM06, RA, 1989. In Wyverstone it was said by the occupant to have been already growing in the lawn when he moved in 35 years ago. (ii) Washbrook, small patch established by field path well away from houses, TM14, v.c. 25, EMH, 13/6/90. All Suffolk plants appear to be ssp. carpathicola Naegeli & Peter. Ornithogalum nutans L., Nodding Star of Bethlehem. Since the publication of Simpson's Flora in 1982, a number of new colonies of this plant have been discovered. These include: Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 27 (1991)


26

Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 27

(i) Boxford, Stone Street, TL93, v.c. 26, NA, 14/5/84. Comm. and conf. EM-R. (ii) Drinkstone, roadside verge, TL96, v.c. 26, JCW, 1985. (iii) Wortham Ling, TM07, v.c. 25, AC, 1989. (iv) Waldringfield, in quantity under hedge, TM24, v.c. 25, PLF, 2/4/90. (v) Snape, c. 50 spikes on verge, TM35, v.c. 25, PGL, 6/5/86. (vi) Bungay, on wide grassy verge, TM38, v.c. 25, EB and GWM, 28/4/87. (vii) Blyford and Walberswick, on verge, 1986 and Bramfield, 1990, all TM47, v.c. 25, PGL. Allium triquetrum L., Triquetrous Garlic. Waldringfield, 9 or 10 flower spikes beside footpath in village, TM24, v.c. 25, PLF, 20/5/89. Conf. E. J. Clement from specimen collected in 1990, now in Ipswich Museum Herbarium. First Suffolk record. Native of the Iberian Peninsula and Mediterranean countries. Completely naturalised in some western counties of England and Wales, and very common in the Isles of Scilly. This attractive species is happily naturalised in my (FWS) Ipswich garden from a few bulbs which I brought from West Cork in 1938, where it grows on wayside ditch banks. Bulbs can be obtained from a few bulb merchants. Festuca rubra L. x Vulpia bromoides (L.) S. F. Gray, Red Fescue x Squirrel-tail Fescue. Kessingland Beach, on sandy shingle, TM58, v.c. 25, EMH, August 1986. Det. P. J. O. Trist 1990, from a pot-grown specimen collected in 1986. Conf. Dr. C. A. Stace, May 1990. Hb. E & MH. The only previous Suffolk record was from Shingle Street (PJOT) in 1969, re-found 1973 and 1976. Festuca juncifolia St.-Amans, Rush-leaved Fescue. Kessingland Beach, on sandy shingle, TM58, v.c. 25, EMH, 28/6/90. Det. P. J. O. Trist, July 1990, as the uncommon var. glabrata Lebel, not recorded in the Flora. Bromus carinatus Hook. & Arn., California Brome. Wherstead, on two roadside verges near Park Farm, TM14, v.c. 25, EMH, 27/5/89. Det. P. J. O. Trist, July 1989. First noticed flowering in early January of that year. Bromus carinatus was first recorded in Suffolk in 1978 in Woolverstone (EMH), as a relic of cultivation. Grown for silage, it was then just beginning to colonise the adjacent roadside verge. Since then it has spread sporadically along the verge of Glebe Lane from the farm (about V* mile from its original site), across the main road and down towards the Church, a distance of almost a mile. In 1978 the farm manager told me that it was a droughtresistant strain called 'Deborah'. More recently he has informed me that he has not grown it since 1978. He attributes its spread to seed falling from farm vehicles, carrying silage and cut grass for cattle feed. The fact that I have found no B. carinatus beyond the most distant of the fields where, until recently, cows were kept, bears out this theory. With its ability to set seed in

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 27 (1991)


SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

27

almost every month of the year (Clement, 1981) and bearing in mind its wellknown and well-documented dominance of lengthy stretches of Thames-side towpaths and of verges elsewhere in Britain, it seems highly likely that routine verge-cutting will disseminate it more widely in Woolverstone and also initiate similar developments in Wherstead. Carex acutiformis Ehr. x C. riparia Curtis, Lesser x Greater Pond Sedge. Carex acuta L. x C. acutiformis Ehr., Slender Tufted Sedge x Lesser Pond Sedge. Extensive stands of these two hybrid sedges were found at Framlingham Mere by A. C. Jermy in June 1990. Comm. PGL. C. acutiformis x C. riparia was found immediately below the Castle and C. acuta x C. acutiformis on the College side of the Mere. Both hybrids are first Suffolk records. (Framlingham Mere, TM26, v.c. 25, ACJ, 14/6/90. Det. ACJ.) Carex distans L., Distant Sedge. (i) Pakenham, Morley's meadows, TL96, v.c. 26, RA, 29/7/90. (ii) Westhorpe, marshy pasture, TM06, v.c. 25, RA, 28/7/90. Specimens from these two sites were determined as C. distans by R. W. David and A. C. Jermy, 3/10/90. This brings to five the number of inland sites discovered in the last four years. Coeloglossum viride (L.) Hartm., Frog Orchid. Winks Meadow, Metfield, 16 flower spikes in unploughed meadow, TM37, v.c. 25, EK, June 1990. First reported by the former owner, Mr. E. Krutysza. Det. MNS. This meadow is a Suffolk Wildlife Trust nature reserve, which guarantees the preservation of this rare orchid and other scarce meadowland species. The Frog Orchid was once fairly frequent in Suffolk, but until last year was thought to have become extinct, through the ploughing-up of old pastures. This is the first record for 30 years. Undoubtedly the botanical discovery of the year in Suffolk. Ophrys apifera Huds. var. trollii (Hegetschw.) Druce, Wasp Orchid. Six flower spikes on roadside verge between Walpole and Cookley, TM37, v.c. 25, D and CO, June 1990. Conf. MNS and EM-R. A most exciting find by David and Christine Orme. This has always been a rare orchid in Suffolk. Only two previous records are known. This variety has a somewhat imperfectly formed, more pointed lip with irregular markings of brown and yellow. It is more Wasp-like in appearance with a longer spreading tooth. A single specimen was shown to me (FWS) by Ronald Burn at Whatfield in 1931, where it appeared in the lawn of the Rectory where he was living at that time. In the small wood opposite I was also shown two specimens of Ophrys insectifera L., Fly Orchid.

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 27 (1991)


28

Suffolk Natural History, Vol. 27 II Bird-seed aliens and other casuals

Chenopodium vulvaria L., Stinking Goosefoot. (i) Ipswich, three specimens in garden, TM14, v.c. 25, FWS, 1990. Probably from the seed of a discarded specimen collected c. 1950 from Felixstowe Ferry Golf Links, where it formerly grew around the Martello Tower. (ii) Also gardens at Bungay (GWM) and Woolverstone (EMH) inadvertently introduced, perhaps after visits to Landguard Common, 1987. Atriplex hortensis L., Garden Orache. (i) Ipswich, along edge of new road near Docks, TM14, v.c. 25, EMH, 1990. Many tall plants with their characteristic beetroot-red leaves sprang up last year where houses were demolished about 20 years ago. (ii) Ramsholt, three plants in churchyard, TM34, v.c. 25, FWS, 1988. (iii) Beccles, waste ground, TM49, v.c. 25, JM, August 1987. Grown in gardens for its decorative leaves, it can become a persistent weed. Gypsophila elegans Bieb., Baby's Breath. Hitcham, appeared in garden, (a species never grown by the owner), TL95, v.c. 26, JH, Aug. 1990. Det. E. J. Clement, 8/90. A pretty little garden annual with small pink or white flowers on upright branching stems. Occasional on tips and waste ground, but not, so far, in Suffolk. Rapistrum rugosum (L.) All. ssp. linneanum Rouy & Fouc., Bastard Cabbage. Bramford, Cubitt's Pit, on spoil heaps, TM14, v.c. 25, MNS, 28/6/90. Also recorded on Landguard Common, AC, 1984 (TSNS 21:45), where it was first found in Suffolk (FWS) in 1935. There are no other records. It is thought to be the least common of the three subspecies of R. rugosum, but it is not always possible to distinguish between them. Ammi majus L., Bullwort. Melton, several plants in garden where bird-seed had been scattered, TM25, v.c. 25, RA, 17/9/89. Hb. E & MH. An occasional bird-seed alien. Turgenia latifolia (L.) Hoffm., Great Bur Parsley. Reydon, in garden where bird-seed is thrown down, TM47, v.c. 25, PGL, 11/7/90. Hb. E & MH. Conf. M. Southam, 7/90, who states that this species, formerly occasional in Britain, is now very rare, because of more efficient screening, even for bird-seed. Its large spiny fruits have been all but eliminated. Last previous record Lakenheath, 1952. Key to Contributors Abrehart, T. Addington, Rev. R. Ayles, Mrs. N.

TA RA NA

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 27 (1991)

Beaumont, Dr. E. Bevan, J. Coombe, Dr. D. E.

EB JB DEC


29

SOME RECENT SUFFOLK PLANT RECORDS

Copping, A. Crewe, M. D. Fitzgerald, Lady Rosemary Furze, P. L. Harris, Mrs. J. Heathcote, Dr. G. D. Hyde, Mrs. E. M. Jermy, A. C. Kerr, N. Krutysza, E. Lawson, P. G. Mathews, Mrs. B. May bury, G. W.

AC MDC RF PLF JH GDH EMH ACJ NK EK PGL BM GWM

Milne-Redhead, E. Muddeman, J. Orme, D. and C. Patrick, E. W. Peck, G. Preston, C. D. Ryland, Mrs. J. Sanford, M. N. Simpson, F. W. Steeds, Mrs. G. E. Stewart, N. Trist, P. J. O. Wakerley, J. C.

EM-R JM D & CO EWP GP CDP JR MNS FWS GES NS PJOT JCW

References Clement, E. J. (1978). Aliens and Adventives., B.S.B.I. News, 20:9. Clement, E. J. (1981). Aliens and Adventives., B.S.B.I. News, 28:12. Simpson, F. W. (1982). Simpson's Flora of Suffolk. Ipswich. Suffolk Naturalists' Society. Tutin, T. G. etal., eds. (1964-1980). Flora Europaea, 1-5. Cambridge. E. M. Hyde, Parkside, Woolverstone, Ipswich, IP9 1AR

F. W. Simpson, 40, Ruskin Road, Ipswich, IP4 1PT

Trans. Suffolk Nat. Soc. 27 (1991)

Some recent Suffolk plant records  

Enid Hyde & Francis Simpson

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