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BusinessDaily CREDIBLE

Volume III, No. 210

Market Indicators

As of 5:57 pm may 9, 2013 (Thursday)

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7,194.43 points

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13.13 points

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Cagayan de Oro City

Businesses told:

Friday

Cops training ABOUT 400 police personnel star ted training here for deployment as members of the Special Board of Election Inspectors in the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) during the midterm elections this year. Pol. Supt. Ronnie M. Cariaga, spokesperson of the police regional office here, made the disclosure Wednesday after confirming the arrival on Tuesday of 200 police officers from Central Visayas for election duties in Lanao del Sur on May 13. According to Cariaga, the Commissions on Elections (C o m e l e c) will c o n d u c t training to police officers for deployment as Special Borad of Elections Inspectors in the absence of volunteer teachers in various areas in the ARMM region.

P15.00

May 10, 2013

‘Close shop on Monday’ I

By CHRISTINE CABIASA, Reporter

N a bid to ensure that Mindanao will have ample power during election time on Monday, the Department of Energy (DOE) urged businesses in the region to temporarily close shop that day to give way for an unimpeded political exercise.

Feeding program D AVA O C i t y – S o c i a l Welfare and Development Secretary Dinky Soliman said that 1,755,034 children in 45,389 day care centers nationwide will benefit from the Supplementary Feeding P r o g r a m (S F P) o f t h e Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) for school year 2013-2014. In the 2013 DSWD budget, it has allocated more than P2.9 billion for the program covering all 17 regions including the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). Secretary Soliman explained that the SFP is the provision of food in addition to the regular meals to children enrolled in day care centers and supervised neighborhood play (home-based) for the period of 120 days. “This is also the DSWD’s contribution to the Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) program of the government,” Secretary Soliman said.

IN-DEPTH

COVENANT WITH YOUTH. After presenting her platforms for the youth, Nacionalista Party-Team PNoy senatorial candidate Cynthia Villar, alongside Sen. Koko Pimentel, signs the Youth Covenant pledging to uphold the youth agenda - right to education, improvement of health and medical services, employment, environmental preservation, gender equality, good governance, among others – at Imperial Palace Hotel, Quezon City. Also present in the Youth Covenant signing is Ms. Mila Magsaysay, representing former Sen. Jun Magsaysay.

DENR-10 to reforest 3,000 has in CdO By BONG D. FABE, Associate Editor

MORE than a year after Sendong washed out parts of Northern Mindanao Region’s capital city Cagayan de Oro, the region’s Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR-10) has finally started the ground work for t he massive

POLL WATCH

re fore s t at ion w it h t he formation of the validation team tasked to identify areas for the project. Environmental advocates, led by Archbishop Antonio J. Ledesma, SJ, DD, repeatedly identified the barrenness of t he cit y’s hinterla nd

barangays and mountain areas due to the destructive hydraulic f lush mining as one of the main factors for the devastating flash flood on the night of Deember 16, 2011 at the height of Sendong. Sendong left more than denr/PAGE 11

ADVERTORIAL

Managsilingan Ta calls for change in CdO leadership “WE call for a change in the leadership in our City!” Thus, the public stand on t he 2 013 elec t ions of Managsilingan Ta, a trans-partisan community organization in alliance with non-government, civic organizations and water

consumer cooperatives of Cagayan de Oro City, after a comprehensive process of discernment based on agreed criteria. In a manifesto (please refer to copy published in page 7 of this newspaper) the group expressed its

endorsement and support for Gov. Oscar S. Moreno for City Mayor, Rep. Rufus B. Rodriguez and former Rep. Rolando “Klarex” Uy for 2nd and 1st district congressmen, respectively, and all “Team Oca” City change/PAGE 11

In a press statement, DOE Secretary Carlos Jericho L. Petilla expressed his appeal to manufacturers and other large industries and business establishments in the region not to open shop on May 13 with a stern warning that those who will not cooperate may also find discomfort with the department with regards to their supply needs. “Pinapakiusapan ko na kahit isang araw lang for national interest. Just for one day if you have to, don’t run your [businesses]. We are asking and begging, but if they do, don’t take it against me if we find a way

to disconnect you,” he said. Insufficient power supply continues to grip Mindanao since early this year resulting to as much as 10 hours of brownouts in some areas in the island. The problem has largely been blamed on the region’s reliance on hydroelectric power plants for the bulk of its supply. The facilities rely on optimal weather and reservoir conditions to operate. The DOE expects Mindanao’s power woes to last up to 2015 or until coal, geothermal and hydro close/PAGE 11

One Network Bank posts 31% gain in net income DAVAO City -- One Network Bank (ONB) raked P136 million in net operating income in f irst quar ter of 2013, an increase of 31 percent from same period last year of P104 million. ONB president and CEO, Alex Buenaventura said that if annualized, the 31 percent increase translates to a 30 percent return on average private equity and a three percent return on average assets. The growth is propelled by t he b a n k ’s he a lt hy performance in lending, Buenaventura said.

ONB data showed that interest income on loans and receivables posted an increase of 31 percent year-on-year to P349 million. Fee based income driven primarily by service fees on loans also rose by 84 percent to P231 million. T hroug h ser v ici ng a total of 98,205 borrowers, t he ba n k succeeded i n expanding its loan portfolio to P15.56 billion which is 41 percent better compared to first quarter of 2012. Loan expansion was reinforced by the bank’s deposit base income/PAGE 11

J.P. RIZAL - CRUZ TAAL STS., (NEAR SHANGHAI BAKERY) DIVISORIA, CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY

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Banking&Finance

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Commercial bank loans Maybank is 13th strongest up 14.2% in March

bank in the world MAYBANK has emerged as number 13th in Bloomberg Markets magazine’s third annual ranking of the world’s strongest banks, according to reports published on the Bloomberg website. This achievement has placed Mayba nk in t he company of an elite global group of banks with assets of over USD100 billion and evaluated based on capital strength, asset quality, strong reserves as well as deposit and funding strength. Maybank is the first and only Malaysian bank in the list. Maybank President and Chief Executive Officer Datuk Seri Abdul Wahid Omar has attributed the strong ranking to tough supervision by Bank Negara Malaysia and new stress testing and risk-control measures instituted inside the bank. “The central bank has a lways adopted a ver y pr a g m at ic s up e r v i sion approach. Whenever there are signs of problems, Bank Nega ra has never been hesitant to intervene,” he said. T he a n nua l ra n k i ng results were also based on banks’ cost efficiency and risk management, areas where

Maybank scored highly. Qatar National Bank placed 1st in Bloomberg Markets rank ing, while Singapore’s Oversea-Chinese Banking Corp (OCBC) came in second. Maybank is Malaysia’s largest bank by asset size, and is currently ranked #4 in Southeast Asia. In 2008, Maybank began its regional expansion with the acquisition of the controlling stake in PT Bank Internasional Indonesia (BII). According to Dato’ Sri Wahid, the bank also aims to extend its footprint to all 10 Asean members as the region moves towards the planned economic integration by 2015. For the financial year ended 31 December 2012, Maybank earned 30% of its pre-tax profit from overseas operations, t he bu l k of which from Indonesia and Singapore. Presently, Maybank has an international network of over 2,200 offices in 20 countries namely Malaysia, Singapore,

Indonesia, Philippines, Brunei D a r u s s a l a m , Vie t n a m , Cambodia, Thailand, Papua New Guinea, Hong Kong SAR and People’s Republic of China, Bahrain, Uzbekistan, Myanmar, Pakistan, India, Saudi Arabia, Laos, Great Brita in a nd t he United States of America. Maybank offers an extensive range of products and services, which includes commercial banking, investment banking, Islamic bank ing, stock brok ing, insurance and takaful and asset management. It has over 47, 0 0 0 employe e s serving more than 22 million customers worldwide. I n t h e Ph i l ip pi n e s , Maybank has 55 branches nationwide. Just this January, its new head office in ultramodern suburb Bonifacio Global City was launched in a glittering inauguration ceremony attended by the Maybank Group Board of Directors and a host corporate clients and business partners. The five-storey Maybank Corporate Centre now houses all business units of Maybank Philippines, which used to be based in Manila and Taguig, and is strategically located in the upscale Bonifacio High Street Central block.

T H E tot a l out st a nd i ng loans of commercial banks, net of reverse repurchase placements with the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, grew 14.2 percent i n Ma rch, just slightly off the pace of February’s 15-percent i ncre a se, t he B SP s a id Tuesday. Bank lending inclusive of RRPs, however, improved 14.7 percent to reach P3.5 trillion in March from a growth of 14.5 percent in February. “On a month-on-month

seasonally-adjusted basis, commercial bank lending in March increased by 1.2 percent for loans net of RRPs while loans inclusive of RRPs rose by 2.4 percent as well,” said the central bank. Loans for production activities, constituting more than 80 percent of banks’ aggregate loan portfolio, rose 14.2 percent in March from 15.1 percent in February. Consumer loan growth also slowed, up 10.8 percent in March from 11.9 percent in February.

According to the central ba n k, product ion loa ns increased primarily due to the growth in loans for real estate, renting and business ser v ices (25.2 percent); financial intermediation (28.8 percent); transportation, storage and communication (26.2 percent); wholesale and retail trade (10.4 percent); and electricity, gas and water (15.4 percent). Lending to agriculture, hunting and forestry (-10.3 percent) continued its decline in March.

Customers take loans at a bank. Many commercial banks have revised their business targets for the year due to declining profits and rising bad debt.

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Higher Learning: PCCED and Globe Challenge Students to Solve Community Problems

3

What if you could do something to solve real portfolio showcased a policy community problems? Through Project Citizen, proposal to address the rising number of students spending high school students are doing just that. Through an international program implemented in select high schools nationwide by the Philippine Center of Civic Education (PCCED), Filipino students are learning what it means to be an active citizen by being part of and creating real solutions to community issues and problems. Project Citizen is a program which trains high school students to seek public policy interventions i n s olv i ng c om mu n it y problems. With the aim to transform the youth as effective and active citizens, the program also trains teachers on understanding publ ic pol ic y, ef fec t ive research and communication st r ateg ie s , a nd Projec t Citizen methodology. In the Philippines, Project Citizen was rolled out in several areas nationwide in 2012: Batangas, Benguet, Davao, Zamboanga, Bicol, National Capital Region (NCR), and Bohol. Globe Tele c om supp or te d it s

B at a n ga s r u n a nd t he National Showcase held last April 13. Eight teams composed of enthusiastic students from all over the country traveled to Manila for the National Showcase, f launting their Project Citizen portfolios with some projects already awaiting discussions on the possibility of becoming actual barangay and city ordinances. “Our policy proposal is pending a public hearing with the city government. Noong una, ang goal kasi namin ay makagawa lang ng project. Hindi naming akalain na y ung ginawa na m i n mat at a ng gap s a barangay, pero pati sa city level, tinanggap,” shared Rickly Kamille Baldoza, 15, of Muntinlupa City National High School. Baldoza added, “We were also awarded ‘Best in Research’ during the NCR showcase.” Muntinlupa City National H i g h S c h o o l ’s pr oj e c t

time in computer shops in Brg y. Poblacion du r i ng school hours. The National Showcase also highlighted community issues such as the hazardous canals. The students from Regional Science High School of Region IX proposed a water clean-up drive in their community which is also being considered by their barangay as a policy. But more than producing pol ic y proposa ls which can be turned into actual ordinances, Project Citizen is a transformative program which empowers the youth to collaborate and contribute to a better community and a more efficient government. “Nung na-practice na namin yung Project Citizen, dun ko nakita yung essence ng teamwork. If you want change, you can’t do it alone. In order to create change, you have to have teamwork and collaboration. Eto yung pinaka-importanteng lesson na natutunan ko,” shared globe/PAGE 10

The Batangas team from the Tanauan School of Fisheries with Globe Corporate Social Responsibility Manager, Bong Esguerra (second from left) during the Project Citizen National Showcase held at the University of Makati.

BPI reported P 8.4 billion net income for 1Q Bank of the Philippine Islands continued to deliver sustainable growth as it reported a net income of P8.4 billion for the first quarter of 2013. This was 43% higher than last year’s P5.8 billion. At the end of first quarter, BPI’s total resources were P940 billion, 16% higher year-on-year as deposits grew by the same rate to P748 billion. In addition, the Bank was able to increase its assets under management to P758 billion or 6% more than same period last year. Net loans hit P514 billion, 19% better year-on-year. Lending to top corporates was up by 25%, while the

middle market and SME segments went up by 17% a nd 14% re sp e c t ively. Consumer loans also grew by 15%. Gross 30 days NPL ratio was down to 2.1% from last year’s 2.5%. Reserve cover was 129%. The improvement in net income for the period was driven by the 21% growth in total revenues as the Bank took advantage of the favorable market condition to register securities trading gains. Net interest income was slightly up, as average asset base expanded by 15%. Net yields though, contracted as interest rates continued to decline. O t he r non-i nt e re s t

i ncome l i nes l i kew ise improved, par ticu larly ser v ice charges and commissions, trust fees, and corporate finance fees. Operating costs reached P6.6 billion or 7% more year-on-year due to higher regulator y, technolog y, manpower, and variable costs. Impairment losses, however was down from last year. B P I ’ s market capitalization as of end of March 2013 stood at P391 billion. Its Basel 2 Capital Adequacy Ratio (CAR) was 15.1%. In its recent ly held Stock holders’ Meeting, bpi/PAGE 10

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friday May 10, 2013

GenSan deploys 500 cops for election duties By Allen V. Estabillo

GENERAL SANTOS CITY – Around 500 policemen will be deployed in various parts of the city starting this weekend in preparation for Monday’s elections. Supt. Rol ly Oc tav io, deputy city police director for operations, said Thursday such move was based on the full personnel deployment d i rec ted by Ph i l ippi ne Nat iona l Pol ic e (PN P) Di rec tor G ener a l A la n Purisima to all police units in connect ion w it h t he upcoming polls. He said such directive includes the placement of the entire area to full alert status to ensure maximum security during the elections. “ We ’ v e a d o p t e d a deploy ment st rateg y to facilitate our full visibility,

especially in the polling centers and other public areas,” the official said. Octavio said the city police office, which operates eight community precincts, has total manpower strength of 560. He said most of their personnel will be deployed in the polling centers and precincts within the city’s 26 barangays. A team of policemen were also assigned to specifically secure the deployment and retrieval of the 298 precinct count optical scan or PCOS machines that will be used

during the polls, he said. “Aside from our fixed detachments, we will put up additional checkpoints along major entry and exit points, and in some remote areas of the city,” he said. Octavio said the PNP central office has sent a team from the Special Action Force while the Police Regional Office (PRO) 12 has assigned additional police trainees to the city to augment the area’s security. He said another au g ment at ion wa s a lso committed by the Philippine Army-led Joint Task Force GenSan. “We have activated an election monitoring action center to coordinate a ll election-related operations

mindanews photo by froilan gallardo

8,000 Applicants troop to SM malls in Mindanao Around 8,000 jobseekers trooped to SM malls in Mindanao on May 1 to join the nationwide Labor Day job fair. A total of 3,457 job applicants and of t he number, 80 were hired on the spot in SM City Davao; 2,184 jobseekers were registered in SM City Cagayan de Oro, 351 were hired on the spot; and 2,257 applicants were listed in SM City General Santos while 544 were hired on the spot. Debby Go, SM Assistant Vice President for Mindanao, said many jobseekers lined up even before the mall opened. “As early as 8:00am,

Workers at the City Treasurer’s Office check every election paraphernalia for the May 13 elections at the City Hall in Cagayan de Oro Tuesday night, 7 May 2013. The inventory, ordered by the Comelec following reports that it was tampered, did not find any irregularity as alleged by political parties.

Sashimi-grade yellowfin tuna production down By Bong S. Sarmiento

there were already a handful job applicants and it went up to more than a thousand when we opened at 10:00am” she said. I n cooperat ion w it h the Department of

Labor & Employ ment ( D O L E ) , Te c h n i c a l E duc at ion a nd Sk i l ls Development Authority ( T E SDA), Ph i l ippi ne Overseas Employment sm/PAGE 7

GENERAL SANTOS CITY – The volume of exportquality or sashimi-grade fresh mature yellowfin tuna landed at this city, the “Tuna Capital of the Philippines,” this year has gone down compared last year. Data from the Philippine Fi s her ie s D e ve lopment Authority (PFDA) showed that export-grade yellowfin tuna landing in the first quarter of the year reached only 505 metric tons.

This is down 4.3 percent or 23 MT from the 528 recorded in the first three months of 2012, data from the state-owned corporation added. PF DA , a n a t t a c h e d agency of the Department of Agriculture, manages the operation of the local fish port complex, as well as seven other fish complexes in the different parts of the country. The best yellowfin tuna stocks go mostly to the United States and Japan, where they are served in fancy sashimi or sushi restaurants. Most of the fresh mature yellowfin tuna landed locally goes to the domestic markets, simply because they do not pass the export quality. T here wa s i n fac t a significant increase in the landings of non-export grade yellow fin tuna in the first quarter of 2013 to 2,034 MT from 1,517 MT for the same period last year, up 34 percent or by 517 MT. The sashimi-grade tuna fetches a hefty average buying price of P355 per kilogram (kg) in the first quarter of 2013. For the same period last year, the average gate price was P325/kg or cheaper by P30/kg. On the other hand, those sold in the domestic market in the first three months of 2013 commanded an average buying price of P218/kg and P148 for the same period in 2012. But who unload the best catches of the day these past years? John Heitz, export chief of GenSan Aqua Traders who has been in the industry for

at least two decades, said it is not the big fishing industry players anymore but the small ordinary fishermen. The American expatriate cited earlier the stricter policy of Indonesia on its rich tuna fishing grounds as one factor that is doing a favor for the small-scale Filipino tuna fishermen. Indonesia did not renew the bilateral fishing access with the Philippines that expired in 2006. The pact provided licenses to the Philippines for 75 catcher vessels, 150 fish carriers, 20 long liners, 300 light boats, and 10 single purse seiners, and allowed access to the Pacific and Indian Ocean areas of the Indonesian EEZ. It also provides offloading and re-supply access to 10 Indonesian ports. “It’s not anymore the big fishing boats that are bringing in the best tuna catch but the small ones owned by poor fishermen,” Rolly Puno, a tuna f ish classifier, also observed way back in 2009. These small boats venture in the sea for a few days so their catches unloaded here most of the time are the freshest, he said.

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Events

Climate Change Commission to hold Greeneration Summit in CdeO By Jennica Rojas, Contributor

The Climate Change Commission will hold ‘Greeneration’ summit on July 23 here. Dandy Gomez, consultant and press relations officer of the Commission said this summit aims to gather 1,000 youths specifically college students f rom dif ferent schools and universities for a green environment initiative. ‘Greeneration’ is intended for the youth. Pebbles Sa nchez, national youth leader of the Greeneration project said, “This is our way of raising awareness and consciousness on climate change and the target primarily is the youth because projections are by 2020-2050 medyo malala na po (climate change will get even worst) so we think

that this generation should instigate movements for a greener Philippines, a greener nation.” She added t hat t hey pushed for a Greeneration here in Mindanao af ter h av i n g it s u c c e s s f u l l y done in Luzon and Visayas because accord ing to PAGASA’s projection the whole Philippines will get warmer but Mindanao will experience more intense warmth. She also mentioned that according to historical records Mindanao is not usually hit by ty phoons compa red to what is happening now. For this event they will be pa r t neri ng w it h t he

Commission on Hig her Education (CHED) to endorse the event to different schools. In t he meantime t he group is working on an Eco Town Framework in order to implement their plans in the local level by incorporating vulnerability assessment, natural resource accounting, a nd eventua l ly ident if y climate change adaptation and mitigation measures in the area. Climate Change Commission (CCC) is defined as a sole-policy making body of the government tasked to coordinate, monitor and evaluate action plans of the government related to climate change. Furthermore the group is continuing their pursuit to ma i nst re a m cl i mate change in existing plans and programs of the government.

DILG-10 implements Seal of Disaster Preparedness The Depar tment of t he Inter ior a nd L oc a l Government (DILG) region 10 is fa st t rack i ng t he implementation of its new awards program - the Seal of Disaster Preparedness (SDP). Atty. Rene K. Burdeos, DILG 10 regional director, said SDP is an offshoot of the Seal of Good Housekeeping (SGH) which intends to scale up a local government unit’s (LGU) performance in Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRMM). Burdeos said the SDP is conferred as an official symbol of excellence to an LGU which demonstrates an acceptable level of disaster preparedness and disaster preparedness response before and during calamities. The prog ra m a ims to re c og n i z e a nd g i ve incentives to loca l government performance in institutionalizing disaster preparedness. SDP plans to focus on covering flood-prone LGUs. In DILG Memo Circular 2012-79, flood prone-LGUs are classified into two phases: Phase 1 covers flood-prone LGUs along the 18 major

river basins as declared by the Mines and Geosciences Bureau of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources while Phase 2 covers other f lood-prone LGUs that are outside the 18 major river basins. For a n LGU to be conferred with the SDP, it will first be assessed by the SDP Regional and national teams using sets of criteria that are consistent with the

DRRM framework. The seal has two levels of assessments. Level 1 is about disaster preparedness, which is a test of a local government capability to address the potential effects of a disaster to human life. Put into emphasis are the criteria on: leadership structure (organization of the DRRM Council and the DR R M Office); guide to action (risk DILG/PAGE 7

Selection committee gears up for ‘Gawad KALASAG’ search By Jorie C. Valcorza Contributor

T he re g iona l s ele c t ion committee (RSC) convened Monday to plan activities and ensure the successful i mplement at ion of t he regional assessment and awards system in the search for excellence in disaster risk reduction management (DRRM). Dubbed ‘Gawad KALASAG’ or KAlamidad at Sakuna LAbanan, SAriling Galing ang Kaligtasan, the

sea rch was init iated by the National Disaster Risk Reduct ion Ma nagement Cou nci l (N DR R MC) to recognize the outstanding performance of local DRRM c ou nc i l s , c i v i l s o c ie t y organizations (CSOs) and m aj or s t a k e ho ld e r s i n promoting and implementing sig n i f ic a nt DR R M a nd climate change adaptation programs and innovations. Search/PAGE 7

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T

Any plan to rig the elections?

HE local Liberal Party candidates in Cagayan de ris iaz Oro City are panicking. This situation becomes obvious when Oscar Moreno, the LP’s mayoral candidate a n d “ D o n g k oy ” E m a n o presented issues and concerns involving the affairs of the city government. Those who saw the two exchanging views on various issues about governance, peace, and order, and in the effective delivery of basic services provided a clear idea of the thinking of the two candidates. Ema no was more deliberate in presenting t he accomplishments of his administration while Moreno was babbling on his achievements in the province of Misamis Oriental. Moreno is the incumbent governor of Misamis Oriental who filed a certificate of candidacy for the mayoral post in Cagayan de Oro come May 13 elections. Certainly, the claim of Moreno about a stable peace and order in Misamis Oriental ran in contrast to what was actually happening in the province during his incumbency. The New People’s Army (NPA) rebels staged various attacks in several towns in Misamis Oriental. One of these was the assault on the municipal office of Medina Mayor where one died in ensuing gun battle. Other incidents of rebel attacked were in Kinoguitan and the landlocked town of Claveria sowing instability of peace and order in Misamis Oriental. The latest incident was the ambuscade of Gingoog City Mayor Ruthie Guingona killing two security escorts. Claiming that Misamis Oriental’s peace and order are stable is deception in the highest order. Moreno, therefore, wants to deceive the people of Cagayan de Oro City. Some police officers also protested Moreno’s claim that Emano used them like “private armies.” A police officer said that Moreno’s accusation is unfounded and insulted the entire police force in the city. Well, the people of Cagayan de Oro will decide during the midterm elections on Monday. diaz/PAGE 7

C

D

A Two-Way conversation

hink a minute…Do you sometimes wonder why you didn’t get what you prayed for? Does God really listen and answer our prayers? Is talking with God just something we do to make us feel good about ourselves? How should we pray? Some people sit back after they pray and wait for God to bring them what they want like a waiter in a restaurant? A wise man said: “We are a part of the answer to every prayer that we pray.” So if we ask God to help us do better in school, then we must do our part of studying more and maybe even getting extra help from someone. We can’t expect God to magically put the answers into our brain the day of the test! It could be that while we’re waiting for God to do something, He’s waiting for us to do our part and responsibility. Prayer is a two-way conversation. Prayer is not us getting God to do what we want; it’s more God telling us what He wants so we can learn how to live His successful, satisfying life. And He’s already told us how to live well through Jesus Christ’s life and teaching, the whole Bible, as well as through our thoughts while we’re listening to Him in

ATTY. MARIO T. JUNI

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prayer. Imagine if God always gave A Minute us everything we ask for. By Jhan Tiafau Hurst Then we would just give Him our orders, forget Him, and go on living our own way. But God created each of us to enjoy a daily, personal relationship with Him. Maybe He’s not giving us exactly what we’re asking for to get our attention, so we’ll start getting closer to Him so we can listen and learn His right, happy way of living. You see, prayer does not only change things, prayer changes US! Other times God wants us to wait, even when we ask Him for good things, because He knows our real reasons and motives are wrong and greedy. Or, if we’re asking God to change someone else instead of changing us, then that problem or difficult person may not go away because God wants us to change our heart hurst/PAGE 7

THINK

Youth and underemployment

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here is a skills mismatch that could hurt the country’s future economic progress, a growing area of concern among public policy makers. Youth advocates say what are needed now are programs and policies that help young people get work. Despite t he cha l lenges unemployed yout h have faced since the weak economic growth of 2012, the jobless situation for youth has never been so bad. It’s challenging. Despite a n increase in Phi lippine employ ment from 39.7 million in 2011 to 40.6 million in 2012, underemployment remains a serious problem according to Labor Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz. While the percentage of underemployment in the National Statistics Office’s (NSO) April 2012 Labor Force Survey decreased from 19.4 percent in 2011 to 19.3 percent in 2012, the number of underemployed persons actually increased by 185,000 to 7.312 million, Baldoz noted.
 
 There is a rise in part-time employment accompanied by the decline in full-time employment. This phenomenon was observed both across age groups and in the industry and services sectors. The number of jobless Filipino youth (15-24 years old) also increased in 2012, even as unemployment eased from 7.2 percent or 2.87 million in April 2011 to 6.9 percent or 2.80 million in April 2012. The Department of Labor and Employment labor force survey showed jobless youth accounted for more than half of the total number of unemployed. Unemployment in the 15-24 year old bracket rose from 1.436 million in April 2011 to 1.450 million in April 2012. 
 Long-term unemployment was uncommon among youth, with just over 5 per cent still jobless after looking for work for a year.

ECONOMIC

Young people are most of ten u nemploye d wh i le B uttresses transitioning from school By Amparo Pamela Fabe to the labor market. T he re i s a p e r si s t e nt problem in the labor market b e c au s e employer s k e e p s ay i ng t hat t he y c a n not find skilled help while many young people cannot find work. Underemployment is a big issue not only for youth, but for people of all ages. Un d e r e m p l o y m e nt i s harmful for individuals as well as to the economy. A possible cause for underemployment is that many more young people pursue post-secondary and postgraduates studies while looking for work, they end up over-qualified. A probable solution is to get more programs that encourage employers to hire and train young people. Youth underemployment is a persistent problem for the Philippine economy. Part- time work is a huge issue for young people. Working on contract is a huge issue for young people. These are some points of action that will hopefully be echoed to important persons in government: a.) the need for local businesses to invest more in machiner y, equipment, research and development, innovation and new foreign markets; b.) The need to develop more higher-skilled, higherwage jobs; and, c.) greater use of school-employer partnerships to better match employers’ needs and workers’ skills.

Liberalizing sale of foreign exhange

I

n two previous articles, we wrote about the “problem of plenty” brought about by the surge of dollar inflows into the country. The Bangko Sentral has responded by “sterilizing” the dollars. We explained that the “sterilization” operations were quite costly but necessary in order to relieve pressure on vulnerable sectors such as our OFWs, our exporters, and the BPO sector and other dollar earners. Recently, the Bangko Sentral came up with additional rules liberalizing the purchase of foreign exchange both by residents and non-residents from authorized agent banks. Somehow, these rules will facilitate the outf low of foreign exchange, thus alleviating current and expected capital inflows into the economy. A side benefit will be a possible shift in foreign transactions from the informal market to the formal banking system. Also, the new rules will benefit residents who have dollars obligations abroad or who intend to invest abroad. “Residents can now buy a higher amount of foreign exchange to meet the costs of education and medical bills incurred offshore, for foreign travel and other services, without need for supporting documentation,” BSP Deputy Governor Nestor Espenilla Jr. said. Espenilla added, “Philippine residents will also have more foreign currency dominated investment instruments to choose from that can be funded from foreign exchange that can be bought from our banks.”

On the other hand, nonresidents will be afforded wider O ut f lexibility in funding their By Ignacio Bunye authorized peso accounts and later on reconverting these pesos into dollars. Summarized below are the salient features of the new forex measures: — Increase the amount of forex that may be sold over-thecounter by authorized agent banks to residents without documentation for non-trade current account transaction to US$120,000 (up from US$60,000). — Increase the maximum amount of forex that may be purchased (at prevailing exchange rate) using unspent pesos of departing non-resident tourists or balikbayans without need to show proof/s of previous sale of forex for pesos to US$10,000 (up from US$5,000). — Relax the rule on the funding the peso accounts of non-residents so as to allow the following: Onshore peso receipts of non-residents from residents for services rendered by former to the latter. Peso receipts of onshore expatriates with short-term bunye/PAGE 7

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attitude toward that person or problem. He’s doing what is best in the long run not only for us, but for everyone else involved. Remember, He is the only One Who can see the big picture or puzzle of life. He knows how everything works and fits together both now and years later! So why not have a real, honest two-way conversation with Him right now? Ask Him to take full charge of your heart and way of living everyday, so He can start showing you His special plan for your life. Just Think a Minute…

Diaz... from page 6

W hether Cagayan de Oro’s more than 277,000 registered voters wou ld succumb to deceptions by unscrupulous politicians is another thing. The electors, however, should be on their toes as plans to rig the election results to favor administration candidates are now coming out. An informant said that s administration candidates had a luncheon meeting with alleged personnel of the Commissions on Elections (COMELEC) last week. A d m i n i s t r a t i o n c a nd id ate s i n C a gay a n de Oro City and Misamis Oriental reportedly attended the discreet meeting. The informant did not provide details of the meeting but suspicions were raised the meeting has something to do with the elections on Monday. This corner, however, is cautious to cast suspicion on the alleged meeting. React: crisguardian@ yahoo.com

abroad. — Allow banks to sell the equivalent FX of excess peso proceeds of FX which funded BSP-registered investments as well as any interest earned thereon, at the exchange rate prevailing on the date of FX sale.

Search... from page 5

The search also recognizes heroic acts of individuals, groups or institutions during natural or man-induced disasters. The RSC will evaluate all entries on May 6-8 and conduct a two-week field validation starting May 20. At the provincial level, they will only evaluate the winning nominee for each categor y. The top t hree regional winners for each category will advance to the national level, provided it gets a minimum score of 85 percent.

DILG... from page 5

assessment and mapping, institutionalized planning and budgeting); disaster preparedness (contingency planning, early warning and evacuation alert system, pre-emptive evacuation, stock pi l i ng , equ ippi ng , technical competency and community awareness) and partnership, volunteerism and innovation. The Level 2 assessment is on disaster-preparedness response which is a test of a local government capability in ensuring basic survival and subsistence needs of the affected population based on acceptable standards during a disaster. An LGU qualified for the second level of assessment

will be evaluated based on the following criteria: search and rescue (trained personnel, response time, equipage and zero casualty) and evacuation center management (adequate tempora r y shelter for evacuees, power, food, and water supply, health and sanitation, counseling, and trained center management personnel). A certificate of recognition will be given to LGUs who have passed first level of assessment. They will also automatically qualify for the second round. The LGU that passes both level 1 and 2 assessments will receive the Seal and Disaster Management Fund or Disaster Equipage. DILG Reg ion 10 has already wrapped up the first level assessment.

Last year, we honored Mindanao’s homegrown businesses... This year, let the Investors from outside the island who helped propel Mindanao’s economy for decades be recognized...thus,

present

SM...

from page 4

Administration (POEA), Overseas Workers Welfare Association (OWWA), Public Employment Service Office (PESO) and ABS-CBN, 13,512 job vacancies were offered by 257 participating local and overseas companies. The Labor Day event was the 6th mega job fair simultaneously held across 46 SM malls nationwide and its objective was to bring employers together to lessen the inconveniences of job seekers and to provide opportunities for gainful employ ment to Fi lipino workers. SM Supermalls has served as a catalyst in creating employment and business opportunities in all areas where they are located, and the job fair is one way in which SM can do its share for the community.

RATIONALE OF THE PROJECT - This is the 2nd Mindanao Business Leaders Awards, in a different category from the first one. The 1st Mindanao Business Leaders Awards was undertaken last year to give due recognition to the achievements of various Mindanao business leaders and entrepreneurs in various categories of homegrown corporate and individual business leadership achievements. - This year’s search is aimed at giving honor and recognition of excellent business leaders in the investors’s category. - BusinessWeek Mindanao as a forerunner of information on economic leadership and entrepreneurial achievements of non-Mindanaoan corporations and businessmen, deems it a part of its social responsibility to trumpet the achievements of these pillars of Mindanao’s economy, for others to emulate and thus propel an awareness for the business potential that Mindanao offers in every economic and business investment plan, whether small or great. -We are helping Mindanao achieve sustainable development of its economy through these humble efforts.

MISSION & VISION OF THE AWARDS - The holding of BWM Awards annually serves as catalyst to the ongoing efforts of business leaders and entrepreneurs who seek greater heights and strive for success in the noble mission of propelling Mindanao and its people towards full economic growth and sustainable development.

Bunye... from page 6

contracts representing salary/ allowance/other benefits. Onshore peso funds of foreign students enrolled in the Philippines and nonresident Filipinos. Allow depository banks to conver t to forex t he balance of the peso deposits funded by said accounts up to US$60,000 per day. — Expand t he list of a l low a b l e for m s of investments for Philippine residents for which forex funding may be purchased from authorized agent banks: Of fshore forexdenominated global/mutual funds and UITFs. Forex intercompany loans of resident enterprises to their offshore parent companies/ subsidiaries with an original tenor of at least 1 year. Real property abroad, including condominium units. Debt securities issued offshore by both residents and non-residents that are in local bank’s asset inventory. Equity securities issued by residents that are listed

7

MECHANICS OF THE SEARCH: Duration of the Search Awards Night

: :

January 15, 2013 to May 15, 2013 June 1, 2013

Entry Requirements: 1. Individual and Company/Establishment nominations shall be accompanied with Nomination Forms available on-line at the Sponsors Website, offices of sponsors, or in the printed page of Businessweek Mindanao and Mindanao Daily issues or may be mailed, if requested, by the Awards Secretariat 2. Nominees or candidates in various categories shall be nominated by BusinessWeek Mindanao and Mindanao Daily Bureaus; individuals, organization or groups not employed by or connected to any of the nominated person or firm . 3. Nominations shall be accompanied by the ff documents which can be mailed, or emailed to the awards secretariat - MINDANAO BUSINESS LEADERS AWARDS 2013 Secretariat, Tanleh Bldg., Abellanosa St., Cagayan de Oro City,not later than May 15, 2013. 4. Brief Resume and History of the Nominee (Individual or Firm) - Photos (at least 3) ; Nomination Form ; Documentary evidence such as certificates, awards or citations

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wants Agusan del Sur ABAMIN seeks assistance KMU palm-oil workers reinstated for M’nao banana growers By Jonathan L. Mayuga

By BONG D. FABE

THE partylist group Abante Mindanao (ABAMIN) has urged the Congressional Committee on Agriculture and Food to help Mindanao’s banana industry in light of the huge losses it incurred due to superstorm Bopha (Pablo) and the ongoing territorial row involving the Philippines and China. Data from the Davao City-based Pilipino Banana Growers & E x por ters Association (PBGEA) showed that at least 8 billion worth or 14,186 hectares of banana plantations were destroyed by Pablo in December 2012. “It will take at least a year to rehabilitate,” PBGEA reported. But before Pablo struck, the industry was already suffering from the strict quarantine implemented by China on Philippine banana abamin/PAGE 10

HELP FOR BANANA INDUSTRY. Rep. Maximo Rodriguez Jr. of the Abante Mindanao (ABAMIN) partylist, together with his elder brother, Rep. Rufus Rodriguez (2nd District, CDP), call on the Congressional Committee on Agriculture and Food to help Mindanao’s banana industry.

Thai-backed palm oil mill to rise in NorthCot CARMEN, North Cotabato— Ca r men Mayor Rogel io Taliño led groundbreaking rites here recently for the construction of a $10-million T ha i-backed pa l m oi l crushing mill. The mayor said the yearlong construction of the mill that will serve planters in Nor t h Cotabato a nd neighboring provinces will start this month. The Univanich Carmen Pa l m O i l C or p or at ion (UCPOC) beh i nd t he milling plant is backed by the Univanich Palm Oil Public Company of Thailand. Un i v a n ic h-T h a i l a nd chairman Apirag Vanich, toge t her w it h h i s w i fe Charntip Vanich, graced the occasion. E st abl ished i n 1969, Univanich pioneered the planting of oi l pa lm in Thailand. It operates a palm oil exporting facility at the

port of Laemphong in Krabi province. Univanich also operates Thailand’s first laboratory for oil palm tissue culture that produces high yielding clones in support to its breeding program. “This is a dream-come true project of my father,” said North Cotabato Governor Emmylou Taliño-Mendoza, the mayor’s daughter. She encouraged farmers to plant oil palm to augment their income. The governor claimed that the recent entry of new investments in the province is proof to the stable political, economic and socio-cultural conditions in the area. Un i v a n i c h s a i d t h e facility will have a crushing capacity of 30 tons of fresh fruit bunches per hour. The company said it will purchase oil palm fresh fruits Northcot/PAGE 10

PAL M OIL M ILL . The Un ivan ich Ca rmen Palm O i l Corporation (UCPOC), which is constructing a palm oil mill in Carmen, North Cotabato, is being backed by the Univanich Palm Oil Public Company of Thailand. The $10 million palm oil mill will be operational one year after construction started. It will serve oil palm tree farmers in North Cotabato and neighboring provinces, such as this photo of a palm oil mill in Malaysia taken from the web, which is surrounded by oil palm trees.

DA seeks harmonization of palay, corn prod’n data GENER AL SANTOS CITY—Local government units (LGUs) and bureaus under the Department of Agriculture in Region 12 (South Cotabato, [North] Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat and Sarangani provinces, and General Santos City or Soccsksargen) (DA-12) have agreed to harmonize their data on the region’s palay (unhusked rice) and corn production in a bid to provide more accurate figures on the area’s grains output. Amalia Jayag-Datukan, DA12 executive director, said on Tuesday they have started discussions with LGU and bureau officials to help set some strategies that would improve the gathering and processing of grains-related data in the region. “We’re looking at coming up with a common data regarding our palay and corn production,” JayagDatukan said. According to her, t hose who joined the discussions were the city, municipal and provincial agriculturists in the region, as well as officials of the National Irrigation Administration, the Bureau of Soils and Water Management, the Philippine Rice Research Institute and the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics. The DA-12 chief said it’s important for the region to have harmonized and accurate grains-production d at a to avoid p o s sible confusion and ensure that seeks/PAGE 10

TRENTO, Agusan del Sur— Militant labor organization Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU) yesterday slammed the layoff of 104 palm-oil workers of the Malaysian-owned Agusan Plantation Inc. (API) based here and blamed President Aquino for it. According to the group, President Aquino’s policy has emboldened businessmen to illegally retrench workers, who are powerless under the country’s current employeremployee setup. KMU Chairman Elmer Labog said the API inked a col lec t ive-ba rga i n i ng agreement with the workers’ union—Pinagbu k lod na L a k a s ng Ma ng ga gaw a sa Plantasyon ng API, an affiliate of the National Federation of Labor UnionsKMU (NaFLU-KMU)—on March 15. But the deal was reportedly set aside in the API’s decision to lay off workers on May 2. “One day after [President]

Aqu i no b o a s t e d a b out prioritizing job creation, we see how he has emboldened capitalists to destroy jobs by violating workers’ job security,” Labog said. “Not on ly has his government failed to generate sufficient jobs for Filipinos, it has allowed capitalists to lay off workers easily, thereby making the country’s employment situation even worse,” he added. K MU said the illegal retrenchment is part of a drive to bust the workers’ union, saying the plantation’s operations will most likely resume once it destroys the union. “ T he ow ners of A PI continue to rake in huge profits, that’s something workers k now. They are not going bankrupt, despite the destruction caused by Typhoon Pablo [international code name Bopha]. They simply want to bust the KMU/PAGE 10

NorthCot coop ships organic rice to Dubai KORONADAL CITY—The Don Bosco Multipurpose Cooperative in M’lang, North Cotabato has increased its presence in the global market as exporter of organic rice. Some 15 metric tons of organic black rice produced by farmer-members of Don Bosco MPC formed part of the 35-MT first shipment of rice export to Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The ceremonial send-off, led by Agriculture Secretary Proceso Alcala and DA 12 Regional Executive Director Amalia Jayag-Datukan, was held at the Manila Harbor Center. At the event, Alcala said the ceremony was indeed very historic as it ushers in a new era in the country’s rice industry and the agriculture sector, in general. Also part of the initial shipment to Dubai were aromatic rice and long-grain rice. As the country is set to achieve rice sufficiency by end of this year, he said it is prudent to start eyeing the export market, particularly for fa nc y or a romat ic , long-grain white varieties and organic coloured and heirloom rice varieties, where Filipino farmers are very much at par. “Ou r ex por t at ion of rice is a result of a strong p a r t ne r s h ip of f a r me r o r g a n i z a t i o n s , pr i v a t e sector as well as officials and employees of the Department of Agriculture in the entire country,” Alcala said. “We want our farmers

ORGANIC RICE. A little girl plays with a mix of red and black organic rice produced by a farmer in Bukidnon who practices the Integrated Rice-Ducks Farming System (IRDFS), another organic rice technology now beginning to get a foothold in Mindanao. photo by bong d . fabe

to start considering opportunities in the export market,” said Alcala, noting rice exports would protect farmers’ incomes because prices of the commodity would drop once the country achieves rice self-sufficiency. Mea ntime, A lca la acknowledged and recog ni zed Assista nt Secretar y Dante Delima concurrently the National Rice Program Coordinator for leading the rice export team along with other farmer groups and officials of the department. Earlier, Delima noted that it is the first time in about 40 years at the Philippines exports the commodity in large volumes. Me a nt i me , D i re c tor Datu kan noting t hat S o c c k s a rgen Re g ion i s officially one of the country’s rice exporters, added that t here i s a ver y s t rong

potential for the Philippines to become globally popular because it offers quality and organic black rice. She also believes that because more countries have expressed desire to try different rice varieties, then it would be an additional door of opportunity for Region 12 farmers who produced black and other colored rice varieties. The lady director also disclosed that exportation of black rice from Region 12 through the Don Bosco MPC will continue and would probably open bigger market tie-ups. With this good news, Director Datu kan urges the off icia ls of the Don Bosco MPC to expand their production areas to cater to the greater demands of black rice in the global market. With this initial shipment, rice/PAGE 10


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ABAMIN... from page 8

many attributed to Manila’s ongoing territorial dispute with Beijing regarding the West Philippine Sea islands. PBGEA said t hat Mindanao-based banana exporters were sending up to 800 container vans of banana per week to China. “But due to the territorial dispute, China has blocked entry of local bananas into their country. This resulted in the banana industry reeling from huge losses due to the quarantine sanctions imposed by China,” Rep. Maximo Rodriguez Jr. said. Rod r ig ue z s a id t hat China accounts for at least 30 percent of the Philippines’ banana market. But while some Philippine bananas were a llowed entr y into China, reports said that Chinese were not buying the fruit as a sign of protest against the Philippines for the dispute with Panatag Shoal. “This has led to a situation where local banana growers are incurring losses,” he added. Minda nao is host to at least 80,000 hectares of banana plantations, making the crop one of the country’s top fruit exports, second only to pineapple. Third largest is Philippine mango. In terms of world banana export, the Philippines ranks third largest. In 2011, the

country shipped $471 million worth of bananas. According to PBGEA Executive Director Stephen Antig, China has sent back 2 4 0 c ont a i ne r v a n s of bananas to the Philippines and are sending another 100 container vans back to the Philippines. These are those bananas that were left in the different ports in China which their importers refused to buy. “There is an urgent need to look into this situation and determine how we can help our local banana growers both in the short term and the long term,” Rodriguez said, adding that “there is a need to study different measures that would help our banana industr y and determine which of these measures would really provide the most number of positive results.” One of these measures Antig for warded is government subsidies, as he cited the example of Ecuador which provides subsidies to local banana producers and in turn gives Ecuador an advantage in banana trade. Rodriguez also said that there is also an urgent need to “determine how the local banana industr y can be assisted and what measures can be done to minimize the damages and losses that they experienced” especially during natural calamities and disasters like Pablo. Mindanao Banana Fa r mers a nd E x por ters

Entertainment A s s o c i a t i o n ( M B F E A) Chairman Romy Garcia had earlier appea led to the government to “extend f inancial support to the farmers as we could not support on our own the needed rehabi litat ion expenses.” The banana industry’s export in 2011 defied global trade slowdown and kept the Philippines’ total exports on the growth path despite the decline of the country’s manufactured exports, the PhilExport said.

Rice... from page 8

Mr. Romano Laurilla, Don Bosco MPC general manager hopes for more government partnerships especially in marketing their black rice as the cooperative’s main agricultural commodity. “We are very happy that the Don Bosco and the DA have strong relationship especia l ly i n prov id i ng market linkages to the rice farmers for the latter to earn bigger profits,” Laurilla said. The national rice program team led by ASec Delima coordinated the initial export rice shipment to Dubai with the Vegetable Importers, E x por ters a nd Vendors Association (VIEVA). Besides black rice from Soccsksargen Region, Secretary Alcala also led the inaugural shipment of 20 MT of Jasponica produced by SL Agritech Corporation based

in Talavera, Nueva Ecija. A lso included in t he shipments which will actually be shipped on May 9 is 166 MT of shallots (or small red onions locally known as ‘lasona’) bound for Indonesia. “Another batch of 80 MT aromatic and heirloom rice varieties are set for export in succeeding months,” Delima disclosed. He said it is composed of 40 MT of long-grain, aromatic white rice bound for Hong Kong, and 40 MT of Cordillera heirloom rice to the United States. He said the DA is also sending a trial shipment of 800 kilograms of black rice to the Netherlands. Among those present during the send-of f ceremon ies were: At t y. Miguel Varela, president of the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry; SL Agritech president and CEO Henry Lim Bon Liong; VIEVA president Lea Cruz; Romano Laurilla and Maria Helenita Gamela of Don Bosco MPC. Meanwhile, information provided by the BiosDynamis, marketing arm of the Don B o s c o Fou n d a t i on fo r Sustainable Development, Inc., to Philippine Informat ion Agenc y 12 indicated that around August last year, they shipped a total of 5 tons of organic rice to Germany and Macao. Another shipment is being scheduled for delivery to Hong Kong within the next six months. (PIA-19/DA-12)

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different communities in the province and will cater from page 8 employment to residents. they reflect the real status of (MindaNews) the area and the situation on the ground. She added that such a move from page 8 would help them determine workers’ union,” said Jacinto w h e t h e r t h e a g e n c y ’s Tanduyan, NaFLU-KMU programs and projects for coordinator for Region 13 the palay and corn sectors (Caraga). are implemented properly “Pa l m oi l cont i nue s and actually helping local t o b e i n d e m a n d a n d capitalists in the palm-oil farmers. (PNA) business continue to target Mindanao for expanding from page 8 their operations. API will from local farmers and will surely resume its operations. produce crude palm oil for [It] should not be allowed to sale both in the local and bust the workers’ union. The export markets. workers should be reinstated The company expects immediately,” he added. that the milling facility will KMU said casual workers contribute significantly to and managers should not be the economic prosperity and seen working if API has really stability of small farmers in stopped operations. (BM)

KMU...

NorthCot...

! D A E R

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Today’s HOROSCOPE AQUARIUS (January 20 – February 18) - Before you dive head first into a new endeavor make sure you are aware of the expectations. When you know exactly what you are responsible for you can eliminate any chance of error. You may have to figure out the details on your own, but you aren’t one who needs instruction anyway. Do what you do best and take the lead of your professional life.

GEMINI (May 21 – June 21) - When love is what you want to attract it is wise to first know what you want from love. The expectations you set determines how satisfied with a relationship or partner you are. Spend time deciding exactly what you want and who you want it with before you go about trying to get it.

LIBRA (September 23 – October 22) - You are your number one priority and although your heart wants to help everyone else, you have to be your focus. If you aren’t totally aware of another’s intentions they can get one over on you. Don’t abandon your common sense or intuition. If someone or something seems too good to be true it probably is.

PISCES (February 19 – March 20) - Confidence is a cornerstone to success, Pisces, and you must make an effort to build yours. Selfesteem can be bolstered by uplifting thoughts and by eliminating self-disparaging thoughts. Take stock of all your outstanding qualities and put them to good use. When you do what you’re good at it can amplify the positive effects on your self-confidence.

CANCER (June 22 – July 22) - Be realistic about the timeline of a proposed project. If you don’t anticipate the amount of time a certain endeavor will require you could come up short. Plan a strategy and a deadline for each task. When you have a plan you can avoid many obstacles just by preparing and pre planning for them.

SCORPIO (October 23 – November 21) -Your focus has been consistently on work for some time now, but it is time for a change. The universe is ripe with love energy right now making it possible for you to meet your match. Make it a point to get out and socialize and you very well may be connected to someone who makes your heart sing.

LEO (July 23 – August 22) - A new and exciting endeavor promises to provide you with unexpected rewards. It may be scary to attempt something totally new to you, but you thrive off the excitement it brings. Think through your options carefully and set off down a path of discovery and promise. Your professional life can be totally reborn.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 – December 21) - Channel your energy directly into making your dreams a reality right now. You can be determined when it comes to achieving a particular purpose and forget there are other aspects of life. This can be to your advantage right now as you feel inspired to go after your goals. Try not to take on too much at once, but rather take one step at a time.

VIRGO (August 23 – September 22) - You may feel uncertain about the future right now, but circumstances will stabilize soon. An influential contact can assist you when you need it most. Even if it feels as though you have no control of the events occurring you will soon be able to manage them adeptly. You’ve got what it takes to excel you just need to believe that.

CAPRICORN (December 22 – January 19) - Instead of reinventing yourself overnight, try a more steady approach. You work as part of a team and if you decide to implement immediate changes you could throw the whole group off kilter. Make changes to one area at a time and you’ll allow everyone to keep up with the alterations without compromising quality.

ARIES (March 21- April 19) - You work to the highest standards of quality no matter what the fiscal gain associated with the task is. The problem with this is you can use all your energy and effort on a job that won’t pay your bills. Before you agree to a job make sure the return will be worth the effort. TAURUS (April 20 – May 20) - You maintain a healthy balance of instinct and intelligence. These two qualities can combine for effective decision making. When you are in doubt of which direction to go in stop and take a moment to check in with your intuition. You may get a feeling that one particular option will be the best.

CROSSWORD puzzle

CIRCLE A WORD On the rocks

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launch lifebelt lifeboat mist overboard pick up pilot

across 1.Cultured (8) 5.Cauliflower head (4) 7.Dumbfound (5) 8.Completely (7) 9.Senior citizen (9) 13.Fashionable (4) 16.Islamic name (3) 17.Insect (3) 18.Eternally (4) 21.Smoothing material (9) 24.Carribean island (7) 26.Snap (5) 27.Wall bar (4) 28.Largest moon of Jupiter (8) DOWN 1.Very sad (6) 2.Prawn dish (6) 3.Ogle (3,2) 4.Illuminated (3) 5.north America indian tribe (8) 6.Laundry machine (5) 8.Vase (3) 10.Andrew Lloyd Webber musical (5) 11.Black (5) 12.Irish Gaelic (4) 14.Hawaiian dance (4)

15.high-ranking clergyman (8) 19.City of canal (6) 20.Irk (6) 21.Boxer, Ray Robinson (5) 22.Legume (3) 23.The Horror Picture show, musical (6) 25.Excavate (3)


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FIBECO assures consumers enough power supply By Mildred Borbon Torrejas

The First Bu k idnon Electric Cooperative (FIBECO) told media that the province of Bukidnon will not likely to experience rot at i ng brow nouts a s what Zamboanga City is experiencing. Engr. Renato Cortezano, General Ma nager FIBECO sa id that 2010 up to present, even though Mindanao

has an unexpected power situat ion, FIBECO has enough power supply. This is due to FIBECO’s Planned for Power supply which started five years ago and that the typical w o r k i n g g r ou p s h ave gathered together with the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Energ y Agenc y (N E A) and did try to figure out

the power requirements for the next few years for FIBECO to be ready in cases like power shortages, Cortezano said. “We created a yearly forecasting in generating possible supplies to m it igate f ut u re power crisis,” he added. Lu z on a nd Vi s ay a s a re a l ready con nec ted v ia subma rine cable,

while Mindanao has no connection facilities or transmission line. I n t h e y e a r 2 01 2 , rotating brownouts were rampant in different areas of Minda nao in which some prov i nces have power interruption which lasted up to eight hours. Cor teza no f ur t her e mph a si z e d t he y w i l l not wait for the potential

problem to occur; instead, they formulated a long term plan good for five to ten years. FIBECO a lso has a Sit io a nd B a r a n g ay

Electrification Program project t hat a llows t he consumers to avail priv i leges such as f ree meter, free duplex and free house wiring connection.

FIBECO - General Manager Engr. Renato S. Cortezano

FIBECO - Dir. Felix G. Vergara, Jr.

FIBECO employee & Media group of Bukidnon

Support...

from page 12 “She has a clear vision w h ic h i s touc ha ble a nd reachable,” further stated Perez adding that President Noynoy would not include Villar in his ticket if he does not believe in her ability. The ICBP is composed of Catholic and non-Catholic bishops nat ionw ide. The following are the officers of ICBP: Bishop Ephraim Perez, President; Bishop James Antioquia, Vice President; Rev. Rey na ldo Mapanoo, Secretary; and Rev. Fr. Jun Bernal, Secretary General. For her part, Villar said she is elated with the latest endorsement coming from our independent bishops. “This pledge of support i s a not her b o os t to my senatorial candidacy, and I’m very thankful for the vote of confidence,” said Villar.

Close...

from page 1 projects in the region come on stream. Petilla said the power crisis should ease by Monday in time for the elections, provided businesses in the area cooperate. “ The response f rom businesses has been positive,” he added. Besides seeking voluntary curtailment of demand, the DOE is a lso ba n k ing on additional supply from the 98-megawatt Iligan diesel and the 700-megawatt AgusPulangi hydroelectric plants. T he A lca nta ra Group recently started operating the Iligan plant, which it acquired

from the Iligan City local government, but can run the facility only at a lower capacity. For its part, the national government has been impounding water at the state-owned Agus-Pulangi reservoir since September last year to ensure adequate power supply this elections. “By May 6, brownouts in Mindanao should ease. By the elections we don’t expect brownouts in Mindanao but with the help of companies,” Petilla said.

DENR...

from page 1 1, 2 0 0 p e o pl e d e a d a n d destroyed P1.3 billion in agriculture and property in Cagayan de Oro and nearby Iligan City. “Typhoon Sendong has taught us the bitter lessons from the wanton degradation of ou r w at e r s he d a re a s surrounding Cagayan de Oro River and other tributaries. The continued bleeding of Iponan River from hydraulic flush mining also has to be stopped. The rehabilitation a nd protect ion of our environment should be a pan-partisan concern of all candidates for public office,” Ledesma said in his latest pastoral letter issued in March. Environmental experts said that the city’s low lying areas, which is basically encompass the city’s urban center, is in danger of being erased from the map because of flooding threats from such natural resource as the Cagayan de Oro River. To a d d r e s s t h i s , Environment Secretary Ramon J.P. Paje formed the six-man

validation team to identify areas where badly-needed reforestation program will be implemented. Paje said the formation of the team, composed of forestry and urban planning officers, is in line with the RA 10452, which mandates the reforestation of at least 3,000 hectares of public land in the city. Priority barangays where the reforestation program will be implemented are those along the Cagayan de Oro River. R A 10 452 , sig ned by President Benigno Simeon C. Aquino III last month, complements t he Aquino administration’s forest policies to fight the effects of climate change-exacerbated natural phenomenon as ty phoons and storms contain in the National Greening Program (NGP) and the total log ban. The NGP is the g o v e r n m e n t ’s f l a g s h i p reforestation program that seeks to plant some 1.5 billion t rees coveri ng about 1.5 million hectares in six years ending in 2016. “ The enact ment of R A 10452 came at a most opportune time, just as the national government is making an unprecedented push to reforest the country through the NGP and the nationwide logging ban in natural and residual forests,” said Agustilo Obsioma, DENR-10 technical director for forestry. Obsioma said the areas to be prioritized under RA 10 4 52 w i l l a l s o i nc lude for mer concession a rea s covered by timber license agreement earlier issued by

the government. DENR data shows that Cagayan de Oro’s forestland area covers 20,702 hectares or about 48 percent of the city’s total land area of 42,246 hectares. DENR-10 has identified at least 11low-lying villages along the Cagayan de Oro River were seriously hit by the 2011 f lash f loods: Carmen, C o n s o l a c i o n , B a lu l a n g , Macasandig, Nazareth, Sitio Taguanao and Barangays 6, 7, 13, 15 and 17. Grou nd mappi ng a nd validation of these areas using the global positioning system (GPS) technology would take at least two weeks, Obsioma said.

Income...

from page 1 which grew by 37 percent to P15.23 billion. The bank’s nonperforming loans (NPL) ratio dropped to t wo percent as it a lso maintained its risk based capital adequacy ratio at 18 percent. ONB’s equity also reached P 3.26 billion as of end March. The bank also closed the first quarter with total resources of P21 billion, reg ister i ng a 30 percent increment from 2012. Buenaventura said ONB is focused on expa nding further in unbanked and underbanked growth areas in both Mindanao and in the island of Panay. ONB has currently 90 branches in Mindanao and a branch in Makati City. The bank is also operating now a five-branch network in key areas of Iloilo City after it merged with Rural Bank of

San Enrique, Inc. ONB is currently working for the most awaited Personal Internet Banking following the successful launch of its online banking facility for corporate clients last year, he said. (PNA)

Change...

from page 1 Kagawads: 1st District: Tito Noel Mora, Eileen San Juan, Boboy Roa Daba, Roger Abaday, Zaldy Ocon, Edgardo Uy, Merle Adaza and Candy Darimbang; 2nd District: Ingrid Chaves Agudo, Edsel Hojas Salvana, Bong Lao, Pastor Ching Roa, Eric Salcedo, Nixon Baban, Roger Villazorda, and Rodney Quiblat. “The time for change in Cagayan de Oro City deserves a better leadership than what we had the past several years. The City needs and wants a leader who could inspire, mobilize, e ne r g i z e a nd s y ne r g i z e its people to feel up to the challenge of development,” the Manifesto said. The multi-sectoral alliance also recommended a set of agenda for t he endorsed candidates to fulfill once in office. The proposed agenda are: Water System Improvements, Health Program for the Poor, Increased Budget Allotment for the J.R. Borja Memorial City Hospital, City Peace and Order; Environmental Preservation and Cleanliness; Enforcement of Traffic Rules and Regulations; Transparency of the City Hall; and Balanced I nte g r ate d Ur b a n-Ru r a l Development. “Managsilingan Ta b el ie ve s i n “s er v a nt

leadership” that is open to public dialogue, genuinely pro-people, and inspire a community-developmentdriven, participatory and transparent governance,” said Mrs. Milagros P. Ortega, one of the group’s Convenors. “We call on all Cagayanons to unite for the needed change in leadership in our city, the city we love and would like to help develop fully,” added Dr. Anselmo “Boy” Mercado, another of the group’s convenors. Managsilingan Ta was organized by civil society groups at the instance of the Archdiocese of Cagayan de Oro under Archbishop Antonio Ledesma, S.J. in time for the 2010 presidential elections. In his pastoral letter to the people of God in the Archdiocese of Cagayan de Oro dated 16 April 2013, Archbishop Ledesma defined being transpartisan as choosing the most qualified candidates across political parties. “In their Pastoral Statement of January 2013, the Catholic bishops “commend and support lay initiatives to form circles of discernment to choose worthy candidates….in order to bring values of God’s kingdom in the public discourse.” “As in previous elections, I have recommended that votes choose c a nd id ates w it h t he f ive C’s – t hat they be men and women of Character, Conscience, Competence, Compassion and Commitment.” “Ot her characteristics have been suggested: that candidates be maka-Diyos, maka-Tao, maka-Buhay, and maka-Kalikasan.”


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Independent bishops support Villar’s senatorial bid THE country’s Catholic and non-Catholic independent bishops on Wednesday endorsed the senatorial bid of former Las Pinas Rep. Cynthia Villar during simple rites at Club Filipino in Greenhills, San Juan. R e v. E f r a i m Pe re z , president of the Independent Bishops Conference of the Philippines (IBCP), said they have chosen Villar due to her track record, competence and leadership which were proven during her nine years in Congress and as managing director of the Villar Foundation. Villar served as President of the Lady Legislators of the House of Representatives in the 12th, 13thand 14th Congress. During her term, landmark bills upholding t he wel fa re of women, children and families were passed. These include the Magna Carta of Women, Anti-Trafficking of Women and Children, Anti-violence against Women, Protection of children in the workplace; Juvenile Justice System and the two versions of the Senior Citizens Act (2003 and 2010), among others. She was also chairperson

of the House Committee on Higher & Technica l Education and the Cong ressiona l Spouses Foundation from 1998 to 2000 and President of the Senate Spouses Foundation, Inc. from August 2006 to December 2008. After the end of her term as congresswoman, Villar has since then sat as managing director of the Villar Foundation. According to Perez, he personally endorsed Villar, who has earned the moniker “Misis HanepBuhay,” to his colleagues. Saying he is not that close to the former lawmaker, he however believes in her incomparable prowess to make things happen. “I personally believe that Madam Cynthia (Villar) is the ‘secret weapon’ in the success of her husband, Senator Manny Villar,” stressed Perez. The outgoing senator,

whose term ends in May 2013, was a Speaker of the House of Representatives and Senate President. Perez said the former congresswoman and her equally-competent husband have proven that poverty is not a hindrance to success. “Ipinakita at pinatunayan nila na ang isang mahirap na Pilipino ay pwede ring umangat sa buhay,” further said Perez. He sa id t hey a re throwing their support to the candidacy of Villar because they believe she should be in the Senate to continue her programs that would alleviate the lives of Filipino people from poverty. support/PAGE 11


BusinessDaily Mindanao (May 10, 2013 Issue)  

BusinessDaily Mindanao (May 10, 2013 Issue)

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