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Volume III, No. 230

Market Indicators

As of 6:03 pm june 6, 2013 (Thursday)

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Cagayan de Oro City

Friday

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THE Department of Trade and Industry-Davao Oriental Field Office (DTI-DO) has added another feather on its cap as it received a Seal of Excellence Award from the Civil Service Commission (CSC). Of the 599 government offices surveyed by CSC last year, only 50 offices obtained an Excellent rating nation-wide, and only two government agencies are in Davao Region – the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) office in Mati City and DTI-DO. As lead implementer of Republic Act No. 9845 or the AntiRed Tape Act (ARTA) of 2007, the CSC conducted a survey among government offices to gather feedback on the effectiveness and compliance with the antired tape measures required of government service.

By CHRISTINE CABIASA Reporter

INDANAO is getting more financial assistance from the US government with the opening of new projects to be implemented in partnership with the Mindanao Development Authority (MinDA).

Water woe

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M’nao gets more US aid

Briefly COUNCILOR Alden Bacal, chair of the commit tee on public utilities, has requested the Cagayan de Oro Water District (COWD) management to submit the company’s short and medium term plans to be implemented in the city to address water shortage in some of its franchise areas. During the meeting, the councilor presented to COWD’s Engr. Bienvenido Batar the special report of Councilor Juan Sia, which was aired during the City Council regular session Monday and complaints of residents regarding inadequate water supply. One of these areas is at Calaanan, where the city’s biggest relocation site is located, said CBacal. Engr. Batar admitted that there were disruptions of water supply last month due to technical problems of the COWD and Rio Verde. He said these have been addressed and problem areas already experienced better water service this month. Batar said there are still some areas that are problematic, which are being monitored.

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MORE US AID. Mindanao Development Authority (MinDA) Executive Director Janet Lopoz chats with US Ambassador Harry Thomas Jr. during the launch of USAID projects held recently in Zamboanga City. The US is the largest donor to the Philippines over the years. Last year, over $318 million was given by the American people to the Philippines. photo by sonny mendoza

DOE holds consultation on renewable energy code of practice

US Ambassador to the Philippines Harry Thomas Jr. said the new projects show the US government’s commitment to peace and stability in Mindanao. “We celebrate and affirm our commitment to peace and stability in Mindanao through these new USAID projects, and I am here today because I have faith in the powerful forces for positive c h a n ge i n M i nd a n ao,” Thomas said. The new projects, a n nou nc e d by T homa s w it h USAID Mission

Di rec tor Glor ia Steele, are the Mindanao Youth De velopment (M Y De v) Program and the Integrated Maternal, Neonatal, Child Health and Nutrition and Family Planning Regional project or MindanaoHealth. The other project is called ENGAGE or Enha ncing Governance, Accountability and Engagement. Thomas said the USAID’s cont i nu i ng suppor t for Mindanao is a proof that opportunities exist for the region and that through hard Aid/PAGE 11

By APIPA P. BAGUMBARAN, Contributor

THE Renewable Energ y Management Bureau (REMB) of the Department o f E n e r g y ( D O E) h a s consulted renewable energy development stakeholders in Mindanao on the Code of Practice for the Renewable Energy Safety, Health and Env ironment Ru les and Regulations (RESHERR).

The public consultation, held today at Dynasty Court Hotel here, was conducted in partnership wit h t he Ph i l ippi ne In for mat ion Agency. Lawyer Marissa P. Cerezo, REMB Assistant Director, said the consultation aims to gather insights, ideas doe/PAGE 11

power outlook

Power coops reduce system losses in 2012 SYSTEM losses by electric cooperatives were down to record low last year, the Nationa l Electrif ication Administration (NEA) data showed.

The NEA report showed that 109 cooperatives under its supervision registered an average system loss of 11.74 percent in 2012, a reduction outlook/PAGE 11

NO TO PREMATURE OPENING. With the scheduled opening of the Laguindingan International Airport on June 16 is getting near, business organizations in Cagayan de Oro City also heighten their campaign against it saying the government is prematurely hastening the airport’s operations despite the lack of navigational equipment. They said the move affects business activities as airline companies have reduced their flights to and from Cagayan de Oro. photo by rolando sudaria

Class suit vs Cebu Pacific Air looms By KEITH BACONGCO, MindaNews

DAVAO City – The passengers of the Cebu Pacific Air plane that veered off the runway of the international airport here

Sunday night have agreed to file a class suit against the airline company. Speaking in behalf of the

165 passengers who have organized themselves into a group called Flight 5Jlooms/PAGE 11

J.P. RIZAL - CRUZ TAAL STS., (NEAR SHANGHAI BAKERY) DIVISORIA, CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY

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DSWD clears issues on distribution of Emergency Shelter Assistance TO answer queries made by Sendong survivors of Brgy. Consolacion, Cagayan de Oro City, on the selection of beneficiaries and distribution of the Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA), the Department of Social Welfare and Development clarifies the assistance can only be provided through certain qualifications. Under Administrative Order No. 17, Series of 2010, which is the Omnibus Guideline on Shelter Assistance, the Emergency Shelter Assistance is only applicable to those families who are not recipients of any other housing assistance from any other agency. “Based on our assessment and validation through the families’ access cards in Barangay Consolacion, a number of them have already

received housing assistance from other sources such as International Organization for Migration (IOM) and Red Cross, thus, are not qualified for the ESA,” Ms. Daisy Ramos, a DSWD social worker, said. Among the qualifications to receive ESA as well include families that have limited re s ou rc e s t hat pre vent t hem from repairing or reconstructing their permanent shelter units.

The monthly income of a family of six in an urban area, which is in this case – Cagayan de Oro – should also be below P10,000.00, depending on the National Stat ist ics C oord i nat ion Board’s statistic report on food threshold. Moreover, the Omnibus Guideline also highlights that the families who can benefit from the assistance are those with or without land ownership property but situated in safe areas, and those who are not willing to be resettled and opt to stay in the same location but compliant with the safety requirements. The amount of the ESA can only be determined DSWD/PAGE 11

Maramag intensifies animal deworming, strengthens livestock farming By RUBY LEONORA R. BALISTOY, Contributor

M A R A M AG, Bu k id non -- In its continuing effort to help farmers increase production and improve quality of livestock products, the local government of Maramag intensif ied its farm animal deworming project. T he projec t a i ms to increase prof itabilit y of farmers and livestock raisers while preventing f uture infections, Mayor Alicia P. Resus said. Deworming in 11 selected

remote ba ra ngays were carried out on 366 heads of cattle, 74 carabaos (water buffalo), 15 horses and 245 goats. Ve n a n c i o Q u i j a n o , municipal veterinarian, said cattle and other farm animals should be dewormed twice a year for best protection and provide for best livestock performance in farms. “Clinically, the parasites of the stomach and intestine of fa r m a n i ma l s c au se a n e m i a , s c ou r i n g a n d

depression. The effects of this parasitism usually are harmful, such as indigestion, poor feed conversion, and decreased milk production for brood cows,” he said. L i kew ise, mu n icipa l agriculturist Maximiano Lugao explained t hat livestock’s internal parasites, especially stomach worms, suppress appetite and reduce nutrient utilization, even when they look great. To prevent occurrence of these parasitic gastritis,

Maramag LGU has been intensifying this strategic deworming program, Lugao said. The hard-working team from the Philippine Carabao C enter a nd Ma ra mag agriculture office worked on the project to help farmers in conser v ing a nima l genetics prevents disease occurrences and outbreaks, and above all, the shifting from ‘traditional’ low-input to ‘modern’ intensive animal production.

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Cebu-based souvenir firm expands in Dipolog City CEBU City -- Cebu-based Islands Souvenirs through franchising here,” recently opened its newest franchise branch said Jay Aldeguer, founder and chairman of The Islands in Dipolog City in Zamboanga del Norte. R ay m on d M i g a b on , franchise head of The Islands Group, said the opening proves that Islands Souvenirs remains an important force in various aspects of tourism. ”Islands Souvenirs brought Cebu closer to Cebuanos and we want to the same in Dipolog. The brand has become a tool for the locals to express their pride of place. It gave them variations specifying what exactly it is about Cebu that they love. Now, they can do the same

in Dipolog,” Migabon said. Dipolog is not on ly known for its orchids and sardines industry but also for its historical and heritage sites, including its numerous tourist destinations. ”Dipolog is undeniably a beautiful city not only because of its rich history, historical landmarks, and exciting tourist destinations, but most importantly, because of its famously friendly people. This is exactly why Islands Souvenirs expanded

Group. Islands Souvenirs-Dipolog is located at Mennens Gift Mart on Rizal Ave., Dipolog City. Isla nds Souveni rs, a subsidiary of The Islands Group, was founded by Aldeguer. Islands Souvenirs “gave a fresher take to the cottageindustry products available by providing the market with distinct, vibrant, stylish, and relevant souvenir items,” the company said. expands/PAGE 10

$200-M credit card hacking ring busted ELEVEN people in the United States, the UK and Vietnam have been arrested a nd accused of running a $200 million worldwide credit card fraud ring, U.S. and UK law enforcement officials said on Wednesday. Federal prosecutors in New Jersey said they had filed charges against a 23-year-old man from Vietnam. They said in a statement that authorities in Vietnam h a d a r re s t e d D uy Ha i Truong on May 29 in an effort to break up a ring he is accused of running with co-conspirators, who were not named in the statement. “One of t he world ’s major facilitation networks for online card fraud has been dismantled by this operation, and those engaged in this type of crime should know that they are neither anonymous, nor beyond the reach of law enforcement agencies,” Andy Archibald, interim deputy director of the National Cyber Crime Unit, said in a statement on the British government’s Serious Organized Crime Agency website. The arrests were coordinated by the three countries, the statement said. The arrests come as law enforcement officials around the world are cracking down on Internet-related heists. Two weeks ago, authorities raided Liberty Reserve, a Costa Rica-based company t hat prov ided a v ir tua l cu rrenc y system used frequently by criminals to move money around the world without using the

traditional banking system. E a r l i e r l a s t m ont h , authorities arrested seven people involved in a $45 million heist in which hackers removed limits on prepaid debit cards and used ATM withdrawals to drain cash from two Middle Eastern banks. “It’s rare that you find actual human beings behind these things,” said Mark R a s ch, a for mer c y b er crimes prosecutor and now a lawyer in private practice in Bet hesda, Mar yla nd. “Usually you can tie them to organizations or hacker handles, but it’s harder to find individual people.” Rebekah Carmichael, a spokeswoman for New Jersey U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman, said the charges were filed in New Jersey’s federal court because some of the victims of the scheme are residents of the state. Prosecutors claim Truong and accomplices stole information related to more t ha n a mi l lion credit cards and resold it to criminal customers through the websites www.matteuter. biz and w w w.mattfeuter. com, according to a criminal complaint filed in federal court in New Jersey. According to the complaint, Truong hacked into websites that sold goods and services over the Internet a nd col lec ted persona l credit card information from the sites’ customers. “The victims’ credit cards i ncu r red, cu mu lat ively, more than $200 million busted/PAGE 10

BRANCHES: 002 DESMARK CORP. G LAVINIA ST VALENCIA CITY 8709 003 DESMARK CORP. 0004 SAYRE HIGHWAY DON CARLOS SUR DON CARLOS BUKIDNON 8712 004 DESMARK CORP. NATL HIWAY TAGLATAWAN BAYUGAN CITY AGUSAN DEL SUR 8502 005 DESMARK CORP. CARISMA BLDG. GEN SANTOS DRIVE ZONE II KORONADAL CITY 9506 006 DESMARK CORP. BELISARIO BLDG. J.P. LAUREL AVE. BAJADA DAVAO CITY 8000 007 DESMARK CORP. SAN PEDRO COR ILUSTRE STS DAVAO CITY 8000 008 DESMARK CORP. A VELEZ ST. CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY MIS ORIENTAL 9000 009 DESMARK CORP. MONTILLA BLVD. COR. ANDAYA ST. FORT POYOHON BUTUAN CITY AGUSAN DEL NORTE 8600

(088) 828-2051 08822-62594 (085) 830-2128 (083) 228-2058 (082) 224-6423 (082) 227-6438 (088) 857-2456 (085) 816-0933

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(063) 223-3442 (083) 552-2123 (063) 223-8666

015 DESMARK CORP. VELEZ-CRUZTAAL STS CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY 9000 016 DESMARK CORP. PUROK 3 SAYRE HIGHWAY POBLACION VALENCIA CITY 8709 017 DESMARK CORP. SAAVEDRA ST. TORIL DAVAO CITY 8000 018 DESMARK CORP. DALISAY GANTE ROAD MAGUGPO WEST TAGUM CITY DAVAO DEL NORTE 8100 019 DESMARK CORP. COR. QUEZON AND OSMENA ST., MAGUGPO CENTRAL TAGUM CITY DAVAO DEL NORTE 8100

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037 DESMARK CORP. A REGIDOR ST POBLACION V SANTA CRUZ LAGUNA 038 DESMARK CORP. DUPOINT BLDG. PUROK 17 NATIONAL HIGHWAY CALINAN DAVAO CITY 039 DESMARK CORP. BRGY. NEW SOCIETY J.C. AQUINO, BUTUAN CITY 040 DESMARK CORP. BRGY. NUEVA, SAN PEDRO LAGUNA 041 DESMARK CORP. UNIT 1, 2 & 3 G/F CONSOLACION BLDG., NATIONAL ROAD, BRGY. DILA SANTA ROSA CITY LAGUNA 4026

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UN spotlights ‘absurdity’ of global food waste WITH tons of edible produce squandered each year – never making it from farm to fork – senior United Nations officials are issuing a call on World Environment Day last Wednesday to “reduce your foodprint!,” urging everyone to help curb the massive loss and waste inherent in today’s food systems. “On this World Environment Day, I urge all actors in the global food chain to take responsibility for environmentally sustainable and socially equitable food systems,” Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said. Currently at least one third of all food produced fails to make it from farm to table. “This is foremost an affront to the hungry, but it also represents a massive environmental cost in terms of energy, land and water,” the UN chief said, noting that in developing countries, pests, inadequate storage facilities and inefficient supply chains are major contributors to food loss. Those who grow for export are also often at the mercy of over-stringent expectations of buyers who place a

premium on cosmetic perfection. In developed nations, food thrown away by households and the retail and catering industries rots in landfills, releasing significant quantities of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. “Food loss and waste is something we can all address,” Mr. Ban said, noting that the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) and public and private sector partners have launched the “Think.Eat.Save: Reduce Your Foodprint” campaign to raise global awareness and showcase solutions relevant to developed and developing countries alike. The Secretary-General explained that infrastructure and technology can reduce the amount of food that perishes after it is harvested and before it reaches the market. Governments in developing countries can work to improve essential infrastructure and maximize trade opportunities with neighbours; developed nations can support fair trade and rationalize sell-by dates and other

labelling systems; businesses can revise their criteria for rejecting produce; and consumers can minimize waste by buying only what they need and re-using left-over food. The current global population of 7 billion is expected to grow to 9 billion by 2050. But the number of hungry people need not increase. “By reducing food waste, we can save money and resources, minimize environmental impacts and, most importantly, move towards a world where everyone has enough to eat,” Mr. Ban said. The scale of the food waste issue is highlighted in a new report, released today to coincide with World Environment Day (WED), which found out that one out of every four calories produced by the global agricultural system is being lost or wasted. According to the study ‘Reducing Food Loss and Waste,’ which was produced by the World Resources Institute and UNEP and draws from FAO research, the absurdity/PAGE 10

Shellfish ban still on in Zambo Peninsula THE government yesterday reiterated that the ban earlier imposed on the harvesting, selling, buying and eating of shellfish in the Zamboanga Peninsula is still in effect. This after the The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) that Red Tide contamination was detected in Dumanguillas Bay i n Z a mboa nga del Sur; and Murcielagos Bay which straddles Zamboanga del Nor te a nd Misa mis Occidental. In the Visayas Region, the BFAR also imposed a shellfish ban in Matarinao Bay in Eastern Samar. In its May 28 report, the BFAR said the prohibition w a s ne c e s s a r y b e c au s e Red Tide renders affected shellfish unsafe for human consumption. In previous Red Tide cases, people who consumed tainted shellfish suffered paralytic shellfish poisoning, which affects the central nervous system and could lead to death. Red tide happens when algal blooms go out of control in a body of water, which then manifests a rust-like color; thus, the tag red tide. “All types of shellfish and Acetes sp. or alamang gathered from the areas ….. are not safe for human consumption. Fish, squids,

shrimps, and crabs are safe for human consumption provided that they are fresh and washed thoroughly, and internal organs such as gills and intestines are removed before cooking.” The BFAR stressed that the following areas remain free from red tide toxins and therefore shellfish gathering and sale are allowed: Cavite, L a s P i n a s , Pa r a n a qu e , Navotas and Bulacan and Bataan (Mariveles, Limay, Orion, Pilar, Balanga, Orani, Abuc ay a nd S a ma l) i n Manila Bay; Bolinao, Anda, Alaminos and Wawa, Bani in Pangasinan; Masinloc Bay in Zambales; Milagros and Mandaon in Masbate and Juag Lagoon in Matnog and Sorsogon Bay in Sorsogon; Honda and Puerto Bays in Puerto Princesa City and Inner Malampaya Sound in Taytay, Palawan; Pilar, President Roxas, Panay, Roxas City, Ivisan and Sapian in Capiz; E.B Magalona, Pontevedra, Pulupandan, Villadolid, Talisay City, Silay City, Bacolod City, Hinigaran, Cadiz Cit, Victorias City, ban/PAGE 10

Senate OK creation of food safety regulatory agency MANILA—Two separate food safety measures were approved on third and final reading on Wednesday, paving the way for the creation of a food regulatory agency and setting companies’ responsibilities in cases of food recall. Once enacted, Senate Bill No. 3311 will establish a comprehensive framework that sets the benchmark for food safety in various stages from the har vest to the manufacture, processing, handling, packaging, distribution, marketing, food preparation until its consumption.

The bill, also known as the Food Safety Act of 2012, will also establish the Food Safety Regulation Coordinating Board (FSRCB), whose functions include monitoring and coordinating the performance of the mandates of several agencies in food safety regulation. These agencies include the departments of agriculture, health, local government, and local government units. The measure defines the roles and responsibilities of food business operators and government agencies involved in the senate/PAGE 10

Alcala urges local, foreign firms to invest in agriculture AGRICULTURE Secretary Proceso J. Alcala has asked big Filipino and foreign corporations to plunk in more money in agriculture. Alcala made the pitch during a recent breakfast meeting with officers and members of the Management Association of the Philippines (MAP), led by Peter Wallace, a longtime Manila resident and a member of the AustraliaNew Zealand Chamber of Commerce. While he was seeking more investments for the farm sector from M AP, the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) was actually providing more loans to hog raisers in Central Luzon through its agribusiness unit. BPI said it was offering a package to borrowers wishing to secure millions of pesos to make their agribusiness operations move full blast. BPI said it is serious in complying with requirements of the agri-agra law that mandates banks to devote 20 percent of their loan portfolio to agriculture. On the other hand, Irish and French businessmen are also putting up organic poultry farms in Cagayan de Oro City in Misamis Oriental and nearby areas that can supply the needs of the lechon manok (roasted chicken) market. These foreign investors alcala/PAGE 10

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Energy

FIBECO marks 41st anniversary By Armando A. Cantoy, ISD-Manager

Year 2013 marks another milestone for FIBECO. This big celebration epitomizes the institution’s commitment to rural electrification. On June 12 to 13, 2013, FIBECO will be holding a two-day anniversary celebration which will be graced by dignitaries from the National Electrification Administration (NEA). The celebration was actually moved from its original anniversary date, May 13, due to the recently conducted National and Local Elections. FIBECO as One of the Top Performing Electric Cooperatives Since 2008, FIBECO maintains the Category A+ status under the National Electrification Administration (NEA) standards. It is the highest categorization given to a well performing electric cooperative considering its financial, technical and institutional viability. In the recently released NEA-Memorandum 2013-09, FIBECO was categorized as AAA-Electric Cooperative using the new Key Performance Standards set by NEA. Out of the one hundred nine (109) electric cooperatives in the country, only fifty (50), including FIBECO, have met the highest rank. Major Innovations and Developments Anchored to FIBECO’s mission and vision of becoming world-class, globally competitive, financially stable and member-consumer-owned electric distribution utility serving as a catalyst of change towards total consumers’ satisfaction and improvement of life, the following innovations and developments are underway: (1) Installation of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) and Monitoring System which is designed to acquire, supervise, and control the whole distribution system and increase power reliability, fast track responses to consumers’ complaints, provide security and monitoring for all sub-stations assets and accessories, and make available on-line and at real time information necessary for system’s predictive and preventive maintenance; (2) Adoption of Consumer Management Business Integrated System (CMBIS) which is adopted to facilitate fast, interconnected, and paperless transactions for the convenience for member-consumers. It is a solution for enterprise resource planning (ERP) anchored on a proprietary platform to implement a unified information system using computer imbedded procedures and modular applications to methodically gather, process, and record transaction-based

data across the organization. To add up, (3) Construction of thirty-two (32) kilometers 69kV Sub-transmission line from Barangay Poblacion, Maramag going to Barangay Barandias, Pangantucan and of five (5) MVA Sub-station located in Barangay Barandias, Pangantucan to improve power distribution system and increase system’s reliability; (4) Construction of parallel lines from Puntian, Quezon to Barangay Camp 1, Maramag (34 circuit kilometers), from Barangay Dabong-dabong to Barangay Lumbo, Valencia City (12.045 circuit kilometers), and from Barangay Dabong-dabong, Valencia City to its neighboring municipality - San Fernando (34.722 circuit kilometers). These line constructions, likewise, help for the improvement of power quality, reliability and efficiency of power transmission and distribution systems of FIBECO; (5) Pre-development activities for Biomass Power Plants and Mini-Hydro Electric Plant to be located in the strategic areas in the province of Bukidnon; And the (6) Conduct of Biomass Resource Assessment in selected areas in Mindanao through USAID grant under Climate Change and Clean Energy Project of USAID-Philippines; and (7.) Entered into Power Supply Agreement with Crystal Sugar Company and KEG/ DPP for additional supply of power to avoid rotating power interruptions and provide continuous supply of power to consumers of FIBECO. Under the management of Engr. Renato S. Cortezano, and the presidency of Dr. Regin D. Mordeno, FIBECO continues to explore other possible ways to ensure dependable supply of power in the next five to ten years, and even beyond, for FIBECO and the Province as well. FIBECO is committed to provide reliable and affordable electricity and high quality of service to its member-consumers to continue to make lives better. On top of the coop’s major innovations and f lagship programs, Engr. Cortezano is exploring on the possibilities of bundling internet and telephone services, including television cable services to the distribution system of FIBECO.

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DPWH completes P122-M worth of infrastructure projects in Misamis Occidental By Christine H. Cabiasa

The Department of Public Works and HighwaysMisamis Occidental has completed 24 infrastructure projects amounting to P122.683 million, all done on the 30th of April, this year. Engr. Denise M. Ayag, officer-in-charge, DPWH, 2nd engineering district said that the series of projects were only pegged at P115.588 million based on the bidding conducted by different contractors but it exceeded 5.78% of the total expected cost of the projects. “The funds were taken from the Basic Education Facilities Fund (BEFF), Preventive Maintenance Fund (PVMF), Maintenance, Operations and Other Expenses Fund (MOOEF), and savings from the DPWH,” Engr. Ayag added. Engr. Ayag also said that the projects were not included in the public works ban during the May 13 midterm elections since some of the contracts were already awarded and signed and were already commenced before the ban was implemented on the 29th of March. The 24 projects completed are the following, constructions of Sinara Bajo and Gata Primary Schools (PS), Zamora Elementary School (ES), Mitazan Integrated School (IS), and the Cartagena Elementary School which were bid at P654, 000 each. Also, the Manla and Caluya Elementary School, Mangidkid Elementary School at P664, 000 each, the Bunga National High School (NHS) at P781, 000, Lower Montol Elementary School at P634, 000, and the Durias Elementary School and Proceso Alburo Memorial Elementary School at P1.156 million each. However, part of the budget went to the 50-mm asphalt laying of the Jimenez Old Route at P386, 000, Calamba-Baliangao Road at P496, 000, OroquietaLangcangan Road at P4.572 million, Bagacay-Cadre Road at P4.799 million, Ozamis-Oroquieta Road at P12.114 million, Oroquieta-Calamba Mountain Road, Phase 1 and Phase 2 at P1.394 million and P2.594 dpwh/PAGE 7


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Is your family climate-controlled? THINK

hink a minute…W hat kind of climate do you A Minute enjoy living in? By Jhan Tiafau Hurst Did you know that you can live in the exact climate you want! I’m not talking about the weather climate, but the more important climate of your home. The daily mood of your marriage and family. Ju st l i ke a ga rden or plantation lives and grows best in a certain kind of climate, so does your marriage and family. Your wife or husband and children live happiest when you control the climate of feelings and emotions in your home. We do this by the way we talk and treat each other. The way we react to the daily problems, mistakes, or disagreements we may have. Do you wish your family was more peaceful and happy? That you and your wife or husband did not argue and fight so much? That your kids were more happy and confident? Well, no one is forcing you and your family to live in that kind of unhappy atmosphere. It’s your choice. You must decide to be the first to change and control your own heart, moods, and anger. You can’t have a peaceful, happy marriage and family until you yourself first have peace and happiness in your own heart. Jesus can give you that kind of peace, power, and selfcontrol you need. Then you can help create the loving, happy climate in your home. hurst/PAGE 7

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The window is closing

T

wo years ago, the Macabalan port was scheduled to get a P400-million upgrade as part of the Philippine Ports Authority’s aim to meet international port facility and service standards for 10 key ports by the end of 2011. Rep. Rufus B. Rodriguez (2nd District, Cagayan de Oro) hosted a press conference at the PPA Cagayan de Oro Port Manager’s Office where Port Manager Capt. Necitas G. Layola, Jr. (Ret., PA) presented the following priority projects approved by then PPA General Manager Juan C. Sta. Ana: construction of a new passenger terminal building (P250-million); paving of newly completed back-up area (P71.269-M) and construction of RoRo berthing facilities and berthing dolphins (P50-M). The first two projects would have been funded by PPA’s internal funds while the third project was conceptualized as a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) project to be undertaken by the private sector. The facility would have been used for general cargo, dry bulk and containerized conventional domestic and foreign vessels. It would have also included an additional area for break bulk cargo like fertilizer, corn grains and sugar, and a common storage area for break bulk cargo in crates, rolled steel coils, logs, lumber, bottled cargo and other steel products. A notice of award was given to the winning bidder by the PPA Head Office on May 23, 2011. The jewel of the expansion project was the P250million two storey passenger terminal with an estimated 1,000-person seating capacity. The program of work for the project was completed by the PPA Head Office and bidding was scheduled at the end of June, 2011.

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The P50-million threeammer unit Roll on-Roll off berth and A nvil and breasting dolphins were By Mike Baños to have been constructed at Berths 1-5 near the passenger terminal complex to ease berth congestion and dedicated to Manila, Cebu, Bohol and Bacolod route RoRo passenger vessels using Mediterranean docking. With the provision of 3-meter w ide elevated walkways, the RORO berth and breasting dolphins would have enhanced the convenience, safety and security of embarking and disembarking passengers. Initially, five projects were requested by Rep. Rodriguez from the PPA including P20-million for the repair of the warehouse which now serves as the passenger terminal and another P80-million for the construction of a new terminal but the PPA Head Office instead chose to upgrade the request to the two-story P250-million facility. Why are we referring to all these in the past tense? Because during the tenure at the Dept. of Transportation and Communications (DOTC) of now DILG Sec. Mar Roxas, he downgraded this and most other of the PPA’s expansion projects so what’s left of the jewel which would have catapulted Cagayan de Oro’s progress to the next level baños/PAGE 7

H

Excellence in BSP’s Official, Personnel

ne of the core values of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas is excellence. Such excellence is reflected in the men and women of the BSP, including its new hires. In the Bangko Sentral’s annual “Breakfast With the Governor,” a special event in which the new employees get to know Governor Amando M. Tetangco Jr. up close and personal, it was revealed how impressive the BSP’s most recent batch of new hires is. According to Managing Director Gerardo S. Tison of the BSP’s Human Resource Sub-Sector, the BSP’s new crop of 343 employees include two summa cum laude, seven magna cum laude, and 31 cum laude. Based on the Bank’s battery of tough pre-employment examinations, 18 of the new employees have very superior IQ, while 52 obtained superior ratings. Other interesting facts about the new hires: 15 are master’s degree holders, one has a Ph.D., 152 are certified public accountants, 18 are engineers, 15 are criminologists, seven are lawyers, three are teachers, two are architects, one is a doctor, another an agriculturist, and still another a librarian. “An impressive batch indeed, which bodes well for excellent work performance,” Tison said of the new recruits. Gov. Tetangco, himself a paragon of excellence (named Best Central Banker several times over), beams with pride over the tough BSP selection process. “...we need to ensure that we can be the best that we can be in working on our mandate as a central monetary authority,” Tetangco said to the new BSP employees.

SPEAKING

He explained t hat t he policies and the programs of O ut the BSP ultimately affect the By Ignacio Bunye lives of all Filipinos — whether it is ensuring stable prices, a sound banking system, or making sure that the country’s payments and settlements system is safe, sound and efficient. Tetangco introduced to the new central bankers the ot her members of senior ma nagement whom he described as “seasoned and crisis-honed central bankers.” Deputy Governor Nestor Espenilla, Jr., of the BSP’s Supervision and Examination Sector, for instance, was recently named as Chair of the Basel Consultative Group Workstream on Financial Inclusion, giving a leadership role for BSP in the discussions with global standard-setting bodies. Tetangco described Deputy Governor Diwa Guinigundo, on the other hand, as a tireless advocate of economic and financial education,” adding that the deputy governor travels to the provinces to spread the good news on the Credit Surety Fund, which provides MSMEs access to collateral-free loans. Bunye/PAGE 7

Accidents do happen!

Juni Law Office Cruz Taal St.,CDO Legal Counsel

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A

ccidents are what they are and most times there is nothing one can do about them which is why they are called accidents. Unless there is intent, it is but an accident. But what do we do with human error and worst of all; incompetence? In Europe after the fall of the financial systems, regulators were quick to penalize incompetence and human error which gave rise to multiple complaints towards human rights. And should these human rights not be addressed who in his right mind will accept responsibility towards issues one has no control over. Wall Street in New York may have been at fault but it was a concerted effort that brought down the financial system worldwide. To date few if none at all have been penalized for Wall Street’s carelessness treating the financial system as if a casino with the elusive derivatives trading which mind you were considered legal. This brings us to the disasters we saw of Cebu Pacific in the Davao airport and the explosion of the Serendra Two building at the Bonifacio Global City. Surely on both occasions we can call them accidents. While human error is coming out to be the cause for the Cebu Pacific airplane, surely the seeming gas leak at the Serendra has to be some type of human error as well.

SUPER

What is interesting is how all the players involved are all B randing towing the line as if a director By Harry Tambuatco to a play or a conductor of an orchestra. Complaints are filed and possibly even a class suits. Meanwhile dole outs by respondents are held in abeyance till such time these complaints are put into order or what we call courts. From there let’s give it a decade if not two before resolutions are made. And by the time they are paid, values of monies to be paid out will no longer satisfy the same values today. Then there are the law firms and lawyers who are on a hay day to slug it out in court for the next twenty years. The losers of course will be government, the local government, the airport, complainants of the law suits and even the insurance companies (or maybe not the insurance companies) who are all made to wait and to pay legal fees for the courts to resolve. There is the infamous Ampatuan case, a criminal class suit tambuatco/PAGE 7


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Hurst... from page 6

It’s never too late to change. So today, why not ask Jesus to forgive you for your past anger and lack of selfcontrol with your family? Then ask Him to take c h a r ge of y ou r h e a r t , marriage, and family, so you can finally start enjoying a satisfying, peaceful climate in your home everyday—for the rest of your life. Just Think a Minute…

Baños... from page 6

level is a pathetic P50-million shell of a Passenger Terminal Building. H ow p a t h e t i c? T h e original P250-million plan the funds for which were already allocated from PPA’s internal funds and scheduled for bidding, had two stories with a total area of 6,940.54 sq.m. vs. the 2,520 sq.m. of the reduced PTB which is only a bare shell of a building without anything in it. As in bare floor sans any chairs, baggage carousel, public address system, airconditioning units, baggage claim area, genset, sorting carousel, business center/ c a r r ie r lou n ge , d i ap e r changing area, male/female toilets, baggage handling a r e a , b a g g a ge l o a d i n g conveyor, departure and arrival galleries, baggage cart parking, escalators, utility rooms, storage rooms,

port police/security CCTV monitoring area, check-in area, X-ray machine area and sprinkler system. And with the disappearance of the second floor as well went the port ad m i n of f ice, smok i ng area, Ka la kbay Centers, carrier of f ices, securit y offices, arrival gates/room, immigration processing a re a , e c u men ic a l h a l l, play area, departure gates, concessionaire stalls, balcony are and view decks. Although Mr. Roxas may have thought inter-island commuters were increasingly taking to air travel with the advent of budget air carriers, recent passenger traffic at the Macabalan port show the number of commuters who travel by sea through the Cagayan de Oro Port still increased 12.13 percent from 2011 (1,012,099) to 2012 (1,134,824). The downgrade of the PTB project to its present P50-million shell also comes at a time when air commuters especially to Cebu, Bacolod and Iloilo are having second thoughts about undertaking the expensive overland trip to the new Laguindingan Airport which would cost them more in terms of the travel time and airfare than they would have spent had they originated from the present Lumbia airport. It is an insult to a city with the prestige and potential of Cagayan de Oro and Nor t her n M i nd a nao to

have a passenger terminal building at its premier port without even the barest of amenities its other PTBs in Balingoan, Misamis Oriental a nd B enon i, C a m ig u i n already have. Re p. Ro d r i g u e z h a s promised to fight the budget cut when the 16th Congress convenes later this year and we are sure he will have t he business sector and civil society behind him all the way. But the window is closing and we have to move fast while the bidding for the P50M PTB is stymied by technical issues else we will not have anyone except ourselves to blame for settling for less than what we deserve to have.

Bunye... from page 6

L a s t l y, R e s o u r c e Management Sector Deputy Governor Juan De Zuñiga, Jr. has been at the forefront of the continuous transformation of the BSP into a highly performing institution. “He leads our legal team to win cases, and is behind the publication of the BSP’s series of legal books on banking laws to promote better understanding of the BSP’s mandate, policies and programs,” Tetangco shared. It comes as no surprise then that the Bangko Sentral n g P i l ipi n a s h a s b e e n consistently ranked No. 1 in the Makati Business Club surveys of Best Performing Government Agencies.

Note: My book, Central Banking for Every Juan and Maria, is now available at the following outlets: Fully Booked – Bonifacio Global C it y, Powe r pl a nt M a l l (Rock wel l), K at ipu na n. Power Books – Alabang Town Center, Greenbelt 4, Serend ra. Nat iona l Book Store – Greenbelt 1, Powerplant Mall (Rockewell), Cash and Carry, Market Market

Tambuatco... from page 6

suit that has stagnated now for some three years and counting. Considering the worldwide exposure this case received it is a wonder how in the Philippines it goes on and on like an energizer battery. And considering the high profile players like the Gonkonwei’s and the Zobel’s––will there be compensation due to whomever? I seriously doubt!!! In court in this country nothing is resolved––it is called procrastination with legal procedures that make it acceptable. This is the freedom we enjoy and the game of the rich and of those with authority.

DPWH... from page 5

respectively, and the 80m m a s p h a lt l ay i n g of t he Oroquieta-Ca la mba Mountain Road at P5.558 million. Engr. Ayag said that the

rest of the budget went to the repair and maintenance of the DPWH Building in Tangub City and Ozamis City, road cementing and pavements. “ T he cont r ac tors of the said projects were the Alinab Construction and Supplies, GLS Construction

7

and General Merchandise, Misamis Occidenta l Construction, MBD General Construction, Grace Construction Corporation, Mindanao Rock, Henry S. Oaminal Construction and General Merchandise and the Administration, “Engr. Ayag added.


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Dr. Enrique A. Tayag, DOH Undersecretary commits his support to HIV/ AIDS awareness campaign, the ceremonial signing was done during the 30th International Aids Day celebration here in Cagayan de Oro City. Photo by Rodolfo D. Mendoza, PIA-10

City Central School here in Cagayan de Oro city holds the nationwide Brigada Eskwela 2013 to welcome and orient mothers and incoming elementary students for a clean-up drive prior to start of classes. This is to make sure students carry pencils and papers instead of broomsticks on June 3. Photo by JMORucat,PIA-10

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Absurdity... from page 4

world will need about 60 per cent more food calories in 2050 compared to 2006 if global demand continues on its current trajectory. “It is an extraordinary fact that in the 21st century, close to 25 per cent of all the calories linked with growing and producing food are lost or wasted between the farm and the fork—food that could feed the hungry, food that has required energy, water and soils in a world of increasing natural resource scarcities and environmental concerns including climate change,” said Achim Steiner, UNEP Executive Director, drawing attention to the absurdity that high volumes of perfectly edible produce are never consumed. “The menu of case studies and recommendations in this study provide national and community-led solutions t hat a l ly smar t policies with traditional knowledge, modern science and common sense,” he added, referring to the study’s recommendations. T h rou g h t h i s ye a r’s WED campaign, the UN and its partners are inviting people across the world to join in an effort to raise awareness and take practical actions “whether in your home, whether on your farm, whether in the supermarket, in a canteen, in a hotel or anywhere else where food is prepared and consumed.”

This year’s global host for the Day is Mongolia, one of the fastest growing economies in the world and one that is aiming for a transition to a green economy and a green civilization. “It is not a big waster or loser of food, but the traditional and nomadic life of many of its people does have some ancient answers to the modern-day challenge of food waste,” Mr. Steiner said. The Mongol Genera l Chinggis Khan and his troops utilized a traditional food called “borts” to gallop across Asia without depending on elaborate supply chains. Bor t s, he ex pla i ned , is basically concentrated beef equal to the protein of an entire cow but condensed and ground down to the size of a human fist. “This remarkable method of food preservation, without refrigeration, meant a meal equivalent to several steaks when the protein was shaved into hot water to make soup,” he said. In adva nce of WED, UNEP has also been compiling similar examples of traditional and indigenous knowledge from familiar techniques such as pickling or salting fish to the smoking of meat, the drying of fruit and other techniques employed by the Inuits to preserve seabirds which are served later at feasts and weddings. WED is being observed in many countries today, including in Iraq, where at least 1.9 million people

are food deprived and 4 million are vulnerable to food insecurity. Resident Humanitarian Coordinator Jacqueline Badcock stressed t hat ta k ing ca re of t he environment is crucial to address food insecurity in the country, which increasingly relies on imports to meet its food needs due to poor environmental management. “It is essential that the Government continues to put in place the policies and good environmental practices that will re-establish Iraqi ag r ic u lt u re a nd ensu re food supply for the most vulnerable,” she said. (UNIC)

Senate... from page 4

food business, with emphasis placed on food business operators on their knowledge of the specific requirements and procedures relevant to their activities. Food business operators, under the measure, will also be held accountable on instances of food recall. The measure also provides stiff penalties to those who are found guilty of violating its provisions, ranging from fines as low as P50,000 to P300,000 and the suspension of appropriate licenses to conduc t busi ness or to prepare food. Besides being tasked with food safety regulation, crisis management, and planning during food safety emergencies, t he boa rd will also set policies and procedures for coordination

among agencies involved in food safety. It will also c o nt i n u o u s l y e v a l u a t e food sa fet y reg u lat ions and research and training programs aimed at addressing food safety hazards. The bill is authored by Senators Jinggoy Estrada, Ma n ny Vi l la r, Edga rdo Angara and Miriam Defensor Santiago. The Senate also passed on third and final reading amendments to the Price Act (Republic Act No. 7581), that will include bottled water and locally manufactured instant noodles in the list of basic items considered as prime commodities. Once enac ted , t hese amendments will increase protection of consumers against unscrupulous traders and merchants who jack up prices of goods during emergenc y situat ions. (Interaksyon)

Alcala... from page 4

appa rent ly chose t he Philippines since the country is free from the dreaded avian inf luenza (AI) virus that regularly decimates chicken p opu l at ion s of C h i n a , Viet na m a nd adjoi ni ng countries. A s proj e c t e d , t he s e investors may rear 140,000 chickens and add another 90,000 if Northern Mindanao can supply the rice bran (darak) and coconut meat s h av i n g s (s a p a l) f r o m c o c onu t s t h a t w i l l b e

processed into feeds for chicken. Irish and French businessmen are seeking t he help of A lca la a nd Department of Agriculture (DA) Region 10 Director Lealyn Ramos in sourcing between 25 metric tons (MT) and 30 MT of darak and sapal weekly that they need to feed their chickens in Cagayan de Oro alone. In his appeal to t h e M A P, A l c a l a s a id Filipino corporations and multinational companies must pour more investments into agriculture, fishery and agribusiness ventures. He added that he has been aggressively promoting and marketing Filipino farm, fishery and food products to the rest of the world. The DA, Alcala said, is gunning to attain sufficiency in rice and other major staples and export non-traditional products such as aromatic and organic colored rice, corn silage, onions and shallots. (BM)

Ban...

from page 4

Bago Cit y, Bi na l ibaga n and San Enrique in Negros Occidental; Irong-irong, Maqueda, and Villareal Bays in Samar; Ormoc, San Pedro, Cancabato and Carigara Bays in Leyte; Biliran waters in

Biliran province; Hinatuan, Bisig and Lianga bays in Surigao del Sur; Balite Bay, Mati Davao Oriental; and Taguines Lagoon in Benoni Mahinog, Camiguin Island. (From Interaksyon)

Busted... from page 3

in fraudulent charges,” the complaint said. The scheme began in 2007. “L i ke ma ny ‘c a rder’ cases, this is an international conspiracy,” Rasch said, add i ng t hat a recent ly passed computer cr i me law in Vietnam had made it possible for Vietnamese authorities to participate in the multinational sting. Although Truong has been charged in the United States, he does not have a U.S.-based lawyer because he is being held in Vietnam, Carmichael said.

Expands... from page 3

The success of Islands Souvenirs has paved the way for the other subsidiaries of the Islands Group, giving birth to Islands Stay Hotels, Isla nd s Ba nc a Cr u ises , Islands Pasalubong Inc., Islands Pasalubong Mall, Islands & More, Islands Design and Merchandising, and Islands Franchise Corp. (PNA)

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Looms... from page 1

971 Victims, businessman Andrew Bautista told reporters on Tuesday night that they have already tapped lawyer Robert de Leon for the legal action. Bautista, who was elected by 44 other passengers who gathered Tuesday night, said they have not yet come up with the amount of damages that they would demand from the airline company. “All of the passengers are already aware of this because right after the incident, we were given so much time to discuss while we were waiting for the assistance coming from the crew,” said Bautista. The passengers have accused the airline crew of mishandling what was apparently an emergency situation. Bautista and his fellow passengers recounted they were able to get out of the plane after around 27 minutes. “We want to know the value of the passengers, we the victims. We rode that airplane because we entrusted our lives to them,” stressed Bautista who traveled with his family including a one-year old baby. Dr. Jess Delgado of the Ateneo de Davao University (ADDU) and SP01 Jun Narciso told MindaNews that none from the crew acted immediately when the aircraft came to a full stop. Instead, it was a former Navy officer who took charge and managed the exit of the passengers from the aircraft. The passengers added there was no immediate and organized evacuation from the site to the airport terminal. Some of them had to walk for around half kilometer to the airport terminal. Delgado said they were loaded into an ambulance “like sardines”. Crash Landing? Rescuers come to the aid of the Cebu Pacific plane that skidded off the runway of the Davao International Airport Sunday evening (3 June 2013). Reports say none of the 165 passengers were hurt. Photo taken by a passenger shortly after the incident. MindaNews photo Rescuers come to the aid of the Cebu Pacific plane that skidded off the runway of the Davao International Airport Sunday evening (3 June 2013). Reports say none of the 165 passengers were hurt. Photo taken by a passenger shortly after the incident. MindaNews photo Narciso, who came from Manila for an official business in Camp Crame, claimed that he saw a flame on the left engine but tried to remain calm so as not to cause panic among the passengers. But he added he could not say how big the flame was because it was raining so hard. He felt that the plane hurriedly landed. ”It was a crash landing.” Delgado, who was seated on 10F, also recalled that he saw a flame on the right engine shortly before the plane touched down, although he noticed that it descended normally. Delgado and businessman John Gaisano recounted that the plane landed on soil. Giselle Escobañez, an ADDU student, recalled that she saw the grassy portion beside the runway when they had touched down and confirmed that the plane landed on soil. In an inter view with ANC, Andrews showed photographs from his tablet showing the aircraft touched down very near the grassy area where it eventually stopped. The plane was removed from the runway around 8p.m. Tuesday and towed to the tarmac of the old terminal, which was around 400

meters away from the site. Workers used a crane to lift the aircraft’s nose and stacked it on a 20-wheeler trailer truck. Cebu Pacific Air reportedly flew in Singaporean contractors to lead the removal operations but utilized their cargo loaders as assistants. Where are the pilots? The former Navy official, who was later named in news reports as Marlon Bo, confirmed to reporters on Tuesday that he was one of those who stood up and controlled the terrified passengers. “At that moment, ako lang ang tumayo because for five to 10 minutes everyone was so shocked,” Bo told reporters. He added that he had not seen the pilots when they were evacuating the passengers. He said aircraft officers should get out only after the last passenger has disembarked. “I did not expect that the first officer and the captain will leave us. I think they abandoned their responsibility.” Reporters asked Bo if he had actually seen the pilots leave, but he said he was leaving the other details to their lawyer. Bo, however, recalled he and the two female flight attendants were the last persons to leave the plane, and he no longer saw the pilots. Bautista showed a video that he took using his phone that a ladder was apparently erected on the left side of the cockpit’s emergency exit. He posted the video on his Facebook account. “Buti pa siya may hagdanan,” said Bautista referring to the pilots. But in an interview with ANC’s Karen Davila Tuesday morning, Cebu Pacific vice president and spokesperson Candice Iyog claimed the pilots and the flight attendants were the last to leave the plane. ‘I thought we’re gonna die’ Andrews pointed out that it was an emergency situation and the passengers should have been evacuated within three minutes. Delgado recalled that he noticed smoke inside the aircraft. He said it was not so thick, but he was terrified that the plane might explode. “I thought we’re gonna die,” he said, adding his mind was already full of thoughts about his wife and two children, a six-year old girl and a four-year old boy. Meanwhile, Bautista refuted the claims of the airline company that the flight attendants did not panic. “Because I saw how the FAs reacted, they were the first ones who shouted.” Davao Oriental Vice Governor Joel Almario earlier said it took about two hours before the company’s manager in Davao City talked to the passengers and nobody seemed to be in charge on the ground. He said simple things like a bus to fetch the passengers from the aircraft to the terminal were not provided even as passengers had remained inside the aircraft for over 20 minutes since the touchdown shortly after 7 p.m. In the same TV interview, Almario said that two hours after the accident, “wala pang pagkain, wala pang doctor dumating. Walang nakakausap na matinong crew na nakakasagot.” Traumatized Bautista said the common goal of the group is to prevent the same things from happening in the future. “This is not about the money. May damage na nangyari, somebody has to pay for it and be put in jail, somebody has to be fired,” he added. But Bautista explained that his group’s move does not aim to taint the image of Cebu Pacific Air but “for them to improve.” Asked if he would still ride an

airplane in the next few days, he said, “I would rather ride a bus going to Manila. We have the same feeling, we are all traumatized by it.” He disclosed that some are now taking sleeping pills. ”It’s like we’re living dead now.”

Aid...

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work, development initiatives can be generously rewarded. ENGAGE is a five-year project that seeks to address governance challenges that lead to continued social and economic instabilities and marginalization. The project also aims to promote community empowerment as a foundation for inclusive local governance. Mindanao Development Authority (MinDA) Executive Director Janet Lopoz chats with US Ambassador Harry Thomas Jr. during the launch of USAID projects held recently in Zamboanga City. | Photo by Sonny Mendoza Mindanao Development Authority (MinDA) Executive Director Janet Lopoz chats with US Ambassador Harry Thomas Jr. during the launch of USAID projects held recently in Zamboanga City. | Photo by Sonny Mendoza MYDev is designed to strengthen the capacity of local government units, communities, and stakeholders to deliver education and training services to out-of-school youth. The five-year project aims to increase youth access to education through the Department of Education’s Alternative Learning System, and enhance out-of-school youth employability by providing equitable access to relevant education and skills training. MindanaoHealth on the other hand is also five-year project that aims to strengthen the delivery of health services in conflict-affected areas of Mindanao. The project will support the Department of Healthled scale up of high-impact services and patient-centered information to improve maternal, neonatal, child health and nutrition outcomes, and to reduce the unmet need for family planning methods, especially among the underprivileged sectors. Janet Lopoz, MinDA executive director, welcomed the implementation of the three new projects. “ MinDA’s par tnership with USAID has evolved through the years into one of the strongest alliances among the Philippine Government-development agencies collaborations,” said Lopoz. MinDA has been serving as oversight agency for several USAID programs in Mindanao. Working with USAID, Lopoz said, MinDA has noted important headways on major peace and development imperatives particularly in MIndanao’s depressed and conflict-affected communities. Lopoz said the three new projects will help strengthen local government units, improve youth access to education, and enhance the delivery of vital health services across the region’s conflict-affected areas. “We are confident that USAID will pursue the successful implementation of these projects as they have done in the past 50 years and we are eager to work with the organization once more in moulding a greener, more progressive, and peaceful Mindanao,” Lopoz said.

the cap ar through a corresponding increase in their electricity bills. The reduction in the cooperatives’ system loss has an equivalent savings of 170,423,093 kilowatt-hours or about P1.15 billion for the memberconsumers they serve. NEA attributed the reduction mainly to the massive meter changes, including pole metering and cluster metering the cooperatives undertook. Last year, 17 substations with an additional capacity of 202.5 megavolt-amperes were also installed and commissioned, which led to better service efficiency. Of the total number of cooperatives under the state agency’s watch, 23 posted a single-digit system loss while 77 were within the cap set by the ERC. “Another 53 [cooperatives] showed marked improvement in their system loss level in 2012 compared to their 2011 level,” NEA said. The five that had the lowest system loss were Dinagat Island Electric Cooperative Inc with 5.07 percent; Misamis Oriental I Electric Service Inc, 5.24 percent; Siargao Electric Cooperative Inc, 6.05 percent; Cebu III Electric Cooperative Inc, 6.46 percent; and Agusan del Sur Electric Cooperative Inc, 6.77 percent. To help bring down system losses, which are borne out of pilferage and technical considerations, NEA said it has partnered with the University of the Philippines-National Engineering

Center since 2005 to bring about a more scientific approach in the technical evaluation and analysis of such losses and to address the requirements of capital expenditure projects. NEA also sought assistance from the Japan International Cooperation Agency, which in turn tapped the expertise of the Tokyo Electric Power Co of Japan to collaborate with NEA and the cooperatives. The output of this collaboration is a “System Loss Reduction Manual,” which aims to develop the technical capacity and planning abilities of NEA and the cooperatives to reduce distribution system losses. The state-run agency is also working with the Korean government through the Korea Eximbank on a technical assistance project to improve the efficiency of cooperatives.

DOE... from page 1

and comments to finalize the Code of Practice for the RESHERR that will be observe in the industry so that the health and safety of environment and the workplace will not be compromise. The DOE has earlier drafted the Code of Practice to ensure that every renewable energy employer will promote, protect and maintain the health and well-being of its employees through the implementation of an occupational health program. Cerezo said the RESHERR which took effect in November,

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last year, mandates renewable energy developer and employer to observe the standards set to promote adequate safety and protection against hazards to health, life, property and the environment from renewable energy operations. It grants authority to the DOE to enforce the rules and other pertinent regulations towards occupational safety, health and environment in the RE sector. Cerezo said a similar consultation will also be conducted in Cebu on Wednesday for Visayas renewable energy developers and stakeholders.

DSWD... from page 2

the assessment of the DSWD social workers. They base their assessment on the qualifications and their living conditions. The DSWD emphasizes that only a maximum of P5,000.00 shall be given to those families whose houses were assessed as partially damaged, and a maximum of P10,000.00 for families whose houses were assessed as totally damaged. The DSWD however clarifies that some may receive an amount lesser than P5,000.00 or P10,000.00 depending on the need and living condition of the families. “As much as we want to accommodate all the communities’ demand, we are still bound by the policies and guidelines of the ESA. Rest assured, there are still other DSWD social services and social protection programs available to the communities of which they can avail,” Ms. Ramos said.

Outlook... from page 1

of 0.13 percent from the 11.87 percent the previous year. This is lower by 1.26 percent than the 13 percent cap set by the Energy Regulatory Commission. Consumers shoulder losses above

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Feature

IN-DEPTH

friday - june 7, 2013

Volunteers find a home in Balay By BONG FABE Associate Editor

THEY are found in all sorts of situations, in all social strata, in all levels of society, in churches, in government, in the private sector, in the rebel movement, in the cities and in the barrios. They are adept at adapting to any situation and circumstance except maybe their own because all they think about is “the others” that they oftentimes forget about “the self.” And they are often bulingit (literally translated “dirty”) not because they don’t take a bath or because they don’t take care of themselves. No! On the contrary, they are some of the world’s most clean and healthy individuals. But yes! They are bulingit because they most often do literally dirty and thankless works that others shun doing, especially if the dirty work make a difference in the life of their fellows. When they do a “job”, they do it as if there is no tomorrow. They oftentimes lost track of time if it means getting the job done. Again, not for themselves, but for their fellows. No supertyphoon, deluge or fire can prevent them from reaching out to the needy; in fact, disasters all the more get them going. They are altruistic, daring

Volunteers for FAITH And in a Philippines that greatly needed FAITH, volunteers are there rising to the challenge to answer F-AI-T-H with faith—a strong belief that what they are doing will bear fruit and impact society for the better. What is F-A-I-T-H? For the VIPS—Volunteers In the Philippines—it refers to Food security and poverty alleviation; Access to education and culture; Integrity of creation or the environment; Truthfulness and transparency in governance; and Human security at all level, not only peace and order, but also in development. F-A-I-T-H is the development challenge the world, that is beginning to lost all faith in their public officials, is trying to solve. Thanks to the volunteers, their strong faith (belief) that they are making small differences in the world, continue to ignite faith in others—a faith that is not religious but very contagious. And rightly so since 2013 has been declared the Year of Faith by the Vatican. “Volunteers are being challenged to continue to do our best to answer all these developmental challenges. Let’s continue to give of ourselves,” said Myrna Aboniawan-Siose, vice president for Program Development of the VOICE Network, Inc. Siose — a former JVP volunteer who founded together with Archbishop Antonio J. Ledesma, the Year of Service (YOS) — reminded everyone, especially newly-elected officials, to cultivate the spirit of the volunteer in service to the Filipino. Recognizing the role of volunteers in nation-building, Malacaňang enacted in 2007 Republic Act 9418 or the Volunteer Act of 2007, which mandates government to harness volunteerism as a strategy for social transformation, sustainable national development and international cooperation. R.A. 9418 provides (1) the policy framework that shall underscore the

daredevils who will stop at nothing just to ease the sufferings of other people. Even for just a day. And they call it a day when they see a hint of a smile from those they are helping. They are made of the toughest materials God reserved for their kind. Deep inside each of them, however, one can find the most soft, cushy and mushy individual who cries just at the sight of an old couple with their dog huddled in a makeshift shanty in a corner of a posh establishment or at the sight of a barefooted, butt-naked child in tattered rags whose face is smeared with grease, dirt and dried “nose juices” begging on the steps of a fastfood chain. Like a fly fleeting from one rotting carcass to another, they look for the worst situation so that can give of their best and make society a much better place to live in. They think and live in the present. But their “job” always factor in the future. Not of their own, but of others. They don’t mind minding other’s sufferings that sometimes their very own family suffers because of their absence.

They are always on the go. They agonized when leaving but feel strange upon returning. Homeless nomads, that’s what they are. And they are called VOLUNTEERS. Volunteers act to meet a need. They do without monetary consideration. They are full of the spirit of service and have very strong moral values. They are sensitive to human pain and suffering. They are the best of leaders who muster followers not by their words or commands but by their very example; they have good interpersonal relationships. And they act as the community’s social conscience by their very deeds which act as a candle that lights society while at the same time act as a mirror that reflects it.

SWEET SMILE. A sweet smile like what this boy is doing amid the ruins left by supertyphoon Pablo makes all the hard work and tears of the volunteers go away amid the devastation. Photo by BONG D. FABE

CHILD-FRIENDLY. BMG chief Ka loy Manlupig talks with some children of supertyphoon ‘Pablo” in Barangay Ban-ao, Baganga, Davao Oriental. BMG has adopted Ban-ao inorder to focus its voluntary work of rehabilitation and meager resources to help the residents get back on their feet. Photo by BONG D. FABE

fundamental principles necessary t o h ar m o n i z e t h e bro ad an d diverse efforts of the voluntary sector; (2) a conducive and enabling environment for the mobilization and nurturance of volunteers and volunteer organizations; and (3) the structure to strengthen the Philippine National Volunteer Ser vice Coordinating Agency (PNVSCA) as an effective institution to support volunteerism in the country. In short, it recognizes the vital but different roles of different sectors of society, including government, in building the country. “Volunteerism is the essence of people’s participation in governance,” said DILG Sec. Manuel Araneta Roxas III or MAR. Roxas issued on Marc h 26, 2013 DILG Memorandum Circular 2013-27 directing all provincial governors, city and municipal mayors and DILG regional directors and others concerned to institutionalize in their jurisdictions the Volunteer and Citizenship Program (VCP) in order to fully harness available human resources in the community for nationbuilding. “It is along the context of volunteerism that good governance

could greatly be enhanced at the local government levels if untapped human resource could be harnessed and mainstreamed into community endeavors in the different service areas of local governance,” he said. Following the issuance of the Circular, Regional Director Rene Burdeos of the DILG Northern Mindanao, and Siose, forged an agreement to mobilize their respective institution’s expertise to promote and advocate for good governance in the LGUs as a demonstration of good citizenship. “A responsible and engaged citizen is one who has a strong spirit of volunteerism, one who is always drawn to doing something for the good of others, in the service of the disadvantaged; one who does extraordinary even for the ordinary, for the common good and interest beyond the self and personal,” Siose said. “If this is the perspective of those who make platforms their promises for the betterment of people, perhaps this could be an emergence of a transformative governance, with the strategic and enabling partnership with the church and interfaith groups and the CSO,” said one of the founder of the VOICE Network, Inc.

VOICE Network: VOICE, for Volunteer Organizations Infor mation Coordination and Exchange, is a network of volunteer organizations (VOs) and volunteer ser vice programs (VSPs) in the Philippines. It links VOs and VSPs for information and resource exchange towards sustainable volunteer service in the country, stressed its president Dr. Grace Aguiling-Dalisay. It was formed in 2001 during the International Year of the Volunteer after many VOs and VSPs realized that they can do so much more for the country if they form one umbrella organization that will facilitate and coordinate information and exchanges of resources, among others. “We realized that different organizations can help strengthen each other since some organizations have so many resources but lack programs or training while other are experts in trainings or program design but lack needed resources. So, naisip namin na kung magsama-sama kami, pwede kaming magtulungan,” Dalisay explained. And on September 2003, VOICE Network, Inc. was formally registered as a non-stock, non-profit organization with the Securities and Exchange

Commission (SEC). At home in Balay: Since its founding, VOICE—true to the nomadic spirit of the volunteer— went from different institutions of learning such as UP Diliman, Miriam College and Xavier University-Ateneo del Cagayan, trying to establish a “home” for itself. Until finally, on its 10th anniversary on May 7, it found a home in the peace and development non-government organizations Balay Mindanaw Group of NGOs (BMG) of Cagayan de Oro City. For BMG chief Charlito “Kaloy” Z. Manlupig, VOICE’s coming to BMG is not only providential but also natural, especially since majority of BMG’s officials, staff and personnel are former bulingits of the Year of Service (YOS). YOS volunteers throughout the years fondly call each other bulingit. “Volunteers are the lifeblood of BMG,” he said. “They are the gift of Balay Mindanaw to the people of Mindanao.” And for VOICE President Dalisay, their “coming home to Balay” is historical because it marked the first time that the umbrella organization of volunteers has come to “live” right in the heart of an NGO—a volunteer organization. “Now that we are finally home in Balay Mindanaw, let us all join hands and work together in strengthening volunteerism in our country so we can help solve our country’s needs,” she said. Mindanao’s foremost volunteer advocate and volunteer formator Archbishop Antonio J. Ledesma, SJ, DD — who is fondly called tatay or lolo Shopi by YOS volunteers and their children — urged the volunteers not to let their successes blind them to the vast needs that await them. He said volunteers are also migrant workers “since you volunteer where the need is and you go there to meet that need.” They maybe migrant workers, but at least, they finally found a home in Balay.

BusinessDaily (June 7, 2013)  

BusinessDaily (June 7, 2013)