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Incorporating a review of birds in Suffolk in 2000


West Area Recorder Cloin Jakes, 7 Maltward Avenue, BURY ST EDMUNDS IP33 3XN Tel: 01284 702215 E-mail: cjjakes@supanet.com

North-East Area Recorder David Thurlow, 1 Ness House Cottage, Sizewell LEISTON IP16 4UB Tel: 01728 832719 E-mail: dave.thurlow@rspb.org.uk

South-East Area Recorder Lee Woods, 5 Gretna Gardens, IPSWICH IP4 3NT Tel: 01473 727324 E-mail: leejanwoods@yahoo.co.uk


SUFFOLK BIRDS VOL. 50 A review of birds in Suffolk in 2000

Editor G Lowe

Published by SUFFOLK NATURALISTS' SOCIETY 2002


Published by The Suffolk Naturalists' Society, c/o The Museum, High Street, Ipswich IP1 3QH Š The Suffolk Naturalists' Society 2002 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission of the Copyright owners.

The SNS is a Registered Charity No. 206084.

ISSN 0264-5793

Printed by Crowes of Norwich 50 Hurricane Way, Norwich NR6 6JB

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CONTENTS

Editorial Gary Lowe Obituaries Herbert Axell John H Grant William Payn Derek Moore Review of the Year Gary Lowe The Passage of European Honey-buzzards through Suffolk, September 2000 Steve Piotrowski Dartford Warbier — Re-colonisation in Suffolk Peter Etheridge The 2000 Suffolk Bird Report Introduction Systematic List Appendices List of Contributors Gazetteer Earliest and latest dates of summer migrants A Guide to Recording Birds in Suffolk Seabird Movements — Field recording and submission of records Peter J Dare Notes Olivaceous Warbier and Isabelline Shrike in Suffolk Brian J Small Stonechats - a cautionary note Paul Holmes Rarities Report Gary Lowe Regional Review Gary Lowe Suffolk Ringing Report 2000 Peter Lack

Page 5 6 8 10 16 27 30 32 143 147 148 150 151 155 157 158 159 168 174

List of Plates Facing Page

Plate No.

1. Bert Axell Bob and Ann Scott Bill Payn Roger Tidman 3. Grey Héron Clive Naunton 4. Whooper Swan Derek Moore 5. Eurasian Wigeon Alan Tate 6. Northern Pintail Alan Tate 7. Water Rail Bill Baston 8. Mandarin Duck Alan Tate 9. Common Buzzard Alan Tate 10. Ruddy Turnstone Alan Tate 1 1 . Eurasian Dotterei Robert Wincup 1 2 . Spotted Redshank Clive Naunton 1 3 . Red-necked Phalarope Clive Naunton 14. Grey Phalarope Bill Baston 1 5 . Mediterranean Gull Clive Naunton 16. Great Black-backed Gull Alan Tate 2.

Facing Page

Plate No.

38

17.

Little Terns Alan Tate

99

38

18.

99

39

19.

Short-eared Owl Clive Naunton Barn Owl Alan Tate

39

20.

52

21.

52

22.

53

23.

53

99 114

24.

European Bee-eaters Alan Tate Richard's Pipit Alan Tate Rock Pipit Alan Tate Alpine Accentor Robert Wincup Western Bonelli's Warbier Alan Tate

53

25.

Stonechat James Lees

115

78

26. 27.

78

28.

79

29.

Dartford Warbier Alan Tate Pied Flycatcher Robert Wincup Bohemian Waxwing Robert Wincup Eurasian Tree Sparrows Alan Tate

140

78

79

30.

Marsh Tit Bill Baston

141

98

31.

Snow Bunting Alan Tate

141

98

Front cover: Eurasian M a r s h Harrier

Brian

Small

The copyright remains that of the photographers/artist. 3

114 114 115 115

140 140 141


Notice to Contributors Suffolk Birds is an annual publication of records, notes and papers on all aspects of Suffolk ornithology. Except for records and field descriptions submitted through the county recorders, all material should be original. It should not have been published elsewhere or offered complete or in part to any other journal. Authors should carefully study this issue and follow the style of presentation, especially in relation to references and tables. Where relevant, nomenclature and order should follow Dr K. H. Voous's List of Recent Holarctic Bird Species and use of English names should be as in the BOU's 'Checklist of the Birds of Britain and Ireland'( Sixth Edition, 1992). If typed, manuscripts should be double-spaced, with wide margins, on one side of the paper only. They must be in the final form for publication: proofs of longer papers are returned to authors, but alterations must be confined to corrections of printer's errors. The cost of any other alterations may be charged to the author. It is possible for papers to be submitted on computer disk; contact the Editor initially for advice. Photographs and line drawings are required to complement each issue. Suitable photographs of birds, preferably taken in Suffolk, should ideally be in the form of 35mm transparencies. A payment of ÂŁ 10 will be made to the photographer for each photograph published and ÂŁ5 for each drawing. Every possible effort will be made to take care of the original photographs and artwork. However, photographers and artists are reminded that neither the Editor nor the SNS can be held responsible in the unlikely event that loss or damage occur. Authors may wish to illustrate their papers, but this will be subject to the illustrations being of the standard required by the Editor and the decision on such matters will rest with him or her. Material submitted for publication should be sent to the Editor no later than March 1st of each year. Authors of main papers may request up to five free copies of the journal.

Suffolk Ornithological

Records

Committee'.

Chair: Malcolm Wright Area County Recorders'. Colin Jakes, Dave Thurlow, Lee Woods. Secretary'. Justin Zantboer Other Committee Members'. Steve Babbs, Richard Drew, Ricky Fairhead, Stuart Ling, Gary Lowe, Rob Macklin, Steve Piotrowski, Brian Small, Dick Waiden.

ADDRESSES Papers, notes, drawings and photographs: The Editor (Suffolk Birds), The Suffolk Naturalists' Society, c/o The Museum, High Street, Ipswich IP1 3QH. Records'. See inside front cover. Suffolk Ornithological Records Committee - correspondence'. The Secretary, SORC, c/o The Museum, High Street, Ipswich IP1 3QH.

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EDITORIAL It was always the intention that there should be a rétrospective theme to this Report, it being Volume 50. Unfortunately, the recent deaths of two of the most influential figures in Suffolk ornithology — Bert Axell and Bill Payn — have added an unwanted piquancy. Nonetheless, throughout the Report there are added notes taken from Bird Reports of the 1950s which I hope will be found interesting. We have also lost two Recorders during the year, although, I am very glad to say, not as finally. Dick Waiden is stepping down from being the north-east area Recorder. Having given many years of service, I for one think he has done more than his fair share of a demanding job and deserves a break. Unfortunately, he's not going to get that as he has been persuaded to remain on the Suffolk Ornithological Records Committee! We have also lost the services of Brian Thompson, the south-east area Recorder to whom we are similarly indebted for his valuable work over several years. The détails of the new Recorders are noted on the inside front cover and we should all thank Dave Thurlow and Lee Woods for taking on this onerous task, which rightly implies that especial thanks should go to Colin Jakes for not being tempted to follow the example of his two colleagues! Moving on from the past, there is a thorough coverage of the present, with a comprehensive analysis of the movement of European Honey-buzzards in September by Steve Piotrowski, a paper charting the re-establishment of the Dartford Warbler as a breeding species in Suffolk, as well as the usuai species' accounts and notes. Particularly welcome is the Ringing Report, now under the authorship of Peter Lack. Looking to the future, you are asked to note Peter Dare's proposais for recording seabirds, which 1 hope will fire your enthusiasm. I should like to thank everyone who has assisted in the préparation of this report, from the authors of the sections of the species accounts to ali those who sent in records especially the RSPB, SWT, EN staff, the WeBS organisers and those individuate who sent in survey data covering the more common species. As usuai, this Report would not have been possible without the assistance of Philip Murphy. Thanks also to John Grant, Steve Piotrowski and to Brenda, my partner, for her help and support. _ Gary Lowe, Boyton, Suffolk. E-mail: gary.lowe@talk21

.com

Eurasian Wryneck Peter Beeson

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HERBERT ERNEST AXELL MBE 1915-2001 An appréciation of an extraordinary life. Bert Axell, who lias died at the age of 86,was a towering man, with an imposing frame and a colossal presence. Thankfully for nature conservation, it was as if he used every inch of his considérable height to see f a r b e y o n d t h e h o r i z o n s w h i c h l i m i t t h e achievements of less imaginative beings. He was big, he saw big possibilities and he turned them into glorious realities. His vision was combined with a fierce détermination, boundless enthusiasm and incredible ingenuity to make him one of the founding fathers of m o d e m nature conservation. It was entirely typical of the man to have seen things in global terms and 'spread his wings' from his adopted Suffolk - w h e r e his genius put his beloved Minsmere on the path to world renown - and in later life exert huge influence on the international conservation scene. Born on July Ist 1915 in Rye, East Sussex, he quickly graduated from the then-common practice of egg collecting to watching and ringing birds. A career with the Post Office, interrupted by war service with the Royal Artillery, was ended in 1951 when London's Bert Axell Eric Hoskings smog aggravated a ehest condition which had afflicted him since childhood. His Post Office career was merely the overture. His major opus, his true calling, was about to begin. In 1952 he was approached by the RSPB to become warden at Dungeness, an area he knew and had loved ever since he first visited it as a child. Seven highly successful years later, in January 1959, he was approached again by the RSPB and the quantum leap in Bert's life was taken - Minsmere beguiled and beckoned him and he found the Iure irrésistible. He was singled out as the RSPB's man for Minsmere, in the days when this magical area was leased from Captain Stuart Ogilvie. "Minsmere looked a heavenly territory to have as my bailiwick," Bert recalled in his memoirs, Of Mice and Men, and he took up the wardenship for the princely salary of £468 per annum. This was a pivotai point in Suffolk's natural history. The RSPB was aware that the days of passive stewardship of its land had gone and was alarmed at the way Minsmere's wetlands were deteriorating after their création as wartime anti-invasion measures. In Bert, Minsmere found a devoted friend and a hard-working saviour. He set about maximising Minsmere's enormous potential with an extraordinary sense of purpose. The most famous of his achievements was The Scrape, a masterpiece of pioneering wetland habitat création which has become the template for many similar projects around the world. He planned the work and carried it out with an army of volunteers which he led with an almost military discipline. But Bert was not blinkered into thinking the work was all about birds - his work had a human dimension too. On his arrivai at the reserve parties of visitors were limited to four. 6


Obituary escorted on four days a week between late April and early September, and six unescorted visitors were allowed on site on two days a week. Compare that with the thousands who enjoy the reserve's spectacle and beauty now - in the comfort of bird hides pioneered by Bert, who also had the compassion to think of disabled visitors by providing ramps for wheelchairs. Herein lies a contradiction which makes Bert all the more interesting. Some people saw him as an unwelcoming, somewhat forbidding, character. True, he was at times forthright with an occasional snapped reply to a foolish question. In reality, however, he was far more likely to offer words of wisdom, encouragement and kindness than to bellow out a gruff put-down. Bert's monumental Minsmere masterpiece earned him an MBE in 1965 to add to his RSPB medal for bird protection which was awarded in 1960, primarily for his work at Dungeness. He later went on to receive a coveted Churchill Fellowship in recognition of his creation of The Scrape. He retired as Minsmere warden in 1975 and became a roving land use advisor for the RSPB. In the ensuing years his conservation work took on a global dimensiĂłn as he undertook many lecture and consultancy tours on which he advised on some of the world's finest wetland projects. During his Minsmere days he still found time to nurture his international interests, notably in the central role he played in the safeguarding and development of Spain's wonderful Coto DonaĂąa. In retirement, if indeed it can be called that, such roles were expanded and he provided many wildlife organisations with invaluable advice on wetland creation and management. Among his most notable successes was his development plan for the hugely important Mai Po marshes in Hong Kong. On his travels and in his lectures Bert showed a supreme diplomacy and a masterful eloquence which allowed him to exert all-important influence on behalf of the conservation cause. Closer to home he was President of the Suffolk Ornitholgists' Group from 1982 to 1995. He wrote several other books in addition to his autobiography, notably Minsmere: Portrait of a Bird Reserve, published in 1977. One of the most endearing aspects of his life was his 63-year marriage to Joan - herself a kindly, understanding woman who loyally supported her husband and fed and housed so many Minsmere volunteers over the years. After Bert retired from the reserve they moved to the charming, homely Suffolk Punch Cottage in Westleton but for the last few years of her life Joan resided at the Mills Meadow Residential Home, Framlingham, after she broke both her hips. Just a few days after he had attended his beloved Joan's funeral, a devastated Bert was admitted to Ipswich Hospital. Having suffered from a heart condition and diabetes for several years his condition deteriorated as he grieved for Joan. He died shortly after his admission and the funeral service was held at St Peter's Church, Westleton, on November 26th, 2001 - a month to the day after Joan's. Fittingly, their ashes have been scattered at their beloved Minsmere so we should all think of them as we look out over The Scrape and marvel at its teeming birdlife. We should also quietly give thanks for the extraordinary life of a man of visiĂłn, a conservationist in the fullest sense. We should reflect on the unshakeable love which was shared by Bert and Joan - who are survived by their son, Roderick - and, above all, we should give thanks for their deep and mutual love of birds. John Grant, Ipswich.

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Suffolk Birci Report

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MAJOR WILLIAM HALE PAYN MBE 1913 -2001 If Babington, Tuck and later Ticehurst were the main players in Suffolk ornithology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, then surely Bill Payn was the most influential immediately prior to the contemporary scene today. Born in West Suffolk at Somerton, Bill lived all his life in the County apart from a short and disastrous speli on Alderney and time spent in the armed forces. Bill was one of those rarities of today; a countryman in every sense, being equally at home behind his binoculars watching Stone-curlews on his beloved Breck, or standing in a line of guns on a Scottish grouse moor. He honestly saw no conflict between his common interests of country life and native fauna and flora. Indeed, his ability with a gun saw him become one of the prime specimen collectors of the early part of the 20th Century working under the auspices of such notables as Colonel Meinertzhagen. Bill collected specimens for the Natural History Museum throughout Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. He once told me that after a period of particularly intense battle with Rommel's troops in North Africa he called for his 410 shotgun in order that he could collect a form of Desert Lark which was new to him. I r e m e m b e r taking Bill to P o l a n d to v i s i t t h e B i e b z r a Marshes and Bialowiecza Forest. Bill had been there just prior to World War Two and was keen to see t h e c o u n t r y a g a i n . I w a s leading a group of birders and we were lined up watching a WhiteCommon Eider and Long-tailed Duck William Payn backed Woodpecker feeding young when I turned casually and remarked "Have you seen this species before, Bill?" His retort was quick and caused a stunned silence amongst his fellow birders: "Seen it, dear boy? I have collected it" snapped back Bill. Even in recent years Bill stili held the opinion that most vagrants should be collected as they would surely perish and never make it back to their normal range. He feit that, as specimens, they reflected a permanent record for science. 'What's hit is history and what's missed is mystery' is a concept Bill thoroughly understood. I stili shiver at the thought of Bill crawling through the legs of hundreds of twitchers at Landguard, 410 in hand ready to bag his specimen. We should never decry or forget men like Bill. Without their pioneering efforts much of the outstanding literature we have today would have been impossible. Remember that they never enjoyed the optics or camĂŠras we have today. Bill never lost his skill as a taxidermist and once whilst on a tour of northern Spain he entertained his fellow travellers by cleverly preparing a cabinet skin of a Little Bittern (a roadside casualty) using only my Swiss army knife (see Piate 2). Despite being a man of that era, Bill was also a visionary. He deplored what he called the twin evils of the plough and the agronomist, both of which he described as the biggest threat to his beloved countryside. He was one of those who had the foresight to launch what today we know as The Suffolk Wildlife Trust. He recognised the need for conserving large areas of habitat and building increased support to ensure the survival of as much of our precious wildlife as

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Obituary possible. Bill was not just an ornithologist. He had o u t s t a n d i n g k n o w l e d g e of m a m m a l s , butterflies, moths and plants. Many of his early notebooks are also illustrated in his own style. Perhaps Bills biggest contribution to Suffolk ornithology was introducing a separate Suffolk Bird Report, whieh he edited from 1961 until 1977. Alongside this he also published his Birds of Suffolk in 1962, which was updated and reprinted in 1978. This is still the standard work for our County, although a new avifauna is imminent. In the early years, Bill did not enjoy the resources that Suffolk Birds has today but he took great pleasure in its modern image and felt proud to have been associated in the early days of its development. There is no doubt that Bill still lived in a time warp. He cursed most things in modern life, Eurasian Golden Oriole William Payn which have led to a decline in wildlife. He did, however, travel a great deal; mostly in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East in search of more birds but in recent decades with binoculars and not a gun. I remember how thrilled he was to visit Finland where he managed to see all the owl species and his visit was written up in a local newspaper. Having seen many species throughout the World, Bill declared the Black Stork was his favourite. I feel privileged to have shown him his first of this species on that memorable trip to Poland. Bill was a man of oĂ­d fashioned charm - a true country gentleman. His contribution was very significant to the ornithological community. He had a long and eventful life and in recent years only lamented his inability to continuĂŠ the search for birds. 1 have lost a great friend, and ornithology has lost a Suffolk legend. Derek Moore, Wales.

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Suffolk Bird Report 2000

REVIEW OF THE YEAR As in 1999, 2000 was dominated by wet weather. A wet and warm spring followed a mild and snowless winter, to be followed by a cloudy and cool summer. The autumn was very rainy, the wettest for at least 160 years. During the year 266 species were recorded in Suffolk. This compares with 263 in 1999, 265 in 1998, 267 in 1997 and 272 in 1996. However, there are three species still to be accepted by the relevant Committees: Siberian Blue Robin, Subalpine Warbler and Eurasian Penduline Tit. Even without those species, there were some excellent birds to be seen and some encouraging breeding reports. Siberian Blue Robin, if accepted, and Olive-backed Pipit are additions to the Suffolk list.

January The year begatt with relatively mild weather and the whole month was without snow. A persistent anticyclone centred to the west of Britain brought high-level cloud resulting in many dull days. The north-westerly airflow also meant chilly conditions, although as the airflow originated in the Atlantic it was never excessively cold. The coldest day of the month was 25th when the maximum daytime temperature was only 2C (36F). There was a sudden change at the end of the month when a strong south-westerly airstream brought positively warm weather; temperatures reached 14C (57F) on 29th. Rainfall was well below average. The birding year got off to a flying start with the establishment of a new record for the number of species seen on the New Year Birdrace. The team of Mike Marsh, Lee Woods and Justin Zantboer shattered the previous record with a total of 127 species. Not included in that total was the first-winter Ivory Gull which had been at Aldeburgh the previous day. It was possibly disturbed by the Millennium celebratory fire-works. They did see the White-tailed Eagle, which remained in the Benacre area throughout the month. January was also notable for the number of Pomarine Skuas seen off the Suffolk coast, possibly up to 30; maximum count was 23 off Minsmere on January 12th. There were also good numbers of divers present with Great Northern and Black-throated at both Lake Lothing and Alton Water and good numbers of Red-throated offshore. Two Red-breasted Geese were found: what was thought to be the same bird was seen at Southwold and Lound; another at Waldringfield with Brent Geese has yet to be considered by BBRC. An American Wigeon found at Minsmere on lOth stayed into Aprii. Other ducks of note were a Green-winged Teal and a Ferruginous Duck, both found at Minsmere on 26th. The same site recorded the only Atlantic Puffin of the year, offshore on 6th.

February In contrast to the preceding month, February was mild and sunny, almost spring-like; temperatures reached a peak on 8th at 14C (57F) and there were only four nights offrost during the month. This was due to the absence of a blocking anticyclonic system on the continent, which also meant that there were none of the ferocious easterly winds that are often a feature of February. The first week and a half was dominated by a south-westerly airflow. The remainder of the month had north-westerly winds and therefore lower temperatures. The westerly airstreams did mean that it was quite a wet month, many places seeing 25mm above the average. The White-tailed Eagle was seen again at various sites along the coast. Remarkably it was joined by a second bird this month; the two were seen interacting over North Warren on 13th. With no cold weather there were few of the expected visitors, such as Smew and Greater Scaup, but there were high numbers of European Golden Plovers in Suffolk, including around 7000 in the Ixworth/Great Livermere area. The first Eurasian Spoonbill of the year was seen at

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Review of the Year Minsmere; low numbers were seen along the coast up until October but there was no indication of breeding.

March Generally, March was another mild month, fortunately combined with dry weather. In many places rainfall was 25mm below the average. The northwesterly airflow continued for the first week of March until 6th, when an anticyclone centred over the Bay of Biscay became established. This resulted in a mild south-westerly airstream for much of the month. There was a period of fog on 21st and 22nd. Temperatures reached 16C (61F) on 9th but a change to north-easterly winds at the end of the month brought much colder weather and on 28th temperatures only reached 6C (43F). The last Horned Larks of the winter were recorded; disappointingly, there was none in the second winter period after a run of high numbers in the last few winters. The first, eagerly-awaited, summer visitors started to appear; Northern Wheatear on 11 th and both Sand Martin and Barn Swallow on 12th (the latter being the earliest date in Suffolk since 1922). There was then a gap before the first Tree Pipit on 25th and House Martin on 26th (both being early dates, the former the earliest for the species in Suffolk since 1968). As a taste of the more exotic, there w a s a Blackcrowned Night Heron at Walberswick from 25th to 30th.

Tree Pipit Peter Beeson

Aprii Wet weather predominated; rain was recorded on 20 days of the month in some areas. Particularly heavy rain on 26th added around 25mm to the monthly total of around 75mm, well above the average of 42-5mm. There were strong winds early in the month, particularly on 4th. Temperatures were again above average, especially after 19th when daytime temperatures were often 16C to 18C (61F to 65F). The first summer visitors continued to trickle in; Yellow Wagtail ( 1 st), Common Cuckoo (2nd), Common Redstart (5th) and Common Nightingale (9th). More exotic fare was provided by a Hoopoe, one of only two records in the year, in a Gunton garden on 12th and 13th, and a White-spotted Bluethroat, the only record of the year, at Landguard on 16th. There was good news for a number of breeding species; Great Cormorants almost doubled their breeding numbers in the County, there was a welcome increase in Stone-curlew numbers on the coast to four pairs, there was a continued increase in both numbers and sites for Dartford Warbiers and there is a possibility that Firecrests may have bred. Three of the four reports during the year of European Serin came in April; the fourth was in May. There was the first of nine reports during the year of Montagu's Harriers. A Purple Heron over Lavenham on 29th was accompanied by a Red Kite; there was a sĂŠriĂŠs of reports of the former along the coast during the year and a further inland record, from Livermere Lake in May.

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Suffolk Birci Report 2000

May The wet weather continued; this May was one of the wettest on record. In Ipswich, the total of 122mm is the highest for the month since 1924. The month began with dull and cold weather brought by north-easterly winds. A change to a south-westerly airstream from 5th meant much higher temperatures, often reaching 23C (74F), lasting until mid-month. Unfortunately, it was accompanied by a series of vigorous low-pressure troughs, leading to frequent downpours, accompanied by thunderstorms on 9th and 15th. However, the worst was still to come. A deep and active low-pressure system arrived on 28th for the Bank Holiday weekend. It brought a huge amount of rain; over 43mm fell in a 24 hour period in some parts of the County. It was also accompanied by gale-force winds, low temperatures and some hailstorms. Following the first breeding record last year, there was a further increase in the breeding numbers of Great Black-backed Gulls to four pairs. Cetti's Warblers also showed a healthy expansion in breeding numbers. The peak of the Black Tern passage was around the 7th and there was also a good passage of Temminck's Stints early in the month; there were at least 10 in the County between 8th and 14th. There was a welcome re-appearance of summering rafts of Black Scoter off the Suffolk coast; up to 400 were recorded in this and the following month. As would be expected, there was the anticipated sprinkling of rarer birds. A Red-footed Falcon, present for two days mid-month, was very welcome, as was the Western Bonelli's Warbler at Landguard from 27th to 29th. A Melodious Warbler inland at West Stow on 18th was a good find and the first of two reports during the year of Red-breasted Flycatcher was of a bird at Southwold on 31st. Very special were the four European Bee-eaters that flew over Benacre on 10th, then to Burgh Castle where they roosted; the following morning they left Burgh Castle and were later seen at Oulton. However, the best of the bunch was probably the Alpine Accentor, found at Corton on 13th by a local bird-race team.

June Although June was an unsettled month, rainfall totals were mercifully low. The development of an anticyclone over the North Sea on 16th meant a very warm and humid southerly airflow over Suffolk; temperatures reached 34C (93F). This was short-lived as a depression to the west of the UK brought much cooler weather from 21st, which continued until the end of the month. On 29th, temperatures were particularly low, struggling to a maximum of 12-5C (55F) in some parts. Common Buzzards bred in Suffolk for the second consecutive year. Although in the same area in the west of the County as last year, the nest was at a different site. Montagu's Harriers were seen twice in the month at sites in the west but unfortunately there was no evidence that breeding took place. Similarly, despite four records of Red-backed Shrikes, including two singing males, there was no evidence of a breeding attempt. There was an interesting report of Eurasian Golden Orioles in the Sandlings area but it was another case where the outcome was unknown.

July July was another disappointing month with many cool and dull days. Recorded hours of sunshine were typically only two-thirds of that expected. Temperatures failed to reach a daytime maximum in excess of 21C (70F) on 21 days in the month in east Suffolk. This was due to the domination of the weather by north-westerly winds, the result of anticyclones positioned to the west of the UK. These moved to the north later in the month, resulting in even cooler

12


Review of the Year north-easterly winds. There was also an above average amount of rain, particularly early in the month. The passage of Manx Shearwaters peaked on 15th, with a count of 61 off Thorpeness. The usual post-breeding congregation of Little Gulls at B e n a c r e Broad also p e a k e d this m o n t h , at 97. A M e l o d i o u s W a r b l e r at Landguard was the second and final record for the year of the species in Suffolk. A Great Egret arrived at Minsmere on the last day of the month for what turned out to be a very protracted stay, until November.

August At last summer arrived in August and there Great Egret Mark Ferris was much welcome sunshine. Temperatures also improved and the whole month was warm, although never exceptionally so; the hottest day was 13th with a maximum of27C(81F). Rainfall was below average although there were downpours on 3rd and 31st. Fourteen Little Egrets in flight formation inland over Polstead on 11th must have been a sight to behold, one that will hopefully become more common as numbers of the species continue to build. Other notable counts included nine Sooty Shearwaters past Southwold on 26th; such high day-counts are rare in Suffolk but unusually it was repeated in October. Numbers of passage Arctic Skuas peaked; there were several daycounts of up to 16 off Thorpeness. Passage numbers of Wood Sandpipers also peaked this month; there were, for example, nine at Hollesley on 8th.

September The warm weather continued into September, as a south-westerly airflow dominated. Temperatures exceeded the average of 18C (65F) on a remarkable 26 days in the month. The warmest day was 10th, which reached 26C (79F). An anticyclone over Scandinavia later in the month resulted in a south-easterly airflow but as the Continent is still warm at this time of year temperatures were not affected. Suffolk escaped the worse of what was a very wet month for other parts of Britain; the County's total for the month was a little above average. Much of this was confined to three spells of wet weather; on 15th, 19th/20th and 26th. The most notable event of the month, and the year, was the movement of European Honeybuzzards later in the month. A full account is contained elsewhere in this Report; suffice it to say that unprecedented numbers were seen in the County. The events seem to have started on 20th, on which day there was also a Buff-breasted Sandpiper at Corton and a Hoopoe at Erwarton. Earlier in the month, a juvenile Woodchat Shrike from 3rd to 10th had been in an inaccessible part of Orfordness and the only Icterine Warbler of the year was at Thorpeness on 9th. The first of three Richard's Pipits recorded in the year was seen on 17th; the others were in October. An Arctic Warbler was trapped and ringed at Dunwich on 25th and a Red-throated Pipit was afforded the same treatment at Shingle Street on 30th. Things were not too bad offshore, either. Amongst good numbers of skuas, shearwaters and other seabirds there were the only two records of Leach's Storm-petrel for the year in Suffolk and the only Sabine's Gull, the latter being a juvenile off Southwold on 19th.

13


Suffolk Birci Report 2000

October October was wet. Nearly the whole of the County recorded more than twice the average rainfall expected in the month. The month had started well but by the end of the first week the first of a sériés of deep and active Atlantic depressions tracked across Suffolk. The most severe came on 29th, when a secondary depression developed on the southern flank of a deep depression to the north-west of Britain. This not only brought high winds (up to 114kph on the coast) and heavy rain, it also produced the lowest barometric pressure recorded in October in the UK; at 951 millibars this was lower than the Great Storm of1987. The month began with the discovery of a Radde's Warbler at Thorpeness and got even better; the Siberian Blue Robin at Minsmere on 23rd may be a first for Britain (if accepted by BBRC/BOURC). This was found as birders sought to see the Sociable Lapwing that had been found at Dunwich the previous day and was seen at several sites over the two days before being relocated at Aldeburgh in November. This purple patch also saw the second and final Redbreasted Flycatcher of the year in Suffolk, at Sizewell on 20th, and it coincided with the peak of Redwing immigration, with, for example, 6000 over Landguard on 22nd. Birds were also moving offshore; the 17 Great Skuas off Thorpeness on 22nd is the record day-count of the year and two European Storm-petrels off Southwold on 30th are the only records of the year in Suffolk.

November The wet weather continued into November. Atlantic depressions continued to affect the County and gale-force south-westerly winds were afeature of the month. More than 25mm of rain fell on 6th as a sériés offronts crossed Suffolk. Whilst most of the month was mild, the first significant frost of the season came on 13th; temperatures were as low as -2C (28F). An Olive-backed Pipit at Southwold on 12th and 13th is the first for Suffolk. There was a count of 21 Mandarin Ducks in Christchurch Park, Ipswich, on 25th, a County record. A Lesser Black-backed Gull of the race fuscus that was seen at Blythburgh on lOth and 1 lth is thought to also be a first for Suffolk, if the record is accepted. There was a significant offshore movement on 6th and 7th; amongst the waders involved on the former date were a Curlew Sandpiper and two Whimbrels, and on latter date 214 Little Gulls moved south off Southwold. The majority of the five records in Suffolk in the year of Pallas's Leaf Warbler fell in this month. As seems to be the case in recent years, there were also a good number of notably late records for various species: a Whinchat on 13th is fairly late; Northern Wheatear on 29th is the latest-ever in Suffolk and an Osprey on 18th is also noteworthy. There were also a number of interesting corpses found: a female Subalpine Warbler found at Sizewell on 9th was freshly dead (a record stili to be accepted by BBRC) and a Barred Warbler, discovered in the shelter used for ringing on Orfordness was presumably not long dead either.

December The mild but unsettled weather continued into December. The Atlantic influence brought frequent spells of rain but temperatures were high for the time of the year, reaching 13C (56F) on I2th. An active depression with winds up to 114kph felled a number of trees on 13th. Shortly afterwards there was a welcome change in the weather pattern as an anticyclone became established over Scandinavia on 15th, although the south-easterly winds did bring lower temperatures. Whilst generally drier in the second part of the month, there were spells of very wet weather, particularly 24th, when 19mm of rain fell. Temperatures fell on 26th, when cold north-easterly winds set in. A front movingfrom the west hitting this cold air resulted in significant snowfall on 28th, with 25mm in east Suffolk. The year ended cold with the lowest temperatures of the year recorded, down to -3C (27F) in many places.

14


Review of the Year Continuing the theme of late records: a Barred Warbler was still at Lowestoft on 6th; four Barn Swallows at Sizewell on 16th are the latest recorded in the County since 1956 and a House Martin at Pakefield on 15th is the latest since 1971. Two juvenile Long-tailed Skuas, seen f l y i n g a l o n g the tide-line at Thorpeness on 13th are the latest-ever recorded in Suffolk. Two G r e y P h a l a r o p e s f l y i n g s o u t h offshore on 5th were seen at two different sites along the coast; they were part of the seven records of the species in Suffolk during the year. The cold weather at the end of the year triggered some significant movements; there were 600 Black-legged Kittiwakes off Southwold on 25th and 4000 Fieldfares were noted at Westleton on 28th. The cold snap also Bohemian Waxwings Peter Beeson brought a marked arrival of Eurasian Woodcocks and a small influx of Bohemian Waxwings. Gary Lowe, Boyton, Suffolk.

15


Suffolk Birci Report

2000

THE PASSAGE OF EUROPEAN HONEY-BUZZARDS THROUGH SUFFOLK IN SEPTEMBER 2000 Steve

Piotrowskì

SUMMARY From September 18th to October Ist 2000, raptor enthusiasts in the eastern and southern counties of England witnessed Britain's largest-ever-recorded influx of European Honey-buzzards Pernis apivorus. Suffolk's tally amounted to at least 100 individuate from a national total of around 500 (Gantlett and Millington 2000). Also part of the Suffolk movement were at least 40 Eurasian Marsh Harriers Circus aeruginosus, 19 Common Buzzards Buteo buteo, 40 Ospreys Pandion haliaetus and many Eurasian Hobbies Falco subbuteo. The number of European Honeybuzzards and Ospreys far exceeded any previous totals for Suffolk. Almost all European Honeybuzzards that were aged were considered to be immatures. Only substantiated records are included in this account and it is likely that the actual number of birds involved was considerably higher. Regrettably, many records, including some very significant gatherings that appeared on pagers and information téléphoné lines remain unsubstantiated.

1950

1955

1960

1965

1970

1975

1980

1985

1990

1995

Year

The annual totals of European Honey-buzzard for Suffolk from 1950-1999 STATUS OF E U R O P E A N HONEY-BUZZARD The European Honey-buzzard is almost entirely a summer visitor to Europe. The number of nesting pairs in Britain has increased steadily between 1988 and 1998, peaking at 39 (Ogilvie et al. 2000). A national census in Britain in 2000 revealed at least 29 confirmed pairs and a possible total of 61 pairs (Batten 2001). Düring the autumn migration period, huge numbers (around 5000 per annum) are seen at the migration watch-point at Falsterbo at the southern tip of Sweden, but relatively few venture to Britain.

1•

1 I - - I

/

May

- a .

/

June

•/•

• • - I I .

July

•/•

A ug.

•/•

1 I lI i i - -

Sept.

European Honey-buzzard occurrences in Suffolk by five-day periods 1950-1999. 16

/Oct-


4.

Whooper Swan: low numbers in both winter periods.

Derek Moore


European Honey-buzzards

through

Suffolk

The European Honey-buzzard occurs in Suffolk solely as a passage migrant. It is noted annually, chiefly at coastal localities principally in May and June and again in late August and September. During the period from 1966 to 2000 there were several reports involving birds frequenting suitable breeding habitat during mid-summer (June-July), although nesting has not been suspected since the last breeding attempt in 1922. THE HISTORY OF THE EUROPEAN HONEY-BUZZARD IN SUFFOLK Ticehurst ( 1932), referring to the European Honey-buzzard, stated that "between 1850 and 1913 there were few years in which it did not appear ". Thereafter, it became rare and there were only three records for the period 1914-1966, with a further five records up to 1976. The number of reports has increased significantly since the mid-1970s and between 1976 and 1999 nearly 100 individuals were logged. The pattern of occurrences shows that most pass through in late May and early June and from late August to mid-September. Spring migrants are relatively rare and more than a third of the 20 records for May occurred in 1995 and included six remarkably early birds over North Warren on 1 st and 2nd of that month. Ticehurst (1932) noted the autumn of 1876 as being "rather remarkable for the numbers of Honey Buzzards ", but this was surpassed by the events of September 1881 when there was an "exceptional immigration ". Unfortunately, documentation of both invasions was poor and exact numbers involved are unknown. Babington (1884-86), listed five specimens for 1876 and six for 1881, which confirms that both influxes were substantial bearing in mind that these birds came within shooting or trapping range. The Common Buzzard, which also featured highly in the 1881 movement, was described as "extraordinarily abundant" but again numbers involved were not documented. The County of Essex also featured in the 1881 influx when five European Honey-buzzards were reported (Christy 1890). An extraordinary southerly movement of raptors was witnessed at Minsmere on September 16th 1993 involving 11 European Honey-buzzards, 11 Common Buzzards, two Ospreys, at least five Eurasian Marsh Harriers, 10 Eurasian Sparrowhawks Accipiter nisus and 17 Common Kestrels Falco tinnunculus (Robertson 1994). Two Black Kites Milvus migrans, also noted during that movement, were not subsequently accepted by the British Birds' Rarities Committee. An additional four European Honey-buzzards were noted elsewhere in Suffolk which brought the total movement to 15 - the largest recorded in Suffolk during the 20th Century. STATUS OF OTHER RAPTOR SPECIES INVOLVED The principal associated species were Ospreys, which were also noted in record numbers, Eurasian Marsh Harriers, Common Buzzards and Eurasian Hobbies. Ospreys migrate through Suffolk between northern nesting grounds and African wintering grounds and, although most pass through quite quickly, a few linger for several weeks. Oversummering individuals have become increasingly frequent in recent years. The majority passing through the County are likely to be moving to and from Scandinavia. Most spring occurrences are from the last week of April to the third week of May, when Scottish birds would be incubating. September is the most favoured autumn month, although Ospreys are regularly seen in August and October. Although still a rare breeding species, the number of Eurasian Marsh Harriers has increased steadily in recent years, rising to 156 nesting females in Britain in 1995 (Ogilvie et al. 1998). Each summer, the extensive reedbeds of coastal Suffolk provide the species with a rich feeding and nesting habitat. A few, mainly females, overwinter annually in the central coastal zone but this harrier is rare elsewhere in winter. Birds are widely reported during passage periods. Although the Common Buzzard is absent as a breeding species from much of central and eastern England, it breeds extensively in western and northern Britain. Although one or two breeding pairs have recently become established in each of Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex, the

17


Suffolk Birci Report

2000

Common Buzzard is almost exclusively recorded as a winter visitor and passage migrant in East Anglia. Spring passage is normally more pronounced although autumn migrants occasionally appear in large groups. Autumn passage can begin as early as July, although most birds occur in late August and September. THE NATIONAL SCENE During the morning of Wednesday September 20th, movements of 14 and 22 European Honey-buzzards were noted at Spurn Point, Yorkshire, and Gibraltar Point, Lincolnshire, respectively and smaller groups of up to five elsewhere in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire as well as Norfolk and Suffolk. It was estimated that over 50 birds were involved. Between September 20th and 26th there were about 800 sightings at mainly east and south coast counties with peaks of 240 and 190 on the 23rd and 25th respectively (Birch 2000). There was a lull around September 27th and 28th but on 29th flocks were seen steadily moving southwards at a number of sites. The main exodus was witnessed in Kent, East and West Sussex, Hampshire and Dorset on 30th with peak counts of 62 at Beachy Head, East Sussex, 12 over Pagham Harbour, West Sussex, 37 o v e r P o r t l a n d , D o r s e t a n d 17 o v e r Hengistbury Head, Dorset. It was estimated that over 300 passed through the five counties on 30th and a further 110 on October 1st. T h e r e w e r e m e d i a r e p o r t s at t h e t i m e detailing the adventures of two German hot-air balloonists who set off from their home in Marie in Germany on 23rd and were blown 560 miles n o r t h - w e s t to C a r n o u s t i e n e a r D u n d e e in Scotland touching down some 25 hours later. Most obviously the same w i n d s forced the European Honey-buzzards to British shores. European Honey-buzzard Mark Ferris THE A U T U M N 2000 INFLUX IN SUFFOLK Prior to the September influx, the year 2000 was already looking to be above-average for European Honey-buzzards in Suffolk. There were three spring records: one low over the A14 at Felixstowe on the early date of May 1st, and singles over Westleton Heath and Minsmere on June 2nd and 4th respectively. One over Oulton Broad on June 24th was probably an oversummering individual. There were no records for August, and one over Loompit Lake, Trimley St Martin, on September 2nd was outside the main influx period. Although an unprecedented six Ospreys flew south in atrocious weather conditions at Landguard Point on September 16th and another European Honey-buzzard flew over Boyton the following morning, nothing untoward was noted in Suffolk until late morning on September 20th when three European Honey-buzzards flew south at North Warren and five were seen from Burrow Hill, Butley. Later that day five flew low over the Orwell Estuary at Nacton and two flew south over Barnhamcross Heath near Thetford. These birds heralded the arrival of the biggest influx of this species that this County, and probably the country, has ever known. Reports were already circulating of a massive influx of European Honey-buzzards in more northern counties, so trained eyes scoured the skies at Suffolk hot-spots. The map shows that observations were principally coastal, which perhaps reflects the favourite bird-watching sites rather than the density of birds. There were clusters of records from the well-wooded areas around Benacre and in the central coastal zone from Dunwich to Boyton, with an apparent affinity towards river valleys. Burrow Hill, Butley, proved to be a popular focal-point for birders where panoramic views of the Butley River, the Aide and Ore estuaries,

18


European Honey-buzzards

through

Suffolk

Gedgrave and Boyton Marshes, Orfordness and the forests of Tunstall and Sudbourne can be obtained. The species was seen sporadically in West Suffolk. The largest totals involved: 11 birds (10 noted by a single observer) from Burrow Hill on 21st; nine circling low over fields just north of the A14 at Kentford on 29th and eight over the interchange between the A12 and A14 at Copdock on the same day. A minimum of 100 European Honey-buzzards passed through Suffolk peaking at coastal localities around September 20th and 21st, and September 29th and 30th in the south and west of the County. It is likely that birds seen on the 29th and 30th were reorienting after making landfall in more northern counties and were now taking a more inland passage south. Some observers were fortunate enough to observe several birds involved in this influx, but others, despite being active during this period, failed to get a glimpse. There were very few birds seen on the immediate coastline with most birds passing through about three or four miles inland and the species was relatively scarce at some of Suffolk's wellwatched sites such as Lowestoft, Minsmere and Landguard. Only one bird was seen to enter or leave a roost site and only one was seen on the ground. The latter was viewed twice during the late afternoon of September 22nd on a roadside verge near Holly Grove, Covehithe, at a range of six and 40 metres respectively, presumably foraging for food, and then almost certainly the same bird at 08.25 the next morning. The timing of the movements indicate, however, that many did roost in Suffolk as they were seen flying southwards relatively early in the morning and could not have possibly covered any significant distance in the hours of daylight available. Very few birds lingered with most noted slowly moving south. Although some birds were noted soaring, 19


Suffolk Birci Report

2000

the vast majority were purposely moving south and many fairly low. There were a number of reports stating that birds were Aying just over tree-top level or following a hedgerow. Modern-day communication aids, such as mobile téléphonés and pagers, meant that birds could be tracked easily and bird-watchers could be quickly directed to birds. However, the only known multiple sighting involved a trio which was initially spotted over Iken Church, then over Burrow Hill and then over Boyton village, a total distance of around 10 kilométrés as the crow (European Honey-buzzard?) flies. The birds covered this distance in 35 minutes - a speed of 17.2 km/h (10.75 mph). Migrants were still passing through Suffolk on October Ist, when at least three individuals were noted passing over Shingle Street, Bawdsey Manor and Landguard Point. Two laggards, flying south over Landguard Bird Observatory on October 15th, were the last birds noted in Suffolk and these constitute the latest recorded in Suffolk since the 1800s. WEATHER CONDITIONS NW European weather-map, Sep.20th 2000.

NW European weather-map, Sep.29th 2000. 20

/ -L


European

Date 16.09.00

Honey-buzzards

through

Suffolk

Wind direction

Speed

Cloud cover

Other conditions

WNW

5-6 < 7

8/8

Driving rain

5/8

17.09.00

sw

3-4

18.09.00

s>ssw

5-6 <

8/8

19.09.00

SSE

4

0/8

20.09.00

SSE > SSW

4-5

4/8

21.09.00

SSE

4-5

l/8>3/8>6/8

22.09.00

SSE

3-4>5>4-5>S3-4

7/8>4/8>3/8

23.09.00

SE

4>5

6/8>l/8

24.09.00

SE

5-6>4-5>SW

3/8>8/8>

25.09.00

SW

4-5

0/8

light & heavy showers

Warm

26.09.00

S

2-3

0/8

27.09.00

SE

2-3 < SSW ine. 5-6. S 7-8

1/8 > 8/8

Overnight rain

28.09.00

S

3-4 > 4 > 2

8/8

Dull o/n rain rain from dawn clearing to light drizzle

29.09.00

SE

3-4 > S 4

8/8

Drizzle - showery rain

30.09.00

S

3-4

7/8

01.10.00

w

1

0/8

heavy sea fog > sunny

Landguard Bird Observatory's Weather Log from Sep. 16th to Oct. Ist Landguard Bird Observatory's weather log detailed continuous strong SE or SSE winds, for the period September 19th to 24th, varying in strength from force 3 to 6. An occluded front drifted eastwards and then returned westwards over the North Sea on 18th, resulting in overcast conditions and there were heavy showers on 19th. ANALYSIS It is extremely difficult to determine the exact number of birds involved as almost certainly some were observed more than once and possibly at a number of sites. However, nearly all the birds were steadily moving southwards and were difficult to relocate by those not present at the original observation. Also, substantial numbers were noted in Essex either on the same day or the day after the Suffolk peak counts. For example, 31 and 19 diffĂŠrent individuate were noted in the Colchester/Abberton Reservoir area on September 22nd and 23rd respectively (Ekins 2002), the two days following Suffolk's first big day. It is therefore safe to generally assume that those seen moving south on one day were diffĂŠrent from those observed the next day. The European Honey-buzzard is a full-description species, but because of the sheer numbers involved, the Suffolk Ornithological Records Committee took the unusual step of relaxing the cnteria required for the record to be accepted to brief notes to cover birds seen during this influx. There were many distant groups of unidentified raptors, thought by observers to have been European Honey-buzzards, that have been omitted from the records. Some observers included the time of their observations and this greatly assisted the assessment of the numbers involved. Behavioural notes such as 'flying strongly south 'and '/wo soaring high with Eurasian Marsh Harrier ', distinctive markings and plumage colour phases also helped with the analysis.

21


Suffolk Birci Report 2000 Most observers noted the direction of any movements which showed a general southerly drift. Birds seen at the same site on consecutive days or on the same day in neighbouring parishes have been counted as the same individuals. More than 100 European Honey-buzzards were satisfactorily described in Suffolk, but this is likely to be only a fraction of the number of birds that actually passed through the County. The map shows a number of records from south Suffolk in areas where bird-watchers are at a very low density and we can only speculate at the actual number of birds that passed unnoticed though centrai Suffolk. The profile of the European Honey-buzzard is diagnostic to the experienced raptor watcher who will normally separate the species from Common Buzzard, at some distance, with relative ease. Some observers, however, were justifiably cautious and others lacked the confidence to be certain of their identification and, in conséquence, there are many records of Buteo species, which almost certainly relate to European Honey-buzzards, that have been omitted from the table.

Acknowledgements My thanks go to County Recorders Richard Waiden and Colin Jakes for their assistance in gathering further détails from the records submitted, to Justin Zantboer, Rob Macklin and Mick Wright for chasing additional records and to Jean and Ken Garrod, Nick Green and Mike Marsh for their comments on earlier drafts. The exchange of ideas with Graham Ekins, the author of a paper chartering the migration of the European Honey-buzzard through Essex, during the same period, was also most useful. 1 am also grateful to those observers who I pestered for additional détails of their observations to make this paper possible. These are: Will Brame, James Brown, Carl Buttle, Peter Dare, Matthew Deans, Peter Doulton, Richard Drew, David Fairhurst, Jean and Ken Garrod, John Grant, Paul Green, Chris Gregory, Edward Jackson, Gerald Jobson, Stuart Ling, Gary Lowe, Rob Macklin, Derek Marsh, Gary Mortimer, Rod Ploughman, Graham Riley, Richard Waiden, Phil Whittaker, Lee Woods and Justin Zantboer,

Référencés Babington, C. 1884-1886. Catalogue of the birds of Suffolk. John Van Voorst. London. Batten, L.A. 2001. European Honey-buzzard survey 2000 and 2001: preliminary results and request for further surveys. British Birds 94: 143-144. Birch , M. 2000. Unprecedented influx of Honey Buzzards into the UK during September 2000. Http://w. w. w.surfbirds. com/Features/honey buzzards. html. Christy, R. M. 1890. The birds of Essex. Essex Field Club. Edmund Durrent & Co. Ekins, G. 2002. The passage of Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus through Essex in autumn 2000. Essex Birds (in prep). Gantlett, S. and Millington, R. 2000. Honey Buzzards in September 2000. Birding World, 13: 363-365. Ogilvie, M. A. and the Rare Breeding Birds Panel. 1998. Rare breeding birds in the United Kingdom in 1995. Brit. Birds, 91: 417-447. Ogilvie, M. A. and the Rare Breeding Birds Panel. 2000. Rare breeding birds in the United Kingdom in 1998. Brit. Birds, 93: 358-393. Robertson, I. R., 1994. The exceptional passage of raptors at Minsmere in September 1993. Suffolk Birds, 43: 20-22. Ticehurst, C. B. 1932. A history of the birds of Suffolk. Gurney and Jackson, London. Steve Piotrowski, Long Stratton, Norfolk NR15 2WH.

22


European

Honey-buzzards

through

Suffolk

SIGHTINGS OF EUROPEAN HONEY-BUZZARDS Date

Site

17.09.00

Boyton

No's

Day total

1

Remarks/times (BST) 09.10

1 20.09.00

North Warren Butley/Boyton

3s 5s

1 @ 11.15 and 2 @ 11.34 juvs. @ 10.10 & 12.30; ad. 11.15; 2 j u v s @ 11.45 juvs - 15.45 - just over tree-top level 13.25

Nacton Barnhamcross Common

5s 2s

Benacre Henstead Westleton/Minsmere Hazlewood Marshes Butley - Burrow Hill

2s 2s ls 1 11 s

Shottisham Lackford

1s 2 se

10 21.09.00

09.25-09.35 soaring 10.15-10.20 11.00 with Common Buzzard 13.55-14.05 6 & 3 @ 10.10-10.20 & singles @ 11.20-11.30 and 14.00 09.00 dark phase juvs. @ 11.20 & 13.05 20

22.09.00

Corton

1s

Benacre Broad Holly Grove, Covehithe Levington/Trimley Lackford

1s 1 1 3

23.09.00

Holly Grove, Covehithe Iken Burrow Hill Boyton village Waldringfield Trimley St Martin Bures St Mary Lodge Fm, Thetford

1 3s 4s 3s 1 1 1 1

24.09.00

Tinker's Marshes, Walberswick Darsham Snape Warren

1 sw 1s 1s

25.09.00

Benacre Southwold Dunwich/Minsmere Kirton

6s 1w 4s 2

dark juv. 15.20 - mobbed by Eurasian Hobby 13.00 18.00 - roadside verge dark juv. s @ 11.25 & 2 (soaring) @ 13.00 6 08.25 and presumed same 09.15 12.15 1 @ 11.00 & 3 @ 12.40 12.50 juv. circling with Buteo sp. 13.00 Loompit Lake & Trimley Marshes juv. 7 14.25 10.00 12.30 3

23

4 @ 12.05-12.15 & 2 @ 14.20-14.35 08.30 - with Osprey in from sea 3 @ 09.30 & 1 @ 12.15


Suffolk Birci Report

Date

Site

No's

Cattawade, Brantham

2000

Day total

Remarks/times (BST)

1s

10.00 12

26.09.00

Dingle Marshes Butley/Boyton Cattawade, Brantham

2s 2 1s

27.09.00

Staverton Pk, Wantisden Brantham Hadleigh

1 sw 1s 1 sw

29.09.00

Copdock Lindsey Flatford, East Bergholt Kentford

8 se 1s 1 sw 9 sw

30.09.00

Benacre South wold

14.30 & 14.35 10.15 10.00 5 10.15 11.00 10.15 3 07.30 15.00 12.30 11.45-11.55 (5 tight ph„ 3 dark + another) 18

1s 3s

Chelmondiston Lackford/Icklingham Lakenheath

10.50 up from woods then south 1 @ 07.15 & 2 (with Eurasian Marsh Harrier) @ 11.00 10.00 4 @ 11.10-11.30 (nr Al 101)

1s 5 sw 1s IO

01.10.00

Shingle Street Bawdsey Manor Landguard

1s 2s 1s

Landguard

2s

07.15 and 08.15 11.45 3

15.10.00

09.20 2 100

Total no. of individuáis

S I G H T I N G S OF ASSOCIATED RAPTOR SPECIES Date

Site

16.09.00

Landguard

17.09.00

Shottisham Nacton

Osprey E. Marsh Com. Harrier Buzz'd 6s 2

Trimley St Martin

caught trout at Orwell Pk Sch.

1

Troston 18.09.00

1e 1 1

Lackford 24

/

Remarks


European

Honey-buzzards

Date

Site

19.09.00

Boyton

20.09.00

Corton

1 w

Covehithe

1s

Southwold

1s

Osprey E. Marsh Com. Harrier Buzz'd

Dun wich

1w

North Warren

1 w

Butley/Boyton

1

Martlesham

1

2

1 ls 1 w

2w 2

Rendlesham Forest

1 1

1

Hadleigh Fornham All Saints 22.09.00

1 1

Herringfleet Walberswick

23.09.00

Osprey caught fish in Meare

Butley - Burrow Hill

Lackford

1 1

over pig fields

Thorpeness/N. Warren

1 sw

1 w

Butley - Burrow Hill

1

1

Kirton Creek

1

Levington/Trimley

2

Lackford

1

Tinker's Mrsh, Walbers'k

2

Burrow Hill Landguard

1s

Lakenheath 25.09.00

Southwold

1

1w

1s

1 1 1

1w 08.30 - in from sea

1w

Alderton Kirton

1

4w

Lackford

North Warren

Osprey caught fish at Church Fm

6s

North Warren

24.09.00

Remarks

flying low with gulls

Westleton/Minsmere Thorpeness/N. Warren

Suffolk

1

Trimley Marshes 21.09.00

through

1 1

Landguard

1s

Cattawade, Brantham

3

Stradishall

1

Eriswell

1 25

Suffolk Birds 2000 Part 1  

Volume 50

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