Issuu on Google+

up to 15% discount on downpayment downpayment-up to 12-24 months to pay balance payable in 10 years @ 10% flat rate

BusinessWeek MINDANAO

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

Issue No. 162, Volume III •

Market Indicators As of 5:58 pm feb. 8, 2013 (Friday)

FOREX

PHISIX

US$1 = P40.67

6,458.67 points

1.32 points

Briefly

X

4 cents

X

Wage hike in CdO

SOME 3,000 city hall workers would receive the fourth tranche of their salary increase retroactive January 2013 on February 15, City Mayor Vicente Emano said on Friday. Emano said that the fourth tranche was the last in a series of salary increases implemented by the city government in the last two years in compliance with the salary standardization law. The mayor hoped that aside from giving benefit to the employees’ families, the increase would also serve to motivate them to work even more efficiently.

More infra for Zambo

DIPOLOG City -- It was sweet music to the ears of the residents of Zamboanga del Norte as President Aquino assured them that there will be more infrastructure and social projects to be poured in the province under his administration. The President gave t his a s sur an c e o n Tuesday before the officials, faculty, and students of Andres Bonifacio College during the inauguration of the Graduate and Professional School (GPS) building of the Andres Bonifacio College this city. One of the infrastructure projects to be given priority by the Aquino administration is the upgrading of the Dipolog City Airport which is expected to be completed by 2016.

Cagayan de Oro City

Monday-Tuesday

Now every Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays

February 11-12, 2013

P15.00

More foreign supports expected for M’danao

D

AVAO City -- Mindanao has now been placed in the radar of foreign countries extending Official Development Assistance (ODA) after it hosted the 2013 Philippines Development Forum (PDF) which was attended by development workers and ODA providers.

“This is the beauty of holding the conference here because the ODA partners now get a feel of Mindanao,” Finance Secretary Cesar Purisima said. While the stock of ODA commitments now is the result of processes prior to the Conference, he said, that will definitely change hopefully in favor of Mindanao which was given a special session during the PDF. But it was not just Mindanao which was discussed, he said, since the main agenda was the social contract of

President Benigno S. Aquino III to the people. The Conference included other pressing issues like governance, economy and climate change. “The donor partner financing is very small and is less than five percent,” World Bank Country Director Motoo Konishi said. However, he added, the goal of the ODA is not money but the sharing and transfer of knowledge to the Philippines. As provided under Republic Act 8182 or the ODA Act of 1996, the ODA loan is supports/PAGE 8

Gov’ts urged to invest in making countries resilient to disasters By BONG D. FABE Correspondent

ASIAN and Pacific governments, including the Philippines, and their development partners have been urged to adopt a coordinated approach to disaster resilience especially since disaster losses are increasing more quickly in Asia than in other regions. The Asian Development Bank (ADB), in its 188-page

report Investing in Resilience: Ensuring a Disaster-Resistant Future, urged governments to strengthen disaster resilience. It also encouraged them to offer disaster risk financing instruments such as calamity funds, tax credits and catastrophe bonds. The report, released on January 31, 2013, stressed that risk financing is key to invest/PAGE 10

J.P. RIZAL - CRUZ TAAL STS., (NEAR SHANGHAI BAKERY) DIVISORIA, CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY

Two innocent-looking young kids in Lantapan, Bukidnon seemed unmindful of what the future hold for them. photo by shaun alejandrae yap - uy

Mrs. Hanepbuhay builds 100 pilot centers for livelihood projects A TOTAL of 100 pilot centers have been established in various provinces across the nation in a bid to duplicate the livelihood centers or green social enterprises initiated in Las Pinas City by former Rep. Cynthia Villar. Villar, who has earned the moniker, “Misis Hanep Buhay,” has successfully provided livelihood to over 500 families in Las Pinas. She noted that livelihood projects in Las Pinas were very successful and sustainable up to now. “So I thought I should share these experiences build/PAGE 8

Editorial and advertising email : businessweekmindanao@gmail.com • Cell Number : 0917-7121424 • 0947-8935776


2

Monday - Tuesday I Feb. 11-12, 2013

Economy

BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

Unpopular yet Vital:

The AgKod and the Aglay/Adlai of the Higaonons By ANNALYN BAUTISTA-ALENTON

HISTORICALLY, IP’s who have sad experiences in having been given less priority in the development process and technological advancements, being culturally scorned and prejudged as “ignorant,” and has “no technical know how” have become traumatic experiences for them, making them less participative

to government initiatives. As creatures of habit, totally dependent on the wealth of the natural environment, many IP Communities have been resistant to change. This is primarily because of the discomfort and uncertainty that change, particularly technological and cultural invariably introduce. In today’s environment, however, few can afford to ignore the

need to adapt to an alwayschanging landscape. The dynamics of a global economy, the constant introduction of innovative technologies and the relentless emergence of competitors have contributed to what many are calling a transformation imperative. And many have thought that IP communities are greatly affected because their traditional practices and matured

0917-7154399 088-856-8562/63

AMENITIES : ZORBIT * ATV * TREE TOP ADVENTURE BUGGY * BUNGEE * PICNIC GROUNDS PLAYGROUND * CAFE * LUGE * MINI GOLF ROOM ACCOMODATIONS

indigenous technologies are finally uprooted and replaced by totally strange approaches. In fact many believed that indigenous products and technologies have been replaced and owners of said indigenous knowledge systems are finally gone. But, cognizant of their very rich indigenous culture and practices, the IPs, particularly the Higaonon Tribes had for themselves the preservation and maximization of their local native technologies. One particular producttechnology I had observed as special for this tribe is the production of “Agkod” from Aglay/Adlai. In fact, there have been attempts by an agency that experimented on an a strategy to document and popularize this traditional yet matured community-based technology inorder to gain support for further research and eventually, give particular credit to the Higaonon’s practice of using the Agkod” as a ritual drink. Getting to know Adlai or Aglay People in the lowlands believe that Adlai is a new discovery in the agricultural industry because its potentials have just been discovered through research and experiments by the academic community. According to MASIPAG Mindanao, there are two major species of Adlai/Aglay, the 1) Coix

lacryma-jobi var.lacrymajobi and 2) lacryma-jobi var. ma-yuen. Accordingly, the first one is being utilized as beads and is usually subsists in swamps and other waterlogged areas, while the latter is the one harvested as a cereal food by the natives. At first, many had thought that utilizing Aglay/Adlai are just part of Higaonon’s lifestyles brought about by ‘have-lessness’ which pushed them to just settle in for a particular unpopular traditional plant rather than corn and rice of the lowlanders. But, much to our expectations, these Higaonons are in fact more advanced than us lowlanders in getting personal knowledge of an alternative source of food to do away with food insecurities. Because recent research results of MASIPAG Mindnao , Adlai/Aglay: Is more nutritious than rice and corn, for it is high in protein and also contains calcium, phosphorus, iron, Vitamin A, thiamine, ribof lavin and niacin helps enhance/increase food biodiversity is tolerant to pest and diseases can ratoon, hence minimal cost of production. It only requires a single land preparation and planting but you can harvest 3-5 times, and there is no need for irrigation. It is resilient to drought and flood. One round of weeding is enough and does not

require chemical synthetic fertilizer application is a low input-requiring crop tastes like the regular rice produced by the majority of the farmers. In an article found in BAR Chronicle Vol.11 No. 7, Adlai is used as a cereal in the same way as rice in other parts of Asia. In fact, it is also used in soups ad broths as in Southern Vietnam where Adlai is the main ingredient of its sweet and cold soup. Recent experiments on the usefulness of Adlai revealed that tonic drinks like beers and wines can be made from fermented grains of Adlai. In Japan, aged vinegar is produced in Korea, a thick drink aptly called Yulmu cha is made from powdered adlai and another liquor is produced from a combination of Adlai and the regular rice called orkujo. Its advantages continue on into herbal medicine as Adlai is said to be a folk remedy for a wide range of ailments. For the Higaonons, however, these technologies are not new to them. For generations, Adlai has been their special staple food and as a major raw material for a tonic and medicinal drink called “Agkod”. But, just what is “Agkod”? According to Datu Mampahaluna, a Higaonon Tribal Chieftain of the Higaonon Tribe in Misamis Oriental, higaonons/PAGE 4

DA’s Sikat Saka expands KORONADAL City -- Rice growers in South Cotabato and Sultan Kudarat provinces can now avail of the loan assistance from the Department of Agriculture under the “Sikat Saka” program. DA 12 regional executive director Amalia JayagDatukan said both provinces in Soccsksargen Region were included in the expansion of

the program as these were among t he top 20 riceproducing provinces in the country in 2011. Agriculture secretary Proceso Alcala last year launched the loan window in four provinces, namely: North Cotabato, Nueva Ecija, Iloilo and Isabela. Some P400 million was allotted for the program’s

initial offering. Under the program, rice farmers are granted loans amounting to P42,000 per hectare per cropping of hybrid rice and P37,000 per hectare per cropping of inbred rice. Datukan said, the expansion of the project is good news to farmers in both provinces because they too would be able to avail of the benefits that farmers in North Cotabato received last year. Romeo Declarador, a rice grower in Tulunan town of said province, in September earned a net of P102,000 from his 1.5 hectare rice field after a single cropping season from a P50,000-grant he received from DA. Declador was among the first beneficiaries of Sikat Saka. Director Datukan urged farmers in Sultan Kudarat and South Cotabato to take advantage of the opportunity. With this loan assistance from Sikat Saka, she said, farm operations would be easier because farmers are provided with funds that they may use for the farming requirements. She added, the loan assistance program, which DA implements with the LandBank of the Philippines is an expands/PAGE 8


BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

Motoring

Monday - Tuesday I Feb. 11-12, 2013

www.businessweekmindanao.com

KIA Motors Corp., South Korea’s second-largest automaker, said Friday that it has unveiled a concept car of its large hybrid crossover vehicle at the Chicago Auto Show as it looks into offering a full-size luxury crossover. The Cross GT -- 8.4 inches longer, 4.9 inches wider and 1.6 inches shorter than Kia’s award-winning Sorento -- features Kia’s signature grille and cuts an imposing figure. “The debut of the GT in 2011 heralded a new frontier for Kia, both from a design and a business perspective,” Peter

Schreyer, Kia Motors Corporation president and global chief of design, said in a statement released by Kia. “It beautifully illustrated to the world that the brand was ready to explore the possibility of perhaps one day offering a full-size rear-drive luxury saloon,” the president said. “The Cross GT, with its raised stance and large cargo area, allows us to envision the GT in the form of a full-size luxury crossover.” The four-door car is powered by an efficient hybrid powertrain that utilizes a state-of-the-art

3

3.8-liter V6 hybrid, 8-speed automatic and torque-vectoring all-wheel-drive, according to the company. It also said the hybrid powertrain looks to reduce the vehicle’s carbon footprint while providing the uncompromising performance that’s expected of a large, luxury crossover. “While strictly a concept powertrain, Kia’s proven hybrid technology, combined with all-wheel drive are thought-provoking ideas that may one day find their way into a production vehicle,” Kia said in the statement.(PNA)


BusinessWeek Billboard Rotary-Nissan partnership drives Golf for a Cause

4

Monday - Tuesday I Feb. 11-12, 2013

THE Rotary Club of Cagayan de Oro (Mother Club) and Nissan Pilipinas have joined forces to ensure the success of “Golf for a Cause” scheduled for February 1417, 2013 at the world-class championship Pueblo de Oro Golf Course in Cagayan de Oro City. “The Rotar y Club of Cagayan de Oro (RC CDO), Rotary Foundation and Nissan are coming together to raise funds for a training center for the Indahag Relocation Site which houses 1,700 households who were displaced by Tropical Storm Sendong,” said Marillo Paa-

no, club president. “With the cooperation of Habitat for Humanity, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), the city government and concerned citizens, the center will provide basic technical skills for both men and women to help them seek employment.” “Nissan Universal Motors Corporation welcomes this opportunity to work alongside the Rotary Club of CDO on this laudable project,” said Honeymae A. Limjap, assistant vice president, marketing and sales, Universal Motors Cor-

M I N DA N A O

poration. “Together with our local partner Nissan Cagayan de Oro, we find it a worthy endeavor to invest in the future of the Sendong victims through the training center.” Carlos Gorospe, past president and project chair, said they are inviting fellow Rotarians and golfers from all over the region to enjoy the tournament and help do their bit in helping the Sendong victims. “We will be giving away a brand new Nissan Navarra pick-up courtesy of Nissan Universal Motors Corporation to the first hole-in-one

winner,” said PP Gorospe. “We will also give away P100, 000 to other hole-in-one winners in three par 3 holes.” Other prizes/awards await participants with the lowest gross and lowest net (36 holes); Class Champions and Runners-ups for Class A, B, C and D (18 holes) as well as to the Ladies Champions. Reg ist rat ion is on ly P1,500 for two-days play with prizes awaiting the first 50 registrants and tokens for the first 250. Other major sponsors for Golf for a Cause include Rep. Peter M. Unabia (1st District, Misamis Oriental),

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

Opol Bgy. Capt. Max Seno, MAA General Assurance Phils., Inc., Pioneer Insurance & Surety Corporation and Stronghold Insurance Co. Inc. Hole Sponsors include the following: We-Fix Construction/Casa Isabella, Kingston Lodge, Vertical Builders, Mocha Trucking/Triland Management, TThS Golf Group, Kim In Su Enterprise, Hosanna Academy, Puerto Community Hospital, PDG Tinnex & PP Devin Jaraula, Suvisco Industries Inc., Barangay Nazareth, Galam Music Lounge, WMC Cold Storage, Oroport Cargo Handling Services Inc., First Gusa Caltex, Shabu-way Hot Pot Cuisine, DBP Northern Mindanao, DBP Northeastern Mindanao, King’s Cross Development Corp., Boysen Pacific Paints, DML Trucking, Maxandrea Hotel/8’s Hightime, UCPB Cogon Branch, UCPB Velez Branch, Virginia Food Inc., Champs, La Ilongga-Ororama, Colgate-Palmolive Phils. Inc.,

Pelican Industrial Sales, PE Ferdie & Ja Bernasor, Llanillo - Romero Optical Clinic, Triple Jr, Fours Agritrade Inc., Alegria Hills, Clarenzon Marketing, Messrs. Ed Gulle & Benjie Calo, Engine Pro Motor Corp. & Denvi and Lito Cabrera, Sterling Savings Bank & Midway White Beach Resort/Minkay Restobar, Leonardo-Vicente Associates & Consolidated Bldg. Maintenance, Inc., Rep. Maximo B. Rodriguez, Jr., Paceman Multi-Purpose Cooperative and San Miguel Corporation. The organizers also wish to acknowledge the assistance received from the following: Star-Ads, Ultra Craft, Modtrade, Seda Hotel, Redbrick, Crocs, Nature’s Spring, Parasat Cable TV and Pryce Plaza. BusinessWeek Mindanao, Mindanao Daily News, Mindanao Star, The Cagayan de Oro Times and BWM Magazine are the exclusive print media partners for the tournament.

By Recthie T. Paculba

supported the Agency such as the 52nd Engineer Brigade under the leadership of Colonel Mutiangpili. That Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman was adopted by the local government unit of Cagayan de Oro as daughter of the city in recognition of her leadership during the relief, early recovery, and rehabilitation operations is considered part of the accomplishment of DSWD. “The growing number of program and project beneficiaries of our core antipoverty programs, like the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (Kalahi-Cidss), Sustainable Livelihood Program, and other social protection programs shows that the DSWD is shifting towards realizing its vision as a lead role in social welfare and development at an international setting,” Solamillo said. During the culmination night, recognition and testimonies were given to the Agency’s retirees, and loyal employees received special awards. The winners of the Department’s sports festival among the employees were also announced that night. (RTP-PIA10)

DSWD-10 highlights solidarity in 62nd Anniv

THE Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Field Office 10 celebrated its 62nd anniversary, with the theme “Sama-samang Husay, Tungo sa Tagumpay,” by recognizing their partner agencies which greatly helped in the proper implementation of social welfare projects and have provided support during the past calamities that hit the region. In their culmination night held at Pearlmont Inn on February 1, Atty. Araceli F. Solamillo, DSWD-10 regional director, shared that, “DSWD has advanced its vision of a society where Filipino individuals, families and communities are empowered to attain an improved quality of life such that the Department becomes the world standard in the delivery of coordinated services and social protection programs by 2030.” She also expressed her utmost appreciation to their partner agencies and dedicated staff who worked hard especially during the onslaught of tropical storm Sendong. For their core shelter project, Solamillo reported that the Department has already built 2,357 core shelter units as of January 25, 2013 with the aid of various offices that

Higaonons... from page 2

the “Agkod” is a native tonic drink of the Higa-onon tribe and used during special ceremonies and events. It is primarily made from the fermentation of Aglay or Adlai (native cereal) and Tapay. The Tapay is a dried mixture of ginger and rice, pulverized, and mixed with cooked Aglay/Adlai then, wrapped in banana leaves for 3-4 nights before it is placed in a jar for aging. The natives believe that drinking Agkod can do well to the body and mind making them physically agile and mentally alert and sharp. That is the reason why this drink is especially used during rituals and considered as a tonic

drink for the Datus and the Tribal Leaders. The once thought to be new discoveries, the Adlai/Aglay are naturally grown in the fertile lands of the IPs. In fact, these traditional rice just grow anywhere in their forestall lands and are thought to be gifts from the Mambabaya (the Creator). Now, this crop is massively promoted as an alternative to commercially grown rice with all its advantages inorder to discourage rice importation. The tonic drink “Agkod” has been documented as a mature indigenous technology by the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority and has been promoted for wide acceptance and production as a livelihood activity.


BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

Monday - Tuesday I Feb. 11-12, 2013

5


6

Monday-Tuesday I Feb. 11-12, 2013

Opinion

BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

The BusinessWeek Mindanao is published by BusinessWeek Mindanao Advertising and Promotions every Monday, Wednesday and Friday of the week with office address at Tanleh Building, Abellanosa, Cagayan de Oro City. It is registered with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), Region 10 with Certificate No. 00875701, and with Business Permit No. 2010-5698, TIN No. 946-396-807 – Non VAT. Tel. Nos.: (088)8578447, 74-5380, 0923-432-0687, 0917-7121424

Website: www.businessweekmindanao.com

E-mail : businessweekmindanao@gmail.com DANTE M. SUDARIA Publisher ROSE MARY D. SUDARIA Manager

allan mediante

NELSON CONSTANTINO Editor-in-Chief Dolly pelone Advertising

executive Editor

cheng ordoñez

executive Editor FELIX SANTILLAN RONALD B. MASTAIL Layout Artists RIZA O. ARES LIEZL A. DELOSO JOE PALABAO Rene Michael BaÑos

JOE DEL PUERTO FELICILDA Uriel C. Quilinguing Editorial Consultants ATTY. MARIO T. JUNI atty. roberto a. cantago jr. Legal Counsels Member: -Philippine Press Institute

Marketing Consultants

-Cagayan de Oro Chamber of Commerce and Industry Foundation, Inc. (Oro Chamber) -Misamis Oriental - Cagayan de Oro Association of Publishers (MOCAP), Inc.

An Upset Tummy? Who hasn’t had it.... An upset tummy is something that most of us, if not all, would rather not have and experience. Given a choice between a severe headache and that of an irritable bowel, I would choose the former ailment. Nobody is above this and it happens when it happens. Irritable bowel disease or syndrome is also known as spastic colitis. The colon in these instances is overly responsive and hypersensitive to certain stimuli or triggers, that can range from stress to food or beverages, even to one’s mental or psychological state. Thus, it is not uncommon to hear patients during the medical history taking that, they experience the disease when their emotional state is in disarray: when one is anxious or is in a panic state, depressed or having that post traumatic stress disorder( PTSD ). Any stressful event can actually upset that tummy, with even the very thought of taking that interview or examination. Although the exact reason why the bowel or gastrointestinal tract becomes irritable is as yet indefinite, researchers believe that it is caused by a combination of physical and mental health problems. Our colon is well enervated, meaning it has nerves that connect to the brain. These nerves control the normal contractions of the colon, and people going through a psychological or mental problem puts their

Health in Focus

Going through hot water THINK a minute… “A tea bag isn’t worth much until it’s been through some hot water.” There’s a saying in boxing: “Everybody’s got a plan—until they’ve been hit!” Sooner or later, life is going to hit and knock you down. Whether you get back up or not is your choice. Almost all people’s successes are built on their former failures. A very successful man was asked if he had ever failed. He answered: “Only in life.” The fact is, even after we’ve been knocked down we can still use our past mistakes and failures to build a bridge to our success.

You know that you’re the only one who can kill your dream by quitting. Remember that just falling in the water is not what drowns you; it’s staying down there that does. Just like kites fly high because the wind pushes against them, so problems that oppose you can actually help you succeed, if you choose to believe and use them that way. There was a man who was the only survivor from a shipwreck. He drifted to an uninhabited island where he built a hut for his shelter. One evening after he returned from searching for food, he found his little

hut on fire. Early the next morning he awoke to find a ship that had come in during the night. When the captain came on shore he told the man: “We saw your smoke signal so we came to rescue you.” Everything this man owned and valued in his hut had to be destroyed before he could be saved. Sometimes our Maker even uses our pain to get our attention, so we can learn our most important lessons for living well and wisely. So why not ask Jesus Christ to take charge and lead you through the hot water you’re in now? He’s

colon into a hypersensitive mode for pain, and cause abdominal discomfort. Irritable Bowel disease is said to affect approximately 3 to 20% of the population, worldwide, and though it is more common among women and those under the age of 45, it doesn’t mean that men and us in the above the 40’s age group are spared from experiencing it! The diagnosis is mostly dependent on the medical history: abdominal pain or discomfort that occurs at least 3 times per month for the past 3 months , in the absence of other diseases or injury, and accompanied by changes in the bowel movement and the consistency of the stools ( which may range from loose to firm ). In other words, it may vary from episodes of diarrhea or constipation , and that feeling of bloating . These symptoms usually occur after a meal, regardloreche/PAGE 10

JHAN TIAFAU HURST

the only one who can help you change your pain and problems into peace and prosperity for you and your family. The choice is yours. Just think a minute…

Small Business: Words of Advice (First of two parts) LAST week, I received a special coffee table book entitled, “Small Steps to Success: Celebrating 10 Years of Partnership with Microentrepreneurs.” The book featured 10 microentrepreneurs who have received the “Citi Microentrepreneur of the Year” Award since the program was conceived 10 years ago. “Their compelling stories lend a face to our philanthropic investment in the field of microfinance and microenterprise development,” said Sanjiv Vohra, Citi Country Officer for the Philippines. Vohra added, “From their humble beginnings, these men and women are now shaping the future of their communities.” In this week and next week’s column, allow me to share with you some pearls of wisdom from these amazing

microentrepreneurs: • Jennilyn Antonio, peanut butter entrepreneur Problems are there to make us think. Learn from them. Trials are part of life. Also learn from them. Always do what is pleasing to the Lord, who gives you strength and guides you on the right path. If you borrow money, do everything you can to pay it back. Never forget the people who helped you succeed, especially those who trusted you with their money. • Corazon Bautista, RTW (ready-to-wear) businesswoman Have a budget for your daily needs. Use any business loan solely for the business. Do not mix personal and business funds in order to keep track of how the busi-

ness is going. Give opportunities to others. Maintain a good relationship with your workers. •Dionesia dela Peña, suman entrepreneur Be nice in your dealings with everyone. Help the jobless by hiring them. Do not skimp on ingredients. Never mess with the taste that your customers like. • Orlando Dulay, buko pie businessman Learn as much as you can about the business you are getting into. Find out where to source your raw materials. Make sure you always have enough basic supplies. Know your target market. Study your product’s marketability. Respect your workers’ rights.

Reaching God DR. MARY JEAN LORECHE

Think a minute

Though we don’t hear it nor speak about it often, the reality of fools obviously continues to take place today and, in fact, in a more rampant albeit subtle ways. I suppose it is out of good manners that we refrain from using the word. We actually now employ a lot of euphemisms to refer to the same banana. In a sense, it is good that it be that way. Refraining from using the word in our daily conversations, I imagine, would make for a cleaner and calmer environment. But neither should we forget it, since the reality, sad to say, continues to be around. In fact, the Bible speaks about fools and its variants many, many times, thus, often jarring the sensibilities of the people of today. This is one more reason why the Bible has to be handled with deliberate care, since its language belongs to a different age and to a different culture. But the Bible teaches truths for all times and defines things in their radical and ultimate dimensions. As to what a fool is and what

things fools do, the Bible, especially in the books of Psalms and the Proverbs, has a lot to say. Many times, it defines a fool as anyone who does not believe in God. “The fool says in his heart, there is no God,” Psalm 14,1 says. And Proverbs 1,7 describes something about fools: “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom. Fools despise wisdom and instruction.” And so a long series of descriptions about fools continues all the way to the New Testament. We have the famous parable of the wise and foolish virgins, for example, and passages about how a foolish man who only hears but does not act on the word of God is like a fool who builds his house on sand, without good foundation. The Book of Ecclesiastes sums up the whole thing when it says: “Infinitus est numerus stultorum,” (Infinite is the number of fools), referring not only to the number of fools but also to their ways, since our freedom, which launches us into infinity, can be used

either for good or for evil, distinguishing the wise from the fool. In spite of all these, there is always hope for as long as we are still alive and capable of changing and converting. “Where sin has abounded, grace has abounded even more,” says St. Paul (Rom 5,20). So, there’s no use simply branding people fools and then lamenting about the predicament. What we need to do is to understand why many people still are fools in the biblical sense, and try to do something about it. And the common reason for this is that they do not know how to relate themselves to God. They don’t see him, they cannot touch him, they don’t have any special feelings for him. There is obviously some ignorance and confusion involved here. While it’s true that we don’t see God, nor touch him, we cannot deny that God is everywhere, since he is the very author and the very supporter of everyone’s and everything’s existence. By merely existing, everyone and everything

Speaking out

IGNACIO BUNYE

• Nolie Estocado, Christmas decor entrepreneur Devote a lot of time to your business and do not leave it to others. Find out as much as you can about a new client before accepting a big order from him or her. Talk to your creditors when you are having problems making payments. Treat your workers fairly bunye/PAGE 10

Hints and traces

FR. ROY CIMAGALA

unavoidably reflects God’s eternal existence. Besides, to start relating to him and developing certain feelings for him is a matter of loving. As long as we love, in any way we express our love, we are at least already on the way to reaching God who is love. We just have to make sure that our loving is the right kind of loving. And that ultimately means we need to conform our love to the love of God who revealed and lived it to the full in Christ. Thus, Christ summarized all the commandments of God into the new commandment of love: “Love cimagala/PAGE 10


BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

Monday-Tuesday I Feb. 11-12, 2013

7


8

BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

Monday-Tuesday I Feb. 11-12, 2013

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

Builds...

Republic of the Philippines PROVINCE OF BUKIDNON City of Malaybalay OFFICE OF THE SANGGUNIANG PANLALAWIGAN EXCERPTS FROM THE MINUTES OF THE 2ND REGULAR SESSION OF THE 11TH SANGGUNIANG PANLALAWIGAN, PROVINCE OF BUKIDNON, HELD ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 AT THE SANGGUNIANG PANLALAWIGAN SESSION HALL, MALAYBALAY CITY, BUKIDNON. PRESENT: Hon. JOSE MA. R. ZUBIRI, JR., Provincial Vice Governor/Chairman & Presiding Officer Hon. ALFEO U. BAGUIO, Board Member/Temp. Presiding Officer Hon. JAY S. ALBARECE, Board Member Hon. NEMESIO B. BELTRAN, JR., Board Member/Floor Leader Hon. RENATO C. CENTILLAS, Board Member Hon. MANUEL L. DINLAYAN, Board Member Hon. ROELITO A. GAWILAN, Board Member(Ex-Officio-rep. FABC) Hon. MARIVIC R. MONTESCLAROS, Board Member Hon. RANULFO E. PEPITO, Board Member Hon. MAGDALINO C. PANDIAN, Board Member(Ex-Officio-rep. IPs) Hon. CLIVE D. QUIÑO, Board Member Hon. GORDON M. TORRES, Board Member/Temp. Presiding Officer ABSENT : Hon. ROLAND F. DETICIO, Board Member(Ex-Officio-rep. PCL) -on O.B. Hon. RAIZA ANGELIQUE D. PORMINAL, Board Member (Ex-Officio-rep. SK) -on O.B. ORDINANCE NO. 2013-073R(11TH SP) (2nd Regular Session) AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE PROVISION EMBODIED UNDER R.A. 9640 – AN ACT AMENDING SECTION 140(a) OF R.A. 7160, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS “THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE OF 1991” REDUCING THE RATE OF AMUSEMENT TAX FROM 30% TO 10% THEREBY AMENDING SECTION 28, ARTICLE VI OF THE PROVINCIAL TAX ORDINANCE NO. 92-03 – WHEREAS, the Provincial Government of Bukidnon through its revenue raising power as provided under Section 140(a) of R.A. 7160 had enacted Provincial Tax Ordinance No. 92-03; thereby imposing an amusement tax from the proprietors, lessees, or operators of theaters, cinemas, concert hall, circuses, boxing stadia and other places of amusement at the rate of thirty percent (30%) of gross receipts from admission fees. WHEREAS, recent development in the field of National Legislation, Congress of the Philippines had enacted Republic Act No. 9640 – An Act Amending Section 140(a) of Republic Act No. 7160, otherwise known as the “Local Government Code of 1991” reducing the rate of amusement tax from 30% to 10%; WHEREAS, there is a need for the provincial government to adopt the provision embodied under R.A. 9640 – An act amending Section 140(a) of R.A. 7160, otherwise known as “The Local Government Code of 1991” reducing the rate of amusement tax from 30% to 10%, and ultimately amend Section 28 of Article VI of the Provincial Tax Ordinance No. 92-03 of the Province of Bukidnon; NOW, THEREFORE, on motion of Hon. Jay S. Albarece, and with the unanimous accord of the Members present, assembled in session; BE IT ORDAINED, by the Honorable Sanguniang Panlalawigan of the Province of Bukidnon, this 16th day of January, in the Year of Our Lord, Two Thousand Thirteen, that: SECTION 1 — Title. This Ordinance shall be known as: AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE PROVISION EMBODIED UNDER R.A. 9640 - AN ACT AMENDING SECTION 140(a) OF R.A. 7160, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS “THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE OF 1991” REDUCING THE RATE OF AMUSEMENT TAX FROM 30% TO 10% THEREBY AMENDING SECTION 28, ARTICLE VI OF THE PROVINCIAL TAX ORDINANCE NO. 92-03. SECTION 2 — This Ordinance shall take effect fifteen (15) days after its complete publication in a newspaper of general circulation in the Province of Bukidnon. Approved. ***

***

***

I HEREBY CERTIFY to the correctness of the foregoing ordinance.

BWM: Jan. 30, Feb. 6 & 11 2013

Republic of the Philippines PROVINCE OF BUKIDNON City of Malaybalay OFFICE OF THE SANGGUNIANG PANLALAWIGAN EXCERPTS FROM THE MINUTES OF THE 1ST REGULAR SESSION OF THE 11TH SANGGUNIANG PANLALAWIGAN, PROVINCE OF BUKIDNON, HELD ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 AT THE SANGGUNIANG PANLALAWIGAN SESSION HALL, MALAYBALAY CITY, BUKIDNON. PRESENT: Hon. JOSE MA. R. ZUBIRI, JR., Provincial Vice Governor Hon. ROLAND F. DETICIO, Board Member(Ex-Officio-rep. PCL) /Temp. Presiding Officer Hon. JAY S. ALBARECE, Board Member Hon. ALFEO U. BAGUIO, Board Member Hon. NEMESIO B. BELTRAN, JR. Board Member/Floor Leader Hon. RENATO C. CENTILLAS, Board Member Hon. MANUEL L. DINLAYAN, Board Member Hon. MARIVIC R. MONTESCLAROS, Board Member Hon. RANULFO E. PEPITO, Board Member Hon. RAIZA ANGELIQUE D. PORMINAL, Board Member (Ex-Officio-rep. SK) -on O.B. Hon. MAGDALINO C. PANDIAN, Board Member(Ex-Officio-rep. IPs) Hon. GORDON M. TORRES, Board Member ABSENT : Hon. ROELITO A. GAWILAN, Board Member(Ex-Officio-rep. FABC) Hon. CLIVE D. QUIÑO, Board Member ORDINANCE NO. 2013-072R(11TH SP) (1st Regular Session) AN ORDINANCE MANDATING THE STRICT IMPLEMENTATION OF DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND RISK REDUCTION MEASURES AS REQUIRED BY RA 10121 IN THE FLOOD AND LANDSLIDE HIGH RISK AREAS IN THE PROVINCE AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES Introduced by: Hon. Jay S. Albarece Board Member-1st District Province of Bukidnon

EXPLANATORY NOTE It is the policy of the State to uphold the people’s constitutional rights to life and property by addressing the root causes of vulnerabilities to disasters, strengthening the country’s institutional capacity for disaster risk reduction and management and building the resilience of local communities to disasters including climate change impacts. Along this policy, local government units are expected to develop, promote and implement their own local risk reduction and management plans that will strengthen their capacity, together with partner stakeholders, to institutionalize arrangements and measures for reducing disaster risks including projected climate risks and enhancing disaster preparedness and response capabilities. Towards this aim, the 10th SP passed resolutions requesting the Mines and Geosciences Bureau, Regional Office 10, to furnish this Body with a geo-hazard map to aid in the crafting of disaster preparedness and response measures for the most vulnerable in the province. With the posting of the list of landslide and flood high risk areas in the province by the bureau in its website, even without the official copy of the requested official geo-hazard mapping, it is imperative for this Body to now pass measures aimed at pressuring the officers and officials of local government units in the province to perform their duties and responsibilities in the protection of their constituents in the identified high risk communities from calamities and disasters.

from page 1 with other communities all over the country,” said Villar who served as congresswoman for nine years. In joining the senatorial bandwagon in the May elections, Villar says she would have a better chance of pushing through with her livelihood projects. “I thought this will be my opportunity to expand the reach of my livelihood projects. I want to make a lot of difference in people’s lives,” said Villar. “Because the Philippines has 1,600 cities, we still have a long way to go,” said Villar who feels that having a job is a solution to most of the problems. With her livelihood projects, Villar wants to provide jobs even to those who failed to finish elementary schooling. “There should be a balance wherein all will be afforded the opportunity to have a decent job and earn a living,” she said. She noted that under the present condition, employers require that even factory workers should be high school graduates. “So how about those who are not even elementary graduates?” asked Villar who recently established the Villar Social Institute for Poverty Alleviation and Governance or SIPAG to serve as center of all her efforts and endeavors in reducing poverty in the country. Villar’s livelihood programs include waterlily products making, establishment of composting facility and coconet factory, and blanket weaving. She has also started plastic pulverizing in Leyte. Through the efforts of Villar, training for waterlily products making had been conducted in

the cities of Las Pinas, Makati, Quezon, Caloocan, Taguig and Pasig; Malabon; Taytay; Rizal; Bulihan, Silang and Bacoor, Cavite; Talusig, Ifugao; Sta. Rosa, San Pedro and San Pablo, Laguna; Libon, Albay; Malolos, Calumpit and Meycauayan, Bulacan; Talavera, Gen. Natividad, Cabiao, Cuyapo, San Jose and Cabanatuan, Nueva Ecija; Baras, Rizal; Basista and Sta. Barbara, Pangasinan; Zambales; Laoag, Ilocos Norte; Tuguegarao, Cagayan; Isabela; Vigan, Ilocos Sur; Mindoro; Davao City; Agusan del Sur, Cotabato City; North Cotabato; South Cotabato; Lanao del Sur and Lanao del Norte; Sultan Kudarat; Butuan City; and Pendatum, Maguindanao. Composting was done in Las Pinas City; Brgy. Loyola, Quezon City; Antipolo City, Rizal; San Manuel, Isabela; San Jose del Monte, Provence and Malolos, Bulacan; Balanga, Bataan; Plantacion, Batangas; Tierra Nevada, Gen. Trias and Bacoor, Cavite; Antique; Talisay City, Cebu; Oton and Alimodian Iloilo; Gen. Santos City; Davao City and Antipas, North Cotabato. Coconet weaving factory was established in Balanga, Bataan: Vigan, Ilocos Sur; Dinagat Island; Iligan City and Iligan City. Blanket weaving is now in Pampanga; Caranglan, Nueva Ecija; Sta. Barbara, Pangasinan; Libon, Albay and Sto. Tomas, Davao del Norte.

Supports...

from page 1 is granted to the Philippines to “promote sustainable social and economic development and welfare.” “The purpose of the Forum is to let the bilateral partners know the priorities and directions the government is pursuing,” Budget Secretary Florencio Abad said.

Instead of our development partners going their own ways, Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Soliman said, “there is a more cohesive approach to our partnership in the next three years.” –PIA with wire reports

Expands...

from page 2 initiative in accordance with the objectives of Food Staples Sufficiency Program (FSSP) of the national government. Implementation of said program is being assisted by the following agencies: Agricultural Credit Policy Council (ACPC), National Irrigation Administration (NIA), National Food Authority (NFA), Agricultural Training Institute (ATI), National Agri-Business Corporation (NABCOR), and Philippine Crop Insurance Corporation (PCIC). ACPC takes provides for additional funds for the program and conduct of evaluation of the program. NIA seeks for and endorses irrigators’ associations that may be employed as credit consolidators or conduits. NFA and NABCOR will ensure sure market for the palay produced by the program beneficiaries. Training of loan recipients on financial and management credits is the responsibility of the ATI; this is intended to guide farmers in the proper use of the loan proceeds. PCIC provides for the crop insurance guarantee. Those interested to avail of the loan or have inquiries regarding Sikat Saka program may ask information from their irrigators’ associations or the nearest LBP branch as well as offices NFA and NIA in their area.

waters of Bubunawan River, Baungon Headwater sections of Mangima River; upslope of Guilang-Guilang area; and along Dalirig- Maluko section of Sayre Highway, all within the Municipality of Manolo Fortich

Moderate-High

Within the middle to upper sections of Kalatungan Mountains, Pangantucan; and steep portions of the hillslope northeast of Kalilangan and at Barangay Kuya, Maramag

Moderate-High

Within the east-bank of Pulangi River from Dangcagan-Kibawe-Damulog area; and along the Omonay road section, Kibawe

Moderate-High

Parts of Musuan Peak; headwaters of Lumba Creek; midslopes in-between headwaters of Hindangon and Pangalihantukan Creeks; Steep slopes west and east of Malaybalay and Valencia cities, and the towns of Cabanglasan and San Fernando; and parts of the Bukidnon-Davao road section.

Moderate-High

WHEREAS, Republic Act 10121 requires, in Section 11 thereof, all local government units to have a Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council with the following functions: (1) Approved, monitor and evaluate the implementation of the LDRRMPs and regularly review and test the plan consistent with other national and local planning programs; (2) Ensure the integration of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation into local development plans, programs and budgets as a strategy in sustainable development and poverty reduction; (3) Recommend the implementation of forced or pre-emptive evacuation of local residents, if necessary; and (4) Convene the local council once every three (3) months or as necessary. WHEREAS, Republic Act 10121 further requires, in Section 12 thereof, that local government unit shall have a Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (or Committee for barangays) which shall be responsible for setting the direction, development, implementation and coordination of disaster risk management programs within their territorial jurisdiction. NOW, THEREFORE, on motion of Hon. Jay S. Albarece, and with the unanimous accord of the Members present, assembled in session, be it: BE IT ORDAINED, by the Honorable Sanguniang Panlalawigan of the Province of Bukidnon, this 9th day of January, in the Year of Our Lord, Two Thousand Thirteen, that: SECTION 1 – Title. This Ordinance shall be known as: AN ORDINANCE MANDATING THE STRICT IMPLEMENTATION OF DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND RISK REDUCTION MEASURES AS REQUIRED BY RA 10121 IN THE FLOOD AND LANDSLIDE HIGH RISK AREAS IN THE PROVINCE AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. SECTION 2 – All municipalities and barangays with areas heretofore identified by the Mines and Geosciences Bureau as flood or landslide prone or high risk areas are hereby required to strictly comply with Republic Act 10121, specially Sections 10 and 11 thereof. SECTION 3 – Dereliction of duty by local government officials or officers of such kind that is not covered by Section 10 of the said law shall be penalized by a fine of P1,000.00 for the 1st Offense, P2,000.00 for the 2nd Offense; and P3,000.00 for the 3rd Offense. SECTION 4 – This Ordinance shall be published in a newspaper with general circulation in the province of Bukidnon. Approved. ***

***

***

I HEREBY CERTIFY to the correctness of the foregoing resolution-ordinance.

WHEREAS, the Mines and Geosciences Bureau of the DENR has published the following list of flood and landslide prone areas in the province of Bukidnon: IDENTIFIED FLOOD-PRONE AND/OR AFFECTED AREAS IN THE PROVINCE OF BUKIDNON RIVER SYSTEM/ FLOOD PRONE AND/OR AFFECTED AREAS CREEKS/ESTUARY Maridugao River Barangays located near riverbanks in the Municipalities of Kalilangan, Pangantucan and Kadingilan Malitbog River Barangays located near riverbanks/flood prone and Barangay Sta. Ines, Malitbog Manupali River Low-lying barangays located near riverbanks within the junction with the main Pulangi River (Valencia City) Muleta River Barangays located near riverbanks of Bangbang, Oata, Lantay and Bagic-ican within the municipalities of Pangantucan and Maramag Pulangi River Low-lying barangays located near riverbanks within the municipalities of San Fernando, Maramag, Quezon, Don Carlos, Kitaotao, Dangcagan, Kibawe, Damulog, and Valencia City IDENTIFIED LANDSLIDE-PRONE AREAS IN THE PROVINCE OF BUKIDNON AFFECTED AREAS DEGREE OF SUSCEPTIBILITY Steep slopes within the headwater sections of Tagiti and Calawaig Rivers, upslope of Moderate-High Ticalaan Plain, Talakag and within the head-

EMD: lbe/’12

BWM: Jan. 30, Feb. 6 & 11 2013


BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

Classified Ads

for R

ENT

088-855-1945 0918-979-3130 0922-865-9063

ADDRESS: 003 Guijo Street Baloy Cagayan de Oro City MDN: Aug 17, 2012-Feb 17, 2013

Monday-Tuesday I-Feb. 11-12, 2013

FOR RENT

EMAIL ADDRESS: andy_jabao@yahoo.com

9

CASA AZZURRI OFFICE SPACE (2nd Floor) Contact Nos.:

857 3995 / 09177009435

A. Velez St. Fronting Eastwest Bank Velez MDN: DEC. 17, 2012-JAN. 17, 2013

KIMBERLITE PAWNSHOP KIMBERLITE PAWNSHOP

Kimberlite Pawnshop will be having its monthly AUCTION SALE with corresponding expiry dates. All items will be sold to public auction at KIMBERLITE PAWNSHOP on the following dates and venues.

MALAYBALAY BRANCH EXPIRY DATE

ADDRESS

Contact no.:

309-5276

HERMILINO VILLALON

TAGUM MAIN

AUCTION MONTH 2012

TAGUM

BRANCH 1

BRANCH 2

MALAYBALAY

Kimberlite Pawnshop will be having an AUCTION SALE on all items that expired on December 2012 Door 1 Misa Bldg., Pioneer Ave., Misa District, Magugpo West, Tagum City

PANABO BRANCH 1

Lot 8 Blk 22 Cor. Mabitad-Quirino Sts., Panabo City, Davao del Norte Tel. No. (084) 628-8165

PANABO BRANCH 2

Blk 10 Stall 7, Panabo Central Market Panabo City, Davao del Norte Tel. No. (084) 628-8529

MALAYBALAY BRANCH

Estrada Bldg., Fortich-Don Carlos Sts., Malaybalay, Bukidnon

November 2011

JANUARY

19

12

26

17

December 2011

FEBRUARY

21

14

28

16

MARCH

20

13

29

15

APRIL

19

12

26

17

MAY

22

15

29

17

April 2012

JUNE

21

14

26

19

May 2012

JULY

24

12

26

19

June 2012

AUGUST

21

14

28

16

SEPTEMBER

20

13

27

18

OCTOBER

18

12

25

16

September 2012

NOVEMBER

20

15

27

20

October 2012

DECEMBER

11

18

18

13

January 2012

February 2012 March 2012

July 2012

August 2012

AUCTION DATE: febrUARY 21, 2013 Estrada Bldg., Fortich-Don Carlos Sts., Malaybalay City, Bukidnon

FOR YOUR ADVERTISEMENTS PLACEMENTS CONTACT

Pryce Plaza Hotel Carmen Hill, CDO, Tel. No.722791 to93/858-4537 E-mail:reservations@pryceplaza.ph

---------------------------------

The Marigold Hotel Velez cor. Luna Sts, CDO Tel Nos. 856-4320, 856-2050, 726937 E-mail: info@marigoldhotel.net

---------------------------------

CHANANTHON BED & BREAKFAST CM Recto Avenue, Cagayan de Oro City Tel. #: 856-81-89 / 309-3095 / 231-2103 Email ad : chananthonbb@yahoo.com Room @ P800.00

---------------------------------

NEW DAWN PENSIONNE Velez-Macahambus Sts, CDO Tel Nos. 8571776, 721776 email : gchreservation@yahoo.com


10

Invest... from page 1

BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

Monday-Tuesday I Feb. 11-12, 2013

to building resilience or “the ability of countries, communities, businesses, and individual households to resist, absorb, recover from, and reorganize in response to natural hazard events, without jeopardizing their sustained socioeconomic advancement and development.” But this should be incorporated within an integrated disaster risk management framework that includes, among others, climate change adaptation. Bindu Lohani, ADB’s vice president for Knowledge Management and Sustainable Development said in a video interview in the bank’s website (http://www.adb.org/news/ videos/why-asia-and-pacific-needdisaster-risk-financing) that in Asia and the Pacific, only about 5 percent of losses to natural disasters are insured whereas “in developed countries, about 40% of the losses there are insured or reinsured.” The report noted that most

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

Asian countries have disaster handling capabilities, but few have adequate provisions for financing post-disaster losses and rehabilitation, which is badly needed because disaster losses are expanding at a faster rate in Asia due to environmental degradation, climate change, demographic pressures, and widespread failure to consider disaster risk in designing and locating many critical development investments. “With the kind of natural disasters we are expecting in Asia, we need to be a little bit serious; the governments need to start making a plan on it, they need to make is as part of their development both as individual development as well as a long term plan,” Lohani said. He added that natural disasters are eroding Asia’s economic gains, which often hit the poorest hardest such as the Philippines, whose annual losses to natural disasters are estimated at US$1.6 million or a loss of 0.8% to the country’s gross domestic product (GDP). He pointed out that in a span of 40 years, from 1970 to 2010, 1.7 million natural disaster-related deaths were recorded in Asia, accounting for 51% of the global total. “Another thing that is very striking is that the losses over a period of time [are] increasing. And if you compare the losses due to natural disasters with the GDP increase, the losses seem to be more rapidly increasing than the growth of the GDP; this is scary,” he said.

“As the global region most vulnerable to climate change, we no longer have a choice but to focus on disaster risk management,” he added. The Investing in Resilience: Ensuring a Disaster-Resistant Future report stressed that natural disasters are threats to sustainable economic growth while noting that Asia and the Pacific has achieved considerable growth over the past four decades, “expanding by an average of 6.3% per year in real terms in the 1970s, 7.3% in the 1980s, 6.7% in the 1990s, and 7.4% in the first decade of the 21st century.” “Asia and the Pacific have made considerable gains in poverty reduction and progress toward the achievement of a number of the Millennium Development Goals, including reducing the number of people living on less than US$1.25 (purchasing power parity) per day. However, these gains may not be sustained in hazard-prone areas unless resilience to natural hazard events is considerably strengthened for the poor and near-poor,” it said. According to the report, successful investment in resilience embodies principles of integrated disaster risk management (IDRM), entailing a systematic set of activities that collectively aims to avoid, lessen, or transfer the potential adverse effects of all hazards, specifically through the integration of climate change adaptation (CCA), disaster risk reduction (DRR), disaster preparedness, post-disaster relief, early recovery, reconstruction, and disaster risk financing (DRF) goals under a single framework. The report also pointed out that “solutions to DRR already

exist, but they are not being applied sufficiently” because of one essential missing ingredient — vision. “A vision will help bring the knowledge and practice gaps into alignment and provide greater likelihood of appropriate action.” However, the report stressed that even if vision is present, if countries and their development partners “continue to regard investment in resilience and investment in development as two separate issues, disaster risk will continue to accumulate and losses to expand, threatening long-term inclusive, sustainable growth in the region.” Thus, investments for a natural disaster resilient future “should be undertaken within the context of a broader development framework, regarding strengthened resilience as an integral part of development goals, approaches, and individual initiatives.” ADB said in the report that the five key sectors that government and its partners should invest in to have a disaster resilient future are (1) livelihoods, where investment in resilience of the poor and near-poor can lead directly to poverty reduction; (2) land use planning, where the integration of disaster risk considerations into the existing process represents a fundamental first step in strengthening resilience; (3) transport, as the siTting and satisfactory functioning of such infrastructure plays a central role in determining the location and continuing productivity of many other development investments; (4) education, where investment in resilience translates into a direct transgenerational investment in the future of a country; and (5) housing, a centerpiece of social fabric and human security.

Cimagala..

be a matter of loving others the way Christ loves all of us. We need to be clear about this doctrine and do everything to live it. It is very doable. We obviously need the grace of God for this, but insofar as we are concerned, we can do it. We just have to stir ourselves everyday to feel that love, making use of some plans, devices or gimmicks to put us into the system. But we can truly reach God here and now!

Loreche..

the discomfort. Foods known to irritate the bowels include those foods that contain high amounts of fat, or those that contain artificial sweeteners, milk products , alcohol and caffeine. Instead of gulping down one’s food and dumping in so much and too much, it is most helpful too, to take it slow and easy, and eating small amounts and chewing them well, in a healthy environment. Simply put, meal times should be happy times. In the times that we live in, it is so easy to forget that, eating and the meals that we have, be treated with respect and gusto..... it is not just the kind of food that we feed our bodies that matters to become healthy, but, the mental status at the time of eating, can and do matter as much....

Bunye..

Note: My book “Central Banking for Every Juan and Maria” is now available at the following Fully Booked outlets: Bonifacio Global City, Rockwell and Katipunan Avenue. You may e-mail us at totingbunye2000@gmail.com.

from page 6 other as I have loved you.” Christ makes himself the standard of our love that necessarily has t wo inseparable objects: love of God and love of neighbor. Loving God and thereby reaching him and being with him is actually not difficult and much less, impossible to do, since loving God can simply from page 6 less of whether its lunch or dinner or breakfast. The good news for this type of illness is: it leaves no permanent damage to one’s gastrointestinal tract , thus, it is not likely to predispose one to the Big C of the colon. The bad side though, is that, there is no cure to IBS. Treatment includes lifestyle changes. Since one’s mental and emotional status has a role to play in its occurrence, keeping a more upbeat and optimistic attitude will help minimize the episodes. Having a good knowledge of the food triggers and avoiding them is another way of avoiding that unhappy and difficult moment of having to experience from page 6 and honestly. Believe in yourself and do not allow others to rule your destiny. (To be continued next week)

Republic of the Philippines Province of Zamboanga del Sur Municipality of Tukuran Office of the Local Civil Registrar R.A. 9048/10172 Form no. 10.1 (LCRO) Notice for Publication In compliance with section 7 of R.A. no. 10172, a notice is hereby served to the public that JONEL BALANSAG VALLE has filed with this office a petition for correction of clerical error particularly in his gender from FEMALE to MALE in the certificate of live birth JONEL BALANSAG VALLE who was born on November 21, 1993 at Tukuran Zamboanga del Sur in whose parents are CRISPIN VALE and ADELAIDA BALANSAG. Any person adversely a affected by said petition may file his written opposition with this office not later than February 4, 2013 (Sgd) GINALYN D. ACUÑA City/Municipality Civil Registrar BWM: Feb. 4 & 11, 2013


BusinessWeek M I N DA N A O

YOUR LOCAL ONLINE BUSINESS PAPER

www.businessweekmindanao.com

Monday-Tuesday I Feb. 11-12, 2013

11


COMING SOON!

“ We never stop moving to serve you... This time, we joined forces to serve you more!”

Friday, March 8, 2013, 9-10:30 am and every Friday thereafter

BusinessWeek Mindanao

NEWSCON at the BWM MEDIA CENTER Tanleh Bldg., Abellanosa St., Consolacion, 9000 Cagayan de Oro City

being brought to you by :

PROVIDING our dear readers with a weekly news conference that tackles different issues in Northern Mindanao and elsewhere with a program that is inquisitive, upbeat and intervening about a variety of topics of vital importantance to kagay-anons and the rest. BusinessWeek Mindanao NewsCon is an hour-and-a-half long program with recurring and unique feature segments. It comes to fore with special media coverage, primarily by the four major newspapers in the Team, plus other media entities invited to join in the news conference for their regular coverage. Ultimately, BWM NewsCon, as a weekly conduit, will help people find ways to answering essential questions and learning from prevailing responses that experts will share as guests in the news conference. BusinessWeek Mindanao NewsCon’s Team believes that the earlier people understand the challenges and the probable solutions, the better off we will all be in the long run. Welcome to the BusinessWeek Mindanao NewsCon!

The TEAM:

DANTE SUDARIA CHENG ORDOÑEZ ALLAN MEDIANTE Publisher

BusinessWeek Mindanao Mindanao Daily News Mindanao Star The Cagayan Times

NewsCon Director

BWM Media Center

Associate Editor

BusinessWeek Mindanao

Editor-in-Chief

Mindanao Daily News

Training Director Print Journalism

JOSE FELICILDA Editor-in-Chief

NELSON CONSTANTINO

Training Director

BusinessWeek Mindanao

Mindanao Star

Editor-in-Chief

Broadcast Journalism

RUEL PELONE Executive Editor

SHAUN ALEJANDRAE UY

Online Editor

The Cagayan Times

Mindanao Daily News businessweekmindanao.com

Editor-in-Chief

Training Director

MIKE BAÑOS

Freelance Writer Editorial Consultant BWM Group of Publications

Photo Journalism

For inquiries, call :

09495449724 / 09064670148 (Cheng) or (088)856-3344, (08822)74-53-80 (Marketing Dept.)


BusinessWeek Mindanao (February 11-12, 2013 Issue)