Page 1

Sustainable Urban Dynamics | Autumn 2016

Sustainable Urban Dynamics Sustainable Urban Design Master’s Program

School of Architecture Lund University Autumn 2016


2016

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Sustainable Urban Design Master’s Program

School of Architecture Lunds Tekniska HĂśgskola Lund University P.O. Box 124, 221 00 Lund, Sweden +46 46 222 00 00 www.stadsbyggnad.lth.se

AxSUD

Ax:son Johnson Institute for Sustainable Urban Design Lund University

Partner Universities

Beijing Jiantong University, School of Architecture, Beijing, China Nankai University, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin, China

Book Editor

Katerina Vondrova

Cover Graphics

Sofia Masrour


Contents Introduction 6

Foreword

8

People

10

Course Outline

12

Course Goals and Objectives

13

Working Process

16

Site Context

20

Design Site Workshop

24

Study trip and Collaborative Workshop

26

Workshop results

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Projects

2

36

Keep The Water

38

Green Density

40

Village Qualities in the Urban Fabric

42

Tianjin

44

Tradition, Connection, Integration

46

Let’s Meet

48

Regenerating Xiyuzhuang

50

The Fingers of the City

52

Tianjin Reimagined

56

Urban Oasis

58

Renovation of Xiyuzhuang

60

Integrating Xiyuzhuang

by Shenol Shahin Ahmed by Evelina Johanna Andersson by Drífa Árnadóttir by Zühranur Celik by Oriol Gómez Cuberes

by Maëlle Christiane Marguerite Ducreux by Martin Jonathan Ellmark by David Espuña Español

by Atanaska Krasimirova Foteva by Fredrik Furrer by Ying Gong

by Karl Arvid Hellström


62

Living Together

64

Let It Flow... Let It Flood...

66

Countering Placelessness

70

Xiyuzhuang Life

74

Tianjin Revisioned

76

In(flow)structures

by Ahmad Kanaa

by Tilda Carinsdotter Kristersson by Sofia Masrour by Polina Moroz by Elva Nano

Relieving Food Uncertainity

by Jessica Marie Perreault

80

People. Zoomed In

82

Reusing Qualities

84

Furnishing Public Space

86

RE:discovering Identity

88

Gradient

90

The Central People’s District of Tianjin

92

City Inside the City

96

Exhibition

98

Afterword: Challenging Tommorow

by Sigita Pociute

by Hanna Rauschkolb by Meike Sänger

by Zuzanna Karolina Sak by Martynas Sinkevicius by Suzete Vilma Timba by Zeljka Ulemek

SUDes 2016

78

by Aileen Lisa Hocker

3


Introduction

Foreword During the autumn term of 2016, students from all around the world participated in the advanced course Sustainable Urban Dynamics and its complementary theory course Urban Dynamics - Theory and Tendencies, focusing on creating a sustainable vision for Tianjin 2050. The aim of the design course was to challenge the existing development trends in China and propose an alternative sustainable future for the design site in the city of Tianjin, China.

Students focused on questions of urban development and sustainability in the context of China, globalization effects on the existing and new cities and the development of a holistic multi-scalar design process. These themes were explored throughout the whole semester in various seminars, guest lectures, and project tutorials with the goal that each student explores and presents a ‘context sensitive’ urban design proposal for the transformation of the assigned design site.

As part of the course and design process, the class took a study trip to Tianjin and Beijing and completed a collaborative workshop with graduate students from School of Architecture at Beijing Jiaotong University and students of Nankai University in Tianjin. During the two weeks in China, the students received background on their design projects, input from local researchers and designers, visited the design site and explored the possibilities of the site through the workshop and visionary group proposals. Upon returning from China, the students spent seven weeks developing their individual design proposals.

The student projects were presented on the 6th and 7th of December, 2016, to the international jury at the School of Architecture in Lund. This exhibition presents the overview of the design process of the design studio and exhibits 26 unique student individual works as result of the semester.

For further information on the course and International Master’s Program please visit our

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

website at www.stadsbyggnad.lth.se.

4


2016秋季,一群来自世界各地的不同专业学生参加了城市可持续动力设计课程及其互补理论课程城市 动力-理论与趋势,着眼于为天津创造可持续的2050城市愿景。这个设计目标是挑战现有的发展趋势, 为天津市提出一个可持续的未来发展模式。 学生聚焦于中国背景下的城市发展与可持续性问题,针对全球化对现有和未来新城市的影响与整体 多标量的发展进行设计。学生针对这些主题在整个学期的各种研讨会,客座讲座和项目教程进行了探 讨,每个学生探索和提出一个基于基地现状的“上下文敏感”的城市设计方案,针对指定的设计基地进 行设计研究。 作为课程和设计过程的一部分,我们与学生一起进行了一次天津和北京的考察旅行,并与北京交通大 学和南开大学的研究生们完成了一次设计合作研讨会。在两周的研讨会中,学生们收到了他们设计项目 的背景,从当地的研究人员和设计师那里了解了很多的基础信息和城市发展目标以及相关研究成果, 对设计基地进行了调研并且分小组进行了概念设计,提出了初步的基地概念设计愿景。从中国回来 后,学生们花了七个星期深入进行个人设计方案。 学生们于十二月六日和七日在建筑学院由国际化的设计师和教师组成的评审团面前进行了方案汇报。 这次展览介绍了课程设计的过程,并且展览了作为本学期的设计成果的26个独特的学生个人作品。

SUDes 2016

有关课程和国际硕士课程的进一步信息,请访问我们的网站 www.stadsbyggnad.lth.se 。

5


Introduction

People SUDes Team:

Guest Teachers:

Peter Siöström Associate Professor Director of SUDes Master’s Program Sustainable Urban Design Lund University

Marco Broekman, Architect and Urban Designer, marco.broekman urbanism research architecture Helene Koch, Landscape Architect, Helene Koch Simon Sjökvist, Architect, COBE

Andreas Olsson Course Leader, Program Assistant Sustainable Urban Design Lund University

Guest Lecturers:

Katerina Vondrova Course Coordinator, Teaching Assistant Sustainable Urban Design Lund University Martin Arfalk Workshop Leader Architect, Landscape Architect Mandaworks AB Chuhan Zhang Study trip and Workshop Coordinator Architect / Urban Designer Mandaworks AB Cyril Pavlu Workshop Coordinator, Teaching Assistant Sustainable Urban Design Lund University

Jane Philbrick, Researcher and Educator, TILL, USA Linus Zhang, Water Engineer, Lund University Martin Laursen, Landscape Architect, ADEPT Niels Bjorn, Urbanist and Researcher Martin Arfalk, Landscape Architect, Mandaworks Marco Broekman, Architect and Urban Designer, marco.broekman urbanism research architecture Helene Koch, Landscape Architect, Helene Koch Simon Sjökvist, Architect, COBE

Guest Critics: Jens Peter Nielsen, Architect, ADEPT Nicholas Bigelow, Urban Designer, Mandaworks Martin Arfalk, Landscape Architect, Mandaworks Marco Broekman, Architect and Urban Designer, marco.broekman urbanism research architecture Helene Koch, Landscape Architect, Helene Koch Linus Zhang, Water Engineer, Lund University Jenny B. Osuldsen, Ax:son Johnson Guest Professor, Landscape Architect, Snøhetta Harrison Fraker, Ax:son Johnson Guest Professor, UC Berkeley

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Students:

6

Shenol Shahin Ahmed, Bulgaria Evelina Johanna Andersson, Sweden Drífa Árnadóttir, Iceland Zühranur Celik, Denmark Oriol Gómez Cuberes, Spain Maëlle Christiane Marguerite Ducreux, France Martin Jonathan Ellmark, Sweden David Espuña Español, Spain Atanaska Krasimirova Foteva, Bulgaria Fredrik Furrer, Switzerland Ying Gong, China Karl Arvid Hellström, Sweden Aileen Lisa Hocker, Germany Ahmad Kanaa, Syria Tilda Carinsdotter Kristensson, Sweden Malka Logo, Sweden Sofia Masrour, Sweden Polina Moroz, Ukraine Elva Nano, Greece Jessica Marie Perreault, United States of America Sigita Pociūtė, Lithuania Hanna Rauschkolb, Germany Meike Sänger, Germany Zuzanna Karolina Sak, Poland Martynas Sinkevicius, Lithuania Suzete Vilma Timba, Mozambique Zeljka Ulemek, Serbia


7

SUDes 2016


Introduction

Course Outline Sustainable Urban Dynamics The course Sustainable Urban Dynamics and its complementary theory course Urban Dynamics - Theory and Tendencies make up the two thirds of the 3rd semester of the Sustainable Urban Design Master’s program at School of Architecture at Lund University and are designed to engage in both theoretical discussions and spatial explorations through a semester-long design project that focuses on ‘the context sensitive design’ in China.

The course includes students enrolled in the architecture school, the SUDes Master’s program, as well as Erasmus exchange students. Therefore, the course is filled with diversity having students from a number of different countries and a number of professional backgrounds including planning, architecture, and landscape architecture.

The Sustainable Urban Dynamics studio is organized around an approach to urban design ‘the context sensitive design.’ While the approach can be far reaching, the studio focuses on three central themes aspects that will form the central driving forces for the theoretical discussions, investigative research, and design explorations.

These three key themes can be described as following:

1. Sustainability with Chinese Characteristics

This studio will demand that each student gain comprehensive knowledge about China’s history, geography and culture. While today, China is a place of rapid change; it is of the utmost importance that each student becomes an expert in historical perspectives, cultural understanding, economic arguments and environmental situations of Tianjin and the whole China to engage in discussions about how to make China’s future more sustainable. Each of the solutions should, therefore, be uniquely grounded in the specific situation of China, Tianjin, and the local context of the design site.

2. Place Making in a Global World

Numerous critics have highlighted the ‘generic’ and placeless qualities of globalized urban development. At the same time, proponents have applauded globalization and its qualities of connectivity. Throughout the course, the theoretical readings will be introduced that initiate students on the benefits and challenges of living in a global world. From this exposure, the challenge for the students is to become experts on the discussions of globalisation’s effect on urban development and translate them it a design project that utilizes its context, speaks of the local qualities of the landscape, and shows how the architecture is specifically related to place and climate conditions.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

3. From Vision to Design

8

The course demands that each of the student works from a holistic vision down to the detailed design. Students are encouraged to do this by continuously moving between scales and testing a range of ideas on the site. Throughout the semester they are exposed to techniques, working methods, and theoretical discussions that provide examples of how to master the need of designers to work from holistic visions down to the detailed design. With this insight, each of the students will create their own unique project story that helps communicate their work - its global dimensions, its regional connections, and its unique sense of place - to the diverse audiences in Sweden and China.


9

SUDes 2016


Introduction

Course Goals and Objectives Course Goals and Objectives Since the studio marks the 3rd semester of the master’s program, the expectations for this course are high. The students are expected to hit the ground running and to challenge themselves, to consistently bring a high level of energy, and to help the course to develop an atmosphere of collective innovation.

The goal of the teachers is to challenge the students, guide them throughout the semester and help them grow as urban designers. The hope is through seminars, tutorials, and critics to raise the level of students work by giving the opportunities to exercise the ability to critically discuss their own design work and better communicate the design intentions.

The main key principles that we believe each of the students should strive to follow as they provide a framework for improving the design skills are as follows:

1. Produce

An emphasis was placed on actively producing material to explore the possibilities of the site. It has been a central belief of the studio that quality design work comes through thorough investigation, large quantities of design sketching, and reflection upon that work through open discussion. In that way it has been our intention to make the studio a test-bed for new ideas and innovation.

2. Research

Parallel to production, research was integrated into each students individual design process. Either inspired by exemplarily projects or by individual design sketches, research formed the foundation of each student’s proposal. Through this process, the student developed a unique design program and formed individual opinnions on appropriate ‘context sensitive’ solutions. The research and theory also helped each student to develop their arguments within contemporary design discussion.

3. Push the Limits

Research and production were geared to push the limits and break down the existing boundaries in the practice of urban design today. It is this studio’s belief that in order to achieve sustainability, it is a must to explore emerging research, cross disciplinary boundaries, and envision innovative design solutions that help create a better future for all of us.

4. Refine + Detail

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Focus and precision are keys to bringing an inspiring concept to reality. Implementation is the most critical phase in any design and its essential to pay attention to these details throughout the design process. Throughout the course, each student was asked to refine their work by utilizing drawing, modeling, and imagery to craft a project that speaks to the human dimension and convinces everyone that sustainability can be a tool to make a better world.

10


Working Process Semester Structure The semester schedule was broken down into 5 parts, each ending in student presentations. A 6th and final part concluded the semester and provided the students a chance to improve and reflect upon their work. This structure allowed for students to focus on specific components of their projects and design process as well as get feedback on a consistent basis.

In general the structure worked from the large over arching scale of globalization toward the development of design details within the final project. A more specific breakdown is presented in the diagram to the right as each 3 week period required the students to go one step further in the development of their projects while at the same time bringing with them knowledge from their previous explorations.

Each period ended with student presentations to a jury that examined their progress and help push their work forward. Through the guest critics comments and weekly individual tutorials, each students work grew in depth and detail in an attempt to tackle the challenges posed by the site and the three themes of the course.

Within each of the parts, the individual weeks had a rhythm to help structure the course work. Mondays and Tuesdays were typically reserved for seminars, lectures, and tutorials to provided inspiration and feedback for each student’s on-going work. On Wednesdays the students were given studio time to develop their projects based on the assigned tasks.

Communicating Detailed Urban Design Developing the Context Visions for the more Globalization and Tianjin’s

Sustainability

Development

Sensitive Design

Sustainable Tomorrow

Transformation PRESENTATION 1 PRESENTATION 2 EXPLORING FIRST IDEAS

PRESENTATION 3 THE URBAN PLAN

PRESENTATION 4 PRELIMINARY REVIEW

PRESENTATION 5 FINAL PRESENTATION

SUDes 2016

THE SITE CONDITIONS

11


12

Sustainable Urban Dynamics


13

SUDes 2016


Introduction

Site Context China And The Jing-jin-ji Region The first part of the course focused on gathering information on the country of China, the city of Tianjin, the neigborhoods surrounding the site, and the assigned study site in the central part of the city. During these first five weeks of the semester the students completed a variety of group studies on the city of Tianjin and its relationship to globalization and the regional dynamics of the Jing-jin-ji Region. Each of the seven student groups were encouraged to explore a line of personal interest that related to their evolving research on Tianjin and the assigned design site.

Their group mappings included analysis of Tianjin’s urban structure, rich history, social characteristics, economic flows, environmental challenges and landscape. The results were presented to a panel of guests, and the research provided a strong base for the studio’s study visits and working process in China.

Additionally, this first part of the course included four seminars that provided a common theoretical background. These seminars introduced the students to the key questions of globalization, the history of Chinese urbanism and contemporary case studies of sustainable urban design in China.

Tianjin within the Jing-jin-ji Region To begin the group research, the student groups were asked to map out the impacts of globalization and on-going processes that were influencing the urban development of China and the Jing-jin-ji Region. Located in northern China, the region is home to around 110 million people and is one of China’s largest and most dynamic economic regions.

Throughout the semester the students researched the history of the Jingjinji Region, the changing dynamics of the region, and the physical impacts that the close connection to the capital city of Beijing and the regional planning focusing on the future development of the port of Tianjin were having on the city of Tianjin and the design site.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

During their investigations, the students discovered both its economic importance for

14

China as well as its unique culture and history. In their research process, the students discovered the Jingjinji was one of the most dense regions in the world, had a vibrant and growing tourism industry, and was rapidly changing through investments in infrastructure such as high speed rail .


HIGH-SPEED TRAIN LOCATION

TIANJIN - MAJOR CARGO CENTER

AGRICULTURAL LAND DISTRIBUTION

COAL RESERVES AND WATER SCARCITY

WATER SUPPLY TRANSFER PROGRAM

PRECIPITATION INTENSITY (2010)

AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURES

SUDes 2016

CHINA’S BACKGROUND

15


Introduction

The City Of Tianjin Located in the in north-east China in the Hai-he river basin, the Tianjin Province is a municipality home to 15.5 milion residents of which 12.8 milion residents live in the urban area of the city of Tianjin. The municipality is one of the four municipalities directly governed by the central administration and the city of Tianjin is considered to be the fourth largest city in the terms of urban population. The region made of Tianjin, Beijing and the Hebei province is one of the fastest growing area in the world: its population increased by 60% since 2000, to 110 million. It comprises 10% of China’s total population, 15% of China’s industrial production and 10% of its agriculture output in only 3.3% of China’s total area

Since 2010 when many international companies set up their bases in the newly developed area around the port of Tianjin, the city is undergoing a process of urban growth and rapid development stimulated by recent economic shifts and a series of large infrastructure projects with the potential to reshape the city. Due to the Tianjin’s strategic location on the coast of the Bohai sea and the Hai river and a good connection to the China’s capital city of Beijing, these trends are predicted to continue in the forthcoming future.

Sponge City Concept China’s municipal leaders want 70 percent of the entire population - 900 milion people - to be assimilated into urban regions by 2025. This will require moving 200 to 250 milion more people into Chinese cities in the next 10 years. Massive urbanization puts an enormous pressure on existing infrastructure of the cities.In 2015, Chinese goverment appointed 16 urban districts across the country as pilot ‘Sponge Cities’. The main task of the so-called ‘Sponge City Concept’ is to use the full potential of the rain water within the urban area, setting up the system to allow rainwater to be stored and purified and recycled.

Within this context, the Urban Dynamics Studio in cooperation with Nankai University and Tianjin Municipality has selected a 1.5 km2 area in a northwestern part of the city. The

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

design site, adjacent to the Tzu-ya River, is located close to the existing high-speed train

16

station Tianjin West Railway Station and accommodates almost 30.000 people. The design site is considered one of the key locations for a redevelopment in the Tianjin city, with only a few inhabitants living on the site.


SUDes 2016

THE HISTORY OF TIANJIN

17


Introduction

Design Site The Design Site The triangular-shaped design site is located in the central area of the city of Tianjin, in the Hongqiao district. The approximately 150 hectares site is located in the north-west of Tianjin’s old city center and is limited by the Zi-ya River in the south and by the highway to the north and east. It is in walking distance from the west train station in the south-west at the opposite river bank from the site and a metro station in the north-west.

Due to its location, the municipality of Tianjin has an ambitious plan to develop the design site into a sub-CBD district in a close future. The existing urban structure is already being removed, making space for traffic-dominated street network, generic highrise development and enormous public spaces with no connection to the Chinese traditions. The implementation of such aggressive developments often require unsensitive relocation of the existing residents into the new structures which leads to the loss of connection to the land, loss of community sense and segregation.

The Urban Village The existing urban fabric on the site has a very contrasting mix of formal high residential blocks and very dense informal housing, the so-called “urban villages” or “village-inthe-city” (Chengzhongcun). As a common part of the Chinese urban landscape, they are considered the only affordable and adequate solution available to the urban poor in the cities based on labour-intensive sectors, such as Tianjin: low-cost living makes it possible to keep the wages of employees of industrial and services sectors low, and therefore benefits the global competitiveness of the city. With the relocation of industries and services from Beijing, the number of urban poor is set to increase in Tianjin as well as the demand for cheap housing. Since the government does not provide social housing, the role

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

of urban villages in providing the affordable housing within the market is crucial.

18


19

SUDes 2016


Introduction

Tianjin 2050 Tianjin had different identities during the few thousand years of its evolution: a water transport hub, a trading center, a military town, a multi-cultural colonial town, an international port and recently, a global mega city. The important geographical features which justified its different identities and its development at this specific location are its closeness to Beijing’s strong economic center and the proximity to numerous bodies of water, such as river, canal and the sea.

On one hand, as Beijing becomes excessively crowded and congested, the strategy for the region is to decentralize numerous services, people and industries from Beijing to nearby location. Since 2008, Tianjin is conveniently linked to Beijing with a high-speed train connection and as the second main center of the region, the city is supposed to gain new functions, jobs and residents from Beijing in the coming years. On the other hand, the city is located in the Hai-he river basin, surrounded by mountains. All the water is accumulated into a bottle neck which ends in Tianjin where three rivers and two canals are meeting the Hai River, the only exit to the sea.

This particular location justified its economic development around water. The Grand Canal, built 2000 years ago to link Beijing to Hangzhou, helped develop Tianjin’s trading center both inland and outland which became today’s international port center on the Bohai Sea. But as water enabled a very successful form of trade it also brought disaster to the city because of the difficult climate. Every year, there are two extreme seasons which are influenced by two contradictory winds, cold and humid. 80% of the yearly rainfall happens during July and August with different consecutive peaks made of typhoon and heavy rainfall that result in the flash floods.

China has suffered disastrous flood events for 4,000 years but it is now more frequent because of increased urbanization, a decrease in the number of farmland, forest and lakes and the effect of climate change. The design site, located on junction of the two rivers, is regularly challenged by the water issues and these events have to be taken in account in

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

order to develop the site into a resilient water-sensitive neighborhood.

20


21

SUDes 2016


Workshop

Study Trip and Collaborative Workshop The Study Trip After the first two parts of the course in Lund, the third part of the course began with a two-week study trip to China that included a series of study tours, site visits, and a design workshop in Tianjin to help jumpstart the student’s design process.

Utilizing the information collected in Lund, the students investigated their study site and its relationship to the planned urban growth of Tianjin. Study tours in Tianjin and Beijing gave the students insight into the urban design conversations currently surrounding the site, urban planning challenges in the Jing-jin-ji Region, and highlighted relevant case studies in and around Beijing.

The study tours and site visits were used as a valuable input for a four-day collaborative workshop with approximately ten Chinese architecture and landscape architecture students from two establisthed universities in the region. The workshop resulted in five group proposals for the student’s design site that showcased a variety of sustainable strategies for the future urban development of Tianjin that challenged the proposed plan by the municipality and offered an informed alternative for the development of the site and the city as a whole.

The Collaborative Workshop The four-day collaborative workshop took place at the College of Environmental Science and Engineering at the campus of Nankai University in Tianjin. The workshop was done in five teams of six to seven students that were comprised of a mix of students from Lund University, Nankai University and Beijing Jiaotong University.

The workshop was concieved as a competition with each group given the opportunity to present their strategic vision for the future of the site on four A1 posters to an international jury of experts. During the workshop, the students were encouraged to think broad and be visionary as the workshops intent was to open up new ways of seeing and working with

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

the complex issues presented by the site and the city of Tianjin.

22

The students spent one of the four days discovering the site from which each group presented an analysis as a starting point. Given the short time, the students worked tirelessly to express and visualize their vision through strategic diagrams, plan and section drawings, collages, and 3d representations. The three winning proposals are presented on the following pages.


23

SUDes 2016


Workshop

KEEP 留

Zühranur Celik, Karl Arvid Hellström, Tilda Carinsdotter Kristersson, Malka Logo, Hanna Rauschkolb, Yalan Gan, Li Min

1

ST

STRUCTURE PLAN

“To preserve and to add a new area emerging in dialogue with

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

its surroundings.”

24

The main idea is to preserve and add on to the existing urban fabric of Xijuzhuang, improve the buildings and add the sponge city concept. As the area on the western side of the site is partly demolished and doesn’t seem to have many unique qualities, our plan is to create a lot of new structures in this area.

The Jury Comments:

Rather than erecting a whole super-block of highrises or newly produced colonial style buildings as part of a new CBD area, we would like the new area to emerge in dialogue with its surroundings. It will be denser and higher than Xijuzhuang and in that way may be a contrast to each other, but at the same time influence each other. To link important nodes in and outside of the site we are highlighting three different spines that create new movements that connect the nodes and neighborhoods.

The proposal works with multiple scales, placing the design site on the map of Tianjin with newly established connections and links to the site as well as working with small details, such as floor tiling. The jury also appreciated the effort to use the existing building material - brick for the new buildings to complement and support the identity of the neigborhood.

The sensitive approach and strategy to preserve the existing qualities while adding new structures and functions to the neigborhood was one of the most valuable key principles that jury identified in the winning proposal.


VISUALIZATION OF THE IMPROVED HUTONG AREA

THE VISION AND MAIN TOOLS

SUDes 2016

DIAGRAMS OF THE STRATEGY

25


Workshop

Hongqiao Gateway

Maëlle Christiane Marguerite Ducreux, Martin Jonathan Ellmark, Fredrik Furrer, Jessica Marie Perreault, Shi Chen, Zhensheng Yang

2

ND

STRUCTURE PLAN

“A role model on how to work with water in a sustainable way in a dense, centrally located city

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

area.”

26

Water is a major issue both in China and in Tianjin. Before visiting the physical site, we spent a great deal of time focusing on water in the urban context. The site is located next to water and looking purely at maps, it appears to be a key characteristic of the site. However, on the contrary, the mental awareness of water is non-existant when on site. Knowing this information we used this as a departure point for our project. It is our goal and intent to make people more aware of and improve water security issues. To achieve this, we want to clean, store, reuse, and reduce water consumption. Additionally, we want to make water be both visible and accessible to people and ergo making it a part of everyday life. In addition to discovering how very little of a presence water has on site, it was very clear that daily life is lived on the streets. Therefore, we wished to incorporate a variety of different street

typologies which focuses on pedestrian, cyclists, and business spaces to promote a lively atmosphere. At the same time, we would incorporate water management practices. Taking advantage of the site’s unique location, and emphasizing water, will enable the Hongqiao Gateway to develop it’s own unique identity that can be a role model for future growth both locally and abroad on how it work with water in a sustainable way in a dense, centrally located city area.

The Jury Comments: The jury appreciated the very clear project strategy that makes the proposal strong from its very beginning. Focus on the water was also highly valued.


VISUALIZATION OF THE RIVER AREA

BIRD-EYE VIEW OF THE DESIGN SITE

SUDes 2016

STREETSCAPE TYPOLOGIES

27


Workshop

Triple Impact

Oriol Gómez Cuberes, Zuzanna Karolina Sak, Meike Sänger, Ying Gong, Zeljka Ulemek, Chunlei Li

3

RD

STRUCTURE PLAN

“The city with a vibrant space for exchanging goods, an active green structure and a futureoriented educational hub!”

Our proposal is based on three factors influencing the site by cutting the existing grid with the intersection of its impact rays. In order to keep the observed qualities of a highly interactive street life, we preserve the existing grid and the characteristic street markets.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

The resulting grid generates blocks which are gradually growing in scale from the existing market in the south to new tower developments in the north west. These block incorporate three different typologies that are reusing the notion of the hutongs to maintain the strong social interaction on site which is generated by markets and events.

28

By introducting an educational layer that includes exhibition areas, museums and workshop spaces for creative industries and micro enterprises, we are creating an environment for diverse generations to gain and exchange knowledge and thus, enable everyone to partake in

the social life on site. With this, we aim to provide the city with a vibrant space for exchanging goods, an active green structure and a future-oriented educational hub.

The Jury Comments: The jury found the quality of the three axes, naturally emerging from the existing conditions on site, very challenging and intriguing. The aim of the project to focus on a public space, informing the urban landscape, was highly appreciated.


VISUALIZATION OF THE ELEVATED STREET

SECTION OF THE GREEN FINGER WITH VARIOUS TYPOLOGIES

SUDes 2016

DIAGRAMS OF INFLUENCE FACTORS

29


30

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Challenging Tomorrow


31

SUDes 2016


Projects

Upon the completion of the workshop and returning to Sweden from China, the students were given 7 weeks to develop their individual design projects. Aided and guided by the tutorials and input from guests, the students were asked to develop a vision for future development through research, writing, and a series of design drawings that could together inspire the city of Tianjin toward a more sustainable tomorrow.

The following pages are a summary of the students projects presented on December 6th and 7th at the School of Architecture at Lund University. Through editing, we have selected a set of images and drawing that we feel best represents each student’s work. As a complement, each student has composed a written project description to give further insight into their work and design process and also made a physicall model of the chosen part of the design site to support the project vision.

It is our hope that all of the students hard work and energy can inspire you as much as it

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

has inspired us throughout the semester.

32

IMAGE: ZUZANNA SAK


33

SUDes 2016


Projects

Keep The Water Shenol Shahin Ahmed, Bulgaria

MASTER PLAN

“Keep the water, connect it with green and live in a sustainable

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Tianjin!”

34

“Keep the Water” project is aimed to solve the problems and to use the opportunities as a tool to create more sustainable place in Tianjin, China. The site is located in the central part of the city which has high pressure to be developed. As a result of the researching and analyses, the main problems that the area is challenging are water issues such as water scarcity, water pollution, flood risk and air pollution. In addition to these problems there are areas built as informal settlements which contains traditional courtyards called “Siheyuan”. The area is between rivers and has green areas next to it which provide an opportunity connect. The plan has set up on the Sponge City concept. The existing water and green structures connected to each other by corridors. Green spaces proposed to gather the water as infiltration. The outdated Siheyuan courtyards which do not meet needs of nowadays reshaped

but preserving the small communities and providing more livable places. To get the pressure on the site to be developed, a CBD area has proposed and to prevent the contrast between low-rise Siheyuans and this area, mid-rise courtyard buildings placed to make a transition.


VISUALIZATION OF THE PARK

SECTION OF THE NEW AREA

SUDes 2016

BLOCK DIAGRAM

35


Projects

Green Density

Evelina Johanna Andersson, Sweden

BIRD-EYE VIEW OF THE DESIGN SITE

“The project Green Density introduces the urban

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

population to rural function.”

36

With the quick urbanization in China the middle class has grown rapidly this leading to a large increase in food consumption. The main plan structure is built from three green strips connected with a research centre and the university a main access route from the train station to the existing park. The first and most prominent green corridor aims to clean the polluted soil on site to be able to harvest agriculture in the future. Along the river another green strip is proposed to clean the water before it reaches the river. The third strip connects the surrounding site in the north with a recreational extension to the existing park underneath the raised highway. Along the main route the density increases in the centre with the lowdesity areas connected to the green strips. Along the route smaller retail pods are placed to make room for all the small businesses which exists on site

but also to break down the scale of the high-density towers. The plan aims to make a long term solution to the increased food need in China and to introduce the urban population to rural function and remove the gap created by Mao’s rural exile.


VISUALIZATION OF THE PEDESTRIAN STREET

LONGITUDINAL SECTION THROUGH SITE

SUDes 2016

CLEANSING PARK VISUALIZATION

37


Projects

Village Qualities in the Urban Fabric Drífa Árnadóttir, Iceland

VISUALIZATION OF THE

“A unique district in the heart of Tianjin.”

Chinese cities are primarily planned from a large-scale traffic perspective and inside individual plots, which leaves the space in-between the gated communities and the traffic neglected. That space is actually the key public space for living our life.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

The planning of China´s new megacities has all too often erased existing human scale neighbourhoods that were once full of life. That is exactly what is happening at our site, the Xijuzhuang area. My plan is to preserve, rebuild and add to the existing hutong area and create a unique district in the heart of Tianjin.

38

The street is a carrier of social, economic and environmental sustainability and a key public space for daily quality of life. The strategy for the site is to create a network of high quality streets with storm water management to prevent flooding in rainy seasons. It also introduces two strong identity links. The recreational link connects the Xi-Gu

Park to the river and brings the life from the park to a sequence of new public spaces together with greenery. The commercial link works as an entrance to the site from public transports and is only for pedestrians and bikes. The commercial street has rich culture and is supposed to boost the local economy and business. In the new plan for the site I tried to capture the hutong qualities and create for example straight and more irregular alleys, small spaces, interesting openings and active open facades.


THE URBAN PLAN

THE ZOOM-IN PLAN, SHOWING THE TWO LINKS MEETING IN A PUBLIC SQUARE WITH A NEW METRO STOP

SUDes 2016

SECTION OF COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL COURTYARDS

39


Projects

Tianjin

Zühranur Celik, Denmark

VISUALIZATION

“Making the site more accessible, attractive and

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

sustainable in various ways.”

40

The vision if to connect the site with the rest of the Hongqiao district. Integrated street networks will make the whole site accessible. The existing quality of the site will be preserved such as preserving some of the old hutong area, the existing street structure, the educational buildings and some residential buildings which will be restorated. There will be a greenblue urban structure linked with the large Xigu Park close to the site. Public spaces, street life, green streets and water management will be on focus. The wetland along the Tzuya-River will absorb the stormwater as well, and during periods of drought it will ensure water availability for the region by slowly releasing the stored water. In the future, the wetland along the river will have the potential to be changed to something else. Additional to the wetland area, there will be small canals close to the Tzuya-River. In some areas

there will be dominated by residential, commercial or cultural buildings, but overall there will be buildings with mixed-use functions. Shopping centers, cultural and entertainment buildings will be located close to the Tzuya-River. There will be trees along the main streets and parks next to them.


MASTER PLAN

VARIOUS CANAL/RIVER SITUATION

SUDes 2016

SECTION THROUGH THE RIVER AND CANAL

41


Projects

Tradition, Connection, Integration Oriol Gómez Cuberes, Spain

MASTER PLAN

“The old and new face each other stablishing an

Masterplan 1:2000

Lund University School of Architecture

integration.”

The project gives an answer to the problems in the site by using the same problems and opportunities, which already exist there. In a place with different typologies and without a clear street hierarchy and a clear order, the new buildings converse with the old ones trying to stablish a relation and facing its differences and similarities.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

This pursuit of conversation produces an integration and connection of the new buildings with the old ones.

42

The tradition is something that is really present in the proposal, which wants to preserve the way of living and all the activities from the informal area that makes this place so unique and special. And all these points are combined with two sustainable tools which makes the city a place with better connections and better public transport but also creates

new different kind of green areas that make the site more pleasant for the people who is living there. So different kind of typologies, with different kind of spaces, in a more efficient and new grid crossed by a green and blue line give an answer and a sustainable tool for the old and new citizens of the site respecting identities, surrounding and existing buildings.

Project phases


DETAILED PLAN

VISUALIZATIONS

SUDes 2016

AXONOMETRIC VIEW OF THE AREA

43


Projects

Let’s Meet

Maëlle Christiane Marguerite Ducreux, France

MASTER PLAN

“Let’s make the informal meet the formal and the city meet the water.”

The proposal aim to reconnect the site with the rest of city by answering current water and housing pressure and by looking into Chinese vernacular architecture and street culture in a practical way.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

The aim was to use what is already present on site and to enhance the existing qualities of the site for the existing population to create a more resilient and sustainable urban design.

44

This project could become an example for a more sustainable type of Chinese urban fabric which ensure two rather conflicting part of Chinese cities to meet: formal urban form and urban village.

It could also provide an integrated answer for water on the scale of the neighbourhood. The proposal has the potential to be a sub-centre for Tianjin, with a density of 2 FSI, linking to the modern and old centre along the flow of the Hai-he River.


EXISTING ACTIVE PLACES

MAIN AXIS

EXISTING BUILDINGS (BLACK: DEMOLISHED; BLUE:

STREET GRID (MIX ON SITE EXISTING AND OFF SITE

SHOULD BE DEMOLISHED; GREY; PRESERVED)

TIANJIN GRID)

EXISTING TOPOGRAPHY

WATER MANAGEMENT

DIAGRAMS

ZOOM-IN AREA PLAN : PUBLIC PLACE AROUND WATER

SUDes 2016

SECTION THROUGH ZOOM-IN AREA, SHOWING PUBLIC LIFE CONNECTED TO WATER AND NATURE

45


Projects

Regenerating Xiyuzhuang Martin Jonathan Ellmark, Sweden

MASTER PLAN

“...adding a framework that can support and enrich the existing.”

The site for this project is Xiyuzhuang, an area in the Chinese megacity of Tianjin. It’s a site riddled with serious and interrelated issues. Physical, economic, political and environmental issues.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Taking on a site like Xiyuzhuang makes you face a number of complex questions. How do you bridge the gap between new and old, small and big, modern and traditional, rich and poor? How do you design an urban fabric that allows for the preservation of the existing culture and identity while introducing a whole new physical framework that can support the cultivation of a new Xiyuzhuang?

46

To give a more sensible alternative to the local governments plans to level the existing to the ground and on the ashes build a commercial business district this project has been focused on adding a framework that can support and enrich the existing. Reworking the “hutong” (chinese for alley) areas is done by identifying important alleys

that can be used as borders to create a new perimeter block structure. Space is opened up in the middle of these blocks while the edges are densified to create an environment that keeps the qualities of the lively narrow streets and creates lots of green semi-public spaces. To create a transition from smaller to larger scale the smaller scale areas are allowed to reach out into the new larger scale development. This creates a multitude of meeting points between the old and new, large and small. Another benefit is creating very pedestrian friendly streets while keeping an overall high density. Also connecting both the new and the regenerated old is an extensive network of storm water canals designed to deal with the flooding problems in monsoon season and provide a natural water cleaning solution for the inhabitants.


HUTONG AREA BLOCK COURTYARD

BIRD-EYE VIEW FROM SOUTH EAST

SUDes 2016

DIAGRAMS: EXISTING/NEW BUILDINGS, SMALL SCALE “FINGERS”, WATER NETWORK, CONNECTED GREENERY

47


Projects

The Fingers of the City David Espuña Español, Spain

MASTER PLAN

“The scale of the project is not the dimensions of the built, but

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

the relations that it creates.”

48

Grid or fork? The proposal is organized in three residential fingers that vertically link the present city with the new neighborhood. These fingers are differentiated by their asymmetric character. Each of them tries to solve a different uses plan, but all them are based on the functional and morphological complexity that characterizes new urban residential in opposition to the specialization of the mono-morphological urban fabrics of last century. Landscape is present between the built fingers, infiltrating the interstitial park into the new residential buildings. Massive presence of vegetation. The ground is the protagonist. Vegetation, transparency, public space and pedestrian connectivity. The green fingers also act as public filter parks, with collective water gardens that help the city to clean the water and storage it. Food production is included in the green space next to the houses

Two river fronts. City vs landscape. Density vs open space. The south river front is built as a big metropolitan square, integrating the station and the river. The Est water front is a natural space that is inside one green finger. City and infrastructure are integrated. In the area of the expressway the buildings accommodate the road and ensure the continuity of the streets (the fingers) at ground level, incorporating the new viaduct into the build fabric. If the road continued to rest on the ground, it would be a barrier.


AXONOMETRIC VIEW OF THE DESIGN SITE

DETAILED PLAN

SUDes 2016

DETAILED SECTION

49


Projects

Tianjin Reimagined Atanaska Krasimirova Foteva, Bulgaria

M

URBAN DETAILED PLAN

“The courtyard will act as the urban element of affection – reimagined, reinvented and

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

re-experienced!”

50

Fascination and frustration are the main forces for this project: fascination with the hutong history, both from a perspective of local and cultural urbanism as well as the way of life of its denizens and a stark frustration with the out of control, large scale urbanization. The future of the hutong is set – dystopic depiction of domicide (destruction of the home). The oppressed population will be displaced together with the social place of micro economies supporting the hutong life and tradition. Thus, the design tries to reintroduce the relationship inhabitants - their homes - the hutong space in new residential typologies, inclusive of that which remains, while adapting to a sustainable way of living. It is crucial to create identifiable spaces to go along with behavioural triggers (e.g artefact spaces) so that the idea of collective space can be truly achieved through architectural and tectonic expression. In this vein of thought, the courtyard will

act as the central element of affection for the project as something reimagined, reinvented and re-experienced. It will be the main tool for creation of local hubs re-forging a traditional bond between the dwellers and the space they live in. It can be said that the hutong will be the urban laboratory to clarify and prolong its role – socially, traditionally and historically.


THE NEW COURTYARD: A COLLECTIVE SPACE OF PAST AND PRESENT

CURRENT HUTONG: OBJECT OF DISPLACEMENT

SUDes 2016

ARTEFACTS OF HUTONG LIFE

51


52

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

MASTERPLAN


53

SUDes 2016


Projects

Urban Oasis

Fredrik Furrer, Switzerland

MASTER PLAN

“The Urban Oasis brings

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

the city back to the people.�

54

The ongoing pollution of the Chinese ecosystem caused by global economic demands needs to stop. Nowadays urbanization in China serves the economy and not the people. Thinking about a more human urban development the design site should become an Oasis in the city. The Oasis reintroduces natural and social processes within an urban development which produce the resources the city needs. Four design strategies are guiding the project: Reduce car traffic to reduce air pollution, introduce water-cycling on all scales to jump start natural processes, place a big city park in the middle in order to clean the air, build new courtyard typologies which strengthen the community. Special attention is given to the water infrastructurewhich is the driving force for the development and defines the design through all the scales. Water is collected on the roof of the

courtyard houses, cleaned through living machines, stored in the middle of the courtyard and used for non-potable and potable use. Similarly on a block level the sewage water is collected in a central spot and treated through living machines, stored and reused. If there is too much rainwater it overflows to the retention beds in the streets which guide the water to the Oasis lakes or the river. On all levels the water can infiltrate into the ground and recharge the groundwater.


VISUALIZATION

COMMUNITY USES

COMMUNITY HOUSE

RESIDENTIAL HOUSE

COLLECT RAINWATER (1.)

NON-POTABLE USE (4.)

OVERFLOW TO STREET (8.)

COMMUNITY HOUSE: CLEAN (2.), STORE (3.), IRRIGATE (5.), MAKE POTABLE WATER (6.), SELL WATER (7.)

VISUALIZATION - PARK IN THE AUTUMN

VISUALIZATION - PARK IN THE SPRING

SUDes 2016

INTEGRATED WATER SYSTEM - COURTYARD CONCEPT

55


Projects

Renovation of Xiyuzhuang Ying Gong, China

MASTER PLAN

“Vibrant city center, Integrated natural environment,

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Healthy living!�

56

In recent years, many Chinese cities are facing the problem of flood and waterlog. Tianjin, a typical affected city among Chinese northern cities. The project takes the Xiyuzhuang in Tianjin as an example to explore the feasible solutions for cities with water problem. Xiyuzhuang, located in the place where the North Canal and Ziya River meet, one has heavy sand sediment, while another one is badly polluted, and the unconventional water resources has became the main supply for Haihe River Basin. So my first idea is to bring more purified running water to the river to make it back to life. Hongqiao District, the most backward area in central Tianjin, but also the most origional place that still keeps a lot of traditional and characteristic stuffs, like the courtyard (Siheyuan), or warren (Dazayuan), the markets and Chinese traditional parks. These distinctive

features should not be placed by highrise buildings. With this idea, I keep the Hutong area and make it matching with the modern city lives.


VISUALIZATION OF THE NEW PROPOSED TYPOLOGY

SECTION THROUGH THE COURTYARD TYPOLOGY

SUDes 2016

TYPOLOGY DIAGRAMS

57


Projects

Integrating Xiyuzhuang Karl Arvid Hellström, Sweden

SCHOOL

FINEPARK TRAM STOP

SCHOOL NURSERY SCHOOL

OFFICES COMMERCIAL HOSPITAL

OFFICES THEATRE

KINDERGARTEN

PLAYGROUND & KINDERGARTEN

MARKET

LIBRARY TOWER SCHOOL ELDERLY HOME

POLICE

URBAN PARK TRAM STOP

KINDERGARDEN

SCHOOL

MARKET

OFFICES

SPONGE PARK

CULTURE HOUSE

BOAT STOP

BOAT STOP

OFFICES & RESTURANTS MASTER PLAN

“A city is more than just a place in space, it is a drama in time.” Patrick Geddes

The main idea with the project is to address the challenges with the site through integration.

generic high rise - and neo-colonial style - area is a mistake, even though it makes it possible for higher density.

Integration as incorporating new elements into the site as turning barriers into assets. Physical barriers as river and roads or mental barriers as division of neighborhoods by tenure, public spaces etc.

I argue that what is important for a sustainable China now is to reduce traffic due to the pollution but also the barriers it is creating. At the same time it is important to create attractive people friendly areas, especially in a central part of the city as it is not only for the people living there.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

As the site today lacks a lot of functions I mean to add on a lot of these in relationship to were former barriers used to be in order to create meeting points between areas.

58

The projects is also a reaction to the way history is being erased when new sites are developed in China. It aims to add on to what exist on the site as much as possible. The area with its small scale brick structure is pretty unic in Tianjin and I believe that erasing it and create a


NEW & OLD

SURROUNDING AREA

INSIDE OF THE AREA

SLOW & LONG TERM

LINK AREAS UNDERNEATH THE

DEVELOPMENT

ELEVATED HIGHWAYS

INTEGRATING STRATEGIES

FLOODABLE MANGROOVE -LIKE AREA & FLOATING WALKING DEVICE POSBILITY TO REACH THE RIVER BY STAIRS

BOAT

PEDESTRIAN PATH PEDESTRIAN PATH

DIFFERENT MEETINGS WITH THE RIVER

NEW SQUARE AREA AND TRAM STOP

SUDes 2016

SECTION OF NEW PARK AREA UNDERNEATH THE ELEVATED HIGHWAY

59


Projects

Living Together Aileen Lisa Hocker, Germany

MASTER PLAN

“Connecting multi-cultural and multi-generational lifestyles through engaging with green

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

living!”

60

The general sustainable urban design vision is to reduce the pollution, recharge nature, encourage community agriculture projects in the neighbourhood and create a mixed dense area for different people and their various requirements. The green link from Hehai Park is a central part of the design vision. It is a starting platform to connect the different green areas in Tianjin and can be continued in the future to create a green structure for the whole city. The expansive green area controls the water management. With a newly defined typography, various digs are created. Storm water will be caught in the retention tank and percolated.

draw the inhabitants into the green nature. A water-sensible layout of the road includes a variety of water drainage methods. Public transport is being expanded with new bus stations and two new metro stations. In addition, they are installed at every metro station mobility centre- where one can borrow e-bikes and e-rollers.

Next to the river is a large wetland area to catch excess storm water and protect the site.Next to both of these green areas one can find special buildings with different social functions as landmarks; these make the green parks more attractive and will increasingly

These different visions are the first step to create Tianjin’s sustainable future; these guidelines can be used in various phases, and all throughout the city.

The 9 different neighbourhoods have differing qualities for different people. There are lively new districts with many places to stay and interesting public spaces. The site is no longer just an isolated area but part of downtown Tianjin. New offices and commercial areas and also traditional areas emerge.

Y


VIZUALIZATION OF THE PARK

SECTION A:A

SECTION B:B

Art & Culture Garden

Art Ga lle Restaur ry ant

Urban

Garde

ning

Reside OfďŹ ce nce Com s merci al

Playground Permanent and perennial water bodies

Even

t Hal

Verti

l

Vegetation of aquatic plants

cal ga

Com

mun

e gard

Peatlands

Yoga Station

Neighborhood garden

Private garden Shared Space Water permeable covering

ing

ouse

Privat

DETAILED PLAN

rden

ity H

en

Neighborhood garden

SUDes 2016

Yoga Station

61


Projects

Let It Flow... Let It Flood... Ahmad Kanaa, Syria

VISUALIZATION OF THE PARK AREA

“New Green-Blue Edges, Priceless Public Asset for

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Everyone!�

62

Rapid urbanization, along with industrialization in China has created unprecedented challenges related to water which affect the sustainability of human urban settlements. Even though the presence of many urban settlement next to the rivers, there are two main challenges which the country faces. The first challenge is lacking access to safe water and sanitation, and the second is increasing water-related disasters such as floods and droughts. The main aim of the proposal is to develop a new concept of integrated urban water management for effectively managing flood risk and adapting to climate change. Moreover, the proposal will enhance the quality of water and create a serious of biologically diverse ecosystem that could repair contaminated soils and treat urban water relying on natural process. Water challenges is transferred into opportunity by proposing a model for managing wastewater, storm water and water supply using an urban area as

the element of management to achieve economic, social and environmental benefits. Proposed green-blue infrastructure is a natural filtration system implemented in different scales in both public and private spaces to increase the permeable surfaces, decrease the runoff distance and function as flood resilience structure. A sequence of connected water structure helps to enhance the river quality which create a new blue edge to the site and become a priceless public asset for everyone.


MASTER PLAN

DETAILED SECTION OF THE STREET

SUDes 2016

DIAGRAMATIC SECTION

63


Projects

Countering Placelessness Tilda Carinsdotter Kristensson, Sweden

VISUALIZATION OF THE COURTYARD

“Working against placelessness through preserving and enhancing as much as possible of existing structures

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

and qualities.�

64

The aim of this project is to create a vivid neighbourhood through preserving as much as possible of existing structures and qualities. In order to avoid a possible loss of identity the intention is to work with and improve existing buildings through a bottom up approach and to add to the qualities in the area rather than trying to replace them.

conclusion the main importance of these strategies are to 1; preserve as much of the existing structure as possible and improve living conditions in the area through community participation, 2; build and mix, in order to densify and create more economic possibilities, 3; to connect the site with the rest of the city and to generate with public functions.

Preserving existing buildings will not only improve the situation for the people living in the area, but also create a new attraction point within Tianjin. The area will in the long run serve as a generator where its unique character creates a competitive advantage that will attract investments and people to the area. New functions are added to ensure a lively neighbourhood with characteristics that can compete with the rest of the city.

The project allows for flexible and incremental development that can change over time. Nonetheless, the uniqueness of Xijuzhuang will be enhanced; it will be something new and exciting that brings people from around the city to the whole site.

Countering placelessness, or in other words, working to sustain the uniqueness that makes the place different is done through three main strategies. In


ZOOM-IN PLANS

SUDes 2016

SUPPORTING DIAGRAMS

65


THEATRE

TRANSIT HUB

MARKET

green/blue link

School

TRANSIT HUB

CUltural CENTER

O E T ION IDG STAT R B AIN TR

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

FERRY

66

AXONOMETRIC VIEW OF THE DESIGN SITE

ROUTE


University

HOSPITAL

EDUCATIONAL HUB

Library

School

COMMUNITY CENTER

School

HOSPITAL

School

Xiyuzhuang COMMUNITY CENTER COMMUNITY CENTER

NADE

PROME

Y RO

FERR

UTE

SUDes 2016

RIVER

67


Projects

Xiyuzhuang Life Sofia Masrour, Sweden

MASTERPLAN

“A reaction to the contemporary

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

urban development in China. ”

68

Xiyuzhuang Life – is essentially a reaction to the contemporary urban development in China. As China is facing a population growth, a way of accommodation is through development of megacities and structures which replaces many old neighbourhoods’ characterizing Chinese architecture and culture. Planning authorities will thus construct road network which will define super blocks, often measuring 300 to 400 m in length. The superblocks are then sold as one piece to developers, thereby favouring mega-projects by large real estate companies over small ones by private investors. Individual projects on small parcels by independent small landowners are almost unknown in China – a reflection of the land ownership patterns and the top-down planning process. The proposal takes form in Xiyuzhuang, introducing an alternative, small scale urbanism that deals both with

the economic, social and ecological aspects through the existing structures of Xiyuzhuang with the intention of reactivating and strengthening the district of Hongqiao. The street network, architectural characteristics and important functions are preserved in the new design. Hence, the proposal suggests a blend of the new with the old. The starting point is the enlargement and connection of the existing street network and functions that finally results in a development of small plots.


ILLUSTRATION OF THE POCKET SQUARE

SPACE TYPOLOGY

SUDes 2016

ARRANGEMENT AND DIVISION OF THE SPACE

69


Sustainable Urban Dynamics 70

BIRD-EYE VIEW OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD


71

SUDes 2016


Projects

Tianjin Revisioned Polina Moroz, Ukraine

MASTER PLAN

“Implementation of the denser urban life while translating the historical layer and atmosphere of the Hutong area into contemporary westernalised realms will turn Hongqiao into

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

attracting city centre.”

72

Despite its central location within Tianjin boundaries, half demolished development area with its bad sanitary conditions, lack of connectivity and public spaces is unable to function as a real city center. Hence regeneration strategy proposed in a project “Tianjin revisioned” aims to address this challenge.

areas, preserved university campus, park and art district situated on the river bank. The second layer of “sequence of spaces” — traditional organization of all the parks and historical mansions in China is developed along the canal with special buildings and pocket parks: theater, libraries, cinema, singing pavilions and tea houses.

Urban principles developed for a sustainable approach towards design are: protecting the cultural legacy, broadening existing communities, introducing new on-site creative economy, installing local transportation system, implementing new public space typology, connecting to surrounding neighborhoods.

Preserved hutong parts are getting a different function: converted from residential into commercial and art districts, repaired with the remains of the original bricks that could be found on the site.

Several observations on public space layout in China made during the study trip are applied in the project. First of all, the canal, the core of the public vital life is installed on the site, connecting all the most important nodes: commercial

Last but not least the historical layer of the hutong along the canal is preserved through the materiality of surfaces — the tool used by Chinese architects for centuries. The footprint of the demolished buildings is highlighted with different types of pavement and vegetation.


BIRD-EYE PERSPECTIVE

EYE-HEIGHT PERSPECTIVE OF THE CANAL AREA

SUDes 2016

CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAMS

73


Projects

In(flow)structures Elva Nano, Greece

MASTER PLAN

“Creating a sustainable

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

network.�

74

The design idea is to create a new network of flows spaces and buildings that coexist in a sustainable way. The proposed network consists of 3 main elements: the threads, the fabric and the spools. The threads layer includes all physical and nonphysical flows running the site: green and blue connections, roads infrastructure and programmatic flows. The blue flows will be based on rain water collection storage and distribution. The green flows will purify the ground, increase biodiversity, provide recreation areas and permeable surfaces. The road infrastructure will enhance connectivity through and outside the area as well as pedestrian and bike movements. Finally, the programmatic flows will suggest diverse functions along the streets leading to the meeting points-spools.

The fabric layer represents the proposed built structures among the flows, including housing, commercial, administration and research facilities. The units will vary in scale, distribution and combinations resulting to a diverse urban spaces. Finally, the spools will be placed on crucial points on flows intersections and act as generators for the new sustainable network. They will be open meeting spaces or public facilities such as lecture rooms, exhibition pavilions, showcase products rooms, research laboratories and cultural facilities. The whole network of the 3 layers will be in constant transition due to environmental or urban dynamics.


VISUALIZATION

DETAILED PLAN

GREEN FLOWS

SUDes 2016

BLUE FLOWS

75


Projects

Relieving Food Uncertainity Jessica Marie Perreault, United States of America

DETAILED PLAN

“Project focuses on taking small scale agricultural practices and transforming it into an urban strategy to reduce reliance on imported

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

food in China.”

76

When I started working on my project I began looking at China’s agricultural role in a global perspective. What found is that, in addition to having a massive population, they are facing a serious problem of food insecurity. They have been purchasing land many other countries around the world, the area of this landmass is equal to the size of about Denmark and half of Skåne. This raised the first question, in my project, is there a way that we can design in the urban setting to reduce China’s reliance on imported food? Within our site in Tianjin, many residents do grow some of their own food. To make an impact, this would have to become a large scale urban strategy. There are factors that prevent their efforts from becoming directly feasible, such as soil pollution and rapid urbanization. As a response to this, I used hydroponics to address the immediate and bio-remediation as a long-term response. With this I looked at

how can we incorporate it into the urban fabric? How can we create a gradation, from an industrial level to a individual level? In the same way that open spaces are important and part of daily life, can agriculture function in a similar way?


INTEGRATION OF AGRICULTURE INTO ARCHITECTURE, RANGING FROM HIGH DENSITY COMMERCIAL TO LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL

BIRD-EYE VIEW OF ENTIRE SITE

SUDes 2016

CROSS SECTION THROUGH DETAILED AREA

77


Projects

People. Zoomed In Sigita Pociūtė, Lithuania

MASTER PLAN

“What if megacities had both - the density and the desired human scale?”

The focal challenge of this project is creating a dense megacity without losing the benefits of the human scale. Another important standpoint is developing the neigbourhood while preserving existing cultural and contextual qualities as well as existing built structure.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

The main aspects challenging the human scale in cities are those of car traffic, volumes of buildings, and spaces between them.

78

Based on the vision of creating cities that are as easy to live in without a car as with a car, the site is being designed as a pilot project of a car free zone in Tianjin, hoping that it would inspire other parts of the megacity to become car free as well. To enhance walkability a public space network is created. The network is a mix of linear and planar, paved and green spaces. It is developed by defining shortest distances withing existing and

future metro stations, street markets, recreational areas and cultural buildings. To deal with the big scale of high rise buildings dividing elements such as smaller units, connecting bridges, plants and water are added in the space in between of towers. Areas where neigbouring buildings defer rapidly in heights are developed by implementing a more gradual change in altitudes to avoid magnification of the scale due to the strong contrast.


ILLUSTRATION OF THE HIGH DENSITY AREA

3D LAYERS OF THE URBAN PLAN

SUDes 2016

DEVELOPMENT OF THE URBAN PLAN

79


Projects

Reusing Qualities Hanna Rauschkolb, Germany

DETAILED PLAN

“Water sensitive urban design

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

is becoming more crucial!”

80

The main goal of the project is to address the site´s main issues, which are the water scarcity and the seasonal flooding caused through heavy rainwater events. For this reason, functional green spaces that treat stormwater in different ways, will be implemented in a green grid. A bicycle and pedestrian friendly urban fabric, which is based on the existing one, together with the green structure help to activate street life and make the site more sustainable and self- sufficient. Like Tianjin, many cities in China are surrounded by a green belt and agricultrue fields that have no connection to the city center. Therefore a green grid will be implemented that connects green areas. On site this grid connects exisiting green areas and new funcitonal green spaces and is based on stormwater flows in order to address the environmental issues. The informal settlement and its charming narrow and irregular street for pedestrians and bicycles only, will

be maintained and enhanced in a way that it allows for bio swales and pocket parks that in turn create street life. The buildings will rise vertically and new building modules can be added on to create different spaces according to the people´s needs. The design strategies for the informal settlement will be applied for the adjoining areas, creating different spaces. The phasing of the future development allows for a development of the green spaces, if the housing need rises. Water and building material will be reused and upcycled. Over all the qualities of the site will be kept, enhanced and activated for the people. The proposal is keeping and reusing materials, characterisitic buildings, structures, habits (like bicycle use and street markets) and not to forget the water. The future development is based on the exisisting situation, the people´s desires and environmental problemes, making it a sustainable und sitespecific design.


VISUALIZATION OF THE AREA

FUNCTIONS

TYPOLOGY

SUDes 2016

SECTION WITH EXISTING BUILDINGS AND GREEN SPACES

81


Projects

Furnishing Public Space Meike Sänger, Germany

AXONOMETRIC VIEW OF THE DESIGN SITE

“Culture and traditions are rooted in social values and

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

should thus be fostered!”

82

My project is defined by four main principles:

• • • •

Preserve Enhance Diversify Resume

More precisely, I am preserving buildings of adequate condition and character. Following my fascination for the intact social life on site, I want to further enhance the social interaction. Providing space for the current residents and introducing new ones, I want to merge these groups by creating spaces for social interaction that involves the exchange of goods (crafts from creative industries but also common retail), education (workshops) and recreational purposes. To cater for the different ways of interaction, I am creating diverse space qualities, based on different street typologies.

While linear streets have the purpose of getting from A to B, providing shops and gastronomy along the way, other paths are rich in space contrast and are designed to be spaces of abidance rather than movement. Certain spaces allow for larger events in the open while others provide covered outdoor areas for sheltered activities. For a good connectivity, I have incorporated bike paths, new metro stations and an eco-bus system. Besides, to manage rainwater, I have introduced an additional river arm and bio swales. In addition, I have included means to store the rainwater in the courtyards of the buildings to use for irrigation and domestic purposes. In conclusion, my design proposal aspires to create an area that incorporates preserved buildings and diversifies resumed, traditional urban design for a close-knit community fabric.


VIEW OF THE NEW RIVER ARM DURING HIGH TIDE TOWARDS THE DENSE, LOW-RISE AREA AND THE TOWER AREA

VIEW FROM WITHIN THE LOW-RISE AREA

SUDes 2016

SECTION WEST-EAST SHOWING THE SPACES IN BETWEEN IN DETAIL

83


Projects

RE:discovering Identity Zuzanna Karolina Sak, Poland

ZOOM-IN PLAN

“This project framework will allow the area to grow as it gains recognition, interest, diverse users, develop local

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

businesses and markets!�

84

The site is located in Honqiao district of Tianjin which has advantageous location on Beijing-Tianjin connection, close to major train station and is surrounded by river and a park. The street life and community of the area are undeniable value. To preserve them I decided to keep the existing street grid, extend neglected connections, restructure street hierarchy to favour pedestrian movement and break borders. My focus points are two main axis – green and commercial - which accumulate new program and give identity to the site by encouraging social activities. The green connection is emphasized by sequence of parks and finishes in the lowest area of the site where it opens towards the river with a wetland park. I create my urban structure by overlapping the existing, organic grid with rigid grid of blocks in two scales. Block design is based on qualities of

traditional courtyard house. Small scale, hutong typology celebrates low rise buildings with vivid street life. Second typology brings street life on higher level of green terraces in mixed height blocks. In scale of the city I hope to achieve an area which will combine diverse functions and user, bring profit and workspaces for residents, interesting, active program, beautiful spaces to use for neighbouring districts and create environmentally and socially sustainable community which can grow incrementally in time.


BIRD-EYE VIEW OF THE DESIGN SITE

VISUALIZATIONS

SUDes 2016

TYPOLOGIES

85


Projects

Gradient

Martynas Sinkevicius, Lithuania

PROCESS PLAN

“The key element of the project is to make the site adaptable and flexible for the current and future people’s needs & values.’’

The project is based on a large scale urban strategy for Tianjin City, which addresses regional & global issues. Population growth, contamination of soil, air & water, lack of public & living spaces are the driving forces of this project.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Gradient project is based on holistic approach and looks towards the future of Tianjin. The concept allows the site to be developed flexibly over long period of time constantly addressing people’s needs and City’s aspiration nationwide.

86

Therefore the staging of the project becomes crucial part of it’s development process. The challenging part of the project is designing an area that could accommodate growing number of habitats by also keeping characteristics of the site and the existing community. Gradient project does not only approach the site from social sustainability point

of view, but also introduces the ways to clean the site, manage rain water, people’s mobility and living conditions within the site. The project reintroduces Tianjin as creative and courageous model for nextlevel sponge city that could be recognised in national and global context.


EDUCATIONAL

C O C ER M M

M

M

M

M

IA

MICRO-INDUSTRIAL

M

L

M

HEALTHCARE

CBD

M

M

CULTURAL

+10 +10 +6

M

+7

M M

+5

GREEN LOOP +9

+8

M

SITE CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

ILLUSTRATION OF THE GREEN LOOP

SUDes 2016

WEST CBD DESIGN SECTION

87


Projects

The Central People’s District of Tianjin Suzete Vilma Timba, Mozambique

DETAILED PLAN

“Exploring the living ways of a humble and sustainable community in the big Tianjin urban structure.”

Imagine a Chinese district that does not follow the existing urban development trend. Imagine a neighbourhood where as a local you can easily relate to the styles, the culture and the habits. Imagine a new Chinese development that is as active and happy as the former, destroyed in order to improve.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

That’s the Central People’s District of Tianjin. The design that plays with trends, breaking them, and exploring how to make it better. Why create a new business district, when you can create a very diverse and active district?

88

My design aims on focusing mainly on the people, the life in between and all the interesting things that can happen when you mix: demographics, tenures, activities and uses. Chinese cities needs more of that, instead of erasing every little settlement that still contains these qualities and simply replacing it with cold and massive blocks that do not invite any sort of social interactions.

The Central people’s District of Tianjin wants to experiment on how it would be to keep up with the fast urbanization trend and not lose important qualities and being able to take care and give back to the environment.


BIRD-EYE VIEW

SECTION THROUGH THE WATER AXE

SUDes 2016

BLOCK TYPOLOGIES AND DIVERSITY

89


Projects

City Inside the City Zeljka Ulemek, Serbia

MASTER PLAN

“In order to solve all chalenges that urban environment is nowadays facing, we must start from a small scale!“

For facing new chalanges in modern Chinas cities,we must first of all be aware of importance that design of human enviroment has. In order to fourfill all needs of a modern society we will work with solving all the aspects of urban planing.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

As solving one aspect without others is not possible ,my solution for this area In Tianjin consists of a combination made from infrastructure solutions,new buiding typologies, improvement of local economy, water managment and social impact. Everything that can make the area work for itself.

90

By providing to residents a place where thay can for work,live,educate , spend there free time and feel the sense of comunity and indentity. The spaces in area will still have a sense of old tradition, made by a new a modern way.

Consisting of a mixture of markets, residental areas, public places, parks, beautifull water front, education facilities and receation centres. Area will be a good solution and examples for Chineese cities facing the same problems. It will be the important part of Tianjin and a great place for living.


DETAILED PLAN

BIRD-EYE PERSPECTIVE OF THE DESIGN SITE

SUDes 2016

DIAGRAMS OF INFLUENCE

91


92

Sustainable Urban Dynamics


93

SUDes 2016


Exhibition

Exhibition Autumn 2016 The results of two SUDes Master’s Program design studios Urban Dynamics and Urban Recycling were exhibited together in the Foyer of the School of Architecture from December 12, 2016 - January 25, 2017.

The autumn semester design courses resulted in 68 unique proposals and sustainable visions for two sites: Tianjin, China (Urban Dynamics) and LTH Campus, Sweden (Urban Recycling). While dealing with completely different urban scales and context, the students of both studios have challenged the conventional approaches to sustainability and present

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

holistic proposals for their complex sites.

94


95

SUDes 2016


Afterword

Challenging Tomorrow From our initial discussions on the effects of globalization to our discussions on the social and economic implications of Tianjin’s current urban development policies, we have had a wealth of inspiring conversations through seminars, tutorials, and lectures that have been translated into this collection of student work. From drawings showing alternative infill and revitalization strategies for Tianjin’s traditional hutong residential area to explorations of sustainable visions for the future growth of the city of Tianjin, we feel there is so much potential in the conversations held within these pages. We hope they have inspired you all as much as they have us.

To all our students we’d like to thank you for these 16 weeks as it is your energy and dedication that have made this semester an overwhelming success. We are proud of you, and how you took the challenges and continued to remember to have fun along the way. We have seen you all progress throughout these weeks, and we believe that as you grow in experience and knowledge you all have the potential to make our world a better and more sustainable place.

As you go forward, continue to question and seek out the challenges your tasked with as a thesis student and a professional urban designer. In the coming years, you will all be tasked with finding solutions to the environmental challenge of global warming, local water shortages, air pollution, and the volatility of natural disasters. It will be your curiosity and desire to face these challenges of the coming decades, that will help us utilize the rapid urbanization of world to become a more sustainable global community.

We hope this studio has been an incubator of ideas and has given everyone involved the belief that if we all continue to push ourselves through research, reflection, and drawing the answers to the challenges of today will come.

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Peter Siöström Associate Professor Director of SUDes Master’s Program Sustainable Urban Design Lund University

96

Andreas Olsson Course Leader, Program Assistant Sustainable Urban Design Lund University Katerina Vondrova Course Coordinator, Teaching Assistant Sustainable Urban Design Lund University


从全球化对于城市的影响,到天津现有城市开发对社会和经济的影响,我们通过研讨会、设计指导和 讲座进行了一系列丰富且灵感迸发的探讨,并且通过学生们的个人设计作品体现了出来。从对天津未 来城市增长模式的探索,到对天津传统的胡同居住区进行的可持续开发策略的设计,我们认为这里面 展现了潜力无穷的设计可能性,并且我们也希望读者可以像我们一样从中受到启发。 我们要感谢所有的学生在这16个星期付出的努力工作,使这个学期的课程设计成果丰富且具有意义。 我们为你们接受挑战、并同时享受乐趣的精神感到骄傲。在过去的几周里,我们看到你们所有人的进 步,同时我们相信每一个人在未来都有潜力可以成为使我们的世界变得更美好、更可持续的设计师。 当你前进时,请迎接和直面作为学生或一个专业的城市设计师在未来所将面临的挑战。在未来的几年 里,你将负责寻找针对各种挑战的解决方案,包括全球变暖,水资源短缺,空气污染,以及自然灾害。 希望未来可以持续激发你的好奇心和欲望,来面对未来几十年的这些挑战,并且帮助我们利用快速的 城市发展将世界建设成一个可持续发展的全球社区。 我们希望这个设计课程可以成为一个孵化器,并使每个人都相信,如果我们继续推动自己不断研究和 反思,那么我们可以为当代以及未来的城市发展带来源源不断的更好的灵感与设计。

Peter Siöström 副教授 SUDes硕士项目主任 可持续城市设计 瑞典隆德大学

Katerina Vondrova 课程助理,助教 可持续城市设计 瑞典隆德大学

SUDes 2016

Andreas Olsson 课程负责人,项目助理 可持续城市设计 瑞典隆德大学

97


Sustainable Urban Dynamics 2016

Ax:son Johnson Institute for Sustainable Urban Design Lund University

Sustainable Urban Design Master’s Program School of Architecture Lunds Tekniska HÜgskola P.O. Box 124, 221 00 Lund, Sweden +46 46 222 00 00 www.stadsbyggnad.lth.se

Lund University P.O. Box 117, 221 00 Lund, Sweden +46 46 222 00 00 www.lunduniversity.lu.se

Partner Universities:

Nankai University College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin, China

Sustainable Urban Dynamics

Beijing Jiantong University School of Architecture, Beijing, China

98

Printed at Media-Tryck Lund, Sweden February, 2017

Sustainable Urban Dynamics  

This book presents the students design projects from the third semester of Sustainable Urban Design international master's degree programme...

Sustainable Urban Dynamics  

This book presents the students design projects from the third semester of Sustainable Urban Design international master's degree programme...

Advertisement