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5 FARM-TO-TABLE RECIPES | 5 ACTIVITIES TO REDUCE STRESS

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MARCH 2014

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38 Farm to Table Eating

20 The Arts

4 Editor’s Note 6 Click 7 What’s Up 8 Get to Know— Nici Mayer 10 FYI 14 Local Matters 16 Calendar 18 Outtakes 28 Our Kids 36 Home Design 48 Swag 50 Dine—Back Forty Texas BBQ 52 Restaurant Guide 54 Taste 56 Word Play 60 Introducing 62 The Where and Wears 66 Tom’s Take

For many this movement is not a fad, but rather a way of living, and the State of California recently declared Sacramento the “Farm-to-Fork Capital of America.” Get on the bandwagon and see what eating close to home really means.

44 8 Hoppin’ Local Breweries

Tom Mailey will take you on a ride—a “brews cruise”— making stops for hops at Style’s favorite purveyors of “consumable craftsmanship.”

Qian Fang

22 Health & Wellness

5 Activities to Reduce Stress

30 Cause & Effect

Animal Outreach of the Mother Lode

32 Green Scene

6 Eco-Friendly Products

34 In History

Legacy of Logtown

58 Escape Mammoth

Cover photo © simmittorok/ fotolia.com.

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FIND ­­OUR TYPOS Everyone makes mistakes from time to time, right?! And we’re no exception, so we thought we’d have some fun and enlist your help in finding ours—that is to say we’d like your help in spotting our errors and in return you’ll be entered in our contest to win a $25 gift certificate! Send your find to info@stylemg.com for your chance to win every month.

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editor’snote

homegrown

We’d love to hear from you—send us your community events (for Calendar and Outtakes), local news (for What’s Up), and any other story ideas to info@stylemg.com. 4 stylemg.com - March 2014

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Photo by Dante Fontana.

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es! It’s my favorite time of year. Spring commences on March 20, and it’s time to celebrate. To get the party started we need a few key components for any successful soirée: good food and drink. Check and check. In this issue, Kristen Castillo takes us on a culinary adventure in “Get Fresh: Farm-toTable Eating,” literally from area farms to the tables of local diners and consumers. You’ve surely heard of this righteously growing food movement called “farmto-table” that is covering the menus of not only area restaurants, but now filling the fridges of residents like you and me. With an abundance of farms and ranches where you can find just about anything at its prime, and more farmers’ markets than we have pages to list—it’s time to eat for our health…and our community. Read on to see why staying close to home has so many perks. Moving on to the beverages. In “Brews Cruise,” Tom Mailey tours and gets a taste of “8 Hoppin’ Local Breweries.” I heard from friends about a few up-and-coming microbreweries in the area, but I had no clue there were more! In the spirit of all things “homegrown,” I find a trip to taste flight after flight of area ales is in order. Now that I have this handy-dandy list of all the right places, there are no more excuses not to drink local. While a brewery tour might not be one of these, Kourtney Jason’s compilation of “5 Activities to Reduce Stress” in Health & Wellness will get you motivated for all that spring brings, including outdoor activities and, of course, cleaning. Speaking of, to help organize all those items collected (and collecting dust) over the year, Kerrie Kelly, ASID, gives “10 Ways to Create a Streamlined Home” in Home Design. Once the house is all tidied up and you finally have room to bring in a few new things—firstly, don’t miss the area farmers’ markets that start up this month (find a list at stylemg.com) and secondly, treat your home, and the world, to a few new eco-friendly items. In this month’s Green Scene, Megan Wiskus shares her favorite six. We hope we’ve given you plenty of reasons to stay close to home this month…and eat and drink around town more often. Until April, cheers! — Desiree


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MARCH 2014 Publishers Terence P. Carroll, Wendy L. Sipple Executive Editor Desiree Patterson Managing Editor Megan Wiskus Editorial Interns Emily Peter, Gabriel Stubbs, Jazmin White, Alyssa Wong Contributing Writers Amanda Anderson, Gail Beckman, Morgan Cásarez, Kristen Castillo, Amber Foster, Tina Helm, Linda Holderness, Kourtney Jason, Kerrie Kelly, Rachel Lopez, Tom Mailey, Sharon Penny, Richard Righton, Julie Ryan, Hiliary C. Simon, Kirsten Vernon Art Director Gary Zsigo Graphic Designers George Kenton Design, 760.285.0686, gkenton@verizon.net David Norby, Aaron Roseli Staff Photographer Dante Fontana Contributing Photographer Justin Buettner 916.220.0159, justinbuettner@hotmail.com Webmaster Ken White, Ixystems Advertising Director Debra Linn, 916.988.9888 x 114 Advertising Sales Representatives Reg Holliday, 916.337.5107 Joanne Kilmartin, 916.607.9360 Lisa Warner/Warner Enterprises, 530.306.2011 Karen Wehr, 916.988.9888 x116 Advertising/Media Administration Doug Wuerth, 916.988.9888 x117

C O M E F O R A S I P, S TAY F O R A B I T E . Reader’s Choice Award: Folsom’s Best Happy Hour.

Social Media Maven Aimee Carroll Accounting Manager Kathleen Hurt Office Administrator Cathy Carmichael, Office Assistant Brenna McGowan

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120 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 5 Folsom, CA 95630 Tel 916.988.9888 • Fax 916.596.2100 © 2014 by Style Media Group. All rights reserved. Style - El Dorado County Foothills is a registered trademark of Style Media Group. Material in this magazine may not be reproduced in any form without written consent from the publishers. Any and all submissions to Style - El Dorado County Foothills become the property of Style Media Group and may be used in any media. We reserve the right to edit. Subscriptions to Style - El Dorado County Foothills are available. Contact info@stylemg.com for more information.

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STYLEMG.COM You Can Never Have Too Much Style SPRING HAS SPRUNG! GREEN EGGS AND HAM, ANYONE? We’ve found recipes to make all things green—milkshakes, fudge, key lime bars, even beer! And if green treats aren’t exactly yo u r p o t o f gold, you’re in luck! We’ve gathered a list of traditional Irish foods to help you celebrate St. Patty’s Day, too.

Thailand honors the season with a water festival while India throws a giant carnival of color. How do you celebrate spring? Log on to learn about various Spring Equinox festivities and where to find them.

SHELF LIFE Get your monthly fix of Sharon Penny’s thenand-now take on popular albums, books and DVDs; look no further…just click.

MAC & CHEESE, PLEASE Who knew this classic crowd-pleaser could be even better? Get comfortable on the couch with a pot of Seven-Cheese Mac & Cheese from this month’s Taste cookbook, The Founding Farmers Cookbook (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2013, $40).

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH Just how far did Amelia Earhart fly? Who exactly was Sojourner Truth? Why did Madame Curie win the Nobel Peace Prize? Find the answers to these questions, along with a few ways to celebrate this historical month locally.

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Sunday, March 9 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Folsom Sports Complex, 66 Clarksville Rd. Exhibits and Demonstrations • Health Screenings Music • Activities for Kids • Fun for All Ages FREE Admission! FREE Parking! FREE Bounce Houses for the Kids!

More details at: www.folsom.ca.us

Sports and Recreation EXPO Sponsored By:

MARCH

a t M I R A F L O R E S W I N E RY SOMMELIER CLASS NO. 2 & 3 Join Sommelier Matthew Lewis for the second and third in the Sommelier series. Taking an in-depth look into wine and tasting. $37 per person. Class starts at 1pm. Reservations only (530) 647-8505. Class No. 2 is March 18th and Class No. 3 is to be determined.

MARCH 16TH: COOKING CLASS WITH CHEF DAMON BARHAM—BBQ CLASSICS Sauces and rubs for indoor and outdoor BBQ’S… all the perfect Zinfandel pairings .Brisket, southern style pulled pork, New York strip and more. Low and slow grilling with rubs and brines is the basis for this delicious class and it all goes well with Zinfandel. You can even make strawberry rhubarb compote shortcake on your grill. Join us for this unique class and while you are here make your own rubs to take home. Starts at 1pm. $37 per person. Reservations only (530) 647-8505. ALSO

Photos courtesy of their respective people/organization.

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atch a flick at the Cozmic Café (594 Main Street in Placerville) on March 12 at 6:30 p.m. for their Wednesday Night Movies series, presented by the Sierra Club and Coalition for Change. This month’s film, Waste Land, follows artist Vic Muniz from Brooklyn to Rio de Janeiro, home to the world’s largest garbage dump, where he meets an eclectic band of “catadores”...Donned in costumes but without the protection of wetsuits, Special Olympics athletes and their supporters will jump into Tahoe’s icy waters on March 29 for the South Lake Tahoe Polar Plunge, a fund-raiser for Special Olympics Northern California and Nevada. To register, make a donation or for more info, visit ipolarplungenv.com...On March 20 at 7 p.m., photography buffs are invited to attend the monthly El Dorado Camera Club meeting at the Cameron Park Community Center (2502 Country Club Drive). March’s photo challenge will be “old”; members and nonmembers alike can enter. For more details, visit eldoradocameraclub.com... Learn more about civil war ancestry on March 19 from 6-8 p.m. at the monthly El Dorado Hills Genealogical Society meeting, held in the community room at the El Dorado Hills Branch Library (7455 Silva Valley Parkway). This month’s speaker, Ron Cannon, will give a riveting lecture titled, “Researching Your Civil War Ancestor.” For more info, email cathygraham@msn. com...Oak Ridge High School alumnus and valedictorian Feross Aboukhadijeh has made Internet history again. The 2012 Stanford University graduate created his first startup company, PeerCDN (peer-to-peer content delivery network), last March and recently sold it to Yahoo! for an undisclosed sum. Congrats!...After a decade caring for children at Marshall Pediatrics in Placerville, Nicole Shorrock, M.D., has opened a solo practice with Marshall Family Medicine in El Dorado Hills. The new clinic, Marshall Whole Child Health—located at 5137 Golden Foothill Parkway, Suite 120—reflects Dr. Shorrock’s innovative approach to patient care, where she focuses on identifying and treating the root causes of illnesses through balancing nutrition and lifestyle. For more info, call 916-933-8010...The El Dorado Community Foundation, a nonprofit serving El Dorado County residents since 1991, is pleased to announce the 2014 officers of their board of directors—Board President Paul Zappettini, Vice President Lois Patrick, Secretary Karen Carter, and Treasurer Chris Reeg. For a full listing of the Foundation’s board of directors, visit eldoradocf.org...The After 5 Club, a free support group for those who care for a relative or friend with a chronic health condition, are invited to attend the next meeting on March 12 from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Senior Day Care Center (935-A Spring Street in Placerville). For more info, visit edcgov.us/ humanservices...The Hangtown Women’s Tennis Club (HWTC) welcomes all ladies interested in playing tennis (at any level) to join their club. Round-robin play takes place at the El Dorado High School courts every Wednesday from 9-11 a.m., September through May, and 8-10 a.m. in June, July and August. For more info, call Beth at 916-217-2110...That’s all for now, but check back next month for Style’s annual Get Outside feature. — Compiled by Gabriel Stubbs

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MIRAFLORES WINERY OPEN DAILY 10 AM TO 5 PM 2120 FOUR SPRINGS TRAIL, PLACERVILLE, CA 95667 530.647.8505 www.mirafloreswinery.com


gettoknow

Q&A

Nici Mayer

Q: What advice would you give to your younger self? A: Life will throw you challenges— your positive attitude is what will get you through them. Q: What comes to you naturally? A: Keeping my head up. Q: Biggest life inspirations? A: My children—I need to know that what I do now will make them proud when they are adults. Q: What are you most proud of? A: Surviving stage-four cancer, followed by conquering a recurrent form of the same cancer. Q: Favorite humanitarian cause? A: Look Good Feel Better (American Cancer Society).

8 stylemg.com - March 2014

(mirrormirrorone.com), a local women’s clothing boutique that donates one percent of all its profits to cancer research. She is currently developing her wig program, Fight Pretty, to provide area cancer patients with high-quality wigs; she also plans to fit and style the wigs in a pampering, salon-like experience. Mayer lost her own hair after her second round of chemo, and she remembers how much a good wig helped reassert her confidence and sense of normalcy. Last November, Mayer underwent a bone marrow transplant, and she is currently cancer free. She credits her survival to a positive outlook and the love and support of her family, especially her mother. “She’s my rock,” Mayer says. — Amber Foster

FAVORITES Author/writer: Edgar Allan Poe Escape: Lake Tahoe Guilty pleasure: Ice cream before bed Meal in town: Anything from Snooty Frog Memory: My wedding day Movie: Big Fish Musician/band: Alanis Morissette Local nonprofit: Food Bank of El Dorado County

Photos by Dante Fontana.

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n August 5, 2012, Nici Mayer was your average mom spending the day at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk with her family. After a fun day on the rides, however, she noticed her neck was unusually sore, and by the next morning, a large mass had formed on the side of her neck. A visit to the hospital revealed the worst possible news: Mayer had stage-four Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a blood-borne cancer that had spread throughout her upper body. While most people would have been fazed by such a grim diagnosis, Mayer was determined to fight—and fight hard. “I never think about what could go wrong,” she shares. “I think about how we’re going to fix it.” While still undergoing chemotherapy, Mayer and her mother opened Mirror Mirror

Q: What’s next? A: Launching a wig donation program—Fight Pretty— designed to help empower women in El Dorado County who are suffering from hair loss due to cancer treatment. I’m a true believer, through experience, that feeling confident through treatment plays a big part in coping with cancer.


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cameron park community services

ask the experts

Spring Into Fun

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For more information about these activities and events, and more, visit cameronpark.org or call the Cameron Park Community Services District at 530-677-2231. 10 stylemg.com - March February 2014 2014

Q: Are there other advantages to using cloth diapers, in addition to reusability?

A:

Cloth diapering has many advantages. They are comfy and healthy. You don’t have to worry about rough material on your baby’s delicate skin and since it’s cloth, it’s easier for parents to know when to change the diaper. Babies are less susceptible to rashes and tend to potty train easier. Organic cotton cloth diapers are economical, too; from birth to potty training, the cost of using reusable ones is $395, unlike disposables, which can cost $2,500-$3,000. Cloth diapers are also just as easy to use—many modern-day ones have snaps or Velcro-style closures, are breathable, made of waterproof fabrics to contain leaks or “blowouts,” and have flushable liners. Plus, when going green is a lifestyle, cloth diapers are the way to go. Disposables for one baby make one to two tons of garbage and take 500 years to break down. —Dandelions Raising Children Naturally 3490 Palmer Drive, Suite I, Cameron Park 530-672-2022, facebook.com/dandelionsusa

Q: What steps should I take if I think my child has special education needs?

A: Each child comes into the world uniquely different and individual. Children develop at different rates, which can be wonderful but also makes it hard to determine when there is cause for concern. If you feel there is something concerning regarding your child, often the first resource is your child’s pediatrician; asking for a developmental assessment or a referral to a child psychologist for developmental skills assessment is not unreasonable. If your child is school age (3+), a parent may request an assessment through their public school’s office. Early intervention is often key to your young child’s educational learning success. Be proactive! —Cindy Keller, Executive Director Guiding Hands School 4900 Windplay Drive, El Dorado Hills 916-939-0553, ghandsschool.com

Cameron Park Community Service District photo courtesy of Cameron Park Community Services District. Ask the Experts photo © kasjato/fotolia.com.

adies, do you want (or need) to make room in your closet? If so, head to Your Own Trunk Show on March 13 from 5-8 p.m. and sell your clothes, purses, shoes, jewelry, accessories and more. Reserve your booth now, while spaces are still available. Wine, champagne and snacks will also be available. O n M a rc h 2 2 a t 7 p.m., the Dean-OHolics, a tribute to the Rat Pack, will perform a live, indoor concert. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and snacks/ b eve ra g e s w i l l b e for sale. To purchase tickets ($18 each or two for $34), head to the CSD Office, Cameron Park Shingle Springs Chamber Office, Walgreens, Bel Air, Cameron Park Fire Station 89 or visit showclix.com; also available at the door for $20 each. On March 11, the monthly Coffee, Tea and Friends program will take place from 10-11:30 a.m. in the social room of the Community Center. This month’s topic is “Medicare 2014—What’s New.” See how this year’s changes will affect you. Play bingo and meet new friends later that same day from 1-3 p.m. March kicks off a new session of Taekwondo classes for all ages. Work on coordination, balance, self-control, blocks and kicks while in your own Taekwondo uniform, included free with each class; or, try Olympic-Style TKS Sparring and Kickboxing. After working up an appetite, head to a cooking class. From Thai Cooking and Ultimate Cooking with Susan to Cooking with Kids, there’s something for everyone. If dance is more your style, register the kids for a Hula or Beyond Basic Hula class and the adults for Belly Dance, Waltz, Nightclub 2-Step or Hula. Music lovers can practice their strumming at the Let’s Uke! or Basic Guitar classes. With warmer weather approaching, a gardening class—offered by instructors at El Dorado Nursery & Garden—might be a wise choice, or perhaps a golf class at Bass Lake Golf Course. An NFL-sponsored Flag Football program will also be offered this spring. Get your friends together and sign up; deadline is March 14, and games start in April. Is your child struggling with math? The Addition and Subtraction Facts to 9 (ages 6+) or Multiplication Facts (ages 8+) classes might be their keys to success. They’ll learn math facts the efficient way and stop relying on counting by fingers. ­— Tina Helm


placerville recreation and parks Get Cooking!

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alking through Downtown Placerville searching for a place to eat is like picking your favorite sugary concoction in a candy store. With so many options that run the gamut from burgers to fine dining, one thing’s clear: Placervillians are bona fide foodies. Learn how to cook some fabulous fare of your own, and get your children on track early to become great chefs with a Kids Cooking and Table Setting class (ages 6-11) on March 8. Children will learn kid-friendly recipes, prepare lunch for the end of class, and learn how to properly set a table. For the adventurous chef, try the Thai Cooking class (ages 13+) on April 5. Students will learn how to make lettuce wraps and a spicy sauce using a recipe not found in any restaurant, or even in Thailand! They’ll also prepare fresh spring rolls with a sweet peanut dipping sauce; after the chefs will be able to enjoy both of their finished products. Private group Thai cooking classes—a perfect activity to do with friends and family—are also an option. — Amanda Anderson To learn more about these classes and others, call the City of Placerville’s Community Services Department at 530-642-5232, visit cityofplacerville.org, or stop by 549 Main Street in Placerville.

foodie find

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Golden Waffle Café

alking into Golden Waffle Café, you’d think you stepped back into the ’50s. The décor, complete with booths that match the carpet and signs about “Mom’s kitchen,” is what you’d expect to find in a diner way back when. As I sat down and opened the menu, I smiled at their waffle selection—they have one for every taste. But if you’re not a waffle person, you’ll stay worry free with their choices of pancakes, biscuits and gravy, and plenty of other breakfast classics. I let my inner kid do the picking with their Strawberry Waffle Combo—consisting of a waffle covered in strawberries, whipped cream and strawberry syrup, all alongside two sausages, two slices of bacon and two fried eggs. When I say this strawberry waffle was the best I’ve ever had, I’m not exaggerating. The strawberries were real, not the squishy processed kind, and the waffle was cooked to buttery perfection with coveted, slightly crunchy edges; I barely needed any syrup. The bacon came sliced thick, the sausage plump and juicy, and my egg cooked just right. My dining partner was bolder and ordered the Bacon Waffle, which featured salty bits of bacon cooked right into the batter! We will be returning to Golden Waffle Café, my new favorite breakfast place, very soon! Golden Waffle Café, 1449 Broadway, Placerville, 530-642-9322. — Jazmin White

12 stylemg.com - March 2014

the10 spot Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day Are you in a pinch about how to celebrate St. Patty’s Day? Whether it’s beer, music or hearty Irish fare that gets you jigging, the list below has green-filled festivities for all. 1. 36 Handles will feature a weekendlong festival (March 14-16) with live music, a craft beer festival (March 15), good eats, kids’ activities and more. 36handles.com 2. Enjoy Celtic music, green beer, corned beef and cabbage, and other holiday-inspired specials at Placerville Brewing Company on March 17. 530-295-9166 3. Old Sacramento’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade will march through the streets on March 15 at 1 p.m. oldsacramento.com/special-events/ st-patricks-day-parade 4. Take your seats and prepare to be amazed by National Dance Company of Ireland’s Rhythm of Dance at Harris Center on March 1718 at 7:30 p.m. harriscenter.net 5. Keaton Raphael Memorial’s St. Baldrick’s Head Shaving Event will start buzzing at noon at the Westfield Galleria at Roseville on March 15. childcancer.org 6. Grab a pint of Guinness at Brick Oven Pub (all day, any day) and let the good times roll. brickovenpub.com 7. You’ll be sweating green (and benefiting education causes in Amador County) at the Bunsen to Beaker 5K, held at Jackson’s Detert Park on March 15. bunsentobeaker. com 8. Head to El Dorado Saloon for a St. Patty’s Day weekend party with food and drink specials, plus live music and more. eldoradosaloon.com 9. Rise and shine with an Irish Benedict at Buttercup Pantry, which features seasoned to perfection, house-made corned beef. Your dining partner will be green with envy when they see your plate. 530-621-1320 10. Downtown Jackson’s St. Patrick’s Dandelion Days Celebration (March 16-17) will feature an outdoor bazaar and flea market, food, a 5K, live music and a micro-brew beer garden. jacksonlionsclub.org/ DandelionDaysInfo.html — Megan Wiskus

Placerville Rec and Parks photo © arinahabich/fotolia.com. Foodie Find photo by Dante Fontana.

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E HE TTH

HITLIST

The year year Squaw Squaw The Valley hosted hosted the the Valley Winter Olympics, Olympics, and and Winter the year year the the Olympics Olympics came came to to the the the tiny town town of of Tahoma—the Tahoma—the site site of of the the tiny biathlon, cross-country cross-country skiing, skiing, and and biathlon, cross-country portion portion of of the the Nordic Nordic cross-country combined event. event. In In 1999, 1999, 15km 15km of of combined the original original Nordic Nordic trails—located trails—located in in the what is is now now Ed Ed Z’Berg Z’Berg Sugar Sugar Pine Pine what Point State State Park—were Park—were uncovered uncovered Point and restored restored for for public public use. use. and

1960

1852

The year year FountainFountainThe Tallman Soda Soda Works Works Tallman was built built (now (now the the was Fountain and and Tallman Tallman Museum), Museum), Fountain making it it the the oldest oldest building building in in making Placerville. Placerville. The key key to to its its The longevity? Brick Brick longevity? construction, construction, which prevented prevented which from being being itit from destroyed by by destroyed the fires fires that that the ravaged so so much much Gold Gold Rush-era Rush-era ravaged architecture. architecture.

14 Best Local “Public Bathroom” In no no particular particular order order In

•• CC OO MM PP II LL EE DD BB YY SS TT YY LL EE SS TT AA FF FF EE RR SS •• “London Best Best Fish Fish && Chip Chip not not only only makes makes aa killer killer fish fish sandwich, sandwich, but but their their bathrooms bathrooms 1.1. “London are always always spotless spotless and and well-stocked.” well-stocked.” 530-642-0777 530-642-0777 are 2. “The “The bathroom bathroom at at Face Face in in aa Book Book is is awesome—clean awesome—clean and and the the wallpaper wallpaper is is all all book book 2. pages, so so there’s there’s aa ton ton of of reading reading material.” material.” getyourfaceinabook.com getyourfaceinabook.com pages, 3.“After “Afteraaday dayat atApple AppleHill, Hill,IIalways alwaysstop stopby by Boa Boa Vista Vista Orchards Orchards for for produce produce and and aa potty potty 3. break. They They have have ‘real’ ‘real’ bathrooms bathrooms (not (not just just break. Port-A-Potties)toward towardthe theback.” back.”boavista.com boavista.com Port-A-Potties) 4. “When “When nature nature calls calls while while in in the the great great outout4. doors at at Marshall Marshall Gold Gold Discovery Discovery State State HisHisdoors toric Park, Park, it’s it’s refreshing refreshing to to know know they they have have toric roomy, squeaky squeaky clean clean bathrooms.” bathrooms.” parks. parks. roomy, ca.gov/?page_id=484 ca.gov/?page_id=484 5. “The “The cleanliness, cleanliness, copper copper sinks, sinks, and and wood wood 5. stalls/doorsat atSienna SiennaRestaurant’s Restaurant’srestrooms restrooms stalls/doors make itit ever ever so so inviting.” inviting.” siennarestaurants. siennarestaurants. make London Best Best Fish Fish && Chip Chip London com com 14 stylemg.com stylemg.com -- March March 2014 2014 14

FACTS & FIGURES

Day in in March March that that is is Day National Pi Pi Day. Day. Huh? Huh? National Pi is is aa mathematic mathematic Pi constant that that has has aa value value of of 3.14; 3.14; constant or, expressed expressed as as aa date, date, March March 14, 14, or, thanks to to aa playful playful physicist physicist at at San San thanks Francisco’s Exploratorium Exploratorium in in 1988 1988 Francisco’s who decided decided to to celebrate celebrate Pi Pi Day Day who with delicious delicious pies. pies. You You heard heard the the with man, eat eat up! up! man,

MINUTES 7MINUTES

Length of of Length the longest longest the Oscar acceptance acceptance speech, speech, given given Oscar by Greer Greer Garson Garson in in 1942 1942 for for her her by performance in in Mrs. Mrs. Miniver. Miniver. For For performance comparison, the the current current cut-off cut-off for for comparison, Oscar speeches speeches is is 45 45 seconds. seconds. Let Let Oscar that one one sink sink in… in… that

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Highest estimate estimate of of the the Highest number of of F-words F-words in in number Martin Scorsese’s Scorsese’s Oscar-nominated Oscar-nominated Martin The Wolf Wolf of of Wall Wall Street, Street, making making The the movie movie with with the the most most swear swear itit the words in in “Best “Best Picture” Picture” nominee nominee words history. The The previous previous record record was was history. held by by Goodfellas, Goodfellas, which which clocked clocked held in at at 300. 300. Hey Hey nominees: nominees: Go Go get get in your (cough) (cough) shine shine box. box. your — Compiled Compiled by by Sharon Sharon Penny Penny —

Bodacious Bodacious Biking Biking Babes Babes photo photo courtesy courtesy of of Bodacious Bodacious Biking Biking Babes. Babes. Catch Catch All All graphic graphic © © DenisNata/fotolia.com. DenisNata/fotolia.com. Bullseye Bullseye image image © © mostafa mostafa fawzy/fotolia.com. fawzy/fotolia.com. London London Best Best Fish Fish & & Chip Chip photo photo by by Dante Dante Fontana. Fontana. Fountain Fountain and and Tallman Tallman Museum Museum photo photo by by Bobak Bobak Ha’Eri. Ha’Eri.

localmatters


EL DORADO COUNTY FOOT HILLS

BEST RESTAURANTS H H H H H

Torino’s Bar & Grill

Heyday Café

Steaks, Pasta, Seafood

Voted Best Overall Restaurant & Best Salads

Happy Hour in the bar Mon.-Fri. 2-6 p.m. Sun.-Thurs. 11-8:30 • Fri. & Sat. 11-9 251 Main Street, Placerville 530-622-7500 • torinosonmainstreet.com

Featuring fresh California cuisine and a fantastic wine list. Open for Lunch & Dinner Tuesday through Sunday 325 Main Street, Placerville 530-626-9700 • heydaycafe.com

The Independent Restaurant and Bar

Bricks Eats & Drinks

American Fusion Cuisine & Craft Cocktails

Voted Best Overall Restaurant

Weekend Brunch and Lunch & Dinner Wednesday through Monday 629 Main Street, Ste.102, Placerville 530-344-7645 • independentplacerville.com

Happy Hour - Monday-Thursday, 3-6 p.m. Serving Lunch And Dinner 7 Days A Week 482 Main Street, Placerville 530-303-3480

Cascada Restaurante & Cantina

Voted Best Mexican Restaurant & Cocktails Serving an eclectic mix of Mexican favorites and California fresh cuisine. Open 7 days a week. Full Bar. 384 Main Street, Placerville 530-344-7757 • cascadaonmainstreet.com

Casa Ramos

15% OFF Your Entrees*!

Bring in this ad for 15% Off All Dine-in Entrees*! Voted Best Mexican & Best Happy Hour 6840 Greenleaf Drive • Placerville 530-622-2303 • casaramos.net *Not valid with any other offer or on take-out. Expires March 31, 2014

March 2014 – stylemg.com 15


2

calendar

march events March is National Women's History Month Compiled by Gabriel Stubbs

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A COMEDY SHOWCASE Sponsored by Leadership El Dorado Class 6 and held at the Placerville Shakespeare Club, this night of comedy will start at 8 p.m. In addition to laughs, the evening will include a raffle and silent auction. Proceeds will benefit various children's organizations. For more details, visit standupedc.evenbrite. com.

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CAMERON PARK FIRE DEPARTMENT CRAB FEED

WINTER WINE & FOOD FEST Benefiting the Make-A-Wish Foundation and considered the premier wine and food event in the region, this year’s WWFF— held at the Sacramento Convention Center from 5-10 p.m.—will feature more than 120 wineries, breweries and restaurants. To purchase tickets, visit necannv.wish.org.

Music, silent auctions, raffles, and of course, lots of crab will be featured from 5-8 p.m. on this night dedicated to support the Cameron Park Fire Department. To purchase tickets, head to Fire Station 89. For more details, visit cameronpark.org.

9 17 20 22

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS BEGINS

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Gary Mullen & The Works will rock the Harris Center at 7:30 p.m. with hit Queen songs such as “Killer Queen,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Under Pressure” and many others. With a lead singer that seems to be Freddie Mercury reincarnated, you'll think you're across the pond seeing Queen at Wembley Stadium. For more details, visit harriscenter.net.

FIRST DAY OF SPRING

DEAN-O-HOLICS

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CONNECTIONS 2014 Connections is a “business to community” and “business to business” expo bringing together more than 150 businesses from the region. Attendees will interact with an array of vendors and exhibitors, while enjoying free lunch samplings at the Folsom Sports Complex from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more details, visit folsomchamber.com.

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FRIENDS OF EL DORADO COUNTY SENIORS’ SPAGHETTI FEED FUNDRAISER Feast on spaghetti and meatballs at the Mother Lode Lions Hall (4701 Missouri Flat Road in Cameron Park) from 1-5 p.m. A no-host bar will be available, as well as raffle drawings. For more details, call 530-644-8519. For even more events happening in our area, log on to our website: stylemg. com and click on Calendar. And, be sure to check out our Blog! Send your events to info@stylemg.com.

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This Rat Pack tribute band will bring back the cool at the Cameron Park Community Center stage at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m.). Step back in time for a night of amazing music and an appearance from Marilyn Monroe! Snacks and beverages will be for sale. For more details, visit cameronpark.org.

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PLACERVILLE SHAKESPEARE CLUB ANNUAL BRIDGE PARTY: LET'S MAKE A DEAL Grab a partner, head to the clubhouse (2920 Bedford Avenue) at 10 a.m. and “make a deal!” Everyone is welcome, and with a morning snack, lunch and an opportunity to win cash prizes and other giveaways, it’s bound to be a good time. For more details, visit placerville-shakespeare.com.

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SUGARLOAF STAMPEDE In this first annual fundraiser to benefit the Sugarloaf Station Foundation, participants will choose from a 5K, 10K or 10-mile course on a part-paved, part-dirt, out and back course over what was once the historic Southern Pacific Railway line (Eastern section of the scenic El Dorado Trail). For more details and to register, visit sugarloafstationfoundation.org.

Connections 2014 photo by Tom Paniagua. Friends of El Dorado County Seniors' Spaghetti Feed photo by Kathi Lishman. All other photos courtesy of their respective organizations.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

ONE NIGHT OF QUEEN


MORE EVENTS Through March 31 – Fourth Annual Art of Love Show. ASiF Gallery continues to celebrate love in this exhibit showcasing artists of the Foothills. Open every day from 5-8 p.m., visitors can enjoy many artistic endeavors—from poetry to fire dancing. For more details, visit asifstudios.com. March 4-5 – SIRO-A: The Digital Technodelic Experiment. This experimental musical group defines their craft as “the next generation of entertainment.” At 7:30 p.m. both nights, three physical performers and two DJs will use the art of optical illusions, visual projections, and musical electro beats to present a mind-bending, fun, and at times, comical night. For more details, visit harriscenter.net. March 8 – 21st Annual Crab Feed & Dance. Support the Rotary Club of El Dorado Hills' local programs and projects while chowing down on Dungeness crab, pasta with red plum tomato sauce and more. Cocktail hour starts at 6 p.m. at the EDH Community Services District Gym (1021 Harvard Way). To purchase tickets, visit edhrotary.org. March 12 – Waste Land. Co-sponsored by Coalition for Change and the Sierra Club, enjoy this third offering of the film series at Cozmic Café (594 Main Street) in Placerville starting at 6:30 p.m.; doors open at 6 p.m. This award-winning movie follows artist Vik Muniz as he journeys to his native Brazil to create art with 3,000 “catadores.” For more details, email coal4change@gmail.com. March 15 – Havana Nights. Enjoy dinner, dancing, silent and live auctions, and live music from 5-10 p.m. at Lakehills Covenant Church in El Dorado Hills. Proceeds will benefit the Cedar Springs Waldorf School. For more details and to purchase tickets, visit cswsauction. com. March 15 – An Irish Hooley. Kerry Records presents this St. Patrick's Day celebration with the triple threat of music, song and dance. The seven musicians of slugger O'Toole, along with some dynamic guests including the Kerry Dance Troupe, will hit the Harris Center stage at 7:30 p.m. For more details, visit harriscenter.net. March 19 – Dan Crary & Thunderation. By combining a steel guitar, banjo and mandolin, this trio entertains audiences with new songs and old stories, blazing instrumental virtuosity and powerfully felt musical moments. The concert begins at 7 p.m. at the Union Mine High School Theater. For more details, visit eldoradocommunityconcerts.com. March 21-23 – Friends of the Folsom Library Book Sale. Find your favorite book or discover something new while benefiting Friends of the Folsom Library, a 100-percent non-profit organization. The sale is from Friday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more details, visit foflib.org. March 22 – Party with a Purpose. Join the Pacific Trauma Specialists for their second annual fundraiser benefiting disadvantaged and emotionally traumatized individuals in our community from 5-10 p.m. at the Serrano Country Club. Spend the night enjoying a gourmet meal, full bar and dancing. For more details, visit, pacifictraumacenter. com. March 23 – The Pink Floyd Experience. With more than $2.5 million dollars in production equipment, this performance will rock all of your senses, and truly be an experience. The cover band will begin playing your favorite Pink Floyd psychedelic riffs at 2 p.m. and again at 7 p.m. at the Harris Center. To purchase tickets, visit harriscenter.net

SAVE THE DATE April 12 – Kids’ Expo. Choices for Children will present this free familyfriendly event at the El Dorado County Fairgrounds from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. A wide variety of community organizations will offer hands-on activities and information about their services, plus entertainment by local children's groups and the Swan Brothers Circus. For more details, visit choices4children-eldorado.org.

March 2014 - stylemg.com 17


outtakes EL DORADO COUNTY SEARCH AND RESCUE CRAB FEED

ART AND WINE WITH SOMETHING M.O.R.E.

El Dorado County Fairgrounds, Placerville, January 25 Photos courtesy of Suzanne Supple and Natalie Trudeau.

El Dorado County Fairgrounds Placerville, January 18 Photos by Jeanine Mays.

Susan Spencer and John Graifemberg

DJ Grant Petersen

Natalie Trudeau and Suzanne Supple

Cynthia Romero and Gerald Hayden

Old Town Grill provides food and smiles Desi Malone

Chris Sanders and Chris Reeg Maureen Carter and Pat and Vincent Panto

Bianca Kroettinger, Paul Duer and Natalie Trudeau

GOLD COUNTRY RUN + SPORT GRAND OPENING 4370 Town Center Boulevard, Suite 150 El Dorado Hills January 25 Photos by Tom Paniagua.

Tony and Tanya Moran and Elaine Kobus

Sarah and Josh Reintsma

HONOR OUR TROOPS ALLAMERICAN BREAKFAST FUND-RAISER Laura Daniels, Michelle Crews and Jennifer Miller

Owners and friends at the ribbon cutting ceremony

Placerville Veterans’ Memorial Hall, January 25. Photos by Cyndi Romano. Katherine, Casey and Carson McLeod

Russ Mote Stacie Walls and Doc League

Denise Lomax, Cyndi Romano and Inga Buckendorf Jenn Soto with owners Donn and Tania Cox

Navy Veterans Jane and Sam Ferguson

Owner Donn Cox and Co-owner Leon Shahinian

Alli, Randi, Emma and Jason Warden

If you know of any events happening in the El Dorado County Foothills area or have photos you would like to share with us, please submit them to info@stylemg.com. And, to see more Outtakes photos, visit our website: stylemg.com.

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marshall

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Marshall Plastic surgery and Medical sPa 4300 Golden Center Drive, Suite D Placerville, CA

530-344-2000 marshallplasticsurgery.org


thearts

qian fang Unrestrained Elegance by Abigail Blank

QF: When I was a teenager, I liked to visit jewelry stores. At that time, jewelry designs seemed incredibly old-fashioned and I thought it was just a rule: Jewelry must look like that. Even as a teen, I thought shiny metals and stones should be unrestrained, so one day I made a pair of very simple jade earnings. Of course, today I use more sophisticated techniques, both more complex as well as more refined. However, my vision has not changed: it’s unrestrained.

I

nspired by nature, modern urban design, and small details in the world around her, Qian Fang uses unusual stones and rare gems to create one-of-a-kind jewelry. Her pieces are best described as “wearable art.” AB: What attracted you to the art of jewelry making? QF: I can’t live without art. It is in my genes from several generations of artists. For me, applied art is more attractive than pure art. When people wear my jewelry, it brings it to life—[it goes from being] a part of me to a part of them. To beautify and brighten people’s lives is the force behind my work.

AB: You’re very knowledgeable about the mineral composition and quality of the rare stones and gems used in your pieces. How does this knowledge affect the way you design jewelry? QF: This is an interesting question. In truth, when purchasing gemstones, I’m most often attracted to a particular pattern or texture, without regard for its mineral composition. Many times, I have been inspired solely by the story or uniqueness behind the gemstone. As a result, sometimes the artistic design of my jewelry is not very practical for everyday wear (because of the particular stone or setting), but I want to be as informed and knowledgeable about the piece as I can, so that I can try to inform my customers of the particular piece’s limitations. AB: Do you remember the first piece of jewelry you made? How has your work changed from that first piece and how has it stayed the same? 20 stylemg.com - March 2014

AB: Where can people learn more about your jewelry and buy pieces? Do you have any upcoming studio tours planned? QF: I’m currently working on my 2014 collection and am excited about my first showing of that collection, which will be May 10-11 at the El Dorado Hills Art & Wine Affaire. A limited number of my pieces are also available online at etsy.com/shop/ qianfangartjewelry.

Visit qianfangartjewelry.blogspot. com for more information.

artbeat March 23 – Black Irish Band. Music on the Divide presents this folk/Irish group that is sure to have you tapping your feet at the I.O.O.F. Hall in Georgetown (6240 Main Street). Groove to their compilations of Gold Rush tunes, maritime and railroad music, as well as ethnic Irish beats, all starting at 3 p.m. For more details, visit musiconthedivide.org.

Photo of Fang by Dante Fontana. Jewelry photo courtesy of the artist.

AB: Most of your pieces are made with sterling silver, but a few incorporate metals such as copper or gold. How do you know what metal is right for a piece? QF: Different metals give me different feelings. Gold is elegant and mild, silver is bright and delicate, and copper can have many variations. When I want to express different feelings, I will use a different material, or mix them.


Distinctive

Dentists

Presenting Style Magazine’s DISTINCTIVE DENTISTS special advertising section. Some of our area’s best dentists and orthodontists have chosen to highlight their practice within the pages of the area’s most read community magazine. Each month Style plans on choosing a different industry to give these businesses a unique opportunity to stand out and highlight their products and services. And when you visit these businesses, make sure you tell them you saw their profile in Style!

Russell S. Jones, D.D.S. 6390 Runnymeade Drive, Suite A Placerville 530-622-6768

Are you one of many who find it stressful to visit the dentist? You are not alone. Relax, we can help! Dr. Russell Jones and his staff provide compassionate, expert dental treatment for patients of ALL ages. As a General and Cosmetic Family dentist, Dr. Jones provides services in cosmetic dentistry, oral surgery, dental implants, root canals, teeth bleaching and dentures. Dentistry is a family profession. Following in the footsteps of his father (R. Bruce Jones, D.D.S., with forty years of service to the profession), uncle (Russell Anderson, D.D.S., who taught dentistry for 20 years at Chicago's Northwestern University), and two older brothers, Dr. Jones graduated from UOP and opened his dental practice in 1991; his sister, a hygienist, works alongside him. With easy access and plenty of available parking; the office is conveniently located off Highway 50 and EI Dorado Road in Placerville.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING

SECTION

Ryan Easterbrook, D.D.S. 493 Main Street | Diamond Springs 530-626-5810 www.ryaneasterbrookdds.com

Conveniently located in historic downtown Diamond Springs, the dental office of Ryan Easterbrook, DDS is eager to help you with your dental care needs! Here at Ryan Easterbrook, DDS we do everything we can to help our patients make informed decisions. Our highly-trained, professional, friendly dental team is specifically suited to assist our patients in every phase of care. “We pride ourselves on having a great staff and a warm, friendly environment,” says Dr. Easterbrook, “which helps us to get to know each of our patients personally and always make sure that they understand their choices about their dental care and treatment needs.” We make sure that all your questions are answered and that you understand all of your options in order for you to decide what treatment is best for you. You will never leave our office feeling like you have been rushed out the door. Ryan Easterbrook, DDS provides all aspects of family and

cosmetic dental care. From routine checkups and cleanings to smile makeovers and everything in between, we are here to provide everything you need to stay healthy and have a great looking smile. We see patients of all ages and provide sedation options for those who feel especially anxious in a dental setting. Dr. Easterbrook is a graduate of Loma Linda University School of Dentistry. He and his wife Holly have four children and make their home in Placerville. “We feel very fortunate to have the opportunity to live and work in Placerville and look forward to many years of raising a family here.” Our website at www.RyanEasterbrookDDS.com for more information about our location and the services we provide. Office hours are Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. New patients are always welcome!

March 2014 - stylemg.com 25


Distinctive

Dentists

Ike Rahimi, D.M.D., D.D.S. 2808 Mallard Lane Placerville 530-622-0701 www.ikerahimi.com Dr. Ike Rahimi has been voted El Dorado County's Best Dentist four years in a row! His patients have recognized him for his passion for excellence in care and his commitment to ensuring his patients dental experience is comfortable and that they receive the most positive results. Dr. Rahimi and his staff have recently moved to an expanded location offering the latest in implant technology, sedation dentistry, and all aspects of general dentistry. The office houses Placerville's first 3D facial scanning technology that allows Dr. Rahimi to offer the best when it comes to implant placement and treatment. At Dr. Rahimi's office the focus is patient comfort before, during, and after treatment. Prior to any treatment you are given individualized time with Dr. Rahimi to discuss your personal concerns and questions. During your procedure Dr. Rahimi uses the latest technology and his gentle approach to dentistry to keep you comfortable. And after

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any treatment lines of communication are kept open starting with a personal call from Dr. Rahimi to check on you the day after your procedure. When you visit Dr. Rahimi you can be assured you are receiving the most up to date information and treatment options. Dr. Rahimi is devoted to furthering his education and spends hundreds of hours expanding his knowledge to bring back to the Foothills and share with his patients. Dr. Rahimi is proud of combining the best the world has to offer with the closeness and warmth of a small town practice. Dr. Rahimi's office invites all in the community to stop in and tour their brand new facility, meet their friendly and experienced staff, and see for themselves what makes Dr. Rahimi the Best in El Dorado County!


SPECIAL ADVERTISING

SECTION

Shingle Springs Health and Wellness Center 5168 Honpie Rd. at Red Hawk Pkwy. Placerville 530-387-4975

Dr. Chalise Morgan is the Supervising Dentist at the Shingle Springs Health & Wellness Center. “I enjoy building relationships with families and creating beautiful smiles,” explains Dr. Morgan.She says that it is important to build trust with patients so they enjoy coming to their appointments. She is proud of the quality of dental care she, the other six dentists, hygienists, and the entire staff at the center provide our patients. “Everyone is friendly and professional.”

and digital x-rays to reduce radiation exposure and increase diagnostic ability of our dentists. The center welcomes Native and non-Native patients, accepts most major insurance and Medi-Cal, and provides a sliding fee scale. Dr. Morgan says, “We look forward to the opportunity to keep you smiling.”

“The ADA recommends the first dental visit by the age of one,” she explains. Dr. Morgan enjoys treating patients of all ages, even toddlers. “We believe in combining care with kindness. Our clinic uses several methods to reduce dental anxiety, including nitrous oxide.” With state-of-the-art equipment and instruments, the clinic offers an array of procedures including orthodontics, root canals, whitening, implants, dentures, crowns, bridges, extractions, and tooth colored fillings. The center boasts a cutting-edge digital panoramic machine

March 2014 - stylemg.com 27


ourkids

dealing with divorce 6 Tips to Help Kids Cope

Photo Š emese73/fotolia.com.

by Linda Holderness

28 stylemg.com - March 2014


I

f you and your spouse have decided to get a divorce—and you have children— you’re dealing with one of the toughest struggles any parent can face: What do you tell the kids? No matter how acrimonious the relationship, all couples want to spare their children pain, and experts agree: Being told their parents are splitting up is one of a child’s most painful moments. Some youngsters carry that hurt far into their adult years—and yet some do not. What makes the difference? In a study of more than 2,500 children of divorce, E. Mavis Hetherington and John Kelly, authors of For Better or for Worse: Divorce Reconsidered, found 75-80 percent of their subjects showed little or no long-term damage as adults. Although that means a significant percentage did have problems, the good news is this: Many of the factors related to how a child responds to divorce can be influenced by parents—the way they break the news, for example, and their attitudes toward each other. “Divorce is a trauma for kids,” says Dawn Hulme, a marriage and family therapist who founded and is the clinical supervisor at Windows of Hope in Roseville and Sacramento and is licensed in Imago Relationship Therapy. “Parents don’t always realize how difficult it can be.” Read on as Hulme and Suzette James, a licensed marriage and family therapist and owner of Family Tree Counseling in Folsom, share six ways parents can help kids cope.

1. Start with counseling.

You’re bound to be angry, and seeing a therapist— together, before you talk to the kids—can help you cut through the fury and amicably work out plans for breaking the news and establishing new living arrangements. Parents need to work together without letting their negative feelings get in the way, James says. “The goal is to put the kids’ needs first.”

Photo © bramgino/fotolia.com.

2. Tell the truth. Give your children only the facts, James advises. If you’re not sure you’re going to divorce, say nothing. If you’re separating, say something like: We’re not sure we’ll get divorced, but we’re going to live apart to see if we can work things out. If divorce is certain, tell your kids you haven’t been getting along and have decided it’s best not to live together anymore. If possible, parents should talk to the kids together, but, says James, “more important than who delivers the information is how it’s delivered”—truthfully and without rancor.

3. Understand what “why?” means. When your children ask why

6. If you’re the “poor” parent, don’t fret about teenage drama. Yes, your

you’re getting divorced, what they really want to know, James says, is what will happen to them. Explain the arrangements you’ve made—where they’ll live and whether they’ll have to change schools, for example. Make sure they understand they’ll still see both parents. Acknowledge their hurt and, most importantly, Hulme says, assure them they’re not to blame.

spouse’s home may have fancier toys—and your teen may rave—but when they’re adults, James says, it is the attachment you make with your children, the love and nurturing you give them, that prevails. Have confidence that you are their rock.

4. Don’t fight in front of the kids. “Conflict between parents is, hands down, the most damaging thing for kids,” James says. No matter how much you dislike your ex, keep it between the two of you. Never badmouth them, and never bring the kids’ names into an argument, Hulme adds, or they will assume the divorce is their fault. “It sounds easy,” James says, “but it is very hard to do.”

5. Make the best of new living arrangements. If custody is split, agree on house rules (with counseling, if necessary). Beyond that, don’t make the kids feel guilty for leaving you and don’t pry. Instead, reassure them your ex loves them and will keep them safe. Taking favorite items back and forth, like a blanket or stuffed toy, can be comforting, says Hulme. If drop-off and pick-up times trigger arguments, she adds, meet at a public place or ask someone you trust to help. “Changing homes is inconvenient and annoying,” says James, “but if the parents can get along and be supportive, it doesn’t have to cause trauma.”

RESOURCES Carol Greenfield, a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Sacramento, suggests Kids’ Turn (kidsturn.org), a nonprofit based in San Francisco that provides a comprehensive program (think workshops, a blog and an online course) for children and family members affected by familial separation.

Meetup (divorcesupport.meetup. com) also offers informal groups with different themes throughout the area. Local hospitals, including Sutter and Kaiser, sponsor groups, and so do churches and other organizations. Googling turns up a good selection. Greenfield also recommends the books Shared Parenting: Beyond the Great Divide by Frank Leek, Ph.D., her husband; Mom’s House, Dad’s House by Isolina Ricci, Ph.D.; Dinosaurs Divorce by Laurene Kransy Brown and Marc Brown, a colorful kids’ book. James suggests

Get Out of My Life, but First Could You Drive Me & Cheryl to the Mall?, by Anthony E. Wolf, Ph.D.

March 2014 - stylemg.com 29


cause&effect

“Our community has been a great support to us in our mission,” shares Lana Deering, a member of the AOML board of directors. “Continuing support is always needed, especially as we grow. Volunteers are always a huge need. A couple hours a week makes a big difference for us.” AOML is currently seeking cage cleaners, adoption and placement specialists, and individuals with enough technological knowhow to perform basic website maintenance. Director Maggie Killackey also encourages donations—just $10 provides a rabies vaccination for one cat or kitten, while $100 covers the cost of a new holding cage. Supplies—ranging from cat litter and food to cleaning products and gently used refrigerators for storing vaccinations—are also gratefully accepted. “I have seen a tremendous change in our organization through the years,” Killackey says, “and the results are simply the impact we have had on the community at large. This particular cause is close to my heart because of my total involvement with the organiza-

animal outreach of the mother lode by Morgan Cásarez

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t was 18th-century philosopher Immanuel Kant who said “We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals.” As a longtime volunteer and board memeber at Animal Outreach of the Mother Lode (AOML), Lori Cicchini lives by these words. “I know that every cat or dog deserves to be well treated and loved by someone, and many aren’t,” she explains. “I feel I have a responsibility, as part of this community, to do what I can to change that and help save as many lives as we can together.” AOML was founded in 1992 with a goal of reducing feline euthanizations in the Diamond Springs area. Throughout its more than 20-year history, the nonprofit’s largely volunteer staff has provided quality low- and no-cost spay/neuter and vaccination services for cats throughout El Dorado, Placer and Sacramento counties, including a free spay/neuter program for feral cats held the first Saturday of every month. In recent years, AOML has extended its reach to canine care, including nail clipping, vaccinations and microchipping. When they aren’t busy educating the public about the benefits of controlling the pet population, Cicchini and her fellow volunteers maintain close relationships with local shelters in an effort to find both foster and permanent homes for animals on the verge of being euthanized. 30 stylemg.com - March 2014

Barbara Gordon with Alex

tion, and the amount of animals we have been able to save throughout the years.” Each year, AOML provides medical care to 10,000 animals, rescues more than 2,000 cats and dogs, and finds more than 100 foster homes for rescued and rehabilitated animals. According to Jeanne Jackson, president of AOML’s board of directors, the organization hopes to expand its “safety net” to other states and encourage shelters to embrace no-kill models of operation. “To be a part of AOML is really a gift. No other organization is so generous,” Jackson says. “Everyone is born with a purpose and mine is to help animals.”

Visit animaloutreach.net for more information.

Photos by Dante Fontana.

Putting Furry Friends First


Homes, Businesses & Lives Repaired.™

EL DORADO RESTORATION

Disaster Repair and Construction


greenscene

local green thumbs

biodegradable. Eating from the Earth will never taste better! Prices vary; available at leafware.com

6 Eco-Friendly Products by Megan Wiskus

1 / MOVERS & SHAKERS California Box Rental, Rocklin, calboxrental.com Save time, energy and money on your next move by renting “boxes” (100-percent plastic containers with attached lids), plus hangers, totes, tubs, straps, dollies and wardrobe boxes—while also saving the environment. California Box Company’s products can be used multiple times before they need to be replaced, while also being weather resistant, waterproof and stackable. With attached tops there’s no need for tape, and they can carry more than double the weight of a comparable cardboard box. Prices vary; available at calboxrental.com

2 / WASH UP Bella Soap Company, Loomis, bellasoapcompany.com Soothe dry and sensitive skin with Bella Soap Company’s GMO-and gluten-free moisturizing body bar that’s received the Seal of Acceptance from the National Eczema Association, is recommended by pediatricians and dermatologists, and was presented before Congress during hearings for the Safe Cosmetics Act. Go green while getting clean! $4.89 each; available at buybellasoap.com and at local retailers, including Whole Foods Market

3 / GREEN LIGHT Candle Soap Bar, El Dorado Hills, candlesoapbar.com These 100-percent soy, vegetable-based wax candles offer a cleanburning alternative to paraffin that’s environmentally sound and healthy for your home. What’s more, each candle is individually hand poured to perfection with maximum scent, and the glass jar is reusable. $23; available at candlesoapbar.com and at Taylor’s Art & Soul in Sacramento

4 / DINNER IS SERVED Leafware, Folsom, leafware.com Handcrafted from fallen palm leaves that are each thoroughly cleaned, heat pressed and fully sterilized, the result is sturdy, casually elegant dinnerware (plates, bowls, utensils and more)—perfect for everyday dining and relaxed gatherings. Liquid and heat safe, with no chemicals or binders, each USDA-certified, 99-percent biobased product (intended for single use) is compostable and 32 stylemg.com - March 2014

5 / ALL BOTTLED UP Mason Solar Jars, Placerville, 530303-3190 Store up sunshine for the nighttime with these Mason Solar Jars, handmade by local crafter Domini Yeske using recycled jars, beads and glass marbles. Each ingenious offering is weather resistant and lasts for six to eight hours (after charging all day in the sun). Perfect on a picnic table, in a garden, lining a walkway or when camping—you’ll be the light of the party. $14+; available at Eco Logical in Placerville

6 / WINE DOWN Sierra Vista Winery, Placerville sierravistawinery.com Sierra Vista’s buzz-worthy vinos are some of the most ecofriendly out there. The winery was the first in the El Dorado American Viticultural Area (AVA) to install solar panels (produces 60 percent of their electricity) and only organic materials are used on their vines; what’s more, it’s certified sustainable by Fish Friendly Farming. We especially love the luscious and rich 201 0 Cabernet Sauvignon Syrah with flavors of blackberry, plum and a hint of toasty spice. $32; available at sierravistawinery.com

Wine photo by Aaron Roseli. All other photos courtesy of their respective companies.

I

’m a fiend for green (the color and living an eco-friendly lifestyle), so when tasked with the challenge to find locally made earth-conscious items, I gladly obliged. From moving boxes and bars of soap to bottles of wine, one thing is clear: Our area embraces every shade of green. Here, we present you with six Style-approved products.


2 0 D E CO R AT I N G T I P S A N D T R I C K S | AWA R D -W I N N I N G H O M E R E M O D E L ™

F O L S O M

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D O R A D O

H I L L S

INSPIRING INTERIORS

FEBRUARY 2013

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STYLEMG.COM

1/17/13 5:01:44 PM

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HOMESHOW M A G A Z I N E


inhistory

forgotten city Legacy of Logtown

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ust south of El Dorado, through a pretty shaded stretch of oak, Highway 49 follows Logtown Creek and Logtown Ravine, but Logtown itself is nowhere to be found. In fact, the exact location of Logtown had been something of a mystery for generations. From 2009-2010, the Logtown Curve Realignment and Road Widening Safety Project opened the way, literally, for archaeologists working with the California Department of Transportation to survey the area believed to have been the site of Logtown, a once-booming mining community. Like many towns in El Dorado County and the surrounding region, Logtown seemed to appear overnight in 1849. Placer mining attracted thousands to the area, and by the 1850s quartz mining was underway. According to an 1858 Mountain Democrat article, there were more than six mills operating in Logtown Ravine, including the Lamoille Mill. Owned by J.R. Beard, it had a steam engine powering eight stamps, 34 stylemg.com - March 2014

which could crush up to 15 tons of rock every 12 hours. The two most renowned mines in the Ravine, however, were Empire Mine and the Pocahontas Mine, which operated well into the 1870s. No one knows how Logtown, which was sometimes referred to as Empire City, got its name. At the time, thousands of miners, blacksmiths, cooks, engineers and saloonkeepers called it home. During the depression in the 1870s, some residents turned more heavily toward agriculture; then, during the Great Depression of 1929, gold mining enjoyed its resurgence in the Mother Lode, particularly in Logtown. By 1948, however, the last buildings were in ruins and Logtown had ceased to exist. The only remains visible were four headstones in the overgrown Logtown Cemetery. Among them is Perry Summers, aged 21 in 1850. According to the census, he lived with two other male family members and a third, unrelated man. In the 1860 census, these men are not recorded;

they had long moved on, like so many men of the Gold Rush. Archaeologists working on the Logtown site were able to survey and record mine tailings, areas of heavy mining activity, a few building foundations and the cemetery, but surprisingly little remains of a town that once held a thousand. Nor did archaeologists discover one of the only known legends surrounding Logtown: Lillian Stanley Drew, the granddaughter of William Rust who, in 1855, owned a saloon on Logtown Road. According to Lillian, Logtown was a prosperous mining area and her grandfather thrived, burying his own gold in cans around the property. One day, while sitting on his porch, he fell backwards and died without having told anyone the location of his gold. Numerous attempts to find the treasure failed. According to Lillian, “a lot of digging went on for a long time.” Logtown never became an agricultural or railroad center; it was founded by miners and like them, in time, it too disappeared.

Photo © johnsroad7/fotolia.com.

by Hiliary C. Simon


homedesign

nesting in small spaces 10 Ways to Create a Streamlined Home by Kerrie Kelly, ASID

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Unify opposing pieces. A coat of white paint can pull together clashing woods or colors. Paint accent pieces to complement each other. Harmonizing shades keeps a small space from looking too busy.

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Paint smart. A very pale hue bounces light around just as white paint would, but also adds a colorful element to create the appearance that tiny confines are larger. If you prefer darker tones, take the wall color onto the ceiling or use a shade that’s two or three shades lighter than the walls on the ceiling to keep the contrast levels down.

STORAGE SOLUTIONS

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Box it up. Bulky items like sheets, blankets and off-season clothing can easily slide under the bed in dust-free boxes when not in use. Colored or fabriccovered boxes can conceal items while decoratively perched in bookcases. 9 A little fabric. Wall-to-wall drapes can expand their use while cleverly covering floor to ceiling open shelving and architectural eyesores.

MAXIMIZE YOUR FLOOR PLAN

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Create a symmetrical layout by centering heavy pieces on a room’s perimeter, in order to create an anchoring sense of order. Flank a sofa by matching bookcases to offset the visual weight of a piano or fireplace. You can make a compact room feel much bigger by choosing fewer large, bold pieces instead of several smaller furnishings and accessories.

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4 Lighten up. A special table or floor lamp gives a room instant style and ambience. You can get a lot of task light out of lamps in a small room without needing much overhead light. The most beautiful fabrics and artwork are useless if they’re hidden in darkness!

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Multitasking furniture pieces. Free up precious square footage by getting creative with your furniture’s purpose. Rearrange a bed so that the longer end is against a wall to create a daybed effect that is functional for sleeping, as well as for a cozy hangout area. Nimble pieces. Select pieces that can be agile within your space. Flexible elements—such as stools, trays, ottomans and side tables—can be easily moved around and multi-purposed for additional seating, night stands, small desks and serving tables. Don’t be afraid to add handles or casters to pieces for maximum flexibility.

36 stylemg.com - March 2014

CLAIM YOUR COLORS Identify your palette. Begin the color selection process by pinpointing your favorite objects in the space. Pull color from rugs, artwork, furniture, fabrics and accessories to create your personal palette. A small space isn’t a place to have high-contrast, jarring color and patterns; go for color, but keep it all in the same tone.

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Kerrie L. Kelly is an award-winning interior designer, author and multimedia consultant. She has authored two books: ‘Home Décor: A Sunset Design Guide,’ published by Oxmoor House, and the newly released ‘My Interior Design Kit,’ with Pearson Professional and Career Education. To contact her, visit kerriekelly.com or call 916-919-3023.

Photo by Brian Kellogg Photography.

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ith spring arriving soon, many of us look to organize and balance the items we’ve collected. In smaller quarters, this may mean mixing styles, colors and unmatched elements, which can ultimately create a space that reflects the real you—just follow these simple guidelines.

Concealed cabinets. Doors can hide file boxes and dayto-day functional items, while open shelving can display decorative books and collectibles. Personalize pre-fabricated cabinetry by staining or painting the doors. Upholstering the front of cabinet doors with padding, beautiful fabric and nail-head trim is another appealing option. Remember, while a diminutive room has the potential to be a “jewel box” in your home, you really have to be detailed when decorating it—everything becomes a focal point. The eye travels quickly around a small room, so you want each piece to have meaning and impact with your own personal touch.


GET FRESH

farm-to-table

eating

IF YOU WANT TO EAT LOCAL, FRESH AND SUSTAINABLE FOODS, THE FARM-TO-TABLE MOVEMENT IS FOR YOU.

BY KRISTEN CASTILLO PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANTE FONTANA

“Farm-to-table is a celebration of seasonality,” says Harvindar Singh, local forager for Whole Foods Markets in northern California, explaining the movement is about celebrating local food, knowing where products are grown and building a healthy community. “Every day we eat, but do we think about where it comes from?” asks Singh. Do you know where and how your food is grown? Were chemicals used? “Farm-to-table isn’t a movement or fad for our customers, it is a way of life,” says Carol Arnold, executive director of Foothill Farmers’ Market Association/PlacerGROWN. The concept of farmto-table, or farm-to-fork as it’s often called, isn’t new. In fact, consuming fresh, local, chemical-free fruits, vegetables and meats is a very traditional idea. That’s the way food was produced and consumed until modern times. Consumers are now realizing that using preservatives, freezing food and trucking it long distances isn’t necessarily a good idea. The State of California and regional elected officials recently proclaimed Sacramento the “Farm-to-Fork Capital of America.” The Art of Real Food co-author Joanne Neft, who also co-authored Placer 38 stylemg.com - March 2014

County Real Food with Laura Kenney, says, “People want to know they are eating healthy food and are willing to spend a bit more time preparing meals.” The pair shopped farmers’ markets every week for a year buying fresh, local foods and then prepared home-style dinners for 8-10 people; the recipes can be found inside Placer County Real Food. “Eating farm-to-table is having an impact and this is just the beginning.” Shop area farmers’ markets for local fruits and vegetables that are picked when they’re ripe, in addition to seasonal jams, honeys and cheeses. “I don’t take a ‘list’ to a farmers’ market,” says Neft. “Whatever is at the market that week is what we eat, including ingredients for a soup or salad, grain or starch, at least two or three different vegetables, some wild fish or grassfed meat and dessert.” Also, consider joining a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) group, where you pay a subscription for fresh produce. Every two weeks, for example, Singh receives a basket of fruits and vegetables from his CSA. “You get to experiment with a variety of foods,” he says. Read on as we take you to local restaurants embracing the movement (with a recipe from each!), and explore area markets and ranches. It’s time to get healthy, eat fresh and help your community.


SEASONAL KALE SLAW Submitted by Chef Kimberly Medici, Table Nectar Local and Organic Catering and Manzanita Kitchen and Events

TABLE NECTAR LOCAL AND ORGANIC CATERING AND MANZANITA KITCHEN AND EVENTS Forget mass-produced convenience food. Being “local and organic” is a way of life at Table Nectar. “The farm-to-table movement is about knowing where our food comes from and enjoying produce, meats and locally made products that haven’t travelled halfway around the world, but were instead grown or produced in our backyards and communities,” says Kimberly Medici, chef and owner at Table Nectar. Medici calls farm-to-table “conscious eating” and explains it’s local, pesticide-free and can help making and preparing food fun, since there are so many colors and flavors to choose from. “It’s quality over quantity and healthier choices combined,” she says. In the spring, Table Nectar’s farm-to-table menus include balsamic beet crostini with oven-roasted South Fork Farm’s baby beets and arugula, Jollity Farm’s fresh goat’s chevré, Mad Dog Mesa’s extra virgin olive oil and balsamic reduction; Flying Mule Farms’ slow braised lamb shank served with Riverdog Farm’s roasted fingerling potatoes, grilled spring asparagus, and creamy truffled polenta from Grass Valley Grains; and for dessert, orange cardamom creme brulée, made with Local Yolk’s pastured eggs, Clover Stornetta cream, and Hooverville Orchards’ fresh citrus. Sourcing ingredients takes time and great communication but Medici has a direct relationship with local farmers, which means she can arrange for a “limited number of custom-grown fruits and veggies.” Medici says that while farm-to-table can cost at least 30-40 percent more than traditional dining, the cost is worth it, explaining, “When you pay a little more for higherquality ingredients that taste better and are more appealing, you tend to waste less and therefore ultimately spend less.” Costs might get better as farm-to-table TABLE NECTAR LOCAL AND ORGANIC gets even more popular. “The good news is CATERING AND MANZANITA that the more we support our local food sysKITCHEN AND EVENTS tems and organic farming, the greater the 4232 Fowler Lane, Suite 101, Diamond Springs demand will be, and the more affordable it will 530-344-7613 | tablenectar.com get,” says Medici.

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• 2 bunches Dinosaur kale (de-stemmed and cut into thin strips or roughly chopped) • 3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil • 1 tbsp. hemp seed oil • 1 tbsp. + 1 tsp. Dijon mustard • 3/4 tsp. sea salt • Fresh ground pepper, to taste • 2 tbsp. Grade B pure maple syrup • 2 tbsp. fresh squeezed lemon juice • 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar • 2 cups red and green cabbage (cut into thin strips or shredded by hand or with food processor) • 1 medium sized tart/sweet apple such as Granny Smith, Fuji, or Pink Lady (shredded or thinly sliced) • 2 medium sized carrots (peeled and shredded by hand or with food processor) • 1 medium sized red beet (peeled and shredded by hand or with food processor) • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, walnut pieces or slivered almonds 1. Wash all fresh ingredients thoroughly. 2. Remove stems from the kale, as they tend to be slightly tough and woody when served raw. 3. Bunch up or stack the de-stemmed greens and thinly slice them to about 1/4-inch thickness. Place them in a medium-sized mixing bowl. 4. Add ingredients (olive oil through cider vinegar) directly to the kale; wash hands, and then thoroughly massage the dressed greens mixture with your hands. 5. Massage the greens with the same intensity you might tenderize meat with a malate. By doing this, the acids in the dressing act to gently tenderize and “cook” the kale without loosing any flavor or nutrients. This is the fun part, so don’t be afraid to really get in there! 6. Prep all of the remaining ingredients. Using a food processor with a shredding attachment works most quickly; otherwise, shred the carrots and beets by hand. The apples can be sliced, diced or shredded, whichever you prefer. 7. Add the cabbage, carrots, beets and apples to the kale mixture and gently toss—mixing all ingredients throughout. 8. If you prefer your nuts and seeds toasted, put them in the oven for about 8 minutes at 350 degrees; let them cool before folding into the salad. March 2014 - stylemg.com 39


CHEF RANDALL SELLAND’S HEIRLOOM TOMATO SOUP Submitted by Selland’s Market-Café

• 2-1/2 lbs. heirloom tomatoes (any variety you prefer) • 3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil • 1/4 bunch cilantro • 1 to 2 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped • 2 tbsp. salt • Additional salt and pepper, to taste

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SELLAND’S MARKET CAFE

Core tomatoes and cut into quarters. Combine tomatoes, olive oil, cilantro, garlic and 2 tbsp. salt in a large bowl and gently mix together. Cover and let marinate for 4-5 hours at room temperature, and then run through a food mill or blender. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve at room temperature with your choice of accompaniments, such as avocado, burrata or fresh mozzarella, or crab. Serves 4.

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SELLAND’S MARKET-CAFÉ 4370 Town Center Boulevard 916-932-5025 | sellands.com

SELLAND’S MARKETCAFÉ

There are many reasons why this El Dorado Hills eatery embraces the farm-to-table concept. “People like to know where their food comes from; it helps create a connection to [it] and helps create a sense of community,” says owner Randall Selland, who also praises the health benefits of eating “a balanced diet of things grown locally or regionally, because you can track what’s in it and how it was raised.” Further, What’s on a farm-to-table menu? Anything local, fresh the farm-to-table style allows the restaurant to back the regional economy by and sustainable. Nothing is processed. “Instead of meat, supporting farmers and produce suppliers close to home. potatoes and a vegetable, you might find grass-fed lamb, Some of their vendors include Lienert’s Honey, Kelly’s Crayfish, Aoyama roasted vegetables, fresh fruit and locally sourced highFarms (for peaches, grapes, tomatoes and onions), Cache Creek Meat Co. (for quality bread,” says Arnold. chicken, turkey and lamb), and The Chef’s Garden (for micro greens and micro Over time, you’ll develop a sense of what’s in season. February herbs, plus specialty lettuces and heirloom vegetables), among other suppliers. for example, is prime time for citrus like blood oranges Selland also values having a good rapport with local farmers and growers. “They and grapefruits. Winter squash is available from October are really our first line of defense and our eyes and ears on the ground to let us through March, and tomatoes are at their peak from July know what, where and when the best stuff will be ready, and how long we have through October. left in the season,” he says. Even with seasonal availability, you can still plan ahead The restaurant plans ahead throughout the year to maximize what’s fresh to create menus. Arnold offers this tasty meal for an in fruits, vegetables, herbs, grains and nuts. Still, flexibility is required because early spring dinner: an appetizer of leek, green garlic, serving fresh, local quality foods is a priority. Selland’s Market-Café in El Dorado and mushroom crostini; a whole roast chicken with Hills and its sister restaurants, The Kitchen, Selland’s in East Sacramento, and root vegetables for dinner; a side dish of sautéed Ella, have been farm-to-table for more than 20 years. “We’ve always had guests chard; and a sweet dessert of fresh navel oranges and Meyer lemon goat cheese cheesecake (for the who are overwhelmingly positive about it,” says Selland. “The food tastes better, it cheesecake recipe, visit stylemg.com). makes guests feel good, and it’s good for the community and the local economy.”

WHAT’S ON THE MENU?

40 stylemg.com - March 2014


WINTER CITRUS SALAD WITH BLOOD ORANGE VINAIGRETTE Submitted by The Smith Flat House

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THE SMITH FLAT HOUSE

Organic mixed salad greens Wedges from 1/2 tangerine Wedges from 1/2 blood orange Wedges from 1/4 ruby red grapefruit 1/4 cup chopped cashews 1/4 cup goat cheese

BLOOD ORANGE VINAIGRETTE: • 1 tsp. finely chopped shallots • Zest and juice from 1 blood orange • Zest and juice from 1 lime • 2 tbsp. white vinegar • 1 tsp. parsley • 2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil • Salt and pepper, to taste

This Placerville restaurant’s farm-to-table Shake or mix vigorously. strategy is three-fold: Customers can eat seaTO PREPARE SALAD: sonal food, thus varyToss organic mixed salad greens lightly in ing their diets; food is dressing. Top with wedges of blood orange, served and eaten at the peak of freshness; and local farmers financially benefit from the tangerine and ruby red grapefruit. Sprinkle restaurant buying their products. cashews and goat cheese on top. “In general, our customers seem to enjoy the variety on the menu and the ever-changing Serves 4, plus leftover vinaigrette. nature of what is offered, as well as the commitment to creative and quality ingredients,” says the restaurant’s managing partner Jason Spencer. “They’ve quickly realized they can come back regularly and try different items and types of food throughout the year, but know that the quality of the ingredients will always be consistent, the things featured will regularly change, and the menu will always have a fresh look.” Throughout the year, The Smith Flat House sources food from Perez’ Red Shack, South Fork Farm, Sorenson Family Farms, Boa Vista Orchards, Barsotti Juice Company, Penrod THE SMITH FLAT HOUSE Farms, Willow Pond Organic Farm and Mad 2021 Smith Flat Road, Placerville Dog Mesa Olive Oil. What’s more, the restau530-621-1003 | smithflathouse.com rant features only El Dorado County wines Farm-to-table is all about on their wine list. supporting local farms and sustainable practices. Once you know where to go, you can buy fresh and local fruits and vegSince menu items are seasonal, here’s etables, as well as eggs, honey and meats. Check out these Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) groups and local farms: what can be found: in winter, a salad with mixed greens and ruby red grapefruit, blood CSAs: red oranges and tangerines, tossed in a citEl Dorado Hills Natural Farms: edhfarms.com rus vinaigrette and topped with cashews; in Farm Fresh to You: farmfreshtoyou.com Full Belly Farm: fullbellyfarm.com spring, an entrée of gemelli pasta with spring It’s Organic: itsorganicdelivery.com asparagus, grape tomatoes and a light basil The Natural Trading Co.: naturaltradingco.com cream sauce; and a fall dessert of pear and Vierra Farms: vierrafarms.com cranberry cobbler with house-made whipped cream. The eatery’s salad changes throughFARMS: out the year as well. In spring and summer, it The Casey Family Farm for chicken and rabbit meat, as well as free-range eggs: penrynrabbitfarm.com Delta Farm, LLC for beef, Berkshire pigs, lamb, honey and free-range eggs: delta-farm.com has local heirloom tomatoes and cucumbers Flying Mule Farm for lamb, mutton and free-range eggs: flyingmulefarm.com while in fall and winter, heirloom radishes, Sinclair Family Farm for beef, lamb, pork, poultry and eggs: sinclairfamilyfarm.net pickled red onions and shredded carrots Tumbling Creek Ranch, LLC for eggs: tumblingcreekranch.com can be found in it. “By changing our menu Wintun Ranch for grass-fed beef: wintungrassfedbeef.com regularly, we can feature produce and items FOR A LIST OF LOCAL FARMERS’ MARKETS, VISIT STYLEMG.COM. that are priced appropriately,” adds Spencer.

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BUY LOCAL!

March 2014 - stylemg.com 41


GUINEA HEN SPANAKOPITA Submitted by Chef James Ablett, Taste Restaurant

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2 lbs. ground hen thighs (skin on)* 3 oz. baby arugula 1 large shallot, minced 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 oz. Brie cheese 1 stick butter, melted 2 tbsp. mixed herbs (such as rosemary, thyme and chives) • 6 sheets #4 phyllo dough • Salt and pepper 1. Mix the ground hen meat with shallot, garlic, salt pepper and herbs. 2. Add 1 tablespoon of melted butter to an 11-inch skillet, over medium heat. 3. Sauté the mixture until just cooked through; while it is cooling, add the arugula and wilt, then allow to cool. 4. Place the phyllo on a tabletop and brush with butter. 5. Fold in half, and butter again. 6. Place 1/6 of the mixture, and 1/2 of Brie onto the closest corners, and fold over the mixture, like a burrito, making sure to butter each fold generously. This should form a 2” x 6” rectangle. 7. Bake at 400 degrees, 10 to 15 minutes, until golden brown. Makes 6 spanakopita. *Taste uses a Guinea hen from Grimaud Farms.

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TASTE RESTAURANT 9402 Main Street, Plymouth 209-245-3463 | restauranttaste.com

TASTE RESTAURANT Using fresh ingredients is the way Taste in Plymouth does business. “I talk to a great deal of the customers, and they enjoy the fact that we are always on the lookout for new and interesting produce,” says James Ablett, the restaurant’s chef de cuisine, talking about the great quality of local produce they get, concluding, “Every day is really like Christmas.” Customers value quality over cost, too. “They will pay for the love that the farmers and my staff put into these ingredients,” says Ablett. “These products are better for people’s health and the environment.” Creating farm-to-table menus isn’t difficult for Ablett since he and the Taste staff work with what foods are in season, such as fava beans. Flexibility is required though since the seasons for certain foods can vary in length. What’s more, the restaurant makes almost everything from scratch and with advance notice, they’ll accommodate customers’ dietary needs such as gluten-free and vegan. Taste sources fresh ingredients from many local farms including Del Rio Botanical, Passmore Ranch, Rosen Farms, Abondonza Farms, Grimaud Farms, Macy’s Eggs. Joe Yeung Farms, Riverdog Farm, Twin Peaks Orchards, and Apple Hill.

COSTLY OR COST-EFFECTIVE?

Eating well can be a challenge on any budget, so is farm-to-table affordable or expensive? It depends who you ask.

Arnold says farm-to-table saves her money since the produce lasts longer than its grocery store counterparts and there’s less waste. “I find that my family eats more simply,” she says, explaining she doesn’t buy any processed foods. “The flavor of the fresh food becomes the center of the experience so I don’t need to buy many ingredients.” Even if farm-to-table is more expensive, Neft says it’s a choice she’s willing to make. “For me, it’s a privilege to eat good, nutritious food and I’m healthy because of it,” she says. “We are what we eat.” For example, while a free-range chicken is pricey, Neft says it yields 10 servings, including four servings of thighs, legs and wings; four servings of breast meat for one; a stir-fry meal for two; a vegetable salad for two topped with pulled chicken; and a chicken broth soup. “I make chicken broth from all of the bones/throw-away pieces and use it as a basis for a yummy chickenvegetable soup,” says Neft. “We always eat meat, but not too much.”

FOR MORE LOCAL RESOURCES AND THE RECIPE FOR MEYER LEMON GOAT CHEESE CHEESECAKE, VISIT STYLEMG.COM. 42 stylemg.com - March 2014


DIG INTO SPRING

ideas fair

Spring is here and it’s TIME TO GET GROWING! FOLSOM LOCATION ONLY

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Seminar Topics: Surviving the Drought, Growing Fruit Trees w/ Less Space & Less Water, Designing w/ Low-Water Plants & more

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Green Acres Nursey & Supply in Folsom 205 Serpa Way (above Costco)


brews cruise

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BREWERIES by Tom Mailey I’m at my third microbrewery in one afternoon. I’m not going to lie: My head is spinning a bit and my notes have gone from tidy penmanship to something resembling the EKG of a winded jackrabbit. Another flight of beer arrives, seven five-ounce samples of fresh-made, handcrafted ales that I now must, in the name of research, consume. Pour me. I mean, poor me. Meanwhile my wife, who is my designated driver, sits patiently, munching on pretzels from a bowl at the bar and coming up with new and creative ways I’m going to owe her for the next six months. According to the latest data, the craft beer industry now commands nearly seven percent of the national beer market—a number that will continue to rise as more people discover that beer can be every bit as complex and flavorful as a good glass of wine. Now, if your interest in fermented hops stops at whether or not the mountains on your can have turned blue, skip this read. But if you can appreciate what I’ve come to call “consumable craftsmanship” (I think I was on my second flight when I came up with that gem) and you have a safe ride home? Keep reading. It’s a fun time to be a beer lover around here.

44 stylemg.com - March 2014

Photo of Tom Mailey by Dante Fontana. Beer photo © simmittorok/fotolia.com. Canvas texture background image © alleks/fotolia.com. Wheat leaf illustrations © Pushkarevskyy/fotolia.com.

Hoppin’


1. AMERICAN RIVER BREWING COMPANY 11151 Trade Center Drive, Suite 104 Rancho Cordova, 916-635-2537

American River Brewing Company and Lockdown Brewing Co. photos by Vickie Mailey. Photo at Mraz Brewing by Dante Fontana.

americanriverbrewingcompany.com

With a degree in brewing from the American Brewers Guild, Dave Mathis opened American River Brewing Company (ARBC) two years ago because, as he proclaims, “Beer is life.” Can’t argue with that. Working alongside Andy Armstrong—a former brew master at the late, great Beermann’s—life is good: They move 200 kegs a month and come the weekend, their tasting room is packed. ARBC has several styles on tap, like the light, crisp AU Golden Ale and the State Fair gold medal-winning Coloma Brown. The Hop Herd Double IPA was my favorite, with a great finish that reminded me of a good party guest: spirited and a little loud, but knows when to tone it down. The Fire Break Red Ale, brewed in honor of firefighters, is wonderful, with pine notes reminiscent of late summer in Tahoe. ARBC also features seasonal and special batches, including the amazing, wine-barrel-aged Prudence Porter.

story mixed assemblage of couches, overstuffed chairs, foosball and pool tables give it a frat house feel. Barkeep Julien Adams says it’s like “hanging out in a neighbor’s garage”—a neighbor who happens to brew some really tasty beer. Emma’s Blonde Ale is a summer ale with a restrained presence of citrus; a little citrus goes a long way for me, and Emma’s finds that balance. Barkeep Adams’ favorite is the Powerhouse Pale Ale. “It’s got everything going on,” he says, and I can’t disagree: great flavor and finish. But it’s the Stony Bar Scotch Ale that has brought Lockdown the most attention. A multiple award winner, it’s strong but not overpowering, sweet but not cloying, and a hint of smoke gives it a nice organic profile; it’s the brewery’s number one beer. Lockdown has several other styles, too, including seasonal selections and, for your designated driver, a really terrific root beer. NOTE: Lockdown also has a lively taproom in Historic Folsom.

3. MRAZ BREWING COMPANY 2222 Francisco Drive, Suite 510 El Dorado Hills, 916-934-0744

mrazbrewingcompany.com At only 1,000 square feet and tucked into a little strip mall off Green Valley Road in El Dorado Hills, Mraz Brewing Company could easily be overlooked. But it shouldn’t be. Named the “California Home Brewer of the Year” in 2008 and 2009, Mike Mraz has turned his passion into his paycheck. And while, like any good businessman, he’s open to growth, he says, “If we stay a nice little neighborhood brewery, we’re happy

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? All beers are either ales or lagers. Most mass-produced commercial beers are lagers but most craft beers are ales. Why? Ale yeasts mature more quickly than lager yeasts and therefore don’t need to be stored as long. Thus, quicker turnaround. As Mike Mraz from Mraz Brewing Company says, “A lot of it is about time and space.” Ales also tend to be more full-bodied, full-flavored and higher in alcohol, and lagers crisper tasting, clearer and more effervescent. Oh, and the “hoppiness” you hear about? It refers to the amount of hops in a beer— primarily ales. Originally, just enough hops were added so their bitterness could balance out the sweetness of sugars from the brewing process, but in the last few decades the taste experience of hops themselves have become a thing—with many brewers seeing how far they can push it, and many beer lovers eager to see how much they can take.

with that.” With 6-10 very palatable presentations on tap, staying small shouldn’t be a problem. Try the EDH IPA, with a peppery profile that resonated nicely inside my face (yes, that thought actu-

2. LOCKDOWN BREWING CO. 11327 Trade Center Drive, Suite 350 Rancho Cordova; 718 Sutter Street, Suite 200 Folsom, 916-358-9645

lockdownbrewingcompany.com The tasting room at Lockdown’s brewing facility in Rancho Cordova—less than a mile from American River Brewing’s—is very casual. The bar is just inside the open warehouse door and a two-

Tom getting tasting advice from Mike Mraz at Mraz Brewing Company

March 2014 - stylemg.com 45


START ME UP

It doesn’t need to be expensive, either. Shmid says you can get going for as little as $99, and then it “just depends on how much you want 5. OUT OF BOUNDS to get into the hobby.” The Brewers Barn (thebrewersbarn. BREWING COMPANY com) in Diamond Springs and Whole Foods Market 4480 Yankee Hill Road, Suite 100 (wholefoodsmarket.com) in Folsom and Rocklin, 916-259-1511 Roseville also offer home-brewing outofboundsbrewing.com materials. Only open since Labor Day, Rocklin’s Out of Bounds has nevertheless hit the craft brew ally occurred to me), and the Winter Wheat, a playing field running. Co-founders Eric Johncitrus-and-coriander-infused Belgian white ale son and Anthony Brown lured one of the West with a hint of celery that would be a great backCoast’s most respected brew masters, Bruce yard summer sip; also, a buoyant Pale Ale that MacPhee, away from one of the West Coast’s took third place in a nationwide home brewer’s most respected breweries, Deschutes of Bend, contest in 2009, and maybe the most interesting beer I tried on this assignment: an aesthetically gorgeous Belgian Ale colored red from dark cherries. If dessert beers existed, it would be one.

Oregon. They built the brewing facilities to his specifications and designed a spacious, comfortable tasting room. They also feature quite a few beers for such a new place, something that customer Christy Burg says initially made her wary. But as she makes her way down the menu board? “I don’t think there’s a beer I’ve been disappointed in yet.” Brown says one thing that sets Out of Bounds’ beers apart is no filtering. “When you filter...you can get the beer onto the market quicker, but it takes out a lot of the rich-tasting organics that really make it a craft beer.” I liked the Joyrider, an easy-drinking IPA that doesn’t punch you in the mouth. Also noteworthy is the maple-y Big Gun Porter, which also has a hint of chocolate. But my favorite was the robust, roasty Granite Chief Stout, which was so good the first sip made me cuss.

6. LOOMIS BASIN BREWING COMPANY 3277 Swetzer Road, Loomis, 916-259-2739

loomisbasinbrewing.com If you like businesses that are family owned and

4. KNEE DEEP BREWING CO. 13395 New Airport Road, Suite H, Auburn 530-797-4677

kneedeepbrewing.com

If there’s a 900-pound gorilla on the local microbrewery scene, it’s Knee Deep. In just two years they’ve gone from the backroom of a shuttered Lincoln restaurant to a spacious new facility next to the airport in Auburn, where they’re currently shipping more than 8,000 kegs a month to places as far away as the East Coast. Owner Jerry Moore (his business card lists him as “janitor”) says a couple years of retirement was all it took for him to realize he “didn’t like golf,” so he followed his passion—hooking up with brewer Jeremy Warren (whose mantra is “respect the beer”); together becoming a potent combination, producing concoctions like the multi-award-winning Hoptologist, a double IPA 46 stylemg.com - March 2014

Cheers! Tom sips his tasting flight while getting expert advice from Out of Bounds Brewing Company Co-founder Anthony Brown.

Knee Deep Brewing Company photo by Chris Moore. Out of Bounds Brewing Company photo by Dante Fontana.

with a sweet, grassy aroma and a clean, tidy finish. The Belga Hoptologist is the Hoptologist using Belgian yeast to give it a So you want to brew your own, eh? You’re in good zippy, almost fruity taste and would company. According to brewersassociation.org, there are be an ideal introductory IPA for the approximately 1.2 million home brewers in America and Erik Shmid, who owns the home brew supply store The Brewmeister uninitiated. The Simtra, on the other (shopbrewmeister.com) with locations in Roseville and Folsom, says hand, is for the hardcore hophead: he sees more people getting started every year. The best way to begin? A a gripping triple IPA and 11 perclass. Schmid acknowledges that you can learn a lot online but...“you can also cent alcohol-by-volume. It’s also get confused. A three-hour beginner class will eliminate a lot of that and help the one Warren is most proud of, you focus on getting started with minimal equipment.” Take good notes due to the challenge in making it. and Schmid says you can have a good first batch in about a month.


Loomis Basin Brewing Company photos by Kim Palaferri-Loomis News. Roseville Brewing Company photos courtesy of Roseville Brewing Company. Gold Hill Vineyard and Brewing photo by Dante Fontana.

operated, you’ll love Loomis Basin. Opened by Kenny Gowen and his dad, Jim, in March 2011, the operation has grown substantially in just three years. And while assorted family members help out, Kenny and his dad are still the only two actual brewers in the building. The downside? “A lot of 16 hour days.” The upside? “I get to work with my dad every day.” All that time and effort together has paid off in some great brews, like the Mandarin Wheat, an American wheat infused with locally sourced oranges from Sunset Ridge Mandarins and a second place finisher at the 2013 California State Fair. Before your mouth even touches the glass, the hoppy aroma from the Vindicator IPA greets you like a happy dog and with a clean finish—it doesn’t leave paw prints. The more adventurous can try the Avenger Double IPA, a jacked-up 4X4 cousin of the Vindicator, and a porter aged in Jack Daniels barrels called Still Jacked with hints of oak, JD, and flame. Yes, flame.

7. ROSEVILLE BREWING COMPANY 501 Derek Place, Roseville, 800-978-3713

rosevillebrewingcompany.com If the three keys to a successful business are “location, location, location,” Roseville Brewing Company (RBC) should have never opened two years ago. Instead, I’m halfway through a line 15 people deep, looking for an empty seat and hoping to reach the bar before the pie I ordered from the mobile, brick oven pizza guy is done. RBC is at the end of a long, dark industrial cul-de-sac in West Roseville. It’s a crowd owner Kelly Rue doesn’t take for granted. Even when they’re slammed, Kelly says he still tries to “go around and say hi to people [to] let them know

Tom shows off his balancing skills while enjoying the view during a beer tasting at Gold Hill Vineyard and Brewing.

we really appreciate them coming down this weird little road to find us.” Frequent patron Erik Smith says he enjoys “the laid-back atmosphere,” and his buddy Paul Gerstle agrees. “It’s easy to feel comfortable here and you’re enjoying good beer.” The Blackberry Wheat is snappy-crisp and refreshing, almost like a cider but not as sweet. Their marquee beer is the Heavy Rail Pale Ale—fullbodied with an assertive combination of flavors that all manage to get along. If your palate

needs a jolt, the hopped-up Spike Driver will give the back of your eyeballs a tug. Rue’s favorite? The Steam Horse, a cinnamon coffee stout with a touch of honey and a yummy (did I just use that word?) chocolate influence from roasted barley.

Feed Me, Seymour

Unless you’re a bird, this is not the easiest place to get to, but so worth it. Tucked into the foothills off the serpentine asphalt of Highway 49 near Coloma, Gold Hill was founded as a winery in 1985 by Hank Battjes. But Hank wasn’t just a vintner, he was a home brewer too, and in 2000 he started making beer. Sadly, Battjes passed away in 2012, but his legacy lives on in the winery he established, the beer that is still brewed, and the view that accompanies the tasting of both. Good Lord what a view. Sit out on the deck and taste the 49’er Red, which server Rob Bietz says is one of their most popular beers. The Helles Bock is “hella” good (sorry), too. Bietz says it was intended to be an autumn seasonal but its brown-sugary-ish taste proved so popular they now serve it year-round. Frequent customer Jim Critz is a fan of the Old Miner’s Scotch. He says he loves the choice a winery/brewery gives: “Some days are great for wine, some for beer.” He does have a point.

8. GOLD HILL VINEYARD AND BREWING 5660 Vineyard Lane, Placerville 530-626-6522

goldhillvineyard.com

All of these breweries have at least some of their products available in bottles or on tap locally, but half the fun is visiting their taprooms, where you’ll hang out with other beer fans and often be able to chat up the brewers themselves. However, many locations are no frills. If it’s busy you may have to stand. You might need a jacket if it’s cool. And, if you’re thinking about food, know that—like wineries— they have rules that prohibit serving much more than pretzels or peanuts. But that doesn’t mean food trucks can’t stop by. From wood-fired pizzas and barbecue to burgers, tacos and Asian fusion, you name it and you can get it, usually Fridays and Saturdays. Also, several locations—like Loomis Basin Brewing Company—are totally cool if you bring your own grub. Tasting rooms also have different guidelines when it comes to children and pets, and most welcome both. A quick phone call or check of a brewery’s website will tell you everything you need to know.

FOR EVEN MORE LOCAL BREWERIES, VISIT STYLEMG.COM. March 2014 - stylemg.com 47


swag Max Complete, $43.99 (180 capsules) at Max Muscle Sports Nutrition, 4615 Missouri Flat Road, Placerville. 530-626-0239, maxmusclenorcal.com.

“Zap” Immunity Bioterra Herbs, $19.99 (30-day supply) at bioterraherbs.com.

Fleur Camouflage Cadet Cap, $22 at Cadence Corner Boutique, 4620 Post Street, El Dorado Hills. 916-673-6300, sudscarwash.net/ cadence-corner.

spring greening by Jazmin White

Soulstice Juice Jalapeño Bizness (handcrafted and coldpressed locally), $8 (16 oz.) at soulsticejuice.com.

Feline Greenies Pill Pockets, $6.99 at Lees’ Feed & Western Store, Inc., 4110 Mother Lode Drive, Shingle Springs. 530677-4891, leesfeed.net.

Capo Pursuit Jersey, $119.99 at Town Center Bike and Tri, 4420 Town Center Boulevard, Suite 150, El Dorado Hills. 916941-0900, folsombike.com.

48 stylemg.com - March 2014

Charlie’s Soap “Clean House Kit” Indoor/Outdoor Surface Cleaner and Kitchen & Bath Household Cleaner, $22.99 at Dandelions Raising Children Naturally, 3490 Palmer Drive, Suite I, Cameron Park. 530-672-2022, dandelionsusa.com

All photos courtesy of their respective companies.

Military Green Wrap Belt, $87.50 at adacollection.com.


Ken Grossman

President and Owner of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

Book Signing March 20th â&#x20AC;˘ 5-7 PM Whole Foods Market - Folsom

a


dine

Brisket Wrap

50 stylemg.com - March 2014


Back Forty Texas BBQ Forward-Thinking Country Food Hot & Spicy Onion Rings

by Sharon Penny Photography by Dante Fontana

W

Sliced Turkey Sandwich

hen you’re married to a barbecuer, you don’t go out for the cuisine a whole lot. If you do, it better be good or you’ll never hear the end of it. But Back Forty Texas BBQ in Shingle Springs is good. Darn good. My husband and I recently dined in for lunch on a rainy Saturday afternoon. For starters, we went with the “hot and spicy” onion rings, and they delivered on both counts. Crispy and golden with a fiery kick, these rings were some of the best I’ve ever tasted. That cayenne kick is something else! For mains, I ordered the sliced turkey sandwich with Texas country fries, and my husband opted for that day’s lunch special: a barbecue wrap with juicy brisket and a side of potato salad. He said later, “You know you’re in California when you get a wrap at a

Tender brisket is hard to achieve, so for my husband—it was barbecue manna from heaven.

barbecue joint.” The turkey sandwich was plain and simple: barbecued, sliced turkey breast on a toasted crusty French roll and just a hint of barbecue sauce, with lettuce, onions and pickles on the side—but as any barbecue fan will tell you, if the meat is good enough, you don’t need anything else. And Back Forty’s turkey was melt-in-my-mouth delicious; I didn’t even add the lettuce! The Texas country fries were finger-lickin‘ good too. My husband’s juicy brisket wrap was full, almost bursting, with tender, flavorful meat, plus rice and beans. Tender brisket is hard to achieve, so for my husband—it was barbecue manna from heaven. But we didn’t stop there. Nope, we took an order of the eatery’s amazing, scratch-made banana pudding to go. Wow, talk about saving the best for last. Back Forty Texas BBQ succeeds in delivering succulent, tangy barbecue and quality, fresh-baked desserts—all with friendly smiles and superb service.

Banana Pudding

Back Forty Texas BBQ, 3977 Durock Road, Shingle Springs, 530-676-4040, backfortyshinglesprings.com. March 2014 - stylemg.com 51


restaurantguide Featuring restaurants and eateries in the El Dorado County Foothills ** = MAGAZINE DISTRIBUTION POINT • AMERICAN / CAFÉ / DELI Back Forty Texas BBQ 3977 Durock Road, #205 Shingle Springs | 530-676-4040 Hours: Tue.-Thrs. 11:00a.m.-8:00p.m., Fri-Sat 11:00a.m.-9:00p.m., Sun. 11:00a.m.- 8:00p.m. Cards Accepted: V, MC, D, AmEx We serve authentic Texas recipes. We’ve been voted number one caterer and number one ribs in El Dorado County. Dine-in, Carry-out and Catering services are available. All of our dishes are made fresh from scratch daily. Our meats are slow smoked on our southern pride pit. Please come join us for a Texas-size meal. Bricks Eats and Drinks 482 Main Street Placerville | 530-303-3480 Burger Barn ** 6404 Pony Express Trail Pollock Pines | 530-344-7167 Buttercup Pantry 222 Main Street Placerville | 530-621-1320 Café Luna 451 Main Street Placerville | 530-642-8669 Caffé Santoro ** 2531 Merrychase Drive Cameron Park | 530-387-4432 Centro ** 385 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-5500 Crystal Basin Bistro 3590 Carson Road Suite B Camino | 530-303-3749 Hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Everyday Cards Accepted: V, MC, D, AmEx Crystal Basin Bistro is Highway 50’s Best Stop with a 5 Star Yelp Rating! Located 5 miles east of Placerville, we bring tasty, wine-friendly food to Camino. Our Shareable Plates are all priced between $7 and $9 and feature tasty culinary stars like our Reuben Hoagie, Stuffed Mushroom Caps and our Carnitas Tacos. Every Friday night, we feature live music and a 3-course dinner for $17. For Valentine’s Day - local crooner Bob Rawleigh will sing songs of love at the Bistro. Two seatings - 5pm and 7:30pm. $75 per couple or $80 with a bottle of Bubbly. RSVP at 530 303-3749. Cuppa Coffee and More ** 442 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-9600 Diamond Springs Hotel 545 Pleasant Valley Road Placerville | 530-621-1730 The Forester Pub and Grill ** 4110 Carson Road Camino | 530-644-1818 Heyday Café ** 325 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-9700 Hog Wild BBQ ** 38 Main Street Placerville | 530-622-3883

52 stylemg.com - March 2014

The Independent Restaurant & Bar 629 Main Street, Suite 102 Placerville | 530-344-7645

• CHINESE/MONGOLIAN China City Restaurant 4100 Cameron Park Drive Cameron Park | 530-672-9888

Log Cabin Café 3220 Pondorado Road Camino | 530-644-0345

Diamond Chinese Restaurant 570 Pleasant Valley Road Placerville | 530-622-8188

Mr. Pickles ** 4601 Missouri Flat Road Placerville | 530-642-1677

Dignity Dragon Restaurant 415-A Placerville Drive Placerville | 530-622-4293

New Haven ** 6396 Pony Express Trail Pollock Pines | 530-644-3448

Grand China 4340 Golden Center Drive Placerville | 530-626-5679

Old Town Grill 444 Main Street Placerville | 530-622-2631

• FRENCH

Placerville Brewery ** 155 Placerville Drive Placerville | 530-295-9166 Shingle Springs Coffee Co. ** 4068A Mother Lode Drive Shingle Springs | 530-676-2623 Snooty Frog ** 3300 Coach Lane Cameron Park | 530-677-9025 Sweetie Pies ** 577 Main Street Placerville | 530-642-0128 Join us to feast on specialty scrambles, omelettes, pancakes and Belgian waffles hot off the griddle for breakfast. For lunch enjoy our best-seller chile relleno casserole, sandwiches and paninis galore, and delightful salads made with the freshest vegetables and fruits to pair with our hearty homemade soups. Don’t forget to leave room for our wonderful homemade desserts! Torino’s Bar & Grill 251 Main Street Placerville | 530-622-7500 ZacJack Bistro 3275 Coach Lane Cameron Park | 530-676-2969 Hours: Monday: Closed Tues.-Thurs.: 11 a.m. - 8:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat.: 8 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Sun.: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Credit Cards Accepted: V, M, A Conveniently located off highway 50 in Cameron Park, ZacJack Bistro, the new restaurant concept from the chef/owner team at Zachary Jacques, serves fresh California bistro cuisine using traditional French and new cooking methods. Open six days a week for lunch and dinner, and serving award winning (Style Magazine Favorite Brunch 2012) breakfast Friday through Sunday. House made artisan breads, Kobe beef burgers ground daily, and fresh ketchup punctuate our focus on locallysourced, all-natural, organic food. Come visit ZacJack Bistro to see how everyday can be gourmet. Z Pie 3182 Center Placerville Drive Placerville | 530-621-2626

Allez! ** 4242 Fowler Lane, Suite 101 Diamond Springs | 530-621-1160

• ITALIAN Papa Gianni’s Ristorante ** 3450 Palmer Drive Cameron Park | 530-672-2333

• JAPANESE Amerikan Ichi Sushi 1234 A Broadway Placerville | 530-621-2100 Kobe Surf & Turf ** 3300 Coach Lane, #C-1 Cameron Park | 530-672-9210 Shilla Sushi Bar 2943 Paul Bunyon Road Placerville | 530-644-5047

• MEXICAN Cascada Restaurante & Cantina 384 Main Street Placerville | 530-344-7757 Casa Ramos ** 6840 Greenleaf Drive Placerville | 530-622-2303 Que Viva ** 3300 Coach Lane Cameron Park | 530-577-3330 Taqueria Carnival 4340 Golden Center Drive Placerville | 530-344-7246

• SEAFOOD Powell’s Steamer Co. & Pub 425 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-1091

• THAI Taste of Thai 1160 Broadway Placerville | 530-621-9559 If we’ve omitted your favorite restaurant or you find an error, let us know via email: info@stylemg.com.

For more restaurant listings in the El Dorado County Foothills and surrounding areas, visit our website at: stylemg.com and click on our extensive restaurant guide.


• ON THE MENU • Sample Menu Selections Appetizers Calamari Fritta

Entrées 10.95 (small), 13.95 (large)

Bruschetta 7.50

Ravioli 14.95

Tomatoes, onions, garlic and basil dressed with olive oil, served with toasted bread

Our homemade meat-filled ravioli, served in a meatsauce

Sausage & Peppers

Mussels, shrimp and scallops, served in a light cream sauce over linguini

8.95

Meatball

Frutta di Mare

19.95

Pollo Francesco

17.95

Chicken breast, artichoke hearts and mushrooms, served in a cream sauce

Lunch Sandwiches 6.50, 6.95 with cheese

Our homemade meatballs, topped with meatsauce

Chicken Parmigiana

3450 Palmer Dr. Ste. 1 Cameron Park Inside Bel Air Shopping Center 530-672-2333 • papagiannis.net Reservations Recommended

15.95

Vodka, cream and chilies blended in a marinara sauce, served over semolina wheat pasta

Sliced sausage links, bell peppers and potatoes, sautéed in olive oil

Papa Gianni’s Ristorante

Gnocchi alla Vodka

Deep fried calamari, served with a spicy marinara dipping sauce

7.50

Vitello Saltimbocca

21.95

Veal cutlets, sautéed in white wine then layered with proscuitto, provolone and mushrooms

Chicken breast, topped with marinara sauce and melted mozzarella

Desserts

Italian Submarine

7.50

Tiramisu 6.50

Toscano salami, pepperoni, coppacola, provolone, lettuce, tomatoes, onion, mustard, mayonnaise and vinaigrette

Lady finger cookies dipped in espresso and layered with a marscapone whipped cream

Hours: Tues-Thurs: 11am - 2pm; 5pm - 9pm Fri: 11am - 2pm; 5pm - 10pm • Sat: 5pm - 10pm Sun: 5pm - 9pm • Closed Mondays

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Cannoli 4.95 Italian pastry filled with creamy ricotta, rum and chocolate

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taste YANKEE POT ROAST From The Founding Farmers Cookbook by Founding Farmers with Nevin Martell (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2013, $40)

Pot Roast Base 4-5 pounds beef chuck 1 tbsp. kosher salt 1 tbsp. ground black pepper 1 tbsp. granulated garlic 1 tbsp. celery salt 1/2 cup canola or olive oil 6 cups chopped yellow onions 3 cups chopped carrots 4 cups chopped celery 10 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 4 cups beef broth 1/4 cup beef base 1 bay leaf 1 cinnamon stick 2 tbsp. minced fresh rosemary 2 tbsp. minced fresh thyme leaves

Roux • 3/4 cup unsalted butter • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour

Pot Roast Vegetables • 1 medium golden beet, peeled and cut into large chunks • 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and cut into large chunks • Kosher salt • 1-1/2 cups diced carrots, diced to 1-1/2inch pieces • 2-1/2 cups diced celery, diced to 1-1/2inch pieces • 1/2 bunch asparagus, cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces • 4 oz. green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces • Ground black pepper • 2 tbsp. unsalted butter Preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Season the beef on both sides with the salt, pepper, granulated garlic and celery salt. Heat the canola oil in a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a lid over high heat. When hot, place the beef in the pot and brown well, 2-3 minutes on each side. Lift the beef out of the pot and reserve, keeping the pot with the beef drippings over medium heat. Place the onions in the pot and sauté 54 stylemg.com - March 2014

dinner date Food and Wine for the Season until caramelized. Add the carrots, celery and sliced garlic and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the beef broth, beef base, bay leaf, cinnamon stick, rosemary and thyme. Return the beef to the pot and bring the liquid to a boil. Cover the pot and place in the oven for 3-3.5 hours, until fork tender. While the pot roast cooks, prepare a roux. Melt the butter in a sauté pan over medium-low heat and whisk in the flour. Continue to whisk, scraping any browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until the flour mixture becomes a pale brown color and smells toasted and nutty, 10-12 minutes. Scrape the roux out of the pan with a rubber spatula and reserve. Place the beet and sweet potato chunks on a baking sheet and roast in the oven (with the pot roast) for 45 minutes, or until tender. Fill a large pot with water and a generous pinch of kosher salt and bring to a boil. Working in batches, blanch the carrots, celery, asparagus and green beans until each vegetable is just tender and cooked through. Drain and cool in an ice bath (half ice cubes and half water in a large bowl). Drain from the ice bath and set aside. When the pot roast is tender and finished cooking, remove the pot from the oven, gently remove the beef from the pot, and transfer it to a large plate while you prepare the sauce. Carefully place the pot roast pot on a burner over medium heat. Remove the cinnamon stick and bay leaf from the pot. Bring the liquid to a boil. Purée the liquid until smooth with a stick blender. Add the roux and purée until smooth. Simmer for 20 minutes and season to taste with salt and pepper. Place the pot roast in the sauce along with the roasted beet and sweet potato chunks and the blanched vegetables and heat through. Stir 2 tablespoons of butter into the sauce. Break the beef up into large chunks with a metal spoon. Keep warm. To serve, place a mound of the mashed potatoes in the center of each plate, then spoon portions of the beef, vegetables and sauce over the top. Top each plate with a few fried onions, if using, and serve immediately. Serves 6 to 8.

2011 SIMI ALEXANDER VALLEY CABERNET SAUVIGNON Simi Winery—founded in San Francisco by two Italian brothers, Giuseppe and Pietro Simi—made their first wine from Sonoma County grapes in 1876. Their colorful past is evident when visiting the Healdsburg locale; since 1890, the same stone cellar has been where the winemaking magic happens. Since day one, their wines have reflected the region: small, scenic and stunningly diverse. The 2011 SIMI Alexander Valley Cabernet Sauvignon is full-bodied with an amazing nose, supple tannins and a beautiful velvety finish. It has a deep, dark color with a ruby edge. Aromas of clove, hints of cedar and cocoa beautifully frame compelling flavors of cassis, cherry and blackberry. The affordable price and ability to stand up to hearty beef dishes makes it an ideal pairing choice for this month’s Yankee Pot Roast. —Richard Righton Owner, 36 Handles and Relish Burger Bar

Wine bottle photo courtesy of Constellation Brands. Recipe and cookbook photos by Nevin Martell.

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PROFESSIONAL GRILLS


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1. Particular potatoes 4. Hoppy beverage 7. Fruit squeeze 10. Apiece (abbr) 11. Winter ailment, often 12. Cool __ a cucumber 13. Hors d’oeuvres 17. Sauvignon follower 18. Tellurium symbol 19. Supposing 20. Short for terminal control 22. Between sol and ti 23. Something’s not right; you smell a ____ 24. I see 25. Onions accompaniment 27. Arid 28. Pilaf ingredient 29. Parks & ____ 30. _____ fruits and vegetables are the best 33. Jelly for lamb 34. T-bone, for one 37. ____ a wine connoisseur 40. Exists 42. Chinese-chicken or taco 43. Used for making Burgundies and Champagnes (2 wds) 45. Already entered 46. Spanish concoction 49. Profoundly wise herb 52. Wk. increment 53. That guy 56 stylemg.com - March 2014

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54. _____ -baked potato 55. Trademark, shortened 56. Sharp to the taste 57. Talking horse 58. Extremely 59. Co. name ending 60. Certain sauce 64. Carnivore need 66. Short for education 67. Such as (abbr) 68. Lump of whipped butter, for example 69. Pre-appetizer selection (2 wds)

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1. Doctored up and molded, baked ground beef Have dinner Restaurant or diner Many cows, eventually Hearing requirement Radio frequency, for short Cherries _______

39. Fizzy drink 41. Pot _____ 44. One answer to: How do you want that cooked? 46. Scampi star 47. It’s in the eye of the beholder

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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8. It can be tin 9. Fancy snails 14. Something to split and put in a soup 15. Type of pasta 16. Keep in the root cellar, for example 21. Rotisserie fowl 26. Deer meat 27. Russian or Italian 31. RR stop 32. Assist 33. Smallest version 35. Associate of Arts, shortened 36. Short for kiln-dried 37. Meatballs partner 38. Hello

DOWN

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48. Merlot shade 50. Jorge’s friend 51. And so on (abbr) 54. Comes before sirloin 58. Extra order 60. Lair 61. Precedes cent or diem 62. Not any 63. Set up, as a see-thru dessert 65. Paid airtime

— A Custom Crossword by Gail Beckman 702-869-6416 customcrosswords.com

FIND THE ANSWERS TO THIS CROSSWORD AFTER THE 1ST OF THE MONTH AT STYLEMG.COM.

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Yes

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Sit on verbal command. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Improve Socialization Skills with Other Dogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Improve Socialization Skills with People. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes

No

WalkCalmly CalmlyOn-Leash. On-Leash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Walks by side while OFF-leash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Minimize / Control Jumping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes

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No

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escape

Mammoth 8 No-Snow Reasons to Visit by Desiree Patterson

Mammoth Mountain Bike Park

1. MOUNTAIN BIKING No matter what level of cycler you may be, Mammoth Mountain Bike Park blankets the entire mountain—over 80 miles—with trails that will, literally, take your breath away. No wonder Outside Magazine ranked it as the “#1 Bike Park in America.” Begin your two-wheeled expedition at the Adventure Center where you’ll find tickets, rentals, repairs and retail. From here, you’ll be able to access beginner terrain (the Pioneer Practice Loop is amazing for kids) on Discovery Chair or take the Panorama Gondola to the mid-station or summit for intermediateadvanced terrain with some heart-pumping downhills.

2. THE WESTIN MONACHE RESORT With it’s prime location, the Westin is just steps from The Village at Mammoth offering great shopping, restaurants, activities for kids, and more. The rooms are spotless and the

décor exemplifies modern-meets-rustic; not to mention the resort is pet-friendly, has free local shuttle service, houses a 24-hour fitness facility, and pleases the masses with an outdoor heated pool. Did I mention its in-house Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge? I’ll get to that in a second.

3. MAMMOTH FOOD & WINE EXPERIENCE Taking place July 11-12 this year, the fourth annual event will feature seminars on both Friday and Saturday with wine experts and star chefs. Highlights for this year’s “experience” include the “Best-of-the-Best” Burger Battle, a Friday night wine walk at The Village amidst live entertainment, multiple options to dine with high-profile chefs, and The Village at Mammoth

Summer Monache

58 stylemg.com - March 2014

Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge

Photos courtesy of Lyman Public Relations.

I

f you haven’t heard already, there’s a whole other side to this mountain town of Mammoth Lakes. Many flock here for the powder snow and plethora of ski trails, but what about the hotter half of the year? Get your shorts, sunscreen, tennis shoes and party hats on—from spring to fall, this place is packed with festivals, food and wine events, and extraordinary outdoor adventuring. Here’s a list of reasons to visit the Eastern Sierra sans skis.


on Saturday—the Grand Tasting featuring wineries pouring over 120 wines, dishes from five teams of culinary students from prestigious schools, and food prepared by star chefs. Tickets are available for purchase beginning March 1 at mammothfoodandwine. org.

4. WORLD-CLASS TROUT FISHING Mammoth Lakes is world-renowned for trout fishing, especially considering the beauty surrounding you and your fishing pole! You can fish from shore, float tube an alpine lake, or rent a boat and find a stretch of water to call your own. McCoy Sports in The Village and the Adventure Center at the Main Lodge have all the gear you need for a day of angling. As well, you can find professional guides to show you the way to where the fish are biting. To download a fishing map of the area, visit mammothmountain.com.

Toomey’s at The Village

Sushi at Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge

Mammoth Fest

Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge

5. 19TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF BEERS & BLUESAPALOOZA One of Mammoth’s biggest events, in addition to Mammoth Fest, this four-day festival (July 31-August 3) showcases the finest craft breweries in the country and top blues performers. Started by Sam Walker, the event is recognized as one of the best beer and blues festivals in the U.S. This year, the line-up includes names such as Buddy Guy, Robert Randolph & the Family Band, Tab Benoit, Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Niki Hill and more. For the complete schedule and to purchase tickets, visit mammothbluesbrewsfest.com

Photos courtesy of Lyman Public Relations.

6. ADVENTURE CENTER The Mammoth Adventure Center is your portal to fun—for both kids and adults! The Center includes the aforementioned world-class bike park, breathtaking views, and an interpretive center at the summit of Mammoth Mountain. At the base—for just $40 (per person; all-day pass)—let your kids loose on the “ultimate mountain playground” that boasts a rock climbing wall, zip line, bungee trampoline and more. Also from the Adventure Center, catch the daily shuttle to the magical destinations of Devils Postpile National Monument, Rainbow Falls, and Reds Meadow, just over the shoulder of Mammoth Mountain in the San Joaquin River Valley. Call 800-6266684 for more information or to purchase tickets in advance.

Mammoth Adventure Center

7. GUILTLESS DINING While not all vacations are alike, a trip to this mecca of nature doesn’t have to include salt, butter and preservative-laden meals. Mammoth not only preserves the health of its natural surroundings, but it also aims to keep its visitors in prime physical condition. While you can certainly indulge here, take for example the “world-famous” coconut mascarpone pancake at Toomey’s at The Village (OMGoodness...so heavenly!), there are also numerous other options for a feelgood meal. For breakfast, or to recharge after a day of biking, hiking and fishing, The Green V embraces the slow-food movement and offers juices, bars, salads, soups and entrées with options for vegans, vegetarians and gluten-free folks. For lunch, try Campo, one of Esquire Magazine’s 2012 “Best New Restaurants in America,” serving up the best in organic, local and seasonal ingredients on their menu of homemade pizzas, pastas and more. For dinner, Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge is where it’s at. Good food, that is. The all-natural cooking style combines classical French, European and Asian flavors

Campo

with local fares to bring out the “true beauty of various cuisines.” The innovative dining options now include a new sushi menu, perfect for “cool” eating in warmer temps.

8. AU NATUREL HOT TUBBING No, I’m not referring to what may have happened back in college; instead, think: soaking in a Mother-Earth-designed spa surrounded by the aura of nature. Word to the wise, keep your clothes on—you can get ticketed for “tubbing” in the nude. Hilltop Tub is probably the best-known, most popular site to enjoy the natural hot water sourced from mountain hot springs. In the summer you can drive basically right up to the tub. Exposing probably the best view in the valley, you sit on a small hilltop perch with a 360-degree view of what some call “the world.” Other natural hot spring areas to check out are Hot Creek (no tubbing here), Wild Willy’s, and Crab Cooker.

FOR MORE PLACES TO ESCAPE TO, VISIT STYLEMG.COM. March 2014 - stylemg.com 59


introducing

SCALEES REPTILE EMPORIUM 4671 Marshall Road, Garden Valley 530-333-4430 facebook.com/scalees

Alexx Gibbs

Chrissie Addison

THE COACHING STUDIO Placerville 530-626-4464 coachingstudiosite.com

Describe your business. Did you find it, or did it find you? Scalees is a small-town pet shop in Garden Valley. We have reptiles of all sorts for sale, or you can just come and play with the animals. We also sell feeders, such as crickets, mealworms, mice and rats. We do birthday parties and educational demonstrations as well. What was the first job you ever had, and what did you learn from the experience? This store is actually my first job. How are you involved with both the community and your customer? We are involved with the community by volunteering at local events, where we bring some of our animals and do free demonstrations. Why is your staff the best in the business? I am the staff—I have no employees. What life accomplishments are you most proud of? I would have to say the opening of this store—I opened it when I was only 18 years old. What’s your hidden talent?
 Snake whispering. What’s your biggest job perk? The best part of my job is seeing people’s faces light up as they hold a snake or a tarantula for the first time. What’s your favorite childhood memory?
 Lizard hunting with my father in the summer. If you could be any other profession, what would it be? I would most likely be a herpetologist (reptile expert).

Do you know that our editorial is not paid for, nor can it be purchased? In fact, our Introducing and Dine reviews are not paid advertisements. If you’d like your business profiled, please email Megan Wiskus at megan@stylemg.com. Once we determine when your business will be featured, we will contact you to schedule a time to come out and take a photograph. Thank you!

60 stylemg.com - March 2014

Photos by Dante Fontana.

Describe your business. Did you find it, or did it find you? Developing my studio was a natural progression, after being involved in theater and music since childhood and teaching English and performing arts in local high schools for many years. Twelve years ago, after teaching group classes at a theater, I realized the need for someone like me to be the “third eye” for aspiring singers and thespians on a private basis. My potential students—who wish to train in voice, dramatic skills and auditioning skills—now find me and keep me busy. How are you involved with both the community and your customer? I recently closed doing Les Misérables with Imagination Theater where I served as an acting coach and acted in the ensemble; I know for a fact that one doesn’t have to go “down the hill” for quality theater. For my next directing project in the community, Lanny Langston (co-owner of Imagination Theater) and I would like to co-direct Mama Mia (when the rights are released). What life accomplishments are you most proud of? I strive to be a worthwhile daughter, sister, wife and mother. By keeping the small stuff in perspective, I hope to let in the joy of life more and more as I mature. Where do you go when the going gets tough? I grab chocolate, walk, listen to music or do tai chi. I am “The Spoonman’s” wife (a.k.a. Mrs. Roger Filippelli) and communicating with him always gives me perspective. What’s your favorite place to eat out locally? For hometown cooking with smiles, Buttercup Pantry and Sweetie Pie’s. For date nights, we like ZacJack Bistro, Cascada, Papa Gianni’s and The Independent. And finally, customer service is…? I tailor instruction for each person I coach. We share in the responsibility of setting artistic goals and work together for success. I have a wealth of resources—is there a name for a person who hoards music and scripts?


thewhereandwears

get lucky 6 Fab Finds in El Dorado County by Rachel Lopez and Kirsten Vernon 3. BELOVED BEANIE The beanie has made a fashion comeback and has proved to be one of our most beloved accessories. From dressed up to casual, this Adora Hat—found at Sandra D’s Boutique in El Dorado Hills—can be paired with almost anything. $19, sandrads.com

5. PROJECT GREEN There are many reasons to choose Hudson jeans, and our favorite cut at the moment is the trendy Beth Midrise Baby Boot in Hunter Green—available at Runway Boutique in El Dorado Hills. $159, runway-boutique.com

Wrap yourself or someone you love in this lightweight, color-blocked beauty. Fringed, fantastic and fashion savvy, this gorgeous infinity scarf is available at Cadence Corner Boutique in El Dorado Hills. $22, 916-673-6300

4. NAIL GLAM “Jade is the New Black” from OPI will have the tips of your fingers and toes singing for joy. Pick your favorite shade of green at Sally Beauty Supply. $8.99, sallybeauty.com

6. DRINK UP Keep the St. Patty’s Day pinches away and get your caffeine buzz on with this deliciously refreshing White Crème Mocha with Mint from The Bean Barn in Placerville. $4.75, 530-622-2758

2. RAZZLE-DAZZLE These dazzling hoop earrings, available at SASS in Shingle Springs, rock modern with the perfect amount of sparkle. Green and glorious, they’ll top off any outfit and are sure to make a statement. $16.50, sassstore.com

62 stylemg.com - March 2014

Rachel Lopez and Kirsten Vernon are hosts of ‘The Where and Wears’ of El Dorado County. Be sure to watch them on Foothill 7 Television and Sierra Community Access Television 2 and “like” them on Facebook.

Runway Boutique photo courtesy of Hudson Jeans; all others courtesy of Rachel Lopez and Kirsten Vernon.

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Come visit one of the largest home decor stores in the county! Unique vignettes from multiple merchants and consignors. We offer a huge selection of furniture and decor from rustic, to shabby chic, to antiques. Stroll through over 7,500 sq ft of truly eclectic merchandise to fit any home. Open Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

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tom’sjulie’stake

Fiercely Finicky Eaters by Julie Ryan

P

oor Tom. I’m filling in for him this month because he’s recovering from his “research” about local breweries (see the story on page 44). He really puts 100 percent into his work. For the past few years, I’ve been involved with some research of my own. I’m trying to figure out why my children will only eat a few items out of the thousands and thousands of options they actually have. I’m no Rachael Ray, but I can cook “things”—things that are even good sometimes! My 4- and 6-year-old daughters, however, believe that by just looking at food, they can tell if they’ll like it or not. Just one glimpse of a juicy slab of chicken and a green veggie and they know it will be the most disgusting things they’ve ever had. It’s quite an amazing ability. I love that all I have to do is place a plate in front of them and they inherently know that one bite will make them sick. I’ve tried all the tricks—bribing, begging, threatening; I’ve tried the recipes where

GE TO CE >

Catch Julie on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1.

VISIT STYLEMG.COM FOR MORE TOM’S TAKES.

66 stylemg.com - March 2014

Illustration by David Norby.

whining and dining

you hide the vegetables (their skill is unbeatable). If you’ve never believed in psychics, I know two kids who will change your mind. On the rare occasion when I get them to try something, I’m, first and foremost, proud of myself for making it past their first line of defense. Then I hold my breath as I wait for the verdict. My 4-year-old tends to accept new cuisine more often than the 6-year-old. She’s also less dramatic about it. Have you ever witnessed someone take a microscopic bite of food, then completely freak out— acting like it was the most revolting flavor they’ve ever tasted? I have. Many times. The other thing that baffles me is how one day they can like something, but the next day they can’t stand it. This just happened with applesauce. Applesauce! How do you go from liking it, eating it and asking for it, to not wanting to be anywhere near it? I now have a pantry full of applesauce and no one to eat it. I’m hoping my children will still grow and remain healthy even though their diet consists of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches (sans crust), chicken nuggets, and buttered noodles. Although, those selections may change at any moment—as I’m writing this they could decide noodles are nauseating. When my girls were babies I had a picture in my head of how it would be when they started eating real food: Our family sitting down for dinner, everyone with the same food on their plates, compliments flying over the table. The sad reality, however, paints a much different picture. I hear this is a phase. Isn’t that always the answer when your kids aren’t doing what you want them to do? “Oh, it’s a phase. No need to worry. They’ll outgrow it.” Until then, I suppose it’s OK that ketchup is a food group and that my research will be unfinished…just like their dinner plates.


5 FARM-TO-TABLE RECIPES | 5 ACTIVITIES TO REDUCE STRESS

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what’sinside ™

E L

D O R A D O

C O U N T Y

F O O T H I L L S

MARCH 2014

8

30

FEATURES

DEPARTMENTS

MORE...

38 Farm to Table Eating

20 The Arts

4 Editor’s Note 6 Click 7 What’s Up 8 Get to Know— Nici Mayer 10 FYI 14 Local Matters 16 Calendar 18 Outtakes 28 Our Kids 36 Home Design 48 Swag 50 Dine—Back Forty Texas BBQ 52 Restaurant Guide 54 Taste 56 Word Play 60 Introducing 62 The Where and Wears 66 Tom’s Take

For many this movement is not a fad, but rather a way of living, and the State of California recently declared Sacramento the “Farm-to-Fork Capital of America.” Get on the bandwagon and see what eating close to home really means.

44 8 Hoppin’ Local Breweries

Tom Mailey will take you on a ride—a “brews cruise”— making stops for hops at Style’s favorite purveyors of “consumable craftsmanship.”

Qian Fang

22 Health & Wellness

5 Activities to Reduce Stress

30 Cause & Effect

Animal Outreach of the Mother Lode

32 Green Scene

6 Eco-Friendly Products

34 In History

Legacy of Logtown

58 Escape Mammoth

Cover photo © simmittorok/ fotolia.com.

50

28

FIND O ­­ UR TYPOS Everyone makes mistakes from time to time, right?! And we’re no exception, so we thought we’d have some fun and enlist your help in finding ours—that is to say we’d like your help in spotting our errors and in return you’ll be entered in our contest to win a $25 gift certificate! Send your find to info@stylemg.com for your chance to win every month.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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editor’snote

homegrown

We’d love to hear from you—send us your community events (for Calendar and Outtakes), local news (for What’s Up), and any other story ideas to info@stylemg.com. 4 stylemg.com - March 2014

FOLLOW US ONLINE:

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Photo by Dante Fontana.

Y

es! It’s my favorite time of year. Spring commences on March 20, and it’s time to celebrate. To get the party started we need a few key components for any successful soirée: good food and drink. Check and check. In this issue, Kristen Castillo takes us on a culinary adventure in “Get Fresh: Farm-toTable Eating,” literally from area farms to the tables of local diners and consumers. You’ve surely heard of this righteously growing food movement called “farmto-table” that is covering the menus of not only area restaurants, but now filling the fridges of residents like you and me. With an abundance of farms and ranches where you can find just about anything at its prime, and more farmers’ markets than we have pages to list—it’s time to eat for our health…and our community. Read on to see why staying close to home has so many perks. Moving on to the beverages. In “Brews Cruise,” Tom Mailey tours and gets a taste of “8 Hoppin’ Local Breweries.” I heard from friends about a few up-and-coming microbreweries in the area, but I had no clue there were more! In the spirit of all things “homegrown,” I find a trip to taste flight after flight of area ales is in order. Now that I have this handy-dandy list of all the right places, there are no more excuses not to drink local. While a brewery tour might not be one of these, Kourtney Jason’s compilation of “5 Activities to Reduce Stress” in Health & Wellness will get you motivated for all that spring brings, including outdoor activities and, of course, cleaning. Speaking of, to help organize all those items collected (and collecting dust) over the year, Kerrie Kelly, ASID, gives “10 Ways to Create a Streamlined Home” in Home Design. Once the house is all tidied up and you finally have room to bring in a few new things—firstly, don’t miss the area farmers’ markets that start up this month (find a list at stylemg.com) and secondly, treat your home, and the world, to a few new eco-friendly items. In this month’s Green Scene, Megan Wiskus shares her favorite six. We hope we’ve given you plenty of reasons to stay close to home this month…and eat and drink around town more often. Until April, cheers! — Desiree


E L

D O R A D O

C O U N T Y

F O O T H I L L S

MARCH 2014 Publishers Terence P. Carroll, Wendy L. Sipple Executive Editor Desiree Patterson Managing Editor Megan Wiskus Editorial Interns Emily Peter, Gabriel Stubbs, Jazmin White, Alyssa Wong Contributing Writers Amanda Anderson, Gail Beckman, Morgan Cásarez, Kristen Castillo, Amber Foster, Tina Helm, Linda Holderness, Kourtney Jason, Kerrie Kelly, Rachel Lopez, Tom Mailey, Sharon Penny, Richard Righton, Julie Ryan, Hiliary C. Simon, Kirsten Vernon Art Director Gary Zsigo Graphic Designers George Kenton Design, 760.285.0686, gkenton@verizon.net David Norby, Aaron Roseli Staff Photographer Dante Fontana Contributing Photographer Justin Buettner 916.220.0159, justinbuettner@hotmail.com Webmaster Ken White, Ixystems Advertising Director Debra Linn, 916.988.9888 x 114 Advertising Sales Representatives Reg Holliday, 916.337.5107 Joanne Kilmartin, 916.607.9360 Lisa Warner/Warner Enterprises, 530.306.2011 Karen Wehr, 916.988.9888 x116 Advertising/Media Administration Doug Wuerth, 916.988.9888 x117

C O M E F O R A S I P, S TAY F O R A B I T E . Reader’s Choice Award: Folsom’s Best Happy Hour.

Social Media Maven Aimee Carroll Accounting Manager Kathleen Hurt Office Administrator Cathy Carmichael, Office Assistant Brenna McGowan

Photo: Alyse Hébert

Customer Service Associate Jarrod Carroll

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this magazine.

120 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 5 Folsom, CA 95630 Tel 916.988.9888 • Fax 916.596.2100 © 2014 by Style Media Group. All rights reserved. Style - El Dorado County Foothills is a registered trademark of Style Media Group. Material in this magazine may not be reproduced in any form without written consent from the publishers. Any and all submissions to Style - El Dorado County Foothills become the property of Style Media Group and may be used in any media. We reserve the right to edit. Subscriptions to Style - El Dorado County Foothills are available. Contact info@stylemg.com for more information.

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STYLEMG.COM You Can Never Have Too Much Style SPRING HAS SPRUNG! GREEN EGGS AND HAM, ANYONE? We’ve found recipes to make all things green—milkshakes, fudge, key lime bars, even beer! And if green treats aren’t exactly yo u r p o t o f gold, you’re in luck! We’ve gathered a list of traditional Irish foods to help you celebrate St. Patty’s Day, too.

Thailand honors the season with a water festival while India throws a giant carnival of color. How do you celebrate spring? Log on to learn about various Spring Equinox festivities and where to find them.

SHELF LIFE Get your monthly fix of Sharon Penny’s thenand-now take on popular albums, books and DVDs; look no further…just click.

MAC & CHEESE, PLEASE Who knew this classic crowd-pleaser could be even better? Get comfortable on the couch with a pot of Seven-Cheese Mac & Cheese from this month’s Taste cookbook, The Founding Farmers Cookbook (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2013, $40).

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH Just how far did Amelia Earhart fly? Who exactly was Sojourner Truth? Why did Madame Curie win the Nobel Peace Prize? Find the answers to these questions, along with a few ways to celebrate this historical month locally.

6 stylemg.com - March 2014

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Irish coffee photo © valbunny/fotolia.com. Women’s History Month photo © John Kropewnicki/fotolia.com. Spring Has Sprung photo © angiolina/fotolia.com. Recipe image courtesy of Andrews McMeel Publishing.

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what’sup

March 2014 - stylemg.com 7

Sunday, March 9 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Folsom Sports Complex, 66 Clarksville Rd. Exhibits and Demonstrations • Health Screenings Music • Activities for Kids • Fun for All Ages FREE Admission! FREE Parking! FREE Bounce Houses for the Kids!

More details at: www.folsom.ca.us

Sports and Recreation EXPO Sponsored By:

MARCH

a t M I R A F L O R E S W I N E RY SOMMELIER CLASS NO. 2 & 3 Join Sommelier Matthew Lewis for the second and third in the Sommelier series. Taking an in-depth look into wine and tasting. $37 per person. Class starts at 1pm. Reservations only (530) 647-8505. Class No. 2 is March 18th and Class No. 3 is to be determined.

MARCH 16TH: COOKING CLASS WITH CHEF DAMON BARHAM—BBQ CLASSICS Sauces and rubs for indoor and outdoor BBQ’S… all the perfect Zinfandel pairings .Brisket, southern style pulled pork, New York strip and more. Low and slow grilling with rubs and brines is the basis for this delicious class and it all goes well with Zinfandel. You can even make strawberry rhubarb compote shortcake on your grill. Join us for this unique class and while you are here make your own rubs to take home. Starts at 1pm. $37 per person. Reservations only (530) 647-8505. ALSO

Photos courtesy of their respective people/organization.

C

atch a flick at the Cozmic Café (594 Main Street in Placerville) on March 12 at 6:30 p.m. for their Wednesday Night Movies series, presented by the Sierra Club and Coalition for Change. This month’s film, Waste Land, follows artist Vic Muniz from Brooklyn to Rio de Janeiro, home to the world’s largest garbage dump, where he meets an eclectic band of “catadores”...Donned in costumes but without the protection of wetsuits, Special Olympics athletes and their supporters will jump into Tahoe’s icy waters on March 29 for the South Lake Tahoe Polar Plunge, a fund-raiser for Special Olympics Northern California and Nevada. To register, make a donation or for more info, visit ipolarplungenv.com...On March 20 at 7 p.m., photography buffs are invited to attend the monthly El Dorado Camera Club meeting at the Cameron Park Community Center (2502 Country Club Drive). March’s photo challenge will be “old”; members and nonmembers alike can enter. For more details, visit eldoradocameraclub.com... Learn more about civil war ancestry on March 19 from 6-8 p.m. at the monthly El Dorado Hills Genealogical Society meeting, held in the community room at the El Dorado Hills Branch Library (7455 Silva Valley Parkway). This month’s speaker, Ron Cannon, will give a riveting lecture titled, “Researching Your Civil War Ancestor.” For more info, email cathygraham@msn. com...Oak Ridge High School alumnus and valedictorian Feross Aboukhadijeh has made Internet history again. The 2012 Stanford University graduate created his first startup company, PeerCDN (peer-to-peer content delivery network), last March and recently sold it to Yahoo! for an undisclosed sum. Congrats!...After a decade caring for children at Marshall Pediatrics in Placerville, Nicole Shorrock, M.D., has opened a solo practice with Marshall Family Medicine in El Dorado Hills. The new clinic, Marshall Whole Child Health—located at 5137 Golden Foothill Parkway, Suite 120—reflects Dr. Shorrock’s innovative approach to patient care, where she focuses on identifying and treating the root causes of illnesses through balancing nutrition and lifestyle. For more info, call 916-933-8010...The El Dorado Community Foundation, a nonprofit serving El Dorado County residents since 1991, is pleased to announce the 2014 officers of their board of directors—Board President Paul Zappettini, Vice President Lois Patrick, Secretary Karen Carter, and Treasurer Chris Reeg. For a full listing of the Foundation’s board of directors, visit eldoradocf.org...The After 5 Club, a free support group for those who care for a relative or friend with a chronic health condition, are invited to attend the next meeting on March 12 from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Senior Day Care Center (935-A Spring Street in Placerville). For more info, visit edcgov.us/ humanservices...The Hangtown Women’s Tennis Club (HWTC) welcomes all ladies interested in playing tennis (at any level) to join their club. Round-robin play takes place at the El Dorado High School courts every Wednesday from 9-11 a.m., September through May, and 8-10 a.m. in June, July and August. For more info, call Beth at 916-217-2110...That’s all for now, but check back next month for Style’s annual Get Outside feature. — Compiled by Gabriel Stubbs

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MIRAFLORES WINERY OPEN DAILY 10 AM TO 5 PM 2120 FOUR SPRINGS TRAIL, PLACERVILLE, CA 95667 530.647.8505 www.mirafloreswinery.com


gettoknow

Q&A

Nici Mayer

Q: What advice would you give to your younger self? A: Life will throw you challenges— your positive attitude is what will get you through them. Q: What comes to you naturally? A: Keeping my head up. Q: Biggest life inspirations? A: My children—I need to know that what I do now will make them proud when they are adults. Q: What are you most proud of? A: Surviving stage-four cancer, followed by conquering a recurrent form of the same cancer. Q: Favorite humanitarian cause? A: Look Good Feel Better (American Cancer Society).

8 stylemg.com - March 2014

(mirrormirrorone.com), a local women’s clothing boutique that donates one percent of all its profits to cancer research. She is currently developing her wig program, Fight Pretty, to provide area cancer patients with high-quality wigs; she also plans to fit and style the wigs in a pampering, salon-like experience. Mayer lost her own hair after her second round of chemo, and she remembers how much a good wig helped reassert her confidence and sense of normalcy. Last November, Mayer underwent a bone marrow transplant, and she is currently cancer free. She credits her survival to a positive outlook and the love and support of her family, especially her mother. “She’s my rock,” Mayer says. — Amber Foster

FAVORITES Author/writer: Edgar Allan Poe Escape: Lake Tahoe Guilty pleasure: Ice cream before bed Meal in town: Anything from Snooty Frog Memory: My wedding day Movie: Big Fish Musician/band: Alanis Morissette Local nonprofit: Food Bank of El Dorado County

Photos by Dante Fontana.

O

n August 5, 2012, Nici Mayer was your average mom spending the day at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk with her family. After a fun day on the rides, however, she noticed her neck was unusually sore, and by the next morning, a large mass had formed on the side of her neck. A visit to the hospital revealed the worst possible news: Mayer had stage-four Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a blood-borne cancer that had spread throughout her upper body. While most people would have been fazed by such a grim diagnosis, Mayer was determined to fight—and fight hard. “I never think about what could go wrong,” she shares. “I think about how we’re going to fix it.” While still undergoing chemotherapy, Mayer and her mother opened Mirror Mirror

Q: What’s next? A: Launching a wig donation program—Fight Pretty— designed to help empower women in El Dorado County who are suffering from hair loss due to cancer treatment. I’m a true believer, through experience, that feeling confident through treatment plays a big part in coping with cancer.


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cameron park community services

ask the experts

Spring Into Fun

L

For more information about these activities and events, and more, visit cameronpark.org or call the Cameron Park Community Services District at 530-677-2231. 10 stylemg.com - March February 2014 2014

Q: Are there other advantages to using cloth diapers, in addition to reusability?

A:

Cloth diapering has many advantages. They are comfy and healthy. You don’t have to worry about rough material on your baby’s delicate skin and since it’s cloth, it’s easier for parents to know when to change the diaper. Babies are less susceptible to rashes and tend to potty train easier. Organic cotton cloth diapers are economical, too; from birth to potty training, the cost of using reusable ones is $395, unlike disposables, which can cost $2,500-$3,000. Cloth diapers are also just as easy to use—many modern-day ones have snaps or Velcro-style closures, are breathable, made of waterproof fabrics to contain leaks or “blowouts,” and have flushable liners. Plus, when going green is a lifestyle, cloth diapers are the way to go. Disposables for one baby make one to two tons of garbage and take 500 years to break down. —Dandelions Raising Children Naturally 3490 Palmer Drive, Suite I, Cameron Park 530-672-2022, facebook.com/dandelionsusa

Q: What steps should I take if I think my child has special education needs?

A: Each child comes into the world uniquely different and individual. Children develop at different rates, which can be wonderful but also makes it hard to determine when there is cause for concern. If you feel there is something concerning regarding your child, often the first resource is your child’s pediatrician; asking for a developmental assessment or a referral to a child psychologist for developmental skills assessment is not unreasonable. If your child is school age (3+), a parent may request an assessment through their public school’s office. Early intervention is often key to your young child’s educational learning success. Be proactive! —Cindy Keller, Executive Director Guiding Hands School 4900 Windplay Drive, El Dorado Hills 916-939-0553, ghandsschool.com

Cameron Park Community Service District photo courtesy of Cameron Park Community Services District. Ask the Experts photo © kasjato/fotolia.com.

adies, do you want (or need) to make room in your closet? If so, head to Your Own Trunk Show on March 13 from 5-8 p.m. and sell your clothes, purses, shoes, jewelry, accessories and more. Reserve your booth now, while spaces are still available. Wine, champagne and snacks will also be available. O n M a rc h 2 2 a t 7 p.m., the Dean-OHolics, a tribute to the Rat Pack, will perform a live, indoor concert. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and snacks/ b eve ra g e s w i l l b e for sale. To purchase tickets ($18 each or two for $34), head to the CSD Office, Cameron Park Shingle Springs Chamber Office, Walgreens, Bel Air, Cameron Park Fire Station 89 or visit showclix.com; also available at the door for $20 each. On March 11, the monthly Coffee, Tea and Friends program will take place from 10-11:30 a.m. in the social room of the Community Center. This month’s topic is “Medicare 2014—What’s New.” See how this year’s changes will affect you. Play bingo and meet new friends later that same day from 1-3 p.m. March kicks off a new session of Taekwondo classes for all ages. Work on coordination, balance, self-control, blocks and kicks while in your own Taekwondo uniform, included free with each class; or, try Olympic-Style TKS Sparring and Kickboxing. After working up an appetite, head to a cooking class. From Thai Cooking and Ultimate Cooking with Susan to Cooking with Kids, there’s something for everyone. If dance is more your style, register the kids for a Hula or Beyond Basic Hula class and the adults for Belly Dance, Waltz, Nightclub 2-Step or Hula. Music lovers can practice their strumming at the Let’s Uke! or Basic Guitar classes. With warmer weather approaching, a gardening class—offered by instructors at El Dorado Nursery & Garden—might be a wise choice, or perhaps a golf class at Bass Lake Golf Course. An NFL-sponsored Flag Football program will also be offered this spring. Get your friends together and sign up; deadline is March 14, and games start in April. Is your child struggling with math? The Addition and Subtraction Facts to 9 (ages 6+) or Multiplication Facts (ages 8+) classes might be their keys to success. They’ll learn math facts the efficient way and stop relying on counting by fingers. ­— Tina Helm


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W

alking through Downtown Placerville searching for a place to eat is like picking your favorite sugary concoction in a candy store. With so many options that run the gamut from burgers to fine dining, one thing’s clear: Placervillians are bona fide foodies. Learn how to cook some fabulous fare of your own, and get your children on track early to become great chefs with a Kids Cooking and Table Setting class (ages 6-11) on March 8. Children will learn kid-friendly recipes, prepare lunch for the end of class, and learn how to properly set a table. For the adventurous chef, try the Thai Cooking class (ages 13+) on April 5. Students will learn how to make lettuce wraps and a spicy sauce using a recipe not found in any restaurant, or even in Thailand! They’ll also prepare fresh spring rolls with a sweet peanut dipping sauce; after the chefs will be able to enjoy both of their finished products. Private group Thai cooking classes—a perfect activity to do with friends and family—are also an option. — Amanda Anderson To learn more about these classes and others, call the City of Placerville’s Community Services Department at 530-642-5232, visit cityofplacerville.org, or stop by 549 Main Street in Placerville.

foodie find

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Golden Waffle Café

alking into Golden Waffle Café, you’d think you stepped back into the ’50s. The décor, complete with booths that match the carpet and signs about “Mom’s kitchen,” is what you’d expect to find in a diner way back when. As I sat down and opened the menu, I smiled at their waffle selection—they have one for every taste. But if you’re not a waffle person, you’ll stay worry free with their choices of pancakes, biscuits and gravy, and plenty of other breakfast classics. I let my inner kid do the picking with their Strawberry Waffle Combo—consisting of a waffle covered in strawberries, whipped cream and strawberry syrup, all alongside two sausages, two slices of bacon and two fried eggs. When I say this strawberry waffle was the best I’ve ever had, I’m not exaggerating. The strawberries were real, not the squishy processed kind, and the waffle was cooked to buttery perfection with coveted, slightly crunchy edges; I barely needed any syrup. The bacon came sliced thick, the sausage plump and juicy, and my egg cooked just right. My dining partner was bolder and ordered the Bacon Waffle, which featured salty bits of bacon cooked right into the batter! We will be returning to Golden Waffle Café, my new favorite breakfast place, very soon! Golden Waffle Café, 1449 Broadway, Placerville, 530-642-9322. — Jazmin White

12 stylemg.com - March 2014

the10 spot Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day Are you in a pinch about how to celebrate St. Patty’s Day? Whether it’s beer, music or hearty Irish fare that gets you jigging, the list below has green-filled festivities for all. 1. 36 Handles will feature a weekendlong festival (March 14-16) with live music, a craft beer festival (March 15), good eats, kids’ activities and more. 36handles.com 2. Enjoy Celtic music, green beer, corned beef and cabbage, and other holiday-inspired specials at Placerville Brewing Company on March 17. 530-295-9166 3. Old Sacramento’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade will march through the streets on March 15 at 1 p.m. oldsacramento.com/special-events/ st-patricks-day-parade 4. Take your seats and prepare to be amazed by National Dance Company of Ireland’s Rhythm of Dance at Harris Center on March 1718 at 7:30 p.m. harriscenter.net 5. Keaton Raphael Memorial’s St. Baldrick’s Head Shaving Event will start buzzing at noon at the Westfield Galleria at Roseville on March 15. childcancer.org 6. Grab a pint of Guinness at Brick Oven Pub (all day, any day) and let the good times roll. brickovenpub.com 7. You’ll be sweating green (and benefiting education causes in Amador County) at the Bunsen to Beaker 5K, held at Jackson’s Detert Park on March 15. bunsentobeaker. com 8. Head to El Dorado Saloon for a St. Patty’s Day weekend party with food and drink specials, plus live music and more. eldoradosaloon.com 9. Rise and shine with an Irish Benedict at Buttercup Pantry, which features seasoned to perfection, house-made corned beef. Your dining partner will be green with envy when they see your plate. 530-621-1320 10. Downtown Jackson’s St. Patrick’s Dandelion Days Celebration (March 16-17) will feature an outdoor bazaar and flea market, food, a 5K, live music and a micro-brew beer garden. jacksonlionsclub.org/ DandelionDaysInfo.html — Megan Wiskus

Placerville Rec and Parks photo © arinahabich/fotolia.com. Foodie Find photo by Dante Fontana.

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anyof ofus usfind ndititeasy easyto tohop hopin inour ourcars carsand anddrive driveto toschool schoolor or fifind any work,but butnot noteveryone everyonecan canfind ndsuch sucheasy easytransportation— transportation— work, fifind especially foster foster and and orphaned orphaned teen teen girls. girls. Enter Enter the the especially Bodacious Biking Babes (BBBs). For 14 years, they’ve given Bodacious Biking Babes (BBBs). For 14 years, they’ve given backto totheir theircommunity communityvia viafund-raisers fund-raisersand andcharity charityrides, rides,all all back whilegetting gettinga ahealthy healthydose doseof ofexercise. exercise.Through Throughtheir theirmost most while recentfund-raisers, fund-raisers,the theBBBs BBBsdonated donatedmoney moneyto toCASA CASA(Court (Court recent By Emily Emily Peter Peter By AppointedSpecial SpecialAdvocates) Advocates)of ofEl ElDorado DoradoCounty Countyand andWorld World Appointed Vision to to buy buy bicycles bicycles for for foster foster and and orphaned orphaned teen teen girls, girls, both both Vision locallyand andaround aroundthe theworld. world.Team Teamsponsor sponsorJohn JohnCrews Crewsof ofBicycles Bicycles locally Plus in in Folsom Folsom has has also also donated donated bikes, bikes, helmets helmets and and other other gear. gear. Plus “[We] can’t can’t get get these these foster foster kids kids out out of of the the cycles cycles of of dependency, dependency, “[We] addiction and and abuse abuse unless unless we we help help them them get get to to jobs jobs and and college college addiction classes locally,” locally,” explains explains Development Development Manager Manager at at CASA CASA and and BBBs BBBs member, member, Kathy Kathy classes Hurd. Providing Providing vital vital transportation transportation to to at-risk at-risk teens teens opens opens the the door door to to an an independent independent Hurd. and better better adult adult life. life. BBBs BBBs and are “Girls “Girls Geared Geared to to Give” Give” are but are are also also about about fun, fun, but fi tness, friendship, and fi tness, friendship, and fitness, providing women women with with an an providing activity they they can can be be proud proud activity of. For For more more information, information, of. email Cindy Cindy Freeman Freeman at at email bodaciousbikingbabes@ bodaciousbikingbabes@ gmail.com. To To donate donate a a gmail.com. bike, visit visit casaeldorado.org casaeldorado.org bike, orworldvision.org. worldvision.org. or

Catch All

E HE TTH

HITLIST

The year year Squaw Squaw The Valley hosted hosted the the Valley Winter Olympics, Olympics, and and Winter the year year the the Olympics Olympics came came to to the the the tiny town town of of Tahoma—the Tahoma—the site site of of the the tiny biathlon, cross-country cross-country skiing, skiing, and and biathlon, cross-country portion portion of of the the Nordic Nordic cross-country combined event. event. In In 1999, 1999, 15km 15km of of combined the original original Nordic Nordic trails—located trails—located in in the what is is now now Ed Ed Z’Berg Z’Berg Sugar Sugar Pine Pine what Point State State Park—were Park—were uncovered uncovered Point and restored restored for for public public use. use. and

1960

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The year year FountainFountainThe Tallman Soda Soda Works Works Tallman was built built (now (now the the was Fountain and and Tallman Tallman Museum), Museum), Fountain making it it the the oldest oldest building building in in making Placerville. Placerville. The key key to to its its The longevity? Brick Brick longevity? construction, construction, which prevented prevented which from being being itit from destroyed by by destroyed the fires fires that that the ravaged so so much much Gold Gold Rush-era Rush-era ravaged architecture. architecture.

14 Best Local “Public Bathroom” In no no particular particular order order In

•• CC OO MM PP II LL EE DD BB YY SS TT YY LL EE SS TT AA FF FF EE RR SS •• “London Best Best Fish Fish && Chip Chip not not only only makes makes aa killer killer fish fish sandwich, sandwich, but but their their bathrooms bathrooms 1.1. “London are always always spotless spotless and and well-stocked.” well-stocked.” 530-642-0777 530-642-0777 are 2. “The “The bathroom bathroom at at Face Face in in aa Book Book is is awesome—clean awesome—clean and and the the wallpaper wallpaper is is all all book book 2. pages, so so there’s there’s aa ton ton of of reading reading material.” material.” getyourfaceinabook.com getyourfaceinabook.com pages, 3.“After “Afteraaday dayat atApple AppleHill, Hill,IIalways alwaysstop stopby by Boa Boa Vista Vista Orchards Orchards for for produce produce and and aa potty potty 3. break. They They have have ‘real’ ‘real’ bathrooms bathrooms (not (not just just break. Port-A-Potties)toward towardthe theback.” back.”boavista.com boavista.com Port-A-Potties) 4. “When “When nature nature calls calls while while in in the the great great outout4. doors at at Marshall Marshall Gold Gold Discovery Discovery State State HisHisdoors toric Park, Park, it’s it’s refreshing refreshing to to know know they they have have toric roomy, squeaky squeaky clean clean bathrooms.” bathrooms.” parks. parks. roomy, ca.gov/?page_id=484 ca.gov/?page_id=484 5. “The “The cleanliness, cleanliness, copper copper sinks, sinks, and and wood wood 5. stalls/doorsat atSienna SiennaRestaurant’s Restaurant’srestrooms restrooms stalls/doors make itit ever ever so so inviting.” inviting.” siennarestaurants. siennarestaurants. make London Best Best Fish Fish && Chip Chip London com com 14 stylemg.com stylemg.com -- March March 2014 2014 14

FACTS & FIGURES

Day in in March March that that is is Day National Pi Pi Day. Day. Huh? Huh? National Pi is is aa mathematic mathematic Pi constant that that has has aa value value of of 3.14; 3.14; constant or, expressed expressed as as aa date, date, March March 14, 14, or, thanks to to aa playful playful physicist physicist at at San San thanks Francisco’s Exploratorium Exploratorium in in 1988 1988 Francisco’s who decided decided to to celebrate celebrate Pi Pi Day Day who with delicious delicious pies. pies. You You heard heard the the with man, eat eat up! up! man,

MINUTES 7MINUTES

Length of of Length the longest longest the Oscar acceptance acceptance speech, speech, given given Oscar by Greer Greer Garson Garson in in 1942 1942 for for her her by performance in in Mrs. Mrs. Miniver. Miniver. For For performance comparison, the the current current cut-off cut-off for for comparison, Oscar speeches speeches is is 45 45 seconds. seconds. Let Let Oscar that one one sink sink in… in… that

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Bodacious Bodacious Biking Biking Babes Babes photo photo courtesy courtesy of of Bodacious Bodacious Biking Biking Babes. Babes. Catch Catch All All graphic graphic © © DenisNata/fotolia.com. DenisNata/fotolia.com. Bullseye Bullseye image image © © mostafa mostafa fawzy/fotolia.com. fawzy/fotolia.com. London London Best Best Fish Fish & & Chip Chip photo photo by by Dante Dante Fontana. Fontana. Fountain Fountain and and Tallman Tallman Museum Museum photo photo by by Bobak Bobak Ha’Eri. Ha’Eri.

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BEST RESTAURANTS H H H H H

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Featuring fresh California cuisine and a fantastic wine list. Open for Lunch & Dinner Tuesday through Sunday 325 Main Street, Placerville 530-626-9700 • heydaycafe.com

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March 2014 – stylemg.com 15


2

calendar

march events March is National Women's History Month Compiled by Gabriel Stubbs

1

A COMEDY SHOWCASE Sponsored by Leadership El Dorado Class 6 and held at the Placerville Shakespeare Club, this night of comedy will start at 8 p.m. In addition to laughs, the evening will include a raffle and silent auction. Proceeds will benefit various children's organizations. For more details, visit standupedc.evenbrite. com.

8

CAMERON PARK FIRE DEPARTMENT CRAB FEED

WINTER WINE & FOOD FEST Benefiting the Make-A-Wish Foundation and considered the premier wine and food event in the region, this year’s WWFF— held at the Sacramento Convention Center from 5-10 p.m.—will feature more than 120 wineries, breweries and restaurants. To purchase tickets, visit necannv.wish.org.

Music, silent auctions, raffles, and of course, lots of crab will be featured from 5-8 p.m. on this night dedicated to support the Cameron Park Fire Department. To purchase tickets, head to Fire Station 89. For more details, visit cameronpark.org.

9 17 20 22

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS BEGINS

3

Gary Mullen & The Works will rock the Harris Center at 7:30 p.m. with hit Queen songs such as “Killer Queen,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Under Pressure” and many others. With a lead singer that seems to be Freddie Mercury reincarnated, you'll think you're across the pond seeing Queen at Wembley Stadium. For more details, visit harriscenter.net.

FIRST DAY OF SPRING

DEAN-O-HOLICS

13

CONNECTIONS 2014 Connections is a “business to community” and “business to business” expo bringing together more than 150 businesses from the region. Attendees will interact with an array of vendors and exhibitors, while enjoying free lunch samplings at the Folsom Sports Complex from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more details, visit folsomchamber.com.

16

FRIENDS OF EL DORADO COUNTY SENIORS’ SPAGHETTI FEED FUNDRAISER

Feast on spaghetti and meatballs at the Mother Lode Lions Hall (4701 Missouri Flat Road in Cameron Park) from 1-5 p.m. A no-host bar will be available, as well as raffle drawings. For more details, call 530-644-8519. For even more events happening in our area, log on to our website: stylemg. com and click on Calendar. And, be sure to check out our Blog! Send your events to info@stylemg.com.

16 stylemg.com - March 2014

This Rat Pack tribute band will bring back the cool at the Cameron Park Community Center stage at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m.). Step back in time for a night of amazing music and an appearance from Marilyn Monroe! Snacks and beverages will be for sale. For more details, visit cameronpark.org.

26

PLACERVILLE SHAKESPEARE CLUB ANNUAL BRIDGE PARTY: LET'S MAKE A DEAL Grab a partner, head to the clubhouse (2920 Bedford Avenue) at 10 a.m. and “make a deal!” Everyone is welcome, and with a morning snack, lunch and an opportunity to win cash prizes and other giveaways, it’s bound to be a good time. For more details, visit placerville-shakespeare.com.

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SUGARLOAF STAMPEDE In this first annual fundraiser to benefit the Sugarloaf Station Foundation, participants will choose from a 5K, 10K or 10-mile course on a part-paved, part-dirt, out and back course over what was once the historic Southern Pacific Railway line (Eastern section of the scenic El Dorado Trail). For more details and to register, visit sugarloafstationfoundation.org.

Connections 2014 photo by Tom Paniagua. Friends of El Dorado County Seniors' Spaghetti Feed photo by Kathi Lishman. All other photos courtesy of their respective organizations.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

ONE NIGHT OF QUEEN


MORE EVENTS Through March 31 – Fourth Annual Art of Love Show. ASiF Gallery continues to celebrate love in this exhibit showcasing artists of the Foothills. Open every day from 5-8 p.m., visitors can enjoy many artistic endeavors—from poetry to fire dancing. For more details, visit asifstudios.com. March 4-5 – SIRO-A: The Digital Technodelic Experiment. This experimental musical group defines their craft as “the next generation of entertainment.” At 7:30 p.m. both nights, three physical performers and two DJs will use the art of optical illusions, visual projections, and musical electro beats to present a mind-bending, fun, and at times, comical night. For more details, visit harriscenter.net. March 8 – 21st Annual Crab Feed & Dance. Support the Rotary Club of El Dorado Hills' local programs and projects while chowing down on Dungeness crab, pasta with red plum tomato sauce and more. Cocktail hour starts at 6 p.m. at the EDH Community Services District Gym (1021 Harvard Way). To purchase tickets, visit edhrotary.org. March 12 – Waste Land. Co-sponsored by Coalition for Change and the Sierra Club, enjoy this third offering of the film series at Cozmic Café (594 Main Street) in Placerville starting at 6:30 p.m.; doors open at 6 p.m. This award-winning movie follows artist Vik Muniz as he journeys to his native Brazil to create art with 3,000 “catadores.” For more details, email coal4change@gmail.com. March 15 – Havana Nights. Enjoy dinner, dancing, silent and live auctions, and live music from 5-10 p.m. at Lakehills Covenant Church in El Dorado Hills. Proceeds will benefit the Cedar Springs Waldorf School. For more details and to purchase tickets, visit cswsauction. com. March 15 – An Irish Hooley. Kerry Records presents this St. Patrick's Day celebration with the triple threat of music, song and dance. The seven musicians of slugger O'Toole, along with some dynamic guests including the Kerry Dance Troupe, will hit the Harris Center stage at 7:30 p.m. For more details, visit harriscenter.net. March 19 – Dan Crary & Thunderation. By combining a steel guitar, banjo and mandolin, this trio entertains audiences with new songs and old stories, blazing instrumental virtuosity and powerfully felt musical moments. The concert begins at 7 p.m. at the Union Mine High School Theater. For more details, visit eldoradocommunityconcerts.com. March 21-23 – Friends of the Folsom Library Book Sale. Find your favorite book or discover something new while benefiting Friends of the Folsom Library, a 100-percent non-profit organization. The sale is from Friday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more details, visit foflib.org. March 22 – Party with a Purpose. Join the Pacific Trauma Specialists for their second annual fundraiser benefiting disadvantaged and emotionally traumatized individuals in our community from 5-10 p.m. at the Serrano Country Club. Spend the night enjoying a gourmet meal, full bar and dancing. For more details, visit, pacifictraumacenter. com. March 23 – The Pink Floyd Experience. With more than $2.5 million dollars in production equipment, this performance will rock all of your senses, and truly be an experience. The cover band will begin playing your favorite Pink Floyd psychedelic riffs at 2 p.m. and again at 7 p.m. at the Harris Center. To purchase tickets, visit harriscenter.net

SAVE THE DATE April 12 – Kids’ Expo. Choices for Children will present this free familyfriendly event at the El Dorado County Fairgrounds from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. A wide variety of community organizations will offer hands-on activities and information about their services, plus entertainment by local children's groups and the Swan Brothers Circus. For more details, visit choices4children-eldorado.org.

March 2014 - stylemg.com 17


outtakes EL DORADO COUNTY SEARCH AND RESCUE CRAB FEED

ART AND WINE WITH SOMETHING M.O.R.E.

El Dorado County Fairgrounds, Placerville, January 25 Photos courtesy of Suzanne Supple and Natalie Trudeau.

El Dorado County Fairgrounds Placerville, January 18 Photos by Jeanine Mays.

Susan Spencer and John Graifemberg

DJ Grant Petersen

Natalie Trudeau and Suzanne Supple

Cynthia Romero and Gerald Hayden

Old Town Grill provides food and smiles Desi Malone

Chris Sanders and Chris Reeg Maureen Carter and Pat and Vincent Panto

Bianca Kroettinger, Paul Duer and Natalie Trudeau

GOLD COUNTRY RUN + SPORT GRAND OPENING 4370 Town Center Boulevard, Suite 150 El Dorado Hills January 25 Photos by Tom Paniagua.

Tony and Tanya Moran and Elaine Kobus

Sarah and Josh Reintsma

HONOR OUR TROOPS ALLAMERICAN BREAKFAST FUND-RAISER Laura Daniels, Michelle Crews and Jennifer Miller

Owners and friends at the ribbon cutting ceremony

Placerville Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Memorial Hall, January 25. Photos by Cyndi Romano. Katherine, Casey and Carson McLeod

Russ Mote Stacie Walls and Doc League

Denise Lomax, Cyndi Romano and Inga Buckendorf Jenn Soto with owners Donn and Tania Cox

Navy Veterans Jane and Sam Ferguson

Owner Donn Cox and Co-owner Leon Shahinian

Alli, Randi, Emma and Jason Warden

If you know of any events happening in the El Dorado County Foothills area or have photos you would like to share with us, please submit them to info@stylemg.com. And, to see more Outtakes photos, visit our website: stylemg.com.

18 stylemg.com - March 2014


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thearts

qian fang Unrestrained Elegance by Abigail Blank

QF: When I was a teenager, I liked to visit jewelry stores. At that time, jewelry designs seemed incredibly old-fashioned and I thought it was just a rule: Jewelry must look like that. Even as a teen, I thought shiny metals and stones should be unrestrained, so one day I made a pair of very simple jade earnings. Of course, today I use more sophisticated techniques, both more complex as well as more refined. However, my vision has not changed: it’s unrestrained.

I

nspired by nature, modern urban design, and small details in the world around her, Qian Fang uses unusual stones and rare gems to create one-of-a-kind jewelry. Her pieces are best described as “wearable art.” AB: What attracted you to the art of jewelry making? QF: I can’t live without art. It is in my genes from several generations of artists. For me, applied art is more attractive than pure art. When people wear my jewelry, it brings it to life—[it goes from being] a part of me to a part of them. To beautify and brighten people’s lives is the force behind my work.

AB: You’re very knowledgeable about the mineral composition and quality of the rare stones and gems used in your pieces. How does this knowledge affect the way you design jewelry? QF: This is an interesting question. In truth, when purchasing gemstones, I’m most often attracted to a particular pattern or texture, without regard for its mineral composition. Many times, I have been inspired solely by the story or uniqueness behind the gemstone. As a result, sometimes the artistic design of my jewelry is not very practical for everyday wear (because of the particular stone or setting), but I want to be as informed and knowledgeable about the piece as I can, so that I can try to inform my customers of the particular piece’s limitations. AB: Do you remember the first piece of jewelry you made? How has your work changed from that first piece and how has it stayed the same? 20 stylemg.com - March 2014

AB: Where can people learn more about your jewelry and buy pieces? Do you have any upcoming studio tours planned? QF: I’m currently working on my 2014 collection and am excited about my first showing of that collection, which will be May 10-11 at the El Dorado Hills Art & Wine Affaire. A limited number of my pieces are also available online at etsy.com/shop/ qianfangartjewelry.

Visit qianfangartjewelry.blogspot. com for more information.

artbeat March 23 – Black Irish Band. Music on the Divide presents this folk/Irish group that is sure to have you tapping your feet at the I.O.O.F. Hall in Georgetown (6240 Main Street). Groove to their compilations of Gold Rush tunes, maritime and railroad music, as well as ethnic Irish beats, all starting at 3 p.m. For more details, visit musiconthedivide.org.

Photo of Fang by Dante Fontana. Jewelry photo courtesy of the artist.

AB: Most of your pieces are made with sterling silver, but a few incorporate metals such as copper or gold. How do you know what metal is right for a piece? QF: Different metals give me different feelings. Gold is elegant and mild, silver is bright and delicate, and copper can have many variations. When I want to express different feelings, I will use a different material, or mix them.


Distinctive

Dentists

Presenting Style Magazine’s DISTINCTIVE DENTISTS special advertising section. Some of our area’s best dentists and orthodontists have chosen to highlight their practice within the pages of the area’s most read community magazine. Each month Style plans on choosing a different industry to give these businesses a unique opportunity to stand out and highlight their products and services. And when you visit these businesses, make sure you tell them you saw their profile in Style!

Russell S. Jones, D.D.S. 6390 Runnymeade Drive, Suite A Placerville 530-622-6768

Are you one of many who find it stressful to visit the dentist? You are not alone. Relax, we can help! Dr. Russell Jones and his staff provide compassionate, expert dental treatment for patients of ALL ages. As a General and Cosmetic Family dentist, Dr. Jones provides services in cosmetic dentistry, oral surgery, dental implants, root canals, teeth bleaching and dentures. Dentistry is a family profession. Following in the footsteps of his father (R. Bruce Jones, D.D.S., with forty years of service to the profession), uncle (Russell Anderson, D.D.S., who taught dentistry for 20 years at Chicago's Northwestern University), and two older brothers, Dr. Jones graduated from UOP and opened his dental practice in 1991; his sister, a hygienist, works alongside him. With easy access and plenty of available parking; the office is conveniently located off Highway 50 and EI Dorado Road in Placerville.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING

SECTION

Ryan Easterbrook, D.D.S. 493 Main Street | Diamond Springs 530-626-5810 www.ryaneasterbrookdds.com

Conveniently located in historic downtown Diamond Springs, the dental office of Ryan Easterbrook, DDS is eager to help you with your dental care needs! Here at Ryan Easterbrook, DDS we do everything we can to help our patients make informed decisions. Our highly-trained, professional, friendly dental team is specifically suited to assist our patients in every phase of care. “We pride ourselves on having a great staff and a warm, friendly environment,” says Dr. Easterbrook, “which helps us to get to know each of our patients personally and always make sure that they understand their choices about their dental care and treatment needs.” We make sure that all your questions are answered and that you understand all of your options in order for you to decide what treatment is best for you. You will never leave our office feeling like you have been rushed out the door. Ryan Easterbrook, DDS provides all aspects of family and

cosmetic dental care. From routine checkups and cleanings to smile makeovers and everything in between, we are here to provide everything you need to stay healthy and have a great looking smile. We see patients of all ages and provide sedation options for those who feel especially anxious in a dental setting. Dr. Easterbrook is a graduate of Loma Linda University School of Dentistry. He and his wife Holly have four children and make their home in Placerville. “We feel very fortunate to have the opportunity to live and work in Placerville and look forward to many years of raising a family here.” Our website at www.RyanEasterbrookDDS.com for more information about our location and the services we provide. Office hours are Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. New patients are always welcome!

March 2014 - stylemg.com 25


Distinctive

Dentists

Ike Rahimi, D.M.D., D.D.S. 2808 Mallard Lane Placerville 530-622-0701 www.ikerahimi.com Dr. Ike Rahimi has been voted El Dorado County's Best Dentist four years in a row! His patients have recognized him for his passion for excellence in care and his commitment to ensuring his patients dental experience is comfortable and that they receive the most positive results. Dr. Rahimi and his staff have recently moved to an expanded location offering the latest in implant technology, sedation dentistry, and all aspects of general dentistry. The office houses Placerville's first 3D facial scanning technology that allows Dr. Rahimi to offer the best when it comes to implant placement and treatment. At Dr. Rahimi's office the focus is patient comfort before, during, and after treatment. Prior to any treatment you are given individualized time with Dr. Rahimi to discuss your personal concerns and questions. During your procedure Dr. Rahimi uses the latest technology and his gentle approach to dentistry to keep you comfortable. And after

26 stylemg.com - March 2014

any treatment lines of communication are kept open starting with a personal call from Dr. Rahimi to check on you the day after your procedure. When you visit Dr. Rahimi you can be assured you are receiving the most up to date information and treatment options. Dr. Rahimi is devoted to furthering his education and spends hundreds of hours expanding his knowledge to bring back to the Foothills and share with his patients. Dr. Rahimi is proud of combining the best the world has to offer with the closeness and warmth of a small town practice. Dr. Rahimi's office invites all in the community to stop in and tour their brand new facility, meet their friendly and experienced staff, and see for themselves what makes Dr. Rahimi the Best in El Dorado County!


SPECIAL ADVERTISING

SECTION

Shingle Springs Health and Wellness Center 5168 Honpie Rd. at Red Hawk Pkwy. Placerville 530-387-4975

Dr. Chalise Morgan is the Supervising Dentist at the Shingle Springs Health & Wellness Center. “I enjoy building relationships with families and creating beautiful smiles,” explains Dr. Morgan.She says that it is important to build trust with patients so they enjoy coming to their appointments. She is proud of the quality of dental care she, the other six dentists, hygienists, and the entire staff at the center provide our patients. “Everyone is friendly and professional.”

and digital x-rays to reduce radiation exposure and increase diagnostic ability of our dentists. The center welcomes Native and non-Native patients, accepts most major insurance and Medi-Cal, and provides a sliding fee scale. Dr. Morgan says, “We look forward to the opportunity to keep you smiling.”

“The ADA recommends the first dental visit by the age of one,” she explains. Dr. Morgan enjoys treating patients of all ages, even toddlers. “We believe in combining care with kindness. Our clinic uses several methods to reduce dental anxiety, including nitrous oxide.” With state-of-the-art equipment and instruments, the clinic offers an array of procedures including orthodontics, root canals, whitening, implants, dentures, crowns, bridges, extractions, and tooth colored fillings. The center boasts a cutting-edge digital panoramic machine

March 2014 - stylemg.com 27


ourkids

dealing with divorce 6 Tips to Help Kids Cope

Photo Š emese73/fotolia.com.

by Linda Holderness

28 stylemg.com - March 2014


I

f you and your spouse have decided to get a divorce—and you have children— you’re dealing with one of the toughest struggles any parent can face: What do you tell the kids? No matter how acrimonious the relationship, all couples want to spare their children pain, and experts agree: Being told their parents are splitting up is one of a child’s most painful moments. Some youngsters carry that hurt far into their adult years—and yet some do not. What makes the difference? In a study of more than 2,500 children of divorce, E. Mavis Hetherington and John Kelly, authors of For Better or for Worse: Divorce Reconsidered, found 75-80 percent of their subjects showed little or no long-term damage as adults. Although that means a significant percentage did have problems, the good news is this: Many of the factors related to how a child responds to divorce can be influenced by parents—the way they break the news, for example, and their attitudes toward each other. “Divorce is a trauma for kids,” says Dawn Hulme, a marriage and family therapist who founded and is the clinical supervisor at Windows of Hope in Roseville and Sacramento and is licensed in Imago Relationship Therapy. “Parents don’t always realize how difficult it can be.” Read on as Hulme and Suzette James, a licensed marriage and family therapist and owner of Family Tree Counseling in Folsom, share six ways parents can help kids cope.

1. Start with counseling. You’re bound to be angry, and seeing a therapist— together, before you talk to the kids—can help you cut through the fury and amicably work out plans for breaking the news and establishing new living arrangements. Parents need to work together without letting their negative feelings get in the way, James says. “The goal is to put the kids’ needs first.”

Photo © bramgino/fotolia.com.

2. Tell the truth. Give your children only the facts, James advises. If you’re not sure you’re going to divorce, say nothing. If you’re separating, say something like: We’re not sure we’ll get divorced, but we’re going to live apart to see if we can work things out. If divorce is certain, tell your kids you haven’t been getting along and have decided it’s best not to live together anymore. If possible, parents should talk to the kids together, but, says James, “more important than who delivers the information is how it’s delivered”—truthfully and without rancor.

3. Understand what “why?” means. When your children ask why

6. If you’re the “poor” parent, don’t fret about teenage drama. Yes, your

you’re getting divorced, what they really want to know, James says, is what will happen to them. Explain the arrangements you’ve made—where they’ll live and whether they’ll have to change schools, for example. Make sure they understand they’ll still see both parents. Acknowledge their hurt and, most importantly, Hulme says, assure them they’re not to blame.

spouse’s home may have fancier toys—and your teen may rave—but when they’re adults, James says, it is the attachment you make with your children, the love and nurturing you give them, that prevails. Have confidence that you are their rock.

4. Don’t fight in front of the kids. “Conflict between parents is, hands down, the most damaging thing for kids,” James says. No matter how much you dislike your ex, keep it between the two of you. Never badmouth them, and never bring the kids’ names into an argument, Hulme adds, or they will assume the divorce is their fault. “It sounds easy,” James says, “but it is very hard to do.”

5. Make the best of new living arrangements. If custody is split, agree on house rules (with counseling, if necessary). Beyond that, don’t make the kids feel guilty for leaving you and don’t pry. Instead, reassure them your ex loves them and will keep them safe. Taking favorite items back and forth, like a blanket or stuffed toy, can be comforting, says Hulme. If drop-off and pick-up times trigger arguments, she adds, meet at a public place or ask someone you trust to help. “Changing homes is inconvenient and annoying,” says James, “but if the parents can get along and be supportive, it doesn’t have to cause trauma.”

RESOURCES Carol Greenfield, a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Sacramento, suggests Kids’ Turn (kidsturn.org), a nonprofit based in San Francisco that provides a comprehensive program (think workshops, a blog and an online course) for children and family members affected by familial separation.

Meetup (divorcesupport.meetup. com) also offers informal groups with different themes throughout the area. Local hospitals, including Sutter and Kaiser, sponsor groups, and so do churches and other organizations. Googling turns up a good selection. Greenfield also recommends the books Shared Parenting: Beyond the Great Divide by Frank Leek, Ph.D., her husband; Mom’s House, Dad’s House by Isolina Ricci, Ph.D.; Dinosaurs Divorce by Laurene Kransy Brown and Marc Brown, a colorful kids’ book. James suggests

Get Out of My Life, but First Could You Drive Me & Cheryl to the Mall?, by Anthony E. Wolf, Ph.D.

March 2014 - stylemg.com 29


cause&effect

“Our community has been a great support to us in our mission,” shares Lana Deering, a member of the AOML board of directors. “Continuing support is always needed, especially as we grow. Volunteers are always a huge need. A couple hours a week makes a big difference for us.” AOML is currently seeking cage cleaners, adoption and placement specialists, and individuals with enough technological knowhow to perform basic website maintenance. Director Maggie Killackey also encourages donations—just $10 provides a rabies vaccination for one cat or kitten, while $100 covers the cost of a new holding cage. Supplies—ranging from cat litter and food to cleaning products and gently used refrigerators for storing vaccinations—are also gratefully accepted. “I have seen a tremendous change in our organization through the years,” Killackey says, “and the results are simply the impact we have had on the community at large. This particular cause is close to my heart because of my total involvement with the organiza-

animal outreach of the mother lode by Morgan Cásarez

I

t was 18th-century philosopher Immanuel Kant who said “We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals.” As a longtime volunteer and board memeber at Animal Outreach of the Mother Lode (AOML), Lori Cicchini lives by these words. “I know that every cat or dog deserves to be well treated and loved by someone, and many aren’t,” she explains. “I feel I have a responsibility, as part of this community, to do what I can to change that and help save as many lives as we can together.” AOML was founded in 1992 with a goal of reducing feline euthanizations in the Diamond Springs area. Throughout its more than 20-year history, the nonprofit’s largely volunteer staff has provided quality low- and no-cost spay/neuter and vaccination services for cats throughout El Dorado, Placer and Sacramento counties, including a free spay/neuter program for feral cats held the first Saturday of every month. In recent years, AOML has extended its reach to canine care, including nail clipping, vaccinations and microchipping. When they aren’t busy educating the public about the benefits of controlling the pet population, Cicchini and her fellow volunteers maintain close relationships with local shelters in an effort to find both foster and permanent homes for animals on the verge of being euthanized. 30 stylemg.com - March 2014

Barbara Gordon with Alex

tion, and the amount of animals we have been able to save throughout the years.” Each year, AOML provides medical care to 10,000 animals, rescues more than 2,000 cats and dogs, and finds more than 100 foster homes for rescued and rehabilitated animals. According to Jeanne Jackson, president of AOML’s board of directors, the organization hopes to expand its “safety net” to other states and encourage shelters to embrace no-kill models of operation. “To be a part of AOML is really a gift. No other organization is so generous,” Jackson says. “Everyone is born with a purpose and mine is to help animals.”

Visit animaloutreach.net for more information.

Photos by Dante Fontana.

Putting Furry Friends First


Homes, Businesses & Lives Repaired.â&#x201E;˘

EL DORADO RESTORATION

Disaster Repair and Construction


greenscene

local green thumbs

biodegradable. Eating from the Earth will never taste better! Prices vary; available at leafware.com

6 Eco-Friendly Products by Megan Wiskus

1 / MOVERS & SHAKERS California Box Rental, Rocklin, calboxrental.com Save time, energy and money on your next move by renting “boxes” (100-percent plastic containers with attached lids), plus hangers, totes, tubs, straps, dollies and wardrobe boxes—while also saving the environment. California Box Company’s products can be used multiple times before they need to be replaced, while also being weather resistant, waterproof and stackable. With attached tops there’s no need for tape, and they can carry more than double the weight of a comparable cardboard box. Prices vary; available at calboxrental.com

2 / WASH UP Bella Soap Company, Loomis, bellasoapcompany.com Soothe dry and sensitive skin with Bella Soap Company’s GMO-and gluten-free moisturizing body bar that’s received the Seal of Acceptance from the National Eczema Association, is recommended by pediatricians and dermatologists, and was presented before Congress during hearings for the Safe Cosmetics Act. Go green while getting clean! $4.89 each; available at buybellasoap.com and at local retailers, including Whole Foods Market

3 / GREEN LIGHT Candle Soap Bar, El Dorado Hills, candlesoapbar.com These 100-percent soy, vegetable-based wax candles offer a cleanburning alternative to paraffin that’s environmentally sound and healthy for your home. What’s more, each candle is individually hand poured to perfection with maximum scent, and the glass jar is reusable. $23; available at candlesoapbar.com and at Taylor’s Art & Soul in Sacramento

4 / DINNER IS SERVED Leafware, Folsom, leafware.com Handcrafted from fallen palm leaves that are each thoroughly cleaned, heat pressed and fully sterilized, the result is sturdy, casually elegant dinnerware (plates, bowls, utensils and more)—perfect for everyday dining and relaxed gatherings. Liquid and heat safe, with no chemicals or binders, each USDA-certified, 99-percent biobased product (intended for single use) is compostable and 32 stylemg.com - March 2014

5 / ALL BOTTLED UP Mason Solar Jars, Placerville, 530303-3190 Store up sunshine for the nighttime with these Mason Solar Jars, handmade by local crafter Domini Yeske using recycled jars, beads and glass marbles. Each ingenious offering is weather resistant and lasts for six to eight hours (after charging all day in the sun). Perfect on a picnic table, in a garden, lining a walkway or when camping—you’ll be the light of the party. $14+; available at Eco Logical in Placerville

6 / WINE DOWN Sierra Vista Winery, Placerville sierravistawinery.com Sierra Vista’s buzz-worthy vinos are some of the most ecofriendly out there. The winery was the first in the El Dorado American Viticultural Area (AVA) to install solar panels (produces 60 percent of their electricity) and only organic materials are used on their vines; what’s more, it’s certified sustainable by Fish Friendly Farming. We especially love the luscious and rich 201 0 Cabernet Sauvignon Syrah with flavors of blackberry, plum and a hint of toasty spice. $32; available at sierravistawinery.com

Wine photo by Aaron Roseli. All other photos courtesy of their respective companies.

I

’m a fiend for green (the color and living an eco-friendly lifestyle), so when tasked with the challenge to find locally made earth-conscious items, I gladly obliged. From moving boxes and bars of soap to bottles of wine, one thing is clear: Our area embraces every shade of green. Here, we present you with six Style-approved products.


2 0 D E CO R AT I N G T I P S A N D T R I C K S | AWA R D -W I N N I N G H O M E R E M O D E L ™

F O L S O M

E L

D O R A D O

H I L L S

INSPIRING INTERIORS

FEBRUARY 2013

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STYLEMG.COM

1/17/13 5:01:44 PM

folsom

presented by:

HOMESHOW M A G A Z I N E


inhistory

forgotten city Legacy of Logtown

J

ust south of El Dorado, through a pretty shaded stretch of oak, Highway 49 follows Logtown Creek and Logtown Ravine, but Logtown itself is nowhere to be found. In fact, the exact location of Logtown had been something of a mystery for generations. From 2009-2010, the Logtown Curve Realignment and Road Widening Safety Project opened the way, literally, for archaeologists working with the California Department of Transportation to survey the area believed to have been the site of Logtown, a once-booming mining community. Like many towns in El Dorado County and the surrounding region, Logtown seemed to appear overnight in 1849. Placer mining attracted thousands to the area, and by the 1850s quartz mining was underway. According to an 1858 Mountain Democrat article, there were more than six mills operating in Logtown Ravine, including the Lamoille Mill. Owned by J.R. Beard, it had a steam engine powering eight stamps, 34 stylemg.com - March 2014

which could crush up to 15 tons of rock every 12 hours. The two most renowned mines in the Ravine, however, were Empire Mine and the Pocahontas Mine, which operated well into the 1870s. No one knows how Logtown, which was sometimes referred to as Empire City, got its name. At the time, thousands of miners, blacksmiths, cooks, engineers and saloonkeepers called it home. During the depression in the 1870s, some residents turned more heavily toward agriculture; then, during the Great Depression of 1929, gold mining enjoyed its resurgence in the Mother Lode, particularly in Logtown. By 1948, however, the last buildings were in ruins and Logtown had ceased to exist. The only remains visible were four headstones in the overgrown Logtown Cemetery. Among them is Perry Summers, aged 21 in 1850. According to the census, he lived with two other male family members and a third, unrelated man. In the 1860 census, these men are not recorded;

they had long moved on, like so many men of the Gold Rush. Archaeologists working on the Logtown site were able to survey and record mine tailings, areas of heavy mining activity, a few building foundations and the cemetery, but surprisingly little remains of a town that once held a thousand. Nor did archaeologists discover one of the only known legends surrounding Logtown: Lillian Stanley Drew, the granddaughter of William Rust who, in 1855, owned a saloon on Logtown Road. According to Lillian, Logtown was a prosperous mining area and her grandfather thrived, burying his own gold in cans around the property. One day, while sitting on his porch, he fell backwards and died without having told anyone the location of his gold. Numerous attempts to find the treasure failed. According to Lillian, “a lot of digging went on for a long time.” Logtown never became an agricultural or railroad center; it was founded by miners and like them, in time, it too disappeared.

Photo © johnsroad7/fotolia.com.

by Hiliary C. Simon


homedesign

nesting in small spaces 10 Ways to Create a Streamlined Home by Kerrie Kelly, ASID

6

Unify opposing pieces. A coat of white paint can pull together clashing woods or colors. Paint accent pieces to complement each other. Harmonizing shades keeps a small space from looking too busy.

7

Paint smart. A very pale hue bounces light around just as white paint would, but also adds a colorful element to create the appearance that tiny confines are larger. If you prefer darker tones, take the wall color onto the ceiling or use a shade that’s two or three shades lighter than the walls on the ceiling to keep the contrast levels down.

STORAGE SOLUTIONS

8

Box it up. Bulky items like sheets, blankets and off-season clothing can easily slide under the bed in dust-free boxes when not in use. Colored or fabriccovered boxes can conceal items while decoratively perched in bookcases. 9 A little fabric. Wall-to-wall drapes can expand their use while cleverly covering floor to ceiling open shelving and architectural eyesores.

MAXIMIZE YOUR FLOOR PLAN

3

Create a symmetrical layout by centering heavy pieces on a room’s perimeter, in order to create an anchoring sense of order. Flank a sofa by matching bookcases to offset the visual weight of a piano or fireplace. You can make a compact room feel much bigger by choosing fewer large, bold pieces instead of several smaller furnishings and accessories.

1

4 Lighten up. A special table or floor lamp gives a room instant style and ambience. You can get a lot of task light out of lamps in a small room without needing much overhead light. The most beautiful fabrics and artwork are useless if they’re hidden in darkness!

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5

Multitasking furniture pieces. Free up precious square footage by getting creative with your furniture’s purpose. Rearrange a bed so that the longer end is against a wall to create a daybed effect that is functional for sleeping, as well as for a cozy hangout area. Nimble pieces. Select pieces that can be agile within your space. Flexible elements—such as stools, trays, ottomans and side tables—can be easily moved around and multi-purposed for additional seating, night stands, small desks and serving tables. Don’t be afraid to add handles or casters to pieces for maximum flexibility.

36 stylemg.com - March 2014

CLAIM YOUR COLORS Identify your palette. Begin the color selection process by pinpointing your favorite objects in the space. Pull color from rugs, artwork, furniture, fabrics and accessories to create your personal palette. A small space isn’t a place to have high-contrast, jarring color and patterns; go for color, but keep it all in the same tone.

10

Kerrie L. Kelly is an award-winning interior designer, author and multimedia consultant. She has authored two books: ‘Home Décor: A Sunset Design Guide,’ published by Oxmoor House, and the newly released ‘My Interior Design Kit,’ with Pearson Professional and Career Education. To contact her, visit kerriekelly.com or call 916-919-3023.

Photo by Brian Kellogg Photography.

W

ith spring arriving soon, many of us look to organize and balance the items we’ve collected. In smaller quarters, this may mean mixing styles, colors and unmatched elements, which can ultimately create a space that reflects the real you—just follow these simple guidelines.

Concealed cabinets. Doors can hide file boxes and dayto-day functional items, while open shelving can display decorative books and collectibles. Personalize pre-fabricated cabinetry by staining or painting the doors. Upholstering the front of cabinet doors with padding, beautiful fabric and nail-head trim is another appealing option. Remember, while a diminutive room has the potential to be a “jewel box” in your home, you really have to be detailed when decorating it—everything becomes a focal point. The eye travels quickly around a small room, so you want each piece to have meaning and impact with your own personal touch.


GET FRESH

farm-to-table

eating

IF YOU WANT TO EAT LOCAL, FRESH AND SUSTAINABLE FOODS, THE FARM-TO-TABLE MOVEMENT IS FOR YOU.

BY KRISTEN CASTILLO PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANTE FONTANA

“Farm-to-table is a celebration of seasonality,” says Harvindar Singh, local forager for Whole Foods Markets in northern California, explaining the movement is about celebrating local food, knowing where products are grown and building a healthy community. “Every day we eat, but do we think about where it comes from?” asks Singh. Do you know where and how your food is grown? Were chemicals used? “Farm-to-table isn’t a movement or fad for our customers, it is a way of life,” says Carol Arnold, executive director of Foothill Farmers’ Market Association/PlacerGROWN. The concept of farmto-table, or farm-to-fork as it’s often called, isn’t new. In fact, consuming fresh, local, chemical-free fruits, vegetables and meats is a very traditional idea. That’s the way food was produced and consumed until modern times. Consumers are now realizing that using preservatives, freezing food and trucking it long distances isn’t necessarily a good idea. The State of California and regional elected officials recently proclaimed Sacramento the “Farm-to-Fork Capital of America.” The Art of Real Food co-author Joanne Neft, who also co-authored Placer 38 stylemg.com - March 2014

County Real Food with Laura Kenney, says, “People want to know they are eating healthy food and are willing to spend a bit more time preparing meals.” The pair shopped farmers’ markets every week for a year buying fresh, local foods and then prepared home-style dinners for 8-10 people; the recipes can be found inside Placer County Real Food. “Eating farm-to-table is having an impact and this is just the beginning.” Shop area farmers’ markets for local fruits and vegetables that are picked when they’re ripe, in addition to seasonal jams, honeys and cheeses. “I don’t take a ‘list’ to a farmers’ market,” says Neft. “Whatever is at the market that week is what we eat, including ingredients for a soup or salad, grain or starch, at least two or three different vegetables, some wild fish or grassfed meat and dessert.” Also, consider joining a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) group, where you pay a subscription for fresh produce. Every two weeks, for example, Singh receives a basket of fruits and vegetables from his CSA. “You get to experiment with a variety of foods,” he says. Read on as we take you to local restaurants embracing the movement (with a recipe from each!), and explore area markets and ranches. It’s time to get healthy, eat fresh and help your community.


SEASONAL KALE SLAW Submitted by Chef Kimberly Medici, Table Nectar Local and Organic Catering and Manzanita Kitchen and Events

TABLE NECTAR LOCAL AND ORGANIC CATERING AND MANZANITA KITCHEN AND EVENTS Forget mass-produced convenience food. Being “local and organic” is a way of life at Table Nectar. “The farm-to-table movement is about knowing where our food comes from and enjoying produce, meats and locally made products that haven’t travelled halfway around the world, but were instead grown or produced in our backyards and communities,” says Kimberly Medici, chef and owner at Table Nectar. Medici calls farm-to-table “conscious eating” and explains it’s local, pesticide-free and can help making and preparing food fun, since there are so many colors and flavors to choose from. “It’s quality over quantity and healthier choices combined,” she says. In the spring, Table Nectar’s farm-to-table menus include balsamic beet crostini with oven-roasted South Fork Farm’s baby beets and arugula, Jollity Farm’s fresh goat’s chevré, Mad Dog Mesa’s extra virgin olive oil and balsamic reduction; Flying Mule Farms’ slow braised lamb shank served with Riverdog Farm’s roasted fingerling potatoes, grilled spring asparagus, and creamy truffled polenta from Grass Valley Grains; and for dessert, orange cardamom creme brulée, made with Local Yolk’s pastured eggs, Clover Stornetta cream, and Hooverville Orchards’ fresh citrus. Sourcing ingredients takes time and great communication but Medici has a direct relationship with local farmers, which means she can arrange for a “limited number of custom-grown fruits and veggies.” Medici says that while farm-to-table can cost at least 30-40 percent more than traditional dining, the cost is worth it, explaining, “When you pay a little more for higherquality ingredients that taste better and are more appealing, you tend to waste less and therefore ultimately spend less.” Costs might get better as farm-to-table TABLE NECTAR LOCAL AND ORGANIC gets even more popular. “The good news is CATERING AND MANZANITA that the more we support our local food sysKITCHEN AND EVENTS tems and organic farming, the greater the 4232 Fowler Lane, Suite 101, Diamond Springs demand will be, and the more affordable it will 530-344-7613 | tablenectar.com get,” says Medici.

<<<<<

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• 2 bunches Dinosaur kale (de-stemmed and cut into thin strips or roughly chopped) • 3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil • 1 tbsp. hemp seed oil • 1 tbsp. + 1 tsp. Dijon mustard • 3/4 tsp. sea salt • Fresh ground pepper, to taste • 2 tbsp. Grade B pure maple syrup • 2 tbsp. fresh squeezed lemon juice • 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar • 2 cups red and green cabbage (cut into thin strips or shredded by hand or with food processor) • 1 medium sized tart/sweet apple such as Granny Smith, Fuji, or Pink Lady (shredded or thinly sliced) • 2 medium sized carrots (peeled and shredded by hand or with food processor) • 1 medium sized red beet (peeled and shredded by hand or with food processor) • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, walnut pieces or slivered almonds 1. Wash all fresh ingredients thoroughly. 2. Remove stems from the kale, as they tend to be slightly tough and woody when served raw. 3. Bunch up or stack the de-stemmed greens and thinly slice them to about 1/4-inch thickness. Place them in a medium-sized mixing bowl. 4. Add ingredients (olive oil through cider vinegar) directly to the kale; wash hands, and then thoroughly massage the dressed greens mixture with your hands. 5. Massage the greens with the same intensity you might tenderize meat with a malate. By doing this, the acids in the dressing act to gently tenderize and “cook” the kale without loosing any flavor or nutrients. This is the fun part, so don’t be afraid to really get in there! 6. Prep all of the remaining ingredients. Using a food processor with a shredding attachment works most quickly; otherwise, shred the carrots and beets by hand. The apples can be sliced, diced or shredded, whichever you prefer. 7. Add the cabbage, carrots, beets and apples to the kale mixture and gently toss—mixing all ingredients throughout. 8. If you prefer your nuts and seeds toasted, put them in the oven for about 8 minutes at 350 degrees; let them cool before folding into the salad. March 2014 - stylemg.com 39


CHEF RANDALL SELLAND’S HEIRLOOM TOMATO SOUP Submitted by Selland’s Market-Café

• 2-1/2 lbs. heirloom tomatoes (any variety you prefer) • 3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil • 1/4 bunch cilantro • 1 to 2 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped • 2 tbsp. salt • Additional salt and pepper, to taste

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SELLAND’S MARKET CAFE

Core tomatoes and cut into quarters. Combine tomatoes, olive oil, cilantro, garlic and 2 tbsp. salt in a large bowl and gently mix together. Cover and let marinate for 4-5 hours at room temperature, and then run through a food mill or blender. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve at room temperature with your choice of accompaniments, such as avocado, burrata or fresh mozzarella, or crab. Serves 4.

GO <<<<<

SELLAND’S MARKET-CAFÉ 4370 Town Center Boulevard 916-932-5025 | sellands.com

SELLAND’S MARKETCAFÉ

There are many reasons why this El Dorado Hills eatery embraces the farm-to-table concept. “People like to know where their food comes from; it helps create a connection to [it] and helps create a sense of community,” says owner Randall Selland, who also praises the health benefits of eating “a balanced diet of things grown locally or regionally, because you can track what’s in it and how it was raised.” Further, What’s on a farm-to-table menu? Anything local, fresh the farm-to-table style allows the restaurant to back the regional economy by and sustainable. Nothing is processed. “Instead of meat, supporting farmers and produce suppliers close to home. potatoes and a vegetable, you might find grass-fed lamb, Some of their vendors include Lienert’s Honey, Kelly’s Crayfish, Aoyama roasted vegetables, fresh fruit and locally sourced highFarms (for peaches, grapes, tomatoes and onions), Cache Creek Meat Co. (for quality bread,” says Arnold. chicken, turkey and lamb), and The Chef’s Garden (for micro greens and micro Over time, you’ll develop a sense of what’s in season. February herbs, plus specialty lettuces and heirloom vegetables), among other suppliers. for example, is prime time for citrus like blood oranges Selland also values having a good rapport with local farmers and growers. “They and grapefruits. Winter squash is available from October are really our first line of defense and our eyes and ears on the ground to let us through March, and tomatoes are at their peak from July know what, where and when the best stuff will be ready, and how long we have through October. left in the season,” he says. Even with seasonal availability, you can still plan ahead The restaurant plans ahead throughout the year to maximize what’s fresh to create menus. Arnold offers this tasty meal for an in fruits, vegetables, herbs, grains and nuts. Still, flexibility is required because early spring dinner: an appetizer of leek, green garlic, serving fresh, local quality foods is a priority. Selland’s Market-Café in El Dorado and mushroom crostini; a whole roast chicken with Hills and its sister restaurants, The Kitchen, Selland’s in East Sacramento, and root vegetables for dinner; a side dish of sautéed Ella, have been farm-to-table for more than 20 years. “We’ve always had guests chard; and a sweet dessert of fresh navel oranges and Meyer lemon goat cheese cheesecake (for the who are overwhelmingly positive about it,” says Selland. “The food tastes better, it cheesecake recipe, visit stylemg.com). makes guests feel good, and it’s good for the community and the local economy.”

WHAT’S ON THE MENU?

40 stylemg.com - March 2014


WINTER CITRUS SALAD WITH BLOOD ORANGE VINAIGRETTE Submitted by The Smith Flat House

• • • • • •

THE SMITH FLAT HOUSE

Organic mixed salad greens Wedges from 1/2 tangerine Wedges from 1/2 blood orange Wedges from 1/4 ruby red grapefruit 1/4 cup chopped cashews 1/4 cup goat cheese

BLOOD ORANGE VINAIGRETTE: • 1 tsp. finely chopped shallots • Zest and juice from 1 blood orange • Zest and juice from 1 lime • 2 tbsp. white vinegar • 1 tsp. parsley • 2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil • Salt and pepper, to taste

This Placerville restaurant’s farm-to-table Shake or mix vigorously. strategy is three-fold: Customers can eat seaTO PREPARE SALAD: sonal food, thus varyToss organic mixed salad greens lightly in ing their diets; food is dressing. Top with wedges of blood orange, served and eaten at the peak of freshness; and local farmers financially benefit from the tangerine and ruby red grapefruit. Sprinkle restaurant buying their products. cashews and goat cheese on top. “In general, our customers seem to enjoy the variety on the menu and the ever-changing Serves 4, plus leftover vinaigrette. nature of what is offered, as well as the commitment to creative and quality ingredients,” says the restaurant’s managing partner Jason Spencer. “They’ve quickly realized they can come back regularly and try different items and types of food throughout the year, but know that the quality of the ingredients will always be consistent, the things featured will regularly change, and the menu will always have a fresh look.” Throughout the year, The Smith Flat House sources food from Perez’ Red Shack, South Fork Farm, Sorenson Family Farms, Boa Vista Orchards, Barsotti Juice Company, Penrod THE SMITH FLAT HOUSE Farms, Willow Pond Organic Farm and Mad 2021 Smith Flat Road, Placerville Dog Mesa Olive Oil. What’s more, the restau530-621-1003 | smithflathouse.com rant features only El Dorado County wines Farm-to-table is all about on their wine list. supporting local farms and sustainable practices. Once you know where to go, you can buy fresh and local fruits and vegSince menu items are seasonal, here’s etables, as well as eggs, honey and meats. Check out these Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) groups and local farms: what can be found: in winter, a salad with mixed greens and ruby red grapefruit, blood CSAs: red oranges and tangerines, tossed in a citEl Dorado Hills Natural Farms: edhfarms.com rus vinaigrette and topped with cashews; in Farm Fresh to You: farmfreshtoyou.com Full Belly Farm: fullbellyfarm.com spring, an entrée of gemelli pasta with spring It’s Organic: itsorganicdelivery.com asparagus, grape tomatoes and a light basil The Natural Trading Co.: naturaltradingco.com cream sauce; and a fall dessert of pear and Vierra Farms: vierrafarms.com cranberry cobbler with house-made whipped cream. The eatery’s salad changes throughFARMS: out the year as well. In spring and summer, it The Casey Family Farm for chicken and rabbit meat, as well as free-range eggs: penrynrabbitfarm.com Delta Farm, LLC for beef, Berkshire pigs, lamb, honey and free-range eggs: delta-farm.com has local heirloom tomatoes and cucumbers Flying Mule Farm for lamb, mutton and free-range eggs: flyingmulefarm.com while in fall and winter, heirloom radishes, Sinclair Family Farm for beef, lamb, pork, poultry and eggs: sinclairfamilyfarm.net pickled red onions and shredded carrots Tumbling Creek Ranch, LLC for eggs: tumblingcreekranch.com can be found in it. “By changing our menu Wintun Ranch for grass-fed beef: wintungrassfedbeef.com regularly, we can feature produce and items FOR A LIST OF LOCAL FARMERS’ MARKETS, VISIT STYLEMG.COM. that are priced appropriately,” adds Spencer.

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GO <<<<<

BUY LOCAL!

March 2014 - stylemg.com 41


GUINEA HEN SPANAKOPITA Submitted by Chef James Ablett, Taste Restaurant

• • • • • • •

2 lbs. ground hen thighs (skin on)* 3 oz. baby arugula 1 large shallot, minced 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 oz. Brie cheese 1 stick butter, melted 2 tbsp. mixed herbs (such as rosemary, thyme and chives) • 6 sheets #4 phyllo dough • Salt and pepper 1. Mix the ground hen meat with shallot, garlic, salt pepper and herbs. 2. Add 1 tablespoon of melted butter to an 11-inch skillet, over medium heat. 3. Sauté the mixture until just cooked through; while it is cooling, add the arugula and wilt, then allow to cool. 4. Place the phyllo on a tabletop and brush with butter. 5. Fold in half, and butter again. 6. Place 1/6 of the mixture, and 1/2 of Brie onto the closest corners, and fold over the mixture, like a burrito, making sure to butter each fold generously. This should form a 2” x 6” rectangle. 7. Bake at 400 degrees, 10 to 15 minutes, until golden brown. Makes 6 spanakopita. *Taste uses a Guinea hen from Grimaud Farms.

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TASTE RESTAURANT 9402 Main Street, Plymouth 209-245-3463 | restauranttaste.com

TASTE RESTAURANT Using fresh ingredients is the way Taste in Plymouth does business. “I talk to a great deal of the customers, and they enjoy the fact that we are always on the lookout for new and interesting produce,” says James Ablett, the restaurant’s chef de cuisine, talking about the great quality of local produce they get, concluding, “Every day is really like Christmas.” Customers value quality over cost, too. “They will pay for the love that the farmers and my staff put into these ingredients,” says Ablett. “These products are better for people’s health and the environment.” Creating farm-to-table menus isn’t difficult for Ablett since he and the Taste staff work with what foods are in season, such as fava beans. Flexibility is required though since the seasons for certain foods can vary in length. What’s more, the restaurant makes almost everything from scratch and with advance notice, they’ll accommodate customers’ dietary needs such as gluten-free and vegan. Taste sources fresh ingredients from many local farms including Del Rio Botanical, Passmore Ranch, Rosen Farms, Abondonza Farms, Grimaud Farms, Macy’s Eggs. Joe Yeung Farms, Riverdog Farm, Twin Peaks Orchards, and Apple Hill.

COSTLY OR COST-EFFECTIVE?

Eating well can be a challenge on any budget, so is farm-to-table affordable or expensive? It depends who you ask.

Arnold says farm-to-table saves her money since the produce lasts longer than its grocery store counterparts and there’s less waste. “I find that my family eats more simply,” she says, explaining she doesn’t buy any processed foods. “The flavor of the fresh food becomes the center of the experience so I don’t need to buy many ingredients.” Even if farm-to-table is more expensive, Neft says it’s a choice she’s willing to make. “For me, it’s a privilege to eat good, nutritious food and I’m healthy because of it,” she says. “We are what we eat.” For example, while a free-range chicken is pricey, Neft says it yields 10 servings, including four servings of thighs, legs and wings; four servings of breast meat for one; a stir-fry meal for two; a vegetable salad for two topped with pulled chicken; and a chicken broth soup. “I make chicken broth from all of the bones/throw-away pieces and use it as a basis for a yummy chickenvegetable soup,” says Neft. “We always eat meat, but not too much.”

FOR MORE LOCAL RESOURCES AND THE RECIPE FOR MEYER LEMON GOAT CHEESE CHEESECAKE, VISIT STYLEMG.COM. 42 stylemg.com - March 2014


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BREWERIES by Tom Mailey I’m at my third microbrewery in one afternoon. I’m not going to lie: My head is spinning a bit and my notes have gone from tidy penmanship to something resembling the EKG of a winded jackrabbit. Another flight of beer arrives, seven five-ounce samples of fresh-made, handcrafted ales that I now must, in the name of research, consume. Pour me. I mean, poor me. Meanwhile my wife, who is my designated driver, sits patiently, munching on pretzels from a bowl at the bar and coming up with new and creative ways I’m going to owe her for the next six months. According to the latest data, the craft beer industry now commands nearly seven percent of the national beer market—a number that will continue to rise as more people discover that beer can be every bit as complex and flavorful as a good glass of wine. Now, if your interest in fermented hops stops at whether or not the mountains on your can have turned blue, skip this read. But if you can appreciate what I’ve come to call “consumable craftsmanship” (I think I was on my second flight when I came up with that gem) and you have a safe ride home? Keep reading. It’s a fun time to be a beer lover around here.

44 stylemg.com - March 2014

Photo of Tom Mailey by Dante Fontana. Beer photo © simmittorok/fotolia.com. Canvas texture background image © alleks/fotolia.com. Wheat leaf illustrations © Pushkarevskyy/fotolia.com.

Hoppin’


1. AMERICAN RIVER BREWING COMPANY 11151 Trade Center Drive, Suite 104 Rancho Cordova, 916-635-2537

American River Brewing Company and Lockdown Brewing Co. photos by Vickie Mailey. Photo at Mraz Brewing by Dante Fontana.

americanriverbrewingcompany.com

With a degree in brewing from the American Brewers Guild, Dave Mathis opened American River Brewing Company (ARBC) two years ago because, as he proclaims, “Beer is life.” Can’t argue with that. Working alongside Andy Armstrong—a former brew master at the late, great Beermann’s—life is good: They move 200 kegs a month and come the weekend, their tasting room is packed. ARBC has several styles on tap, like the light, crisp AU Golden Ale and the State Fair gold medal-winning Coloma Brown. The Hop Herd Double IPA was my favorite, with a great finish that reminded me of a good party guest: spirited and a little loud, but knows when to tone it down. The Fire Break Red Ale, brewed in honor of firefighters, is wonderful, with pine notes reminiscent of late summer in Tahoe. ARBC also features seasonal and special batches, including the amazing, wine-barrel-aged Prudence Porter.

story mixed assemblage of couches, overstuffed chairs, foosball and pool tables give it a frat house feel. Barkeep Julien Adams says it’s like “hanging out in a neighbor’s garage”—a neighbor who happens to brew some really tasty beer. Emma’s Blonde Ale is a summer ale with a restrained presence of citrus; a little citrus goes a long way for me, and Emma’s finds that balance. Barkeep Adams’ favorite is the Powerhouse Pale Ale. “It’s got everything going on,” he says, and I can’t disagree: great flavor and finish. But it’s the Stony Bar Scotch Ale that has brought Lockdown the most attention. A multiple award winner, it’s strong but not overpowering, sweet but not cloying, and a hint of smoke gives it a nice organic profile; it’s the brewery’s number one beer. Lockdown has several other styles, too, including seasonal selections and, for your designated driver, a really terrific root beer. NOTE: Lockdown also has a lively taproom in Historic Folsom.

3. MRAZ BREWING COMPANY 2222 Francisco Drive, Suite 510 El Dorado Hills, 916-934-0744

mrazbrewingcompany.com At only 1,000 square feet and tucked into a little strip mall off Green Valley Road in El Dorado Hills, Mraz Brewing Company could easily be overlooked. But it shouldn’t be. Named the “California Home Brewer of the Year” in 2008 and 2009, Mike Mraz has turned his passion into his paycheck. And while, like any good businessman, he’s open to growth, he says, “If we stay a nice little neighborhood brewery, we’re happy

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? All beers are either ales or lagers. Most mass-produced commercial beers are lagers but most craft beers are ales. Why? Ale yeasts mature more quickly than lager yeasts and therefore don’t need to be stored as long. Thus, quicker turnaround. As Mike Mraz from Mraz Brewing Company says, “A lot of it is about time and space.” Ales also tend to be more full-bodied, full-flavored and higher in alcohol, and lagers crisper tasting, clearer and more effervescent. Oh, and the “hoppiness” you hear about? It refers to the amount of hops in a beer— primarily ales. Originally, just enough hops were added so their bitterness could balance out the sweetness of sugars from the brewing process, but in the last few decades the taste experience of hops themselves have become a thing—with many brewers seeing how far they can push it, and many beer lovers eager to see how much they can take.

with that.” With 6-10 very palatable presentations on tap, staying small shouldn’t be a problem. Try the EDH IPA, with a peppery profile that resonated nicely inside my face (yes, that thought actu-

2. LOCKDOWN BREWING CO. 11327 Trade Center Drive, Suite 350 Rancho Cordova; 718 Sutter Street, Suite 200 Folsom, 916-358-9645

lockdownbrewingcompany.com The tasting room at Lockdown’s brewing facility in Rancho Cordova—less than a mile from American River Brewing’s—is very casual. The bar is just inside the open warehouse door and a two-

Tom getting tasting advice from Mike Mraz at Mraz Brewing Company

March 2014 - stylemg.com 45


START ME UP

It doesn’t need to be expensive, either. Shmid says you can get going for as little as $99, and then it “just depends on how much you want 5. OUT OF BOUNDS to get into the hobby.” The Brewers Barn (thebrewersbarn. BREWING COMPANY com) in Diamond Springs and Whole Foods Market 4480 Yankee Hill Road, Suite 100 (wholefoodsmarket.com) in Folsom and Rocklin, 916-259-1511 Roseville also offer home-brewing outofboundsbrewing.com materials. Only open since Labor Day, Rocklin’s Out of Bounds has nevertheless hit the craft brew ally occurred to me), and the Winter Wheat, a playing field running. Co-founders Eric Johncitrus-and-coriander-infused Belgian white ale son and Anthony Brown lured one of the West with a hint of celery that would be a great backCoast’s most respected brew masters, Bruce yard summer sip; also, a buoyant Pale Ale that MacPhee, away from one of the West Coast’s took third place in a nationwide home brewer’s most respected breweries, Deschutes of Bend, contest in 2009, and maybe the most interesting beer I tried on this assignment: an aesthetically gorgeous Belgian Ale colored red from dark cherries. If dessert beers existed, it would be one.

Oregon. They built the brewing facilities to his specifications and designed a spacious, comfortable tasting room. They also feature quite a few beers for such a new place, something that customer Christy Burg says initially made her wary. But as she makes her way down the menu board? “I don’t think there’s a beer I’ve been disappointed in yet.” Brown says one thing that sets Out of Bounds’ beers apart is no filtering. “When you filter...you can get the beer onto the market quicker, but it takes out a lot of the rich-tasting organics that really make it a craft beer.” I liked the Joyrider, an easy-drinking IPA that doesn’t punch you in the mouth. Also noteworthy is the maple-y Big Gun Porter, which also has a hint of chocolate. But my favorite was the robust, roasty Granite Chief Stout, which was so good the first sip made me cuss.

6. LOOMIS BASIN BREWING COMPANY 3277 Swetzer Road, Loomis, 916-259-2739

loomisbasinbrewing.com If you like businesses that are family owned and

4. KNEE DEEP BREWING CO. 13395 New Airport Road, Suite H, Auburn 530-797-4677

kneedeepbrewing.com

If there’s a 900-pound gorilla on the local microbrewery scene, it’s Knee Deep. In just two years they’ve gone from the backroom of a shuttered Lincoln restaurant to a spacious new facility next to the airport in Auburn, where they’re currently shipping more than 8,000 kegs a month to places as far away as the East Coast. Owner Jerry Moore (his business card lists him as “janitor”) says a couple years of retirement was all it took for him to realize he “didn’t like golf,” so he followed his passion—hooking up with brewer Jeremy Warren (whose mantra is “respect the beer”); together becoming a potent combination, producing concoctions like the multi-award-winning Hoptologist, a double IPA 46 stylemg.com - March 2014

Cheers! Tom sips his tasting flight while getting expert advice from Out of Bounds Brewing Company Co-founder Anthony Brown.

Knee Deep Brewing Company photo by Chris Moore. Out of Bounds Brewing Company photo by Dante Fontana.

with a sweet, grassy aroma and a clean, tidy finish. The Belga Hoptologist is the Hoptologist using Belgian yeast to give it a So you want to brew your own, eh? You’re in good zippy, almost fruity taste and would company. According to brewersassociation.org, there are be an ideal introductory IPA for the approximately 1.2 million home brewers in America and Erik Shmid, who owns the home brew supply store The Brewmeister uninitiated. The Simtra, on the other (shopbrewmeister.com) with locations in Roseville and Folsom, says hand, is for the hardcore hophead: he sees more people getting started every year. The best way to begin? A a gripping triple IPA and 11 perclass. Schmid acknowledges that you can learn a lot online but...“you can also cent alcohol-by-volume. It’s also get confused. A three-hour beginner class will eliminate a lot of that and help the one Warren is most proud of, you focus on getting started with minimal equipment.” Take good notes due to the challenge in making it. and Schmid says you can have a good first batch in about a month.


Loomis Basin Brewing Company photos by Kim Palaferri-Loomis News. Roseville Brewing Company photos courtesy of Roseville Brewing Company. Gold Hill Vineyard and Brewing photo by Dante Fontana.

operated, you’ll love Loomis Basin. Opened by Kenny Gowen and his dad, Jim, in March 2011, the operation has grown substantially in just three years. And while assorted family members help out, Kenny and his dad are still the only two actual brewers in the building. The downside? “A lot of 16 hour days.” The upside? “I get to work with my dad every day.” All that time and effort together has paid off in some great brews, like the Mandarin Wheat, an American wheat infused with locally sourced oranges from Sunset Ridge Mandarins and a second place finisher at the 2013 California State Fair. Before your mouth even touches the glass, the hoppy aroma from the Vindicator IPA greets you like a happy dog and with a clean finish—it doesn’t leave paw prints. The more adventurous can try the Avenger Double IPA, a jacked-up 4X4 cousin of the Vindicator, and a porter aged in Jack Daniels barrels called Still Jacked with hints of oak, JD, and flame. Yes, flame.

7. ROSEVILLE BREWING COMPANY 501 Derek Place, Roseville, 800-978-3713

rosevillebrewingcompany.com If the three keys to a successful business are “location, location, location,” Roseville Brewing Company (RBC) should have never opened two years ago. Instead, I’m halfway through a line 15 people deep, looking for an empty seat and hoping to reach the bar before the pie I ordered from the mobile, brick oven pizza guy is done. RBC is at the end of a long, dark industrial cul-de-sac in West Roseville. It’s a crowd owner Kelly Rue doesn’t take for granted. Even when they’re slammed, Kelly says he still tries to “go around and say hi to people [to] let them know

Tom shows off his balancing skills while enjoying the view during a beer tasting at Gold Hill Vineyard and Brewing.

we really appreciate them coming down this weird little road to find us.” Frequent patron Erik Smith says he enjoys “the laid-back atmosphere,” and his buddy Paul Gerstle agrees. “It’s easy to feel comfortable here and you’re enjoying good beer.” The Blackberry Wheat is snappy-crisp and refreshing, almost like a cider but not as sweet. Their marquee beer is the Heavy Rail Pale Ale—fullbodied with an assertive combination of flavors that all manage to get along. If your palate

needs a jolt, the hopped-up Spike Driver will give the back of your eyeballs a tug. Rue’s favorite? The Steam Horse, a cinnamon coffee stout with a touch of honey and a yummy (did I just use that word?) chocolate influence from roasted barley.

Feed Me, Seymour

Unless you’re a bird, this is not the easiest place to get to, but so worth it. Tucked into the foothills off the serpentine asphalt of Highway 49 near Coloma, Gold Hill was founded as a winery in 1985 by Hank Battjes. But Hank wasn’t just a vintner, he was a home brewer too, and in 2000 he started making beer. Sadly, Battjes passed away in 2012, but his legacy lives on in the winery he established, the beer that is still brewed, and the view that accompanies the tasting of both. Good Lord what a view. Sit out on the deck and taste the 49’er Red, which server Rob Bietz says is one of their most popular beers. The Helles Bock is “hella” good (sorry), too. Bietz says it was intended to be an autumn seasonal but its brown-sugary-ish taste proved so popular they now serve it year-round. Frequent customer Jim Critz is a fan of the Old Miner’s Scotch. He says he loves the choice a winery/brewery gives: “Some days are great for wine, some for beer.” He does have a point.

8. GOLD HILL VINEYARD AND BREWING 5660 Vineyard Lane, Placerville 530-626-6522

goldhillvineyard.com

All of these breweries have at least some of their products available in bottles or on tap locally, but half the fun is visiting their taprooms, where you’ll hang out with other beer fans and often be able to chat up the brewers themselves. However, many locations are no frills. If it’s busy you may have to stand. You might need a jacket if it’s cool. And, if you’re thinking about food, know that—like wineries— they have rules that prohibit serving much more than pretzels or peanuts. But that doesn’t mean food trucks can’t stop by. From wood-fired pizzas and barbecue to burgers, tacos and Asian fusion, you name it and you can get it, usually Fridays and Saturdays. Also, several locations—like Loomis Basin Brewing Company—are totally cool if you bring your own grub. Tasting rooms also have different guidelines when it comes to children and pets, and most welcome both. A quick phone call or check of a brewery’s website will tell you everything you need to know.

FOR EVEN MORE LOCAL BREWERIES, VISIT STYLEMG.COM. March 2014 - stylemg.com 47


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50 stylemg.com - March 2014


Back Forty Texas BBQ Forward-Thinking Country Food Hot & Spicy Onion Rings

by Sharon Penny Photography by Dante Fontana

W

Sliced Turkey Sandwich

hen you’re married to a barbecuer, you don’t go out for the cuisine a whole lot. If you do, it better be good or you’ll never hear the end of it. But Back Forty Texas BBQ in Shingle Springs is good. Darn good. My husband and I recently dined in for lunch on a rainy Saturday afternoon. For starters, we went with the “hot and spicy” onion rings, and they delivered on both counts. Crispy and golden with a fiery kick, these rings were some of the best I’ve ever tasted. That cayenne kick is something else! For mains, I ordered the sliced turkey sandwich with Texas country fries, and my husband opted for that day’s lunch special: a barbecue wrap with juicy brisket and a side of potato salad. He said later, “You know you’re in California when you get a wrap at a

Tender brisket is hard to achieve, so for my husband—it was barbecue manna from heaven.

barbecue joint.” The turkey sandwich was plain and simple: barbecued, sliced turkey breast on a toasted crusty French roll and just a hint of barbecue sauce, with lettuce, onions and pickles on the side—but as any barbecue fan will tell you, if the meat is good enough, you don’t need anything else. And Back Forty’s turkey was melt-in-my-mouth delicious; I didn’t even add the lettuce! The Texas country fries were finger-lickin‘ good too. My husband’s juicy brisket wrap was full, almost bursting, with tender, flavorful meat, plus rice and beans. Tender brisket is hard to achieve, so for my husband—it was barbecue manna from heaven. But we didn’t stop there. Nope, we took an order of the eatery’s amazing, scratch-made banana pudding to go. Wow, talk about saving the best for last. Back Forty Texas BBQ succeeds in delivering succulent, tangy barbecue and quality, fresh-baked desserts—all with friendly smiles and superb service.

Banana Pudding

Back Forty Texas BBQ, 3977 Durock Road, Shingle Springs, 530-676-4040, backfortyshinglesprings.com. March 2014 - stylemg.com 51


restaurantguide Featuring restaurants and eateries in the El Dorado County Foothills ** = MAGAZINE DISTRIBUTION POINT • AMERICAN / CAFÉ / DELI Back Forty Texas BBQ 3977 Durock Road, #205 Shingle Springs | 530-676-4040 Hours: Tue.-Thrs. 11:00a.m.-8:00p.m., Fri-Sat 11:00a.m.-9:00p.m., Sun. 11:00a.m.- 8:00p.m. Cards Accepted: V, MC, D, AmEx We serve authentic Texas recipes. We’ve been voted number one caterer and number one ribs in El Dorado County. Dine-in, Carry-out and Catering services are available. All of our dishes are made fresh from scratch daily. Our meats are slow smoked on our southern pride pit. Please come join us for a Texas-size meal. Bricks Eats and Drinks 482 Main Street Placerville | 530-303-3480 Burger Barn ** 6404 Pony Express Trail Pollock Pines | 530-344-7167 Buttercup Pantry 222 Main Street Placerville | 530-621-1320 Café Luna 451 Main Street Placerville | 530-642-8669 Caffé Santoro ** 2531 Merrychase Drive Cameron Park | 530-387-4432 Centro ** 385 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-5500 Crystal Basin Bistro 3590 Carson Road Suite B Camino | 530-303-3749 Hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Everyday Cards Accepted: V, MC, D, AmEx Crystal Basin Bistro is Highway 50’s Best Stop with a 5 Star Yelp Rating! Located 5 miles east of Placerville, we bring tasty, wine-friendly food to Camino. Our Shareable Plates are all priced between $7 and $9 and feature tasty culinary stars like our Reuben Hoagie, Stuffed Mushroom Caps and our Carnitas Tacos. Every Friday night, we feature live music and a 3-course dinner for $17. For Valentine’s Day - local crooner Bob Rawleigh will sing songs of love at the Bistro. Two seatings - 5pm and 7:30pm. $75 per couple or $80 with a bottle of Bubbly. RSVP at 530 303-3749. Cuppa Coffee and More ** 442 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-9600 Diamond Springs Hotel 545 Pleasant Valley Road Placerville | 530-621-1730 The Forester Pub and Grill ** 4110 Carson Road Camino | 530-644-1818 Heyday Café ** 325 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-9700 Hog Wild BBQ ** 38 Main Street Placerville | 530-622-3883

52 stylemg.com - March 2014

The Independent Restaurant & Bar 629 Main Street, Suite 102 Placerville | 530-344-7645

• CHINESE/MONGOLIAN China City Restaurant 4100 Cameron Park Drive Cameron Park | 530-672-9888

Log Cabin Café 3220 Pondorado Road Camino | 530-644-0345

Diamond Chinese Restaurant 570 Pleasant Valley Road Placerville | 530-622-8188

Mr. Pickles ** 4601 Missouri Flat Road Placerville | 530-642-1677

Dignity Dragon Restaurant 415-A Placerville Drive Placerville | 530-622-4293

New Haven ** 6396 Pony Express Trail Pollock Pines | 530-644-3448

Grand China 4340 Golden Center Drive Placerville | 530-626-5679

Old Town Grill 444 Main Street Placerville | 530-622-2631

• FRENCH

Placerville Brewery ** 155 Placerville Drive Placerville | 530-295-9166 Shingle Springs Coffee Co. ** 4068A Mother Lode Drive Shingle Springs | 530-676-2623 Snooty Frog ** 3300 Coach Lane Cameron Park | 530-677-9025 Sweetie Pies ** 577 Main Street Placerville | 530-642-0128 Join us to feast on specialty scrambles, omelettes, pancakes and Belgian waffles hot off the griddle for breakfast. For lunch enjoy our best-seller chile relleno casserole, sandwiches and paninis galore, and delightful salads made with the freshest vegetables and fruits to pair with our hearty homemade soups. Don’t forget to leave room for our wonderful homemade desserts! Torino’s Bar & Grill 251 Main Street Placerville | 530-622-7500 ZacJack Bistro 3275 Coach Lane Cameron Park | 530-676-2969 Hours: Monday: Closed Tues.-Thurs.: 11 a.m. - 8:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat.: 8 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Sun.: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Credit Cards Accepted: V, M, A Conveniently located off highway 50 in Cameron Park, ZacJack Bistro, the new restaurant concept from the chef/owner team at Zachary Jacques, serves fresh California bistro cuisine using traditional French and new cooking methods. Open six days a week for lunch and dinner, and serving award winning (Style Magazine Favorite Brunch 2012) breakfast Friday through Sunday. House made artisan breads, Kobe beef burgers ground daily, and fresh ketchup punctuate our focus on locallysourced, all-natural, organic food. Come visit ZacJack Bistro to see how everyday can be gourmet. Z Pie 3182 Center Placerville Drive Placerville | 530-621-2626

Allez! ** 4242 Fowler Lane, Suite 101 Diamond Springs | 530-621-1160

• ITALIAN Papa Gianni’s Ristorante ** 3450 Palmer Drive Cameron Park | 530-672-2333

• JAPANESE Amerikan Ichi Sushi 1234 A Broadway Placerville | 530-621-2100 Kobe Surf & Turf ** 3300 Coach Lane, #C-1 Cameron Park | 530-672-9210 Shilla Sushi Bar 2943 Paul Bunyon Road Placerville | 530-644-5047

• MEXICAN Cascada Restaurante & Cantina 384 Main Street Placerville | 530-344-7757 Casa Ramos ** 6840 Greenleaf Drive Placerville | 530-622-2303 Que Viva ** 3300 Coach Lane Cameron Park | 530-577-3330 Taqueria Carnival 4340 Golden Center Drive Placerville | 530-344-7246

• SEAFOOD Powell’s Steamer Co. & Pub 425 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-1091

• THAI Taste of Thai 1160 Broadway Placerville | 530-621-9559 If we’ve omitted your favorite restaurant or you find an error, let us know via email: info@stylemg.com.

For more restaurant listings in the El Dorado County Foothills and surrounding areas, visit our website at: stylemg.com and click on our extensive restaurant guide.


• ON THE MENU • Sample Menu Selections Appetizers Calamari Fritta

Entrées 10.95 (small), 13.95 (large)

Bruschetta 7.50

Ravioli 14.95

Tomatoes, onions, garlic and basil dressed with olive oil, served with toasted bread

Our homemade meat-filled ravioli, served in a meatsauce

Sausage & Peppers

Mussels, shrimp and scallops, served in a light cream sauce over linguini

8.95

Meatball

Frutta di Mare

19.95

Pollo Francesco

17.95

Chicken breast, artichoke hearts and mushrooms, served in a cream sauce

Lunch Sandwiches 6.50, 6.95 with cheese

Our homemade meatballs, topped with meatsauce

Chicken Parmigiana

3450 Palmer Dr. Ste. 1 Cameron Park Inside Bel Air Shopping Center 530-672-2333 • papagiannis.net Reservations Recommended

15.95

Vodka, cream and chilies blended in a marinara sauce, served over semolina wheat pasta

Sliced sausage links, bell peppers and potatoes, sautéed in olive oil

Papa Gianni’s Ristorante

Gnocchi alla Vodka

Deep fried calamari, served with a spicy marinara dipping sauce

7.50

Vitello Saltimbocca

21.95

Veal cutlets, sautéed in white wine then layered with proscuitto, provolone and mushrooms

Chicken breast, topped with marinara sauce and melted mozzarella

Desserts

Italian Submarine

7.50

Tiramisu 6.50

Toscano salami, pepperoni, coppacola, provolone, lettuce, tomatoes, onion, mustard, mayonnaise and vinaigrette

Lady finger cookies dipped in espresso and layered with a marscapone whipped cream

Hours: Tues-Thurs: 11am - 2pm; 5pm - 9pm Fri: 11am - 2pm; 5pm - 10pm • Sat: 5pm - 10pm Sun: 5pm - 9pm • Closed Mondays

SAVINGS GUIDE

Cannoli 4.95 Italian pastry filled with creamy ricotta, rum and chocolate

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March 2014 - stylemg.com 53


taste YANKEE POT ROAST From The Founding Farmers Cookbook by Founding Farmers with Nevin Martell (Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2013, $40)

Pot Roast Base 4-5 pounds beef chuck 1 tbsp. kosher salt 1 tbsp. ground black pepper 1 tbsp. granulated garlic 1 tbsp. celery salt 1/2 cup canola or olive oil 6 cups chopped yellow onions 3 cups chopped carrots 4 cups chopped celery 10 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 4 cups beef broth 1/4 cup beef base 1 bay leaf 1 cinnamon stick 2 tbsp. minced fresh rosemary 2 tbsp. minced fresh thyme leaves

Roux • 3/4 cup unsalted butter • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour

Pot Roast Vegetables • 1 medium golden beet, peeled and cut into large chunks • 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and cut into large chunks • Kosher salt • 1-1/2 cups diced carrots, diced to 1-1/2inch pieces • 2-1/2 cups diced celery, diced to 1-1/2inch pieces • 1/2 bunch asparagus, cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces • 4 oz. green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces • Ground black pepper • 2 tbsp. unsalted butter Preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Season the beef on both sides with the salt, pepper, granulated garlic and celery salt. Heat the canola oil in a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a lid over high heat. When hot, place the beef in the pot and brown well, 2-3 minutes on each side. Lift the beef out of the pot and reserve, keeping the pot with the beef drippings over medium heat. Place the onions in the pot and sauté 54 stylemg.com - March 2014

dinner date Food and Wine for the Season until caramelized. Add the carrots, celery and sliced garlic and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the beef broth, beef base, bay leaf, cinnamon stick, rosemary and thyme. Return the beef to the pot and bring the liquid to a boil. Cover the pot and place in the oven for 3-3.5 hours, until fork tender. While the pot roast cooks, prepare a roux. Melt the butter in a sauté pan over medium-low heat and whisk in the flour. Continue to whisk, scraping any browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until the flour mixture becomes a pale brown color and smells toasted and nutty, 10-12 minutes. Scrape the roux out of the pan with a rubber spatula and reserve. Place the beet and sweet potato chunks on a baking sheet and roast in the oven (with the pot roast) for 45 minutes, or until tender. Fill a large pot with water and a generous pinch of kosher salt and bring to a boil. Working in batches, blanch the carrots, celery, asparagus and green beans until each vegetable is just tender and cooked through. Drain and cool in an ice bath (half ice cubes and half water in a large bowl). Drain from the ice bath and set aside. When the pot roast is tender and finished cooking, remove the pot from the oven, gently remove the beef from the pot, and transfer it to a large plate while you prepare the sauce. Carefully place the pot roast pot on a burner over medium heat. Remove the cinnamon stick and bay leaf from the pot. Bring the liquid to a boil. Purée the liquid until smooth with a stick blender. Add the roux and purée until smooth. Simmer for 20 minutes and season to taste with salt and pepper. Place the pot roast in the sauce along with the roasted beet and sweet potato chunks and the blanched vegetables and heat through. Stir 2 tablespoons of butter into the sauce. Break the beef up into large chunks with a metal spoon. Keep warm. To serve, place a mound of the mashed potatoes in the center of each plate, then spoon portions of the beef, vegetables and sauce over the top. Top each plate with a few fried onions, if using, and serve immediately. Serves 6 to 8.

2011 SIMI ALEXANDER VALLEY CABERNET SAUVIGNON Simi Winery—founded in San Francisco by two Italian brothers, Giuseppe and Pietro Simi—made their first wine from Sonoma County grapes in 1876. Their colorful past is evident when visiting the Healdsburg locale; since 1890, the same stone cellar has been where the winemaking magic happens. Since day one, their wines have reflected the region: small, scenic and stunningly diverse. The 2011 SIMI Alexander Valley Cabernet Sauvignon is full-bodied with an amazing nose, supple tannins and a beautiful velvety finish. It has a deep, dark color with a ruby edge. Aromas of clove, hints of cedar and cocoa beautifully frame compelling flavors of cassis, cherry and blackberry. The affordable price and ability to stand up to hearty beef dishes makes it an ideal pairing choice for this month’s Yankee Pot Roast. —Richard Righton Owner, 36 Handles and Relish Burger Bar

Wine bottle photo courtesy of Constellation Brands. Recipe and cookbook photos by Nevin Martell.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •


PROFESSIONAL GRILLS


wordplay

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1. Particular potatoes 4. Hoppy beverage 7. Fruit squeeze 10. Apiece (abbr) 11. Winter ailment, often 12. Cool __ a cucumber 13. Hors d’oeuvres 17. Sauvignon follower 18. Tellurium symbol 19. Supposing 20. Short for terminal control 22. Between sol and ti 23. Something’s not right; you smell a ____ 24. I see 25. Onions accompaniment 27. Arid 28. Pilaf ingredient 29. Parks & ____ 30. _____ fruits and vegetables are the best 33. Jelly for lamb 34. T-bone, for one 37. ____ a wine connoisseur 40. Exists 42. Chinese-chicken or taco 43. Used for making Burgundies and Champagnes (2 wds) 45. Already entered 46. Spanish concoction 49. Profoundly wise herb 52. Wk. increment 53. That guy 56 stylemg.com - March 2014

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1. Doctored up and molded, baked ground beef Have dinner Restaurant or diner Many cows, eventually Hearing requirement Radio frequency, for short Cherries _______

39. Fizzy drink 41. Pot _____ 44. One answer to: How do you want that cooked? 46. Scampi star 47. It’s in the eye of the beholder

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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8. It can be tin 9. Fancy snails 14. Something to split and put in a soup 15. Type of pasta 16. Keep in the root cellar, for example 21. Rotisserie fowl 26. Deer meat 27. Russian or Italian 31. RR stop 32. Assist 33. Smallest version 35. Associate of Arts, shortened 36. Short for kiln-dried 37. Meatballs partner 38. Hello

DOWN

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48. Merlot shade 50. Jorge’s friend 51. And so on (abbr) 54. Comes before sirloin 58. Extra order 60. Lair 61. Precedes cent or diem 62. Not any 63. Set up, as a see-thru dessert 65. Paid airtime

— A Custom Crossword by Gail Beckman 702-869-6416 customcrosswords.com

FIND THE ANSWERS TO THIS CROSSWORD AFTER THE 1ST OF THE MONTH AT STYLEMG.COM.

Photo © derkien/fotolia.com.

ACROSS

47


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1. Does your dog pull while on a leash?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

2. Is chewing an issue (shoes, furniture, etc.)?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

3. Does your have ‘accidents’ in the house?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

4. Does your dog damage anything while you’re away from home?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

5. Is your dog showing aggression toward people or other dogs?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

6. Does your dog display any signs of fear?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

7. Is your dog destructive in the backyard?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

8. Does your dog beg for food at the table?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

9. Does your dog vocalize too much (barks, howls, whines, etc.)?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

10. Does your dog jump on house guests?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11. Does your dog escape or “bolt” from the yard or house?

No

Yes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Sit on verbal command. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Improve Socialization Skills with Other Dogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Improve Socialization Skills with People. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes

No

WalkCalmly CalmlyOn-Leash. On-Leash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Walks by side while OFF-leash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Minimize / Control Jumping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes

916 -79

No

Lay Down on Verbal Command. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Down & Stay (short duration). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Down & Stay (long duration). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Come on verbal command - OFF leash from distance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes

No

Minimize unwanted barking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Reduce play biting / nipping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Manage chasing of kids / people. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes

No No No

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escape

Mammoth 8 No-Snow Reasons to Visit by Desiree Patterson

Mammoth Mountain Bike Park

1. MOUNTAIN BIKING No matter what level of cycler you may be, Mammoth Mountain Bike Park blankets the entire mountain—over 80 miles—with trails that will, literally, take your breath away. No wonder Outside Magazine ranked it as the “#1 Bike Park in America.” Begin your two-wheeled expedition at the Adventure Center where you’ll find tickets, rentals, repairs and retail. From here, you’ll be able to access beginner terrain (the Pioneer Practice Loop is amazing for kids) on Discovery Chair or take the Panorama Gondola to the mid-station or summit for intermediateadvanced terrain with some heart-pumping downhills.

2. THE WESTIN MONACHE RESORT With it’s prime location, the Westin is just steps from The Village at Mammoth offering great shopping, restaurants, activities for kids, and more. The rooms are spotless and the

décor exemplifies modern-meets-rustic; not to mention the resort is pet-friendly, has free local shuttle service, houses a 24-hour fitness facility, and pleases the masses with an outdoor heated pool. Did I mention its in-house Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge? I’ll get to that in a second.

3. MAMMOTH FOOD & WINE EXPERIENCE Taking place July 11-12 this year, the fourth annual event will feature seminars on both Friday and Saturday with wine experts and star chefs. Highlights for this year’s “experience” include the “Best-of-the-Best” Burger Battle, a Friday night wine walk at The Village amidst live entertainment, multiple options to dine with high-profile chefs, and The Village at Mammoth

Summer Monache

58 stylemg.com - March 2014

Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge

Photos courtesy of Lyman Public Relations.

I

f you haven’t heard already, there’s a whole other side to this mountain town of Mammoth Lakes. Many flock here for the powder snow and plethora of ski trails, but what about the hotter half of the year? Get your shorts, sunscreen, tennis shoes and party hats on—from spring to fall, this place is packed with festivals, food and wine events, and extraordinary outdoor adventuring. Here’s a list of reasons to visit the Eastern Sierra sans skis.


on Saturday—the Grand Tasting featuring wineries pouring over 120 wines, dishes from five teams of culinary students from prestigious schools, and food prepared by star chefs. Tickets are available for purchase beginning March 1 at mammothfoodandwine. org.

4. WORLD-CLASS TROUT FISHING Mammoth Lakes is world-renowned for trout fishing, especially considering the beauty surrounding you and your fishing pole! You can fish from shore, float tube an alpine lake, or rent a boat and find a stretch of water to call your own. McCoy Sports in The Village and the Adventure Center at the Main Lodge have all the gear you need for a day of angling. As well, you can find professional guides to show you the way to where the fish are biting. To download a fishing map of the area, visit mammothmountain.com.

Toomey’s at The Village

Sushi at Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge

Mammoth Fest

Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge

5. 19TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF BEERS & BLUESAPALOOZA One of Mammoth’s biggest events, in addition to Mammoth Fest, this four-day festival (July 31-August 3) showcases the finest craft breweries in the country and top blues performers. Started by Sam Walker, the event is recognized as one of the best beer and blues festivals in the U.S. This year, the line-up includes names such as Buddy Guy, Robert Randolph & the Family Band, Tab Benoit, Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Niki Hill and more. For the complete schedule and to purchase tickets, visit mammothbluesbrewsfest.com

Photos courtesy of Lyman Public Relations.

6. ADVENTURE CENTER The Mammoth Adventure Center is your portal to fun—for both kids and adults! The Center includes the aforementioned world-class bike park, breathtaking views, and an interpretive center at the summit of Mammoth Mountain. At the base—for just $40 (per person; all-day pass)—let your kids loose on the “ultimate mountain playground” that boasts a rock climbing wall, zip line, bungee trampoline and more. Also from the Adventure Center, catch the daily shuttle to the magical destinations of Devils Postpile National Monument, Rainbow Falls, and Reds Meadow, just over the shoulder of Mammoth Mountain in the San Joaquin River Valley. Call 800-6266684 for more information or to purchase tickets in advance.

Mammoth Adventure Center

7. GUILTLESS DINING While not all vacations are alike, a trip to this mecca of nature doesn’t have to include salt, butter and preservative-laden meals. Mammoth not only preserves the health of its natural surroundings, but it also aims to keep its visitors in prime physical condition. While you can certainly indulge here, take for example the “world-famous” coconut mascarpone pancake at Toomey’s at The Village (OMGoodness...so heavenly!), there are also numerous other options for a feelgood meal. For breakfast, or to recharge after a day of biking, hiking and fishing, The Green V embraces the slow-food movement and offers juices, bars, salads, soups and entrées with options for vegans, vegetarians and gluten-free folks. For lunch, try Campo, one of Esquire Magazine’s 2012 “Best New Restaurants in America,” serving up the best in organic, local and seasonal ingredients on their menu of homemade pizzas, pastas and more. For dinner, Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge is where it’s at. Good food, that is. The all-natural cooking style combines classical French, European and Asian flavors

Campo

with local fares to bring out the “true beauty of various cuisines.” The innovative dining options now include a new sushi menu, perfect for “cool” eating in warmer temps.

8. AU NATUREL HOT TUBBING No, I’m not referring to what may have happened back in college; instead, think: soaking in a Mother-Earth-designed spa surrounded by the aura of nature. Word to the wise, keep your clothes on—you can get ticketed for “tubbing” in the nude. Hilltop Tub is probably the best-known, most popular site to enjoy the natural hot water sourced from mountain hot springs. In the summer you can drive basically right up to the tub. Exposing probably the best view in the valley, you sit on a small hilltop perch with a 360-degree view of what some call “the world.” Other natural hot spring areas to check out are Hot Creek (no tubbing here), Wild Willy’s, and Crab Cooker.

FOR MORE PLACES TO ESCAPE TO, VISIT STYLEMG.COM. March 2014 - stylemg.com 59


introducing

SCALEES REPTILE EMPORIUM 4671 Marshall Road, Garden Valley 530-333-4430 facebook.com/scalees

Alexx Gibbs

Chrissie Addison

THE COACHING STUDIO Placerville 530-626-4464 coachingstudiosite.com

Describe your business. Did you find it, or did it find you? Scalees is a small-town pet shop in Garden Valley. We have reptiles of all sorts for sale, or you can just come and play with the animals. We also sell feeders, such as crickets, mealworms, mice and rats. We do birthday parties and educational demonstrations as well. What was the first job you ever had, and what did you learn from the experience? This store is actually my first job. How are you involved with both the community and your customer? We are involved with the community by volunteering at local events, where we bring some of our animals and do free demonstrations. Why is your staff the best in the business? I am the staff—I have no employees. What life accomplishments are you most proud of? I would have to say the opening of this store—I opened it when I was only 18 years old. What’s your hidden talent?
 Snake whispering. What’s your biggest job perk? The best part of my job is seeing people’s faces light up as they hold a snake or a tarantula for the first time. What’s your favorite childhood memory?
 Lizard hunting with my father in the summer. If you could be any other profession, what would it be? I would most likely be a herpetologist (reptile expert).

Do you know that our editorial is not paid for, nor can it be purchased? In fact, our Introducing and Dine reviews are not paid advertisements. If you’d like your business profiled, please email Megan Wiskus at megan@stylemg.com. Once we determine when your business will be featured, we will contact you to schedule a time to come out and take a photograph. Thank you!

60 stylemg.com - March 2014

Photos by Dante Fontana.

Describe your business. Did you find it, or did it find you? Developing my studio was a natural progression, after being involved in theater and music since childhood and teaching English and performing arts in local high schools for many years. Twelve years ago, after teaching group classes at a theater, I realized the need for someone like me to be the “third eye” for aspiring singers and thespians on a private basis. My potential students—who wish to train in voice, dramatic skills and auditioning skills—now find me and keep me busy. How are you involved with both the community and your customer? I recently closed doing Les Misérables with Imagination Theater where I served as an acting coach and acted in the ensemble; I know for a fact that one doesn’t have to go “down the hill” for quality theater. For my next directing project in the community, Lanny Langston (co-owner of Imagination Theater) and I would like to co-direct Mama Mia (when the rights are released). What life accomplishments are you most proud of? I strive to be a worthwhile daughter, sister, wife and mother. By keeping the small stuff in perspective, I hope to let in the joy of life more and more as I mature. Where do you go when the going gets tough? I grab chocolate, walk, listen to music or do tai chi. I am “The Spoonman’s” wife (a.k.a. Mrs. Roger Filippelli) and communicating with him always gives me perspective. What’s your favorite place to eat out locally? For hometown cooking with smiles, Buttercup Pantry and Sweetie Pie’s. For date nights, we like ZacJack Bistro, Cascada, Papa Gianni’s and The Independent. And finally, customer service is…? I tailor instruction for each person I coach. We share in the responsibility of setting artistic goals and work together for success. I have a wealth of resources—is there a name for a person who hoards music and scripts?


thewhereandwears

get lucky 6 Fab Finds in El Dorado County by Rachel Lopez and Kirsten Vernon 3. BELOVED BEANIE The beanie has made a fashion comeback and has proved to be one of our most beloved accessories. From dressed up to casual, this Adora Hat—found at Sandra D’s Boutique in El Dorado Hills—can be paired with almost anything. $19, sandrads.com

5. PROJECT GREEN There are many reasons to choose Hudson jeans, and our favorite cut at the moment is the trendy Beth Midrise Baby Boot in Hunter Green—available at Runway Boutique in El Dorado Hills. $159, runway-boutique.com

Wrap yourself or someone you love in this lightweight, color-blocked beauty. Fringed, fantastic and fashion savvy, this gorgeous infinity scarf is available at Cadence Corner Boutique in El Dorado Hills. $22, 916-673-6300

4. NAIL GLAM “Jade is the New Black” from OPI will have the tips of your fingers and toes singing for joy. Pick your favorite shade of green at Sally Beauty Supply. $8.99, sallybeauty.com

6. DRINK UP Keep the St. Patty’s Day pinches away and get your caffeine buzz on with this deliciously refreshing White Crème Mocha with Mint from The Bean Barn in Placerville. $4.75, 530-622-2758

2. RAZZLE-DAZZLE These dazzling hoop earrings, available at SASS in Shingle Springs, rock modern with the perfect amount of sparkle. Green and glorious, they’ll top off any outfit and are sure to make a statement. $16.50, sassstore.com

62 stylemg.com - March 2014

Rachel Lopez and Kirsten Vernon are hosts of ‘The Where and Wears’ of El Dorado County. Be sure to watch them on Foothill 7 Television and Sierra Community Access Television 2 and “like” them on Facebook.

Runway Boutique photo courtesy of Hudson Jeans; all others courtesy of Rachel Lopez and Kirsten Vernon.

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OPEN M-F 10-6 Sat 10-5

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www.HandsOnHealer.net Michael Clifford • 916-337-6045 Folsom


Under the Arbor Home & Garden Decor •

WELCOME SPRING SALE! MARCH 21ST—23RD New inventory plus store-wide savings!

Come visit one of the largest home decor stores in the county! Unique vignettes from multiple merchants and consignors. We offer a huge selection of furniture and decor from rustic, to shabby chic, to antiques. Stroll through over 7,500 sq ft of truly eclectic merchandise to fit any home. Open Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

4120 Sunset Lane, Shingle Springs

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tom’sjulie’stake

Fiercely Finicky Eaters by Julie Ryan

P

oor Tom. I’m filling in for him this month because he’s recovering from his “research” about local breweries (see the story on page 44). He really puts 100 percent into his work. For the past few years, I’ve been involved with some research of my own. I’m trying to figure out why my children will only eat a few items out of the thousands and thousands of options they actually have. I’m no Rachael Ray, but I can cook “things”—things that are even good sometimes! My 4- and 6-year-old daughters, however, believe that by just looking at food, they can tell if they’ll like it or not. Just one glimpse of a juicy slab of chicken and a green veggie and they know it will be the most disgusting things they’ve ever had. It’s quite an amazing ability. I love that all I have to do is place a plate in front of them and they inherently know that one bite will make them sick. I’ve tried all the tricks—bribing, begging, threatening; I’ve tried the recipes where

GE TO CE >

Catch Julie on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1.

VISIT STYLEMG.COM FOR MORE TOM’S TAKES.

66 stylemg.com - March 2014

Illustration by David Norby.

whining and dining

you hide the vegetables (their skill is unbeatable). If you’ve never believed in psychics, I know two kids who will change your mind. On the rare occasion when I get them to try something, I’m, first and foremost, proud of myself for making it past their first line of defense. Then I hold my breath as I wait for the verdict. My 4-year-old tends to accept new cuisine more often than the 6-year-old. She’s also less dramatic about it. Have you ever witnessed someone take a microscopic bite of food, then completely freak out— acting like it was the most revolting flavor they’ve ever tasted? I have. Many times. The other thing that baffles me is how one day they can like something, but the next day they can’t stand it. This just happened with applesauce. Applesauce! How do you go from liking it, eating it and asking for it, to not wanting to be anywhere near it? I now have a pantry full of applesauce and no one to eat it. I’m hoping my children will still grow and remain healthy even though their diet consists of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches (sans crust), chicken nuggets, and buttered noodles. Although, those selections may change at any moment—as I’m writing this they could decide noodles are nauseating. When my girls were babies I had a picture in my head of how it would be when they started eating real food: Our family sitting down for dinner, everyone with the same food on their plates, compliments flying over the table. The sad reality, however, paints a much different picture. I hear this is a phase. Isn’t that always the answer when your kids aren’t doing what you want them to do? “Oh, it’s a phase. No need to worry. They’ll outgrow it.” Until then, I suppose it’s OK that ketchup is a food group and that my research will be unfinished…just like their dinner plates.


Style El Dorado County Foothills - March 2014  

The communities of Western El Dorado County have accomplished the challenging task of maintaining a “small town” quality of life while exper...

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