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HARRIS CENTER FOR THE ARTS AT FOLSOM LAKE COLLEGE PRESENTS

Great Shows. Up Close! Neil Berg’s 101 Years of Broadway Featuring 5 of Broadway’s Finest Singers

Memphis

4 Tony Awards including Best Musical! Fri May 23: 7:30 pm Sat May 24: 2 & 7:30 pm Sun May 25: 1:30 & 7 pm

Mon May 5: 7 pm

Keyboard Conversations® with Jeffrey Siegel Mistresses and Masterpieces

Marionetas de la Esquina’s Sleeping Beauty Dreams

Sun May 18: 1 pm

Sat May 17: 1, 4, 7 pm Sun May 18: 12 & 3 pm

Joni Morris A Tribute to the Music of Patsy Cline

STARSHIP

Featuring Mickey Thomas Mon Jun 2: 7:30 pm

Fri May 30: 7:30 pm Sat May 31: 2 & 7:30 pm Sun Jun 1: 2 pm

The Hit Men

Featuring Former Stars of Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons Sun Jun 8: 2 & 7 pm

916-608-6888 HarrisCenter.net


what’sinside ™

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D O R A D O

C O U N T Y

F O O T H I L L S

MAY 2014

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48

30

FEATURE

DEPARTMENTS

MORE...

36 7th Annual Student Spotlight

20 The Arts

4 Editor’s Note 6 Click 7 What’s Up 8 Get to Know—James Whipple 10 FYI 14 Local Matters 16 Calendar 18 Outtakes 32 Home Design 44 Swag 48 Dine—The Levee 50 Restaurant Guide 52 Taste 54 Word Play 60 Introducing 62 The Where and Wears 66 Tom’s Take

Cover Photo by Dante Fontana; shot at Bricks Eats & Drinks in Placerville, © Style Media Group.

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Once again Style honors high-achieving, local high school seniors leading the pack, both in the classroom and on the playground. Get inspired by their words of wisdom, accomplishments and future plans.

Gregory Kiefer

22 Health & Wellness

5 Tips to Protect Your Peepers

24 Cause & Effect

Team Will

26 Family Vacation Memories Shine Bright

30 In History

Coloma’s Gooch Family

56 Escape D-Day Beaches and Cemeteries

FIND ­­OUR TYPOS

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Everyone makes mistakes from time to time, right?! And we’re no exception, so we thought we’d have some fun and enlist your help in finding ours—that is to say we’d like your help in spotting our errors and in return you’ll be entered in our contest to win a $25 gift certificate! Send your find to info@stylemg.com for your chance to win every month.

May 2014 - stylemg.com 3


editor’snote

good to go

FOLLOW US ONLINE:

We’d love to hear from you—send us your community events (for Calendar and Outtakes), local news (for What’s Up), and any other story ideas to info@stylemg.com. 4 stylemg.com - May 2014

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Photo by Dante Fontana.

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couldn’t help but laugh, loudly and in a library-like setting nonetheless, when I came across a quote from Franklin P. Jones: “Patience is what parents have when there are witnesses.” After my giggle and sigh, I uttered an “amen.” Further along in my investigation of inspirational quotes for parents, I came across another one on momastery.com that truly resonated: “Don’t let yourself become so concerned with raising a good kid that you forget you already have one.” My parents grew up with parents who survived the Great Depression, so naturally, they modeled some parenting practices of yesteryear—from a time when kids were often conditioned to be “seen and not heard.” So, no tomfoolery at the dinner table if you know what I mean. Before you get the wrong idea, let me preface this paragraph with the assertion that my parents were great (and still are), and I’m who I am because of them. But…they were tough. For example, I heard the following mantras on a regular basis: “Sit up straight.” “Don’t play with your food.” “Did you say ‘thank you’?” “Did you say ‘please’?” “Close the refrigerator door, you’re wasting electricity.” “Use your head for something other than a hat rack.” “Stop crying or I’ll give you something to cry about.” “Do you see a money tree in the backyard?” “Got time to lean? Got time to clean.” I could write a book filled with these one-liners. Thinking back to my childhood, I realize that I, too, model similar behaviors of my parental units. Shoulder-deep in stress (just how I remember my dad), I often find myself at the grocery store behaving like the ever-patient, cameraready parent I’m supposed to be. If truth be told, rather than gently pulling my daughter aside and speaking calmly and firmly at her eye level (like all the books say) when she incessantly whines for items we never buy, I’d grab a roll of duct tape off the shelf and seal her lips as I leisurely finished my picture-perfect day of shopping. Heck, I think my mom carried a roll in her purse just to scare us. So when it comes to that prophetic notion that if you’re too busy making sure your kid is going to be great, you’re probably missing out on your already-great kid—heed these words. Too often I find myself expecting my exceedingly smart 10-year-old to act as if she is 18. Her love for school is flourishing and her listening skills are improving; what more can I ask for from a fourth grader? Now when it comes to twelfth graders, there’s plenty to ask. And we did. This month’s 7th Annual Student Spotlight exemplifies the results of both good parenting and great student achievement. As I read the student questionnaires this year, I noticed these pace-setting, scholastically-inclined high school seniors often credited their folks for much of their success today. Way to go Mom and Dad! This month, we hope you’re inspired by our community’s next generation of go-getters. And, when tending to your own adult(s)-in-training, remember they’re only young once—don’t miss their goodness now! — Desiree


E L

D O R A D O

C O U N T Y

F O O T H I L L S

MAY 2014 Publishers Terence P. Carroll, Wendy L. Sipple Executive Editor Desiree Patterson Managing Editor Megan Wiskus Editorial Interns Emily Peter, Gabriel Stubbs, Jazmin White, Alyssa Wong Contributing Writers Amanda Anderson, Gail Beckman, Abigail Blank, Morgan Cásarez, LeeAnn Dickson, Amber Foster, Tina Helm, Kerrie Kelly, Rachel Lopez, Tom Mailey, Sharon Penny, Don Pritchard, Jacqueline Renfrow, Hiliary C. Simon, Kirsten Vernon, Heather Zamarripa Art Director Gary Zsigo Graphic Designers George Kenton Design, 760.285.0686, gkenton@verizon.net David Norby, Aaron Roseli Staff Photographer Dante Fontana Contributing Photographer Justin Buettner 916.220.0159, justinbuettner@hotmail.com Webmaster Ken White, Ixystems Advertising Director Debra Linn, 916.988.9888 x 114 Advertising Sales Representatives Reg Holliday, 916.337.5107 Joanne Kilmartin, 916.607.9360 Alex Minno, 916.284.9987 Lisa Warner/Warner Enterprises, 530.306.2011 Social Media Maven Aimee Carroll Accounting Manager Kathleen Hurt Office Administrator Cathy Carmichael, Office Assistant Brenna McGowan Customer Service Associate Jarrod Carroll

Printed on recycled paper. Please recycle this magazine.

120 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 5 Folsom, CA 95630 Tel 916.988.9888 • Fax 916.596.2100 © 2014 by Style Media Group. All rights reserved. Style - El Dorado County Foothills is a registered trademark of Style Media Group. Material in this magazine may not be reproduced in any form without written consent from the publishers. Any and all submissions to Style - El Dorado County Foothills become the property of Style Media Group and may be used in any media. We reserve the right to edit. Subscriptions to Style - El Dorado County Foothills are available. Contact info@stylemg.com for more information.

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click

STYLEMG.COM You Can Never Have Too Much Style VOTE NOW! Style’s Readers’ Choice Awards are back. Voting begins May 1! Don’t forget to cast your vote at stylemg.com for all your local favorites. Hurry, voting ends July 15!

’14 CHOICE

AWARDS

We’ve gathered 10 valuable pieces of wisdom for the graduate-to-be on what to expect leading up to, during, and after graduation. Welcome to the real world!

SHELF LIFE Get your monthly fix of Sharon Penny’s thenand-now take on popular albums, books and DVDs; look no further…just click.

BBQ AND A BIKINI BOD? Want to wear you favorite suit and eat tri-tip too? Follow these tips for how to indulge in finger-licking food, healthfully, while keeping both your tummy and your waistline happy.

FEEL-GOOD GIFTS FOR MOM Does Mom have a tower of candles collecting dust on her shelves? Take a look at these atypical Mother’s Day “gift” ideas, and give the mom in your life a gift she’ll always cherish.

6 stylemg.com - May 2014

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Graduate photo © Andy Dean/fotolia.com. Cupcake photo © Ruth Black/fotolia.com. BBQ photo © auremar/fotolia.com.

READERS’

10 THINGS HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS SHOULD KNOW


what’sup

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l Dorado County Health and Human Services now offers a volunteer-driven Senior Shuttle to assist residents ages 60 and up with weekly grocery shopping trips to stores in Placerville and Cameron Park, as well as small day trips. A $2 round-trip donation is recommended, or $5 for out-of-county rides. Seating is limited; to make a reservation, call 530-621-6369...El Dorado County Senior Day Care Services offers two free support groups for caregivers—My Time, which takes place the first Friday of every month from 1:30-3 p.m., and the After 5 Club, which meets the second Wednesday of each month from 5:30-7 p.m. For more details, including meeting locations, call 530-621-6180...The El Dorado Hills Town Center Farmers’ Market will begin May 18 and continue every Sunday through October, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m...May 24 marks the beginning of Art on Parade, a community art project featuring more than 30 colorfully decorated banners on light poles along Placerville’s Main Street. The banners will be sold at the Art & Wine Festival’s silent auction on October 18. For more info, visit placerville-downtown.org...The Gold Country Artists’ Gallery saves a percentage of its annual proceeds READERS’ CHOICE from the 3rd Saturday Art Walk and donates

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’14

Awning Orders

Art on Parade photo by Dante Fontana. Observatory photo courtesy of the Cameron Park Rotary Community Observatory.

AWARDS

them to a local charity. This year, they presented Style’s Readers’ a check for more than $1,350 to the Food Bank Choice Awards of El Dorado County. For more info, call 530- are back. VOTING STARTS MAY 1! 621-9950...Every Friday, Saturday and Sunday Don’t forget to (weather permitting) from 8:30-10:30 p.m., the cast your vote at Cameron Park Rotary Community Observatory stylemg.com for all and the El Dorado County Office of Education your local favorites. Hurry, voting ends invite the public to join trained docents as they July 15! show the many celestial wonders of the universe through the Observatory’s two, 14-inch telescopes. On May 3, from 6:3010:30 p.m. at the Observatory, Spring Astronomy Day—featuring telescopes of all types, special speakers and science demonstrations—will take place. Admission is free, but any donation will be appreciated. For more info, visit communityobservatory.com... On May 7, from 9:30-11:30 a.m., Marshall Medical Center Diabetes & Nutrition Education will offer a Weight Management course at 681 Main Street in Placerville. Learn how to lose weight and keep it off with meal planning, and strategies for dining out and making positive lifestyle changes. Class fees are usually covered by insurance; to register, call 530-672-7021...On May 6, the El Dorado Community Foundation (EDCF) will join hundreds of community foundations across the country in a 24-hour giving challenge, called the “Big Day of Giving.” The virtual Give Local Now event will showcase El Dorado County nonprofits, and others, and give residents an opportunity to support them by funding a need—whether it’s $5 for art supplies, $50 for a sports scholarship, or $100 for family counseling services. Gifting avenues will be available online (givelocalnow.org/bigdayofgiving), at EDCF’s office (312 Main Street in Placerville) or at El Dorado Savings Banks throughout the county. For more info, visit eldoradocf.org...That’s all for now, but check back next month for Style’s annual Summer Fun Guide. — Compiled by Gabriel Stubbs

May 2014 - stylemg.com 7

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gettoknow

James Whipple

Q&A Q: What advice would you give to your younger self? A: Habits you develop early in life are hard to change, whether it’s work, exercise or relationships. Q: What’s your biggest pet peeve? A: People whose views are based on theory, and who have little understanding of the real world or how actions affect people. Q: Biggest life inspirations? A: My father who, during my middle school years, retired from the army and went to college—earning his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees in four years. He taught me to work hard to achieve my dreams, and that education can change anyone’s life.

8 stylemg.com - May 2014

where he has raised his four children. Whipple’s career catapulted with his position appointment as director of finance at Marshall Medical Center. Since becoming CEO of the independent, non-profit hospital in 2003, he’s dedicated himself to expanding Marshall’s available services; currently, the hospital is raising funds for a new cancer center at its Cameron Park campus. In his spare moments, Whipple volunteers with Rotary Club and spends time with his family. And while his father passed away seven years ago, Whipple still credits him for his own success in life. “He told me, ‘Find your passion and follow it,’” he says. “That’s what I’ve tried to do.” — Amber Foster

FAVORITES Escape: Very remote adventure travel Guilty pleasure: Poker Meal in town: Tijuana Taqueria Local landmark: Horsetail Falls Memory: Birth of my children Movie: Monty Python and the Holy Grail Musician/band: Rob Zombie Place to buy a gift, locally: Placerville Hardware Store

Photo by Dante Fontana.

J

ames Whipple, CEO of Marshall Medical Center, moved to Northern California more than 30 years ago after a tumultuous childhood. His father was in the military, and by the time he was 13 years old, Whipple had lived all over the U.S. and abroad. After receiving his MBA in finance at the University of Washington, Whipple served as the assistant controller for Rideout Memorial Hospital in Marysville. He soon fell in love with the health care industry. “It’s one of the few places where you’re constantly learning and giving back to the community,” Whipple shares. Four years later, Whipple made the move to plant roots in El Dorado County and now lives on 10 acres outside Coloma,

Q: Favorite humanitarian cause? A: Outside of Marshall and my church, I think Snowline Hospice provides an awesome service. Using their service at the end of my mother’s life showed me an amazing group of compassionate caregivers.


INDEPENDENT LIVING with SERVICES, ASSISTED LIVING and MEMORY CARE

Where Residents are Number One

Eskaton Village Carmichael

Continuing Care Community (CCRC): Independent Living with Services, Assisted Living, Memory Care and Skilled Nursing

Carmichael 916-485-2597

License # 340313383 | COA # 202

Eskaton Village Roseville

Multi-Level Community: Independent Living with Services, Assisted Living and Memory Care

Roseville 916-432-5058

License # 315002052

Eskaton FountainWood Lodge Assisted Living and Memory Care

Orangevale 916-900-1680

License # 347003574

Eskaton Lodge Cameron Park Assisted Living

Cameron Park 530-675-4024 License # 097001275

Eskaton Lodge Gold River

Assisted Living and Memory Care

Gold River 916-900-1677

Eskaton was recently voted the BEST by numerous publications in the Greater Sacramento area, including Style Magazine, The Press Tribune, Mt. Democrat, The Union — as well as caring.com. THANK YOU! And may we humbly admit that the reason we are number one is because our residents are number one with us. Do something special for Mom this Mother’s Day. Come see what Eskaton has to offer.

License # 347001241

Eskaton Lodge Granite Bay

Independent Living with Services and Assisted Living

Granite Bay 916-245-1166

License # 315001421

Eskaton Village Placerville

Multi-Level Community: Independent Living with Services, Assisted Living and Memory Care

Placerville 530-206-3470

License # 097005046

A California Nonprofit Corporation

eskaton.org


cameron park community services Breeze Into Spring

S

tart May off with a visit to the annual Spring Antique, Craft and Garden Show—taking place May 3 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Community Center. This indoor/ outdoor show will feature a variety of antiques, handmade crafts and garden accessories specific to the spring season. Entrance is free and food and beverages will be available for purchase. And, don’t miss the wine tasting fund-raiser sponsored by the El Dorado Dog Owners Guild (EDDOG). The Cameron Park Concert Series continues with the Capitol Pops Concert Band on May 17 from 6-9 p.m. at the Cameron Park Community Center Gymnasium. The Capitol Pops symphony has been performing and providing high-quality music for thousands of concertgoers throughout Northern California since 1977. Based in Citrus Heights, Jerry Lopes has led the band since its inception. Seventy-one musicians represent a cross section of the area, ranging in age from high school students to 99-year-olds. Doors open at 6 p.m. and music starts at 7 p.m.; food and beverages will be available for purchase. Advance tickets (available at the Cameron Park CSD office, Fire Station 89, Walgreens, Bel Air, and the Shingle Springs/ Cameron Park Chamber of Commerce, or online at showclix.com) are $10, $18 for two, or $12 each at the door. To officially kick off summer, head to the Cameron Park Community Center on May 24 for Welcome to Summer, a free swim day featuring class demonstrations, food and vendor booths, giveaways, and a “thank you” to community sponsors. Plan your summer by registering for a variety of new activities, including swim lessons, summer camps and programs; and purchase pool passes and Summer Spectacular wristbands. Get the Summer Activity Guide now and find some exciting new classes, including tennis lessons, day trips, Pilates, cheer programs, “Baby Boomers and Their Parents,” Japanese calligraphy and more. Also include inside the Guide is a complete listing of programs, camps, activities and special events. The kids will be out of school soon, or already are, and thankfully the Cameron Park CSD has options! Summer Kids Kamp, a weeklong program for ages 6-13, will feature games, cooking, swimming, Tumble Time, arts and crafts, and visits to the lake and Community Center. What’s more, each week will feature a different theme and weekly field trip. Additional offerings include Sterling “Smooth” Forbes Basketball Camp, Skyhawk Sports Camps (multi-sport, flag football, mini-hawk and volleyball), Challenger Soccer Camp, UK International Soccer Camp, Horse Camps, Spanish Camps, Mad Science Camps, swim lessons and more. ­— Tina Helm For a complete listing of all activities and events, or if you’d like to inquire about rental opportunities at the Community Center or Cameron Park Lake, visit cameronpark.org or call the Cameron Park Community Services District at 530-677-2231. 10 stylemg.com - May February 2014 2014

ask the experts Q: What are some simple ways to spot water damage before a bad smell is detected?

A:

The simplest way—without having to invest in costly test equipment—is to look for subtle changes in building materials. Here’s a list of some common indicators: •Swollen • and/or discolored baseboards and door trims •Cabinets • that are swollen or have checked or discolored finish •Joints • in ceiling and wall board suddenly appear •Bubbled • and/or sagging paint on walls or ceilings •Isolated • areas of ceiling and wall where paint is changing color   •Underlayment • joints showing through vinyl floor coverings •Isolated • areas where vinyl floor covering is discolored If in doubt, call an expert. The least expensive time to fix a water problem is now—not after more damage and mold growth occurs. —Bill Prosch, CR, General Manager El Dorado Restoration, Inc., Diamond Springs 800-626-1676, eldoradorestoration.com

Q:

What exactly is malolactic fermentation? 

A:

Malolactic fermentation, in short, is a process used in winemaking to create a fuller, rounder mouth feel to wines that are high in acidity. It’s occasionally called “secondary fermentation.” Malic acid is sometimes associated with the taste of green apples, while lactic acid, being less acidic, is often perceived as smoother and softer. Malolactic fermentation is desirable in wines that have excessive acidity—particularly red wines produced in cooler climates—as it generally enhances the body and the flavor persistence of the wine, creating greater palate softness. It can also add flavor and complexity to both red and white wines, as well as render the wine impervious to the risk of malolactic fermentation in the bottle, a highly undesirable possibility. In a “buttery” Chardonnay, the butter aroma is a by-product of malolactic fermentation. —Matricia Haigood, General Manager Miraflores Winery 2120 Four Springs Trail, Placerville 530-647-8505, mirafloreswinery.com

Cameron Park Community Services District photo courtesy of CPCSD. Ask the Experts photo © ferblues/fotolia.com.

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placerville recreation and parks Let the Sun Shine

E

very year Placerville’s Recreation and Parks Division undergoes a fantastic change that transforms young swim students into “Tadpoles,” “Ducks,” “Alligators,” “Seals,” “Dolphins,” “Seahorses” and “Sharks.” With this cacophony of aquatic life learning to swim (at various levels), it’s not surprising that the City’s summers are sun- and fun-filled. What better way to start your summer than with swim lessons for your little one? Placerville Aquatics Center will open for summer on May 31; classes fill fast, so register soon. For swimmers who enjoy an open pool—public swim times will be available as well. Excited to come to the pool every day? Get a season pass! Pool party rentals during public swim times and facility rentals on the weekends are also optional services. Check out the Summer 2014 Activity Guide for more information on the City’s spectacular aquatics center and summer classes. — Amanda Anderson For more information, visit cityofplacerville.org or call the Placerville Community Services Department at 530-642-5232.

foodie find

Morning Brew

M

orning Brew has a warm, inviting atmosphere, thanks to its grand, artfully mismatched sofa chairs, community library and large paintings of musicians. On a recent visit, the employees were incredibly friendly and helpful when it came time to order—a difficult decision, for me at least, as they offer five different types of chai! I was in latte heaven. After the barista let me smell a few flavors, I chose a Maple Leaf Chai Latte. I had read online reviews raving about the Vegetable Fritatta; however, I hadn’t a clue what a frittata was. The barista’s explanation—an egg-based dish, similar to a crustless quiche, with various ingredients—made the pastries look even better than when I first arrived. I decided on the Italian Frittata and prompted my boyfriend to order the veggie version so I could try both. We sat down in two gigantic, plush chairs and skimmed Maple Leaf Chai Latte and Italian Frittata through some magazines while we anxiously waited. My chai came out first—piping hot and deliciously aromatic. Next came the fritattas (my new breakfast preference!). My favorite frittata (say that five times fast), the Italian, was filled with a delicious concoction of fried eggs, cherry tomatoes, spinach, artichokes and cheese. One thing’s certain: I’ll be returning to Morning Brew soon—perhaps to peruse and donate to the free community library or for open mic night! Morning Brew, 3392 Coach Lane, Cameron Park. — Jazmin White 12 stylemg.com - May 2014

the10 spot Local Museums

In honor of National Museum Month, visit one (or all!) of these museums to soak up information through photographs, artifacts and displays. 1. El Dorado County Historical Museum Placerville, museum.edcgov.us. Learn about the history of El Dorado County through historical records. 2. Fountain and Tallman Museum Placerville, eldoradocounty historicalsociety.org/ fountaintallman2.htm. Located on Main Street in the original soda works building, the museum now displays exhibits about Placerville’s history. 3. Roseville Telephone Museum Roseville, rosevilletelephone musuem.org. Discover a bit of telephone history while perusing an extensive collection of antique telephones and memorabilia. 4. Hattie’s Gold Rush Museum Placerville, goldbugpark.org/miningmuseum.html. Browse the displays of mining equipment and learn about local geology while enjoying a day in Gold Bug Park. 5. Folsom History Museum, Folsom folsomhistorymuseum.org. Learn about the formation of Folsom and the different people that contributed to the area. 6. Benton Welty Historic School Room, Auburn, 530-885-5334. Get educated about schooling of the early 1900s through photographs and old school books. 7. Folsom Prison Museum, Folsom folsomprisonmuseum.org. Visit one of the nation’s oldest maximumsecurity prisons and learn about one of its famous visitors. 8. Folsom Powerhouse, 916-988-0205 parks.ca.gov/?page_id=501. Take a docent-led tour to see vintage generators and massive transformers that advanced the commercial application of electricity. 9. Maidu Museum & Historical Site Roseville, roseville.ca.us/museum. Get a glimpse of what life was like for the Nisenan Maidu who lived here for thousands of years. 10. Folsom Railroad Museum, Folsom fedshra.org. Learn about the first railroad west of the Rockies and how it shaped California. — Emily Peter

Placerville Rec and Parks photo © .shock/fotolia.com. Foodie Find photo by Dante Fontana. Ten Spot photo © James Steidl/fotolia.com.

fyi


M I R A F L O R E S W I N E RY

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MAY

MaY 3RD & 4th: thE MIRaFLORES OLIVE OIL BaR FEatURING GOCCE

D’ ISOLa Meet Nelson Young and come taste his olive oil sourced from Mt. Etna, Sicily! 11-4pm.

MaY 17th & 18th: thE ORIGINaL & UNIqUE aShLEY NUSERa Ashley will have unique jewelry and

colorful, high fashion designed accessories for sale.

MaY 23RD: wINEMakER DINNER at thE NatIONaL hOtEL IN jaCkSON wIth ChEF DaN MOORE Limited seating. Call the hotel and make

your reservation at (209) 223-0500.

MaY 24th: REaDY, SEt, ShOOt — IphONE MaGIC paRt 2 Explore apps, composition, shooting

techniques and editing your photographs on your iPhone. RSVP at (530) 647-8505. $57 per person.

MaY 24th & 25th: ROCkS & RhONES Find your favorite Rhone wine at this annual event. Tickets can be purchased at http://rocksrhones2014.eventbrite.com

miraflores

MIRAFLORES WINERY OPEN DAILY 10 AM TO 5 PM 2120 FOUR SPRINGS TRAIL, PLACERVILLE, CA 95667 530.647.8505 www.mirafloreswinery.com


Catch All

BY EMILY PETER

W

hether you’re a cycling pro or new to the game, Bicycles Plus Diva Night is the place for women of all cycling abilities to be! Taking place May 18 from 5-8:30 p.m. at Bicycles Plus in Folsom, this annual event promises a fun evening for all. Inspired by the increase in women to the cycling market, John Crews, owner of Bicycles Plus, created Diva Night six years ago and has seen exponential growth since then. Going from 50 attendees the first year to an expected 1,500 this year, Crews is proud to provide a sociable evening for female cyclists. “Women like the social aspect of cycling...this is a social event with bike talk,” Crews explains. All who attend will receive a T-shirt and swag bag, in addition to great discounts provided by vendors, a fashion show, and how-to clinics that will teach women important aspects of cycling. The best part? It’s free (!), but donations will help women and children at the Powerhouse Transition Center. You must pre-register online at bpdiva.com. For more information, email John Crews at johnc@ onlinecycling.com, or visit bpdiva.com.

THE

HITLIST

Fabulous Local

Burgers In no particular order...

1. “ZacJack Bistro’s Bleu Burger— featuring a half-pound of American Kobe beef on a house-made bun with •COMPILED BY STYLE STAFFERS• garlic aioli, Applewood smoked bacon and melted bleu and Cheddar cheeses— is top-notch and always cooked perfectly.” zacjack.com 2. “The Western Q Burger at El Dorado Saloon comes on a buttery brioche roll with thickcut bacon, sharp Cheddar cheese and loads of crispy fried onions. Make sure you have plenty of napkins—this is one juicy, awesome burger!” eldoradosaloon.com 3. “The Bo Peep Burger at Bricks Eats & Drinks is a definite winner for a deliciously different burger. With ground lamb, grilled onions, pickled cucumbers, Feta, tomato, and paprika yogurt sauce on a big fluffy brioche roll—it’s hamburger heaven.” bricksonmainstreet.com 4 . “ Th e Past ra mi C h ee seb u rg e r at Shoestring on Broadway is hands-down the best burger in town. It’s a meal and a half!” 530-622-7125 5. “Relish Burger Bar has a Trio of American Kobe Sliders that packs a punch of incredible flavors. Each comes with different toppings—bacon and bleu cheese, red onion marmalade, and roasted red peppers with goat cheese—ensuring even the pickiest Bleu Burger at eaters won’t complain.” relishburgerbar.com ZacJack Bistro

14 stylemg.com - May 2014

FACTS & FIGURES

50

Number of years that Apple Hill has been in operation. It’s also the number of ranches participating in the Apple Hill community. That’s a whole lot of apples…and Christmas trees…and berries…and wine…and beer! (Also, the number of pounds one can acquire frequenting the pie stands.)

1939

The year the Olde Coloma Theatre was built, but not in Coloma: It was originally built as a fancy log cabin at the World’s Fair in San Francisco. It served a variety of purposes for four decades before being donated to the Olde Coloma Theatre group in the early ’80s by Governor Ronald Reagan. The cabin was dismantled and moved to Coloma where it resides today.

$1,200,465 of gold

Dollars worth

that was produced by one of El Dorado County’s biggest gold mines, Georgetown’s Beebe Mine, between 1932 and 1939 (according to eldoradolibrary.org). The entrance to this historic mine is now occupied by a picturesque pond called the “Glory Hole.”

4.1 Million

The number of women between the ages of 15 and 50 who gave birth in the 12 months leading up to Mother’s Day 2013, according to census.gov. covered by 253 Acres the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, home of the Indy 500, held every year on Memorial Day. According to indianapolismotorspeedway.com, the Rose Bowl, Roman Colosseum, Churchill Downs, Yankee Stadium and Vatican City can all fit inside the speedway. Sure, let’s make it noisier! — Compiled by Sharon Penny

Bicycles Plus photo courtesy of Bicycles Plus. Catch All graphic © DenisNata/fotolia.com. Bullseye image © mostafa fawzy/fotolia.com. ZacJack photo by Dante Fontana. Facts & Figures photo by A. F. Litt.

localmatters


May 10 & 11 Saturday & Sunday Free Admission Nearly 100 Fine Art Artisans All media, from throughout our region & beyond.

25+ Wineries from Our El Dorado County Region Pouring samples Noon – 4:30 p, $25 each for a day of wine tasting.*

New! Craft Beer* New this year, quality craft beer available in the center of activity.

11 am – 5 pm Mother’s Day Weekend El Dorado Hills Town Center

Live Entertainment Both Days! saturday

saturday

sunday

sunday

11:30a Dance Performances Region’s Best!

2:45p The Stone Foxes Rock & Roll

11a The Rhythm Riders Great Cash & Cline

2p Tom Rigney & Flambeau Cajun, Blues & More

Event parking at Blue Shield of CA. Event is rain or shine. *must be 21 for wine/beer.

Support Our Sponsors Parker DeveloPment ComPany

Presenting Partners

Event managed by

For more info, 530.558.1336 or eldoradohillsartaffaire.com


calendar

may events May is National Hamburger Month Compiled by Gabriel Stubbs

3

SPRING ANTIQUE, CRAFT AND GARDEN SHOW

This indoor and outdoor show will feature antiques, handmade crafts and garden accessories specific for the spring season; don’t miss it from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Cameron Park Community Center. Admission is free, and food and beverages will be available for purchase. For more details, visit cameronpark.org.

folsom

3

FOLSOM HOME SHOW presented by:

HOMESHOW M A G A Z I N E

Presented by Style Magazine, this free event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Folsom Sports Complex at will feature door prizes, an abundance of vendors and more. For more details, visit facebook.com/ folsomhomegardenshow.

3-4

FIFTH ANNUAL GARDENS OF THE HILLS TOUR

The Assistance League of Sierra Foothills will host their annual garden tour from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. Peruse eight distinct oases, each giving a glimpse into beautiful personal sanctuaries. All proceeds will benefit area families, children and seniors. For more details, visit sierrafoothills.assistanceleague.org.

3

TOAST TO EDUCATION Enjoy a festive evening of food, wine and auction items at the Buckeye Education Foundation’s fifth annual fund-raising gala. This year’s event will take place at Blackstone Community Clubhouse in El Dorado Hills from 5-9 p.m. To purchase tickets, visit buckeyefoundation.org.

3-4

RELAY FOR LIFE OF CAMERON PARK Celebrate survivors, remember loved ones who have passed, and fight back against cancer at this 24-hour team event, sponsored by the American Cancer Society. The event will kick off at 9 a.m. at Christa McAuliffe Park. For more details, visit relayforlife.org/ cameronparkca.

5 10-11

CINCO DE MAYO

EL DORADO HILLS ART & WINE AFFAIRE The El Dorado Hills Optimist Club, the El Dorado Hills Chamber of Commerce and the El Dorado Arts Council are pleased to present this annual event. From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days, enjoy fine art, taste the region’s finest wines and sample craft brews. For more details, visit eldoradohillsartaffaire.com.

11 18

MOTHER'S DAY

26

MEMORIAL DAY

31-June 1

SPRING ART STUDIO TOUR The El Dorado Hills Arts Association will feature the work of numerous artists— including painters, sculptors, jewelers, potters, photographers and mixed media artists—in several locations around Shingle Springs, El Dorado Hills and Folsom. Don’t miss this self-guided, free event. For more details, visit eldoradohillsartists.com.

16 stylemg.com - May 2014

Enjoy food by Lake Natoma Inn, wine, a fashion show, classes on how to fix a flat tire, and win amazing prizes—all from 5-8:30 p.m. at Bicycles Plus in Folsom. Admission is free, but donations will help women and children at the Powerhouse Transition Center. For more details, visit bpdiva.com.

23-25 MEMPHIS

This Tony Award-winning musical is inspired by actual events and includes explosive dancing, song, and a tale of fame and forbidden love. From the underground dance clubs of the 1950s, Memphis tells the tale of a radio DJ who wants to change the world and a club singer who is ready for her big break. For show times and to purchase tickets, visit harriscenter.net.

All photos courtesy of their respective companies.

BICYCLES PLUS DIVA NIGHT


MORE EVENTS May 2 – Sacramento Go Red Luncheon. Featuring more than 500 leaders and champions of women’s heart health, a health and beauty expo, and a heart-healthy lunch, this event—sponsored by the American Heart Association’s “Go Red For Women” movement at Sleep Train Arena from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.—is a day of education and inspiration in the fight against heart disease. For more details, visit sacramentogoredluncheon.org. May 3 – Derby Day 2014: Hats On For the Kids. Don’t miss the annual event celebrating the 140th Kentucky Derby—all while raising awareness and supplies for vulnerable children and families. The event will feature a live broadcast of the Derby races, authentic Southern food by Mulvaney’s B&L, raffle prizes and the first “Triple Crown” hat contest. All net proceeds will benefit Lilliput Children’s Services. To purchase tickets, visit lilliput.org. May 3, 10, 17 & 31 – SenseSational Storytime. Every Saturday in May from 10:30-11:30 a.m. at the Pollock Pines Library, preschool level children with autism or other sensory integration challenges, and their families, can take part in this interactive and educational program specifically designed for them. For more details, visit eldoradolibrary.org or call 530-644-2498. May 9-10 – Placerville Shakespeare Club’s Spring Rummage Sale. This year's sale—from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday at 2940 Bedford Avenue in Placerville—will feature jewelry, housewares, books, toys and clothing, as well as a special plant sale on Saturday at 8 a.m. For more details, call 530-677-1134. May 16 – Outdoor Movie Night. At 8 p.m., head to the Steven Young Amphitheatre in the El Dorado Hills Town Center for an outdoor screening of How to Train Your Dragon. For more details, visit eldoradohillstowncenter.com. May 18 – Apple Blossom Bike Tour. This fund-raiser benefitting the El Dorado Adventist School will include three routes for cyclists: the metric century, metric half-century and the family ride. Participants will enjoy tasty apple treats, healthy snacks and refreshing drinks at the rest stops. To register, visit appleblossombiketour.com. May 18 - Hangtown Car Show. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Historic Main Street, the Placerville Lions Club will sponsor this family-friendly event. Admission and parking are free for spectators. For more details, visit placerville-downtown.org. May 18 – Capitol Pops Concert Band. Don’t miss your chance to watch 71 musicians—ranging from high school members to 99-yearolds—take the stage at the Cameron Park Community Center Gym. Doors open at 6 p.m., and the concert begins at 7 p.m. For more details, visit cameronpark.org. May 24 – Pasta Feast. Support the Community Resource Center from 5-8 p.m. at the Veterans Hall (130 Placerville Drive) by feasting on a delicious pasta dinner, and taking part in a raffle, dessert dash and more. For more details, visit edcrc.org. May 30-June 1 – Joni Morris: A Tribute to the Music of Patsy Cline. Watch and be amazed as Joni Morris performs her tribute to Patsy Cline through song, showmanship and authentic vintage costumes. For show times and to purchase tickets, visit harriscenter.net.

SAVE THE DATE! June 29 – Summer Spectacular. Don't miss the biggest event of the year featuring live music, a kids’ carnival, swimming at the lagoon, refreshments, food and craft vendors, and a fireworks finale. For more details, visit cameronpark.org. •

May 2014 - stylemg.com 17


outtakes EL DORADO HILLS ROTARY CRAB FEED

HAVANA NIGHTS Lakehills Covenant Church, El Dorado Hills, March 15 Photos by LMason Photography.

El Dorado Hills CSD March 8 Photos courtesy of Laurie Edwards. Mimi Escabar and Henry Carr Kevin and Angela Rohr DP Maracin and Troy Vukovich

Noelle Robinson and Betty Flagg

Jim Curtis

Jane and Greg Widroe Connie Weatherhold, Georgi Knight and Betty January

Robert and Vicki Ashworth

PARTY WITH A PURPOSE

ST. PATRICK’S BASH & FUND-RAISER

Serrano Country Club El Dorado Hills March 22 Photos by Katherine McDuffee.

Reunion Nightclub El Dorado Hills March 13 Photos courtesy of Steve Cockerell. Irish Rock band Whiskey and Stitches prepare to take the stage

Jeff and Tami Genovese

Kelly Larson

Stacy Whittingham of Leap Yoga and Lisa Larson of Pacific Trama Center

Pacific Trauma Center staff: Eryn Barrett, Jennifer Young, Kirsten Kraus, Andy Kraus, Lisa Larson, Eva Lukas and Jeanine Bogar

Sharyn Mairani and Carolyn Poer

Lisa Larson and husband Peter Fitch

Local Realtor Paula Mahoney performs

Lynnette Long, Bob Hedges and Steve Long

Chuck Jones of Keller Williams, Kathy Withrow of Intero, and Katie Minor of Coldwell Banker

Steve Cockerell of Vitek Mortgage, Lucy Barnes of American Heritage, and Pina McDermot of Orange Coast Title

Lyon Real Estate Managers Brenda Manginelli and Casey McLoed, and Lyon Real Estate President Pat Shea

If you know of any events happening in the El Dorado County Foothills area or have photos you would like to share with us, please submit them to info@stylemg.com. And, to see more Outtakes photos, visit our website: stylemg.com.

18 stylemg.com - May 2014


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thearts from around the world—sitar, doorbells, wind chimes, the xylophone and flute—that would not normally be considered complementary, and make new sounds and songs.

AB: Who is your mentor or inspiration? GK: John DeBoer, the co-author on our album Many Worlds. He is a multi-talented composer and entertainer whose main instruments are flute and piano. DeBoer has been performing on stage and national television since he was four years old.

AB: Do you have a new album in the works? GK: I’m planning to create three additional albums in the near future (in the next five years or so): blues, meditation, and experimental.

Music from the Heart by Abigail Blank

G

regory Kiefer, software engineering CEO by day and accomplished Native American flutist by night, is taking the music world by storm with his fresh take on this unique instrument.

AB:

How did you discover the Native American flute, and why did you choose it over a traditional flute? GK: Basically, I love the sound produced by the instrument and the shock on people’s faces when you play it in a traditional and non-traditional manner. I also have great respect for Native Americans because they have a purpose, history and great depth to their native culture.

AB: Was the Native American flute your first foray into musicianship? 20 stylemg.com - May 2014

GK: I played classical music on the guitar for a few years in junior high school. It was painful. I have always loved listening to music from all around the world. When I get the chance to travel to foreign countries, I often seek out local music. AB: How do you approach composing your original pieces? GK: Since music comes from the heart, it is frequently created based on how you feel about yourself and the events that occur in your life. Some songs are happy, some are sad, some are playful, and some are really weird. My goal was to create a new genre of music that hadn’t been discovered. One of the challenges about creating new music is not everyone is willing to listen to it initially. I have a desire to combine instruments

AB: Do you have any upcoming performances? Where can the public hear more of your music? GK: My next performance is planned for Mother’s Day at Rosebud’s Café in Jackson. Later this year, I hope to perform for the kids again at the Crocker Art Museum. I also play three times a week at the El Dorado Hills Sports Club’s yoga class.

For more information, visit cdbaby.com/ cd/gregorykiefer or facebook.com/ manyworldsflutemusic.

artbeat May 16-July 12 – Multiple Journeys. At the Gallery at 48 Natoma, Frank Francis will exhibit his photography, Don Womack his turned wood pieces, and Fredrick Clarin will show his spray paint canvases. For details, visit facebook.com/thegalleryat48natoma.

Photos by Dante Fontana.

Gregory Kiefer

AB: Which song means the most to you on your Many Worlds album? GK: Two—“A Minor Move,” where DeBoer composed the song and let me play the flute along with him on keyboards, and “Steps in Space,” where I was able to show off some of the more dynamic aspects of the Native American flute. The first album was written with a purpose. I dedicated it to a great man named Clyde Hoffman, my father-in-law.


Celebrate Mom!

Mother's Day is May 11

3951 Missouri Flat Rd | Placerville, CA 95667 | 530-621-1188 goldsmith-gallery.com | M-F 10am-6pm, Sat 10am-5pm, Sun-Closed


health&wellness

look out!

5 Tips to Protect Your Peepers by Jacqueline Renfrow

1/HEALTHY BODY=HEALTHY SIGHT How well you see is linked to the overall health of your body. “Eating right, not smoking and exercising regularly lowers your risk of heart disease and diabetes, which in turn lowers your risk of retinopathy and complications in your eye,” Dr. Van Winkle says. She goes on to say that nutrients such as lutein, zeaxanthin,

Photo © Tyler Olson/fotolia.com.

W

e all know how important diet and exercise are to maintaining a healthy body, but what about healthy eyes? What do we do to protect them as we age? For all of us, getting older makes us more susceptible to eye disorders, such as blindness and decreased vision, as well as more serious ailments like age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. More familiar and common refractive errors can affect our eyes, too, such as myopia (near-sightedness), hyperopia (far-sightedness), astigmatism (distortion at all distances) and presbyopia (not being able to focus up close to read). However, there’s good news. “These disorders can be easily detected during a comprehensive eye exam and are usually correctable with glasses or contact lenses,” says Lauren Narvaez Van Winkle, O.D., at Viewpoint Optometry in Roseville. And, although many of these diseases are age-related or genetic, there are some diet and lifestyle changes that can help you see 20/20 as long as possible.


vitamins C and E, zinc and omega-3 fatty acids have been linked to reducing the risk of AMD and cataract formation. These powerful punches are found in leafy vegetables like kale, spinach and collard greens, as well as in eggs, nuts, fish, fruits, flax, fortified cereals and sweet potatoes.

(HEV) light, which, like UV rays, cause free radical damage to retinal cells. “There are specialty anti-reflective coatings you can get on your glasses to block HEV during computer use,” says Dr. Van Winkle. “These coatings are different than commercial anti-glare coatings—ask your eye care provider about them at your next visit.”

2/GET CHECKED Early detection is the key to saving your sight, so eye exams are a must. In fact, many of these diseases are asymptomatic—a doctor would detect a problem before you do. “I’m also an advocate for getting your children’s eyes checked early, so certain childhood vision problems like amblyopia (lazy eye) or strabismus (turned eyes) can be detected,” Dr. Van Winkle says. Lazy eye, the most common cause of vision defects in children, refers to a situation where one eye or both eyes are not working properly in conjunction with the brain. “Think of it as a computer, where all the hardware is intact, but there are issues with the software,” says Nguyen Quach, O.D., at QT Optometry in Folsom.

3/BEWARE OF SCREEN TIME Limit the amount of time you spend staring at a laptop, tablet, television and smartphone. They give off high-energy visible

4/KEEP MOIST As we age, our eyes become drier. Heating and air conditioning exasperate this situation; therefore, Dr. Van Winkle recommends using artificial tears regularly. In addition, eating omega-3s and drinking water help to keep eyes lubricated and improve the quality of tears.

5/COVER UP Cataracts are a highly preventable disorder, and one of the biggest weapons to guard against harmful UV radiation—and the harmful progression of AMD—is wearing sunglasses. “One of my biggest pet peeves is seeing a family at the beach...or strolling around on a very sunny day and the mom and dad are both wearing sunglasses yet the children, especially infants, are walking around or in strollers without any sunglasses or hats [on],” Dr. Quach says.

WONDERING IF YOU SHOULD SEE AN OPTOMETRIST OR AN OPHTHALMOLOGIST, BUT DON’T KNOW THE DIFFERENCE? FIND OUT AT STYLEMG.COM.


cause&effect

team will Ride of Their Lives by Morgan Cásarez

24 stylemg.com - May 2014

Photos by Dante Fontana.

K

aden Woodall was 10 days old when he started chemotherapy for bilateral retinoblastoma, a rare cancer of the retina that affects nearly 300 children in the U.S. annually. The past four years have found him in and out of remission, a battle his mother, Rebecca, understands all too well as a survivor of childhood cancer. “Kaden literally means ‘fighter’ and we had no idea how ironic our name choice would end up being,” she says. “It can be a daunting task to try and manage the daily routines of life while navigating the emotional and financial stress childhood cancer can place on a family.” In June, Rebecca and her husband, Conrad, will embark on a cross-country journey with Team Will, a Sacramento-based community of cyclists dedicated to raising awareness and funds for pediatric cancer research and supportive services. The organization’s signature “Go the Distance” ride will see volunteers visiting hospitals and participating in community rallies throughout 13 states with a goal of raising $125,000. For their part, the Woodalls hope that Back: Brian Williams, Becky Woodall and Jonathon Weast; Middle: Kaden Woodall and sharing their story along the way will bring comTina McCardle; Front: Ella Woodall fort to others. “The organization is bringing families “I realized that little Will’s family wasn’t alone and there were thouand communities together sands of children in the battle for their lives.” to support these children Just two years later, the group traveled to Washington, D.C., as they fight for their life,” and successfully lobbied for the Caroline Pryce Walker Conquer they explain. “Their chalChildhood Cancer Act. This year’s ride will honor Kaden and dozlenging endeavor…is an ens of other Team Will Heroes, a group of children nominated by inspiring and motivating friends and family for their courage in the face of heartbreaking act to show others that odds. “I’ve seen the pain and fear of families that are dealing with we have to actively particithis disease,” Scarberry says. “I’ve come to accept that I can bring pate in our community’s hope to families just by showing that a stranger cares for them and welfare.” walk away a new-found friend to them.” Executive Director Ken Much like Scarberry, Rourke and Jessica Ann Adams have a Scarberry co-founded the deeply personal connection to the cause. Their daughter, Eden, organization in honor of died in 2008 following a four-year battle with neuroblastoma. That William, the son of a family same year, they discovered Team Will in Washington, D.C., while friend who died of a rare supporting CureSearch at the Capitol. This summer, their son Riley Ella with her mom Becky Woodall and aggressive form of will ride in memory of his sister and her fellow Heroes. and little brother Kaden cancer when he was just 17 “[It] will always be more to us than a cancer organization,” they months old. In 2006, Scarberry and his fellow share. “They’ve given our son a way to give back to children in the same situation his cyclists raised $60,000 for CureSearch for Childsister once was in, and we are so proud of his association with the organization.” hood Cancer with their inaugural coast-to-coast ride. “That trip changed my life forever,” he says. For more information, visit teamwillcharity.org.


Father’s Day Weekend | Saturday, June 14, 12–6 | Folsom, California | Palladio 6

Tommy Castro & The Painkillers

4O+

Free Admission. Tasting Kits $18.

SHINGLE SPRINGS SUBARU

2 Stages GREAT MUSIC

Dennis Jones Band

Val Starr Jim Lauderdale & The Blues Rocket

Roy Rogers & The Delta Rhythm Kings

Danny Click & The Hell Yeahs

Tasting 12p – 5p

Order Your Craft Beer Tasting Kit | Only $18 (save $7) through June 2 online

Just some of the brewers attending:

Advance price of $18 online through 6/2/14, after which the regular price is $25. Prices include sales tax. A portion of proceeds benefits the Folsom Chamber of Commerce, their partner local service club(s), and Young Life.

Kid ZOne Games, Face Painting, Music & Dance

Join us for our second annual family-friendly event featuring the best craft breweries, exceptional musical talent, fantastic food choices, and more!

folsomrhythmandbrews.com

Support Our Sponsors!

Tasting kit includes 16-ounce pint glass with logo and seven (7) tasting tickets; additional tasting tickets available at event: 4 tickets $5, 9 tickets $10, 20 tickets $20; prices include sales tax. Must be 21 or over for tasting kit and tickets. Event is rain or shine. No refunds or exchanges. Artists subject to change. No outside food or alcohol allowed in event. © 2014 Carrera Productions, llc, carrera-productions.com. All rights reserved.


A

s spring arrives and summer approaches, our thoughts begin to drift toward vacations: beaches, mountains, campfires, sunrises, sunsets, peace and quiet, and a break from the demands and pressures of work and responsibilities—even if only momentarily. As young parents with limited resources, our family opted for camping. It was a great way to get away, have fun, find adventure, and most importantly, make memories. Our first campout was at Yosemite—filled with the excitement of bears at night, starry skies, hikes, a campfire and s’mores! It was tons of fun, but we were in search of one “special” place to build memories—a place we could return year after year. The following year, we found our way to Burney Falls—another amazing holiday filled with swimming, fishing, grandmas, friends, dust and, of course, campfires.

endless summer Vacation Memories Shine Bright by Don Pritchard

Patrick’s Point State Park

Burney Falls

But it was the next year when we found our “spot”: Patrick’s Point State Park. This became the place where we built, and continue to build, family memories. For almost two decades now, we go annually at the end of July, when it’s scorching hot in the foothills but cool and refreshing along the coast. We pack sweatshirts and coats while in 100-degree heat to prepare for impending foggy coastal mornings. Each of our kids brought a friend, and I became a mentor to many in the rudiments of “Camping 101.” Every year we added something new to our equipment arsenal; within a few years we had the “Taj Mahal” of camping setups, and our seven days stretched into 10. We were hardcore tent campers, not wanting our experience to be cheapened by the luxury of RVs (only because we couldn’t afford one!). Looking back, it’s so important that we make time and sacrifices to build 26 stylemg.com - May 2014

Yosemite Valley Tunnel View

memories that last a lifetime, memories that strengthen the family bond. With so many pressures and demands placed on the family, it’s imperative we shore up its foundation with quality time. Vacations don’t have to be grandiose, thrilling, over the top, better than last year’s, or put you in debt—what a family needs is family time. It’s my prayer for you that your summer

vacation will be more than just a few days away. May it be time filled with memories that add volumes to the pages of your family diary—and ones that can be handed down to generations to come.

Don Pritchard is the pastor at Solid Rock Faith Center in Diamond Springs. He can be reached at dbp@solidrockfaithcenter. com.

Patrick’s Point photo by Don Winslow. Burney Falls photo © Dvortygirl_Wikimedia Commons. Yosemite Valley Tunnel View photo © Chensiyuan_WikimediaCommons.

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Guest Conductor Peter Jaffe

LE

INA SEASON F

Saturday, May 31, 2014 7:30 PM Sunday, June 1, 2014 3:00 PM

Guest conductor Peter Jaffe

The Planets: Mars, Venus, Jupiter Star Trek Through the Years Lord of the Rings Suite: “Fellowship of the Ring” Superman March and Love Theme Music of the Spheres Das Rheingold: Ride of the Valkyries

Holst arr. Custer Shore Williams Strauss Wagner

Plus other heavenly surprises!

Harris Center for the Arts Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom, CA 95630

Visit www.folsomsymphony.com or call 916-608-6888 for ticket information


214

! p U n e t s

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7 TH A N N UA L S T U D E NT S P OTLI G HT | G E T TO K N OW TEO TO R R E S

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inhistory

american dreams Coloma’s Gooch Family

I

n 1849, Peter Gooch and Nancy Ross Gooch arrived at El Dorado County’s gold fields. Unlike so many other men and women who traveled across the country or around the world for the chance to make their fortune, however, the Goochs hadn’t chosen to try their luck in California—they were forced to by their owners. Peter and Nancy were slaves. They came with their owner William Gooch (slaves often took the last names of their owners), but were told to leave behind their infant son, Andrew, who was purchased by the Monroe family. William possibly had a partnership in Placerville’s Crescent Hotel, but whether from conscience, public p re ss u re (s l ave r y was not popular and rarely tolerated in the mining camps and towns), or because of the impending entry of California into the Union as a free state, William freed Nancy and Peter. The two set about making a living for themselves—Peter working as a handyman and Nancy hiring herself as a cook, mender and washer, a somewhat lucrative business in the early years of the Gold Rush when very few women were available to do the work most men had never learned. According to her grandson, James Monroe, Nancy was a good cook and made meals for the miners in the Garden Valley area. Sadly, in 1861, Peter passed away, leaving Nancy alone in California. For the next nine years, she worked hard and managed to save $700 to travel back east and collect the son she had been forced to leave, who was now 24 years old. An-

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drew had been working as a tenant farmer with his wife, Sarah, and their sons, Pearley and Grant. After paying his debts and fare, Nancy returned to California with her son, daughter-in-law and grandchildren. Andrew and Sarah had several more children: Andrew Jr., Cordelia, William, Garfield and James. Two other babies did not survive. The growing family settled in Coloma where they purchased and cleared more than 70 acres on t h e we s t s i d e o f the river and began producing apples and pears. All of the Monroe children attended school, as well as helped with the family business, which wasn’t unusual in the 1800s when kids were expected to work hard and help the family succeed. “I’d get up at five o’clock in the morning, start the fire, feed the hogs, milk the cow, clean the barn, and then get ready for school by 8:30. Then after school, do the same chores all over again,” remembered James Monroe. In the ensuing years, the family acquired more land—including six acres containing the original Sutter’s Mill site where gold was first discovered—built several commercial properties, and participated in community matters and events. In 1901, at the age of 90, Nancy passed away. She arrived in California without her freedom, but left as the matriarch of one of El Dorado County’s most successful pioneer families.

Top photo courtesy of calparks.org; middle photo courtesy of the California State Library; bottom photo courtesy of Lonnie DeCloedt/findagrave.com.

by Hiliary C. Simon


2014

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Windows Remodeling


homedesign

habitat for kids 3 Steps to Sweet-Dream Success by Kerrie L. Kelly, ASID

STEP 1/MEASURE YOUR SPACE WALL-TO-WALL Pick your scale of measurement (1/4”=1’ works for most scenarios) and measure the room from wall to wall. Use your measurements to draw the room’s perimeter.

DOORS, CLOSETS AND BUILT-INS Measure doors, closets and built-ins from the outside trim. Note whether doors open in or out.

WINDOWS Note window heights, as well as window distance from the floor, as 32 stylemg.com - May 2014

you might want to put cabinets and window seats below; also, measure and note the window height and width inside the window trim, as you may want to hang a window shade.

CEILING Measure the main ceiling height, noting any archways or anything else impeding the space such as a soffit.

STEP 2/DEVELOP YOUR DESIGN DIRECTION Now it’s time to get creative and craft the heart of your bedroom design. Involve your child in the planning process; the design should be a reflection of his or her personality.

SHAPE Start with a comfortable bed that inspires hours of relaxation, dreams and contented sleep. Although your child is probably still small enough to fit in a twin bed, consider a full- or queensized one, which is ideal for reading stories together now and keeping ahead

Top photo by Nichola Wray. Bottom photo courtesy of PhotographerLink.

S

imilar to your own room, a child’s bedroom should provide a cozy and nurturing retreat. Follow these simple steps to take your little one’s bedroom design from concept to completion—ultimately creating a space they will love.


of future growth spurts. Make the bed the focal point of the room; then, add other essential pieces including a nightstand, dresser and desk. Finally, determine whether you have room for additional pieces like a bookshelf, armoire, toy chest or activity table.

COLOR Ask your child about his or her favorite colors and activities. Have them help pick out sheets and a comforter that ties into these favorites. Be sure to let them feel the fabric— touch is one of children’s most acute senses and they love feeling different textures. Next, select three hues from the bedding—a light, medium and darker tone—and use these as the foundation for your color palette for the rest of the room.

DETAILS Small details give the bedroom its unique personality. Choose a few fun pieces of wall art that tie back to the theme of the room; add a plush rug to provide a soft surface for play; try some novelty pegs on the wall to hang pajama sets, robes or jackets; and look for fun buckets, baskets or shelving to provide storage in an aesthetically pleasing way.

SHARED SPACE Will your child be sharing the bedroom with a sibling? If so, plan this into your design and consider space-saving furniture like a bunk or trundle bed. Each child can still display their individual personality in the room with color and bedding choices.

STEP 3/BRING YOUR PLAN TO LIFE

Bottom photo courtesy of Steve Holmes Creative. Top photo courtesy of PhotographerLink.

Finally, plot the desired items on your original floor plan. Each approved piece can provide the road map for prioritizing your purchases. You can even develop a spreadsheet with pricing to serve as your shopping list or working budget.

INSTALLATION The most challenging installation items include furnishings that may need to be assembled, lighting, paintings and window coverings. Unless you’re handy, leave this to the experts and include their labor charges in your pricing projections.

CELEBRATION Because of your step-by-step planning, your child will now have a special space to spend precious hours playing, learning and dreaming. Relax and enjoy!

Kerrie L. Kelly is an award-winning interior designer, author and multimedia consultant. She has authored two books: ‘Home Décor: A Sunset Design Guide,’ published by Oxmoor House, and the newly released ‘My Interior Design Kit,’ with Pearson Professional and Career Education. To contact her, visit kerriekelly.com or call 916-919-3023. May 2014 - stylemg.com 33


r o t c a r t n o

C

e h t f o

2014 Local CotY Award winners

r a e Y

See more photos and a complete listing of NARI members in the 2014 NARI Home Remodeling Guide!

Residential Kitchen Under $40,000 Kathleen Jennison, Design + Build

Residential Interior Under $100,000 Morse Remodeling, Inc.

Residential Addition Under $100,000 Silver Fern Construction & Remodeling/ California Custom Cabinets & Mill, Inc.

Residential Kitchen $40,000 to $80,000 Kathleen Jennison, Design + Build

Entire House Under $250,000 MAK Design + Build, Inc.

Residential Universal Design Silver Fern Construction & Remodeling/ California Custom Cabinets & Mill, Inc.

Residential Exterior Specialty Morse Remodeling, Inc.


WATCH THE CHAPTER VIRTUAL HOME TOUR AT WWW.NARISACTO.ORG

Residential Interior Element MAK Design + Build, Inc.

Residential Bath $30,000 to $60,000 Henley Homes, Inc.

Residential Kitchen Over $120,000 Nar Fine Carpentry, Inc.

Residential Kitchen $80,001 to $120,000 Nar Fine Carpentry, Inc.

Residential Exterior Under $100,000 Morse Remodeling, Inc.

Residential Bath Over $60,000 Nar Fine Carpentry, Inc.

Residential Interior $100,000 and Over Landmark Builders

Residential Addition Over $250,000 Henley Homes, Inc.

Entire House $250,000 to $500,000 Landmark Builders

 2014 Judges Choice Award  Residential Bath Under $30,000 Nar Fine Carpentry, Inc.

Residential Exterior Specialty Landmark Builders

—National Association of the Remodeling Industry— www.narisacto.org


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Graduating Senior Superstars COMPILED BY MEGAN WISKUS PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANTE FONTANA This month, in Style’s annual compilation of high-achieving high school seniors, we give you each school’s selections for local teens setting the pace—whether in academics, athletics, philanthropy, or all of the above. Read on and get inspired by the words and achievements of these 2014 super grads. 36 stylemg.com - May 2014


CHANJU PARK

Ponderosa High School Tell us about yourself. I’m a senior who is excited about life and ready for whatever adventures are heading my way. I’m the second child of three and love to cook and bake, as well as do yoga and Pilates. What accomplishment are you most proud of and why? I’m most proud of becoming who I am today, and taking difficult issues in life— such as self-image, school, boys, etc.—and turning them into experiences where I can further my personal growth and appreciation for life. What are your school interests, involvements and hobbies? I love the music program at my school! I’m currently in choir singing under the tutelage of one of the most amazing directors; I’m also involved in both concert choir and chamber choir. I’m a part of the California Scholarship Federation and have had the privilege of being the club’s president and secretary. Lastly, I’m a junior volunteer on Marshall Medical Center’s executive team; we provide assistance to patients, visitors and hospital staff. What’s one thing that not many people know about you? I have a passion for healthy living. Having to deal with health issues in my family, I’ve developed a love for wellness and finding a balance between healthy eating, exercise and happiness. I love cooking and baking all sorts of nutritious foods. What are your plans after graduation? I plan to attend a four-year college, followed by graduate school and residency to pursue my dream of becoming a surgeon.

Describe your career aspirations. I plan on becoming a surgeon. I believe that when your body is telling you something, you should react to it instead of turning to medicine constantly. The human body and its functions fascinate me, and I want to learn more about it, as well as educate others.

“I PLAN ON BECOMING A SURGEON.”

If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? I’d probably pick somewhere in South America because of its beautiful landscapes, history, culture, and the liveliness of its cities and towns.

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ZACHARY PICKETT Ponderosa High School

Tell us about yourself. I’m 17 and the youngest of three boys. I love to watch and play sports, hang out with friends, and discover new things. What accomplishment are you most proud of and why? I’m proud of the fact that, even after my injury, I played water polo on the Ponderosa team. It was a very tough goal to reach, and I was able to participate the entire season. Thankfully, we had a successful year! What are your school interests, involvements and hobbies? I’m involved with student council (serving as junior class president and rally commissioner), swim team, water polo, California Scholastic Federation; and I served as the boys’ basketball team announcer this season. What’s one thing that not many people know about you? I love to play table tennis. What are your plans after graduation? I plan to attend a four-year college and earn a degree in business marketing. Who is your role model? Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Describe your career aspirations. I would like to work for a sports franchise in a position that pertains to my degree. If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? I would love to travel to Italy.

“I LOVE TO PLAY TABLE TENNIS.”

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RACHEL TIMBERMAN Ponderosa High School

Tell us about yourself. I’m an outdoorsy kind of girl who loves camping and my four dogs. I love school, especially math and science, but I really love athletics! I play the wonderful game of softball, and my favorite thing to do is play board games. What accomplishment are you most proud of and why? I’m most proud of earning a D1 softball scholarship—I’ve worked so hard to get where I am and couldn’t be more ecstatic about playing a sport in college!

“I TEND TO WATCH A LOT OF CRIME SHOWS...”

What are your school interests, involvements and hobbies? I get the amazing opportunity to play with very talented athletes and some of my best friends on the varsity softball team this year. I’m also a part of the Black Student Union, the American Sign Language Club, and I am a peer counselor. What’s one thing that not many people know about you? I’m a video gamer. Whether it’s Mario Kart or Call of Duty, I can beat my older brothers any day of the week. What are your plans after graduation? I get to play the sport I love after graduation, so I will continue my athletic and academic career at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania. Who is your role model? My grandma, Sue. Unfortunately she passed away my sophomore year from breast and lung cancer, but she was one strong and sarcastic woman—that’s probably where I get it from! Describe your career aspirations. I tend to watch a lot of crime shows (more than I should) and fell in love with the idea of working in a CSI lab or as a medical examiner. Regardless, I want to pursue a medical career. If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? I would go backpacking through South America and see the rainforests and waterfalls.

JESSICA DAGER Union Mine High School

Tell us about yourself. I have lived in El Dorado County my whole life with my parents, twin brother and younger sister. The house I grew up in was present during the Gold Rush era, which inspired me to take an interest in local history. Through a creative mind, I enjoy making films and even won first place in my class for my silent film.

“MY ROLE MODEL IS MY DAD.”

What accomplishment are you most proud of and why? I’m proud that through all of my activities, I’m able to make a positive impact on others. Just to see others smile while I play the keys, hit the ball, or play a note on the horn is enough to make all the effort worth it. What are your school interests, involvements and hobbies? I was involved in the music department by playing the French horn and mellophone, and singing in the choir. This year, I was blessed to co-lead the Christian Club. I played varsity softball (and made All League) all four years, and was honored this year by leading as team captain. What’s one thing that not many people know about you? I love to compose my own music, whether it’s vocal or piano. What are your plans after graduation? I will attend Simpson University on a softball scholarship and major in biology. This summer, I’m excited to help at-risk kids at Camp Calvary’s Horse Camp, which my church sponsors. Who is your role model? My role model is my dad. We have very similar personalities and, if I work hard and apply myself as he’s done, I can see myself accomplishing what he has. Describe your career aspirations. My current career aspirations include doing something that will help and impact others. If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? I have been fortunate to travel with my family to many sights in the U.S.; however, one place I dream of visiting is Italy.

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JETT HAGERTY Union Mine High School

Tell us about yourself. I’m very outgoing and passionate about whatever I’m doing, and I’m fascinated by the world around me. What accomplishment are you most proud of and why? My biggest accomplishment is being able to contribute to my community and campus through an eclectic array of services and actions, including keeping our environment pristine, creating a fun atmosphere on campus, and sharing my music and passion in our community. What are your school interests, involvements and hobbies? I’m senior class president and president of the Environmental Club. I play varsity soccer and participate in theater; in my free time I enjoy playing violin and traveling. What’s one thing that not many people know about you? I know how to unicycle, juggle, watercolor, walk on stilts, work with bee’s wax, knit, felt wool, sing verses, make bread, and recite the South African national anthem. I’m Waldorf. What are your plans after graduation? I plan to attend Humboldt State University and study sustainability/ environmental science. I want to help create a proactive, safe future while enjoying the ornate and unique offerings of Mother Earth. Who is your role model? My mother, for her persistence in her daily life. No matter how large the obstacle she comes out on top, because she always believes and never gives up. Describe your career aspirations. In college I’ll be searching for what exactly I want to do as a career; whatever I pursue, however, I will remember my core values of helping people and our environment. If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? I think my next stop will be Costa Rica to help out on my uncle’s farm and enjoy the beautiful landscape. .

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“I KNOW HOW TO UNICYCLE, JUGGLE, WATERCOLOR, WALK ON STILTS...”


TANYA GALLAGHER Union Mine High School

Tell us about yourself. I’m a diligent worker, conscientious, and always exploring ways to make my school a better place. I have strong relationships with both my teachers and the staff at Union Mine. I’m actively involved in student council, as well as the Safe School Ambassador program. In addition, I serve as editor for Union Mine High School’s award-winning yearbook. Loving music, I play both the violin and flute. Additionally, I have dedicated hours of community service by volunteering at a local animal outreach facility. I also work 12 hours a week at a local coffee shop (Fire Dawg), babysit for several families, and have started my own photography business where I do an average of four sessions a month. What accomplishment are you most proud of and why? Being selected to represent Union Mine at Girls State at the Claremont Colleges in Southern California. This is a program that selects young leaders to create a mock state government, from the campaign process to the elections of all state officials—from the governor to the dogcatcher. What’s one thing that not many people know about you? I was adopted and had open-heart surgery when I was three years old. What are your plans after graduation? I will be completing a bachelor’s degree in graphic communication; the field of advertising has always appealed to me. Who is your role model? I’ve grown up in a very wonderful family that includes my extended family of grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins. Growing up in this environment, I learned how to become my own person, to stand up for myself, face challenges and deal with them, do the right thing, root for the underdog and be compassionate with the less fortunate. The major role model in my life, however, is my dad. He epitomizes everything I have learned and has always encouraged me to be the best I can be.

“...THE FIELD OF ADVERTISING HAS ALWAYS APPEALED TO ME.”

If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? I would love to go to Ireland. Part of my ancestry is Irish, and I would like to learn as much about the Emerald Isle as possible. Their history is fascinating, as they went from a Pagan Druid nation to a Catholic country with Saints Patrick and Bridget as their patron saints.

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MATT COEN

El Dorado High School

Tell us about yourself. I was born in South Florida and moved to Northern California when I was four years old. I’m half Italian and really appreciate good food. I’m a typical Italian epicurean: I indulge in gourmet pasta, bread and pizza. As a lifelong swimmer, my appetite alone has kept my mom pretty busy in the kitchen. I learned to tread water when I was 18 months old, and I’ve been a competitive swimmer since I was five. I trained as a year-round swimmer throughout high school, swimming at the crack of dawn before school and then again after school as the sun was setting. This monotonous yet rigorous regime has only been interrupted because of injuries or broken bones from skiing, wakeboarding and wake surfing. What accomplishment are you most proud of and why? I’m mostly proud of keeping my focus on academics throughout high school. Balancing school, sports, music, family obligations and community service was both challenging and rewarding. I learned to manage my time so that I could still leave time for fun, relaxation and friends. What’s one thing that not many people know about you? Not many people know that I’m a “band geek.” I’ve been playing alto sax since fifth grade and have been in concert band and marching band throughout high school. Most people also don’t know that I’ve been an altar server at Saint Patrick’s Church for years, or that my cat sleeps with me every night and hangs out with me whenever I’m home.

What are your plans after graduation? Presently, I’m not sure which specific university or academy I will attend, but I am certain that the most fulfilling path for me will be a career of service. I’m considering careers in aviation, medicine and business. Who is your role model? My older brother, Andrew, is my number one role model and my best friend. We share many similar interests, opinions and goals. Throughout our lives, we have motivated, challenged and supported each other as we continually strive for excellence in and outside of school. I look up to him not only because of his admirable accomplishments, but also because of the remarkable and humble person that he is.

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“MY OLDER BROTHER, ANDREW, IS MY NUMBER ONE ROLE MODEL AND MY BEST FRIEND.”


JESSICA RITZ

El Dorado High School

Tell us about yourself. I’m a 17-year-old senior who was blessed to be elected Associated Student Body president last year, so I spend a lot of my time fulfilling my presidential duties. Outside of school, I like to think of myself as a loving friend, daughter, sister and aunt. What accomplishment are you most proud of and why? Running a marathon is by far my largest personal accomplishment. To a lot of people, running 26.2 miles sounds like an outrageous physical challenge, but to me it was so much more. Starting and finishing a marathon taught me that no matter the circumstances, as in life, you have to keep putting one foot in front of the other. In a sense, it was a metaphorical life lesson.

“RUNNING A MARATHON IS BY FAR MY LARGEST PERSONAL ACCOMPLISHMENT.”

What are your school interests, involvements and hobbies? As a senior, I would say that my first interest right now is graduating high school. There are too many wonderful things on this campus for me to have done them all, but I have had the privilege to be on the cross-country team, participate in Faith Out Loud (a local club on campus) and most significantly, be a member of Associated Student Body. What are your plans after graduation? I will proudly attend California State University, Monterey Bay, this fall, and major in liberal studies with an emphasis in elementary education. I plan to stay at Cal State Monterey Bay for a fifth year to attain my multi-subject teaching credential. Who is your role model? Choosing just one person is so difficult because I have been blessed with a huge number of phenomenal mentors throughout my life. Jamie (Mrs.) Trykar has had the most profound impact on my life in high school. She is such a light in what can sometimes be such a dark world. In several situations, she has reached out a hand and shown such an immense amount of grace. She is such a blessing. Describe your career aspirations. After attaining my teaching credential, my goal is to teach younger grades, preferably kindergarten. If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? Sitting on a warm beach in Hawaii sounds so wonderful—a place to rest, gather my thoughts and enjoy this world that God has given us.

MICHAEL WESTON

El Dorado High School

Tell us about yourself. I’ve worked very hard throughout my high school career and have been able to maintain a perfect, un-weighted straight-A record all four years. Due to my advanced placement courses, I currently hold an overall weighted GPA of 4.41, which has propelled me to number one in my class. Besides academics, I’ve participated in many other activities. During my first week of high school, I joined the water polo team and became the starting goalkeeper for the JV team. I also joined the speech and debate team and competed in many tournaments, even traveling to Santa Clarita to debate in the State Championship Tournament. This year, I was selected as the team captain and assisted my coach in preparing the team for events. Additionally, I’ve competed all four years on both the basketball and baseball teams. During my junior year, I was nominated as one of six male juniors at my high school to be interviewed by American Legion members to participate in the annual Boys State. After being selected, I spent a week at Sacramento State participating in the leadership conference. Lastly, I’m very proud of the awards I’ve earned. My junior year, I received the AP Scholar with Honor Award and the Marine Corps Award for Scholastic Excellence. Recently, I was selected as a National Merit Scholarship finalist and received the California Interscholastic Federation’s Dale Lacky Award for my athletic league.

“I WANT TO STUDY SOME AREA OF PHYSICAL SECIENCE...”

What accomplishment are you most proud of and why? My basketball team making it to the playoffs this year. We didn’t make it last year, so I was really excited that we did it for my senior year. What’s one thing that not many people know about you? I’ve been in two musicals at Imagination Theater, Big River and Lil’ Abner, and had singing parts in both. What are your plans after graduation? I plan to attend a top four-year university, although I haven’t decided which school. I want to study some area of physical science, and someday find a profession as a scientific researcher (and possibly make new scientific discoveries!). Who is your role model? My grandpa. He has a great outlook on life, living every day to its fullest. If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? I would travel to all the major European countries and then to Armenia, where my ancestors are from.

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swag Perfect “Cranberry Crunch” Bar, $3.49 each at Placerville Foods Co-op, 535 Placerville Drive, Placerville. 530-6213663, placervillecoop.org.

The Really Tiny Booklight, $12.95, and ‘The Pocket Guide to Girl Stuff’ by Bart King, $9.99 at Face in a Book, 4359 Town Center Boulevard, El Dorado Hills. 916-941-9401, getyourfaceinabook.com.

Tyler Candle Company Candle, $20 (22 oz.) at Tan Central, 3490 Palmer Drive, Cameron Park. 530-672-2826, tancentral.com.

pinking of you

Tom’s “Adeline” Sunglasses, $129 at Mirror Mirror, 3300 Coach Lane, Suite B-8, Cameron Park. 530-6764511, mirrormirrorone.com.

Redken Pillow Proof Blowdry Express Primer, $19.80 at Adagio Salon, 4356 Town Center Boulevard, El Dorado Hills. 916-939-6604, adagioforhair.com.

by Jazmin White

Flower Hair Clip with Bling, $10, and Baby Emporio Little Legs Socks with Bling, $7, at Jordan’s Closet, 6394 Pleasant Valley Road, El Dorado. 530-3775154, jordanscloset.net.

Camoflauge Bandages, $4.50, and Ariat Fatbaby Pink Cowboy Boots, $99.95, at Redneck Bling, 492 Main Street, Placerville. 530-558-0722, getredneckbling.com.

Coral Acid Wash Shorts, $55 at us.topman.com.

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Jordan’s Closet photos by Justin Buettner; all others courtesy of their respective companies.

Sky Halter Top, $129 at Runway Boutique, 1000 White Rock Road, Suite 500, El Dorado Hills. 916-9336300, runway-boutique.com.


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48 stylemg.com - May 2014


W

hen dining at The Levee in Placerville, you can’t help but hum the old Hank Williams tune “Jambalaya (On the Bayou).” Why? Well, they have jambalaya on the menu for a start, and because, son of a gun we’ll have big fun—and we did! Have big fun, I mean. Under new ownership as The Levee (formerly Café Luna), the location off Main Street is intimate yet festive and very welcoming with its Louisiana-style ambiance, which should suit Placervillians down to the ground: Louisiana style is all about being friendly and laid-back. The Levee does Saturday evenings up right, too, with live music in the dining room beginning at 7:30 p.m. And who doesn’t love a little toe tapping with their meal? For starters, my husband and I enjoyed Cajun Beef Sliders, which is The Levee’s take on a Philly cheesesteak with thinly sliced Cajun-seasoned beef. Let me tell you, these sliders were oh-so cheesy—just how cheese steak should be. For mains, my plus-one ordered the Pasta Jambalaya and I opted for the Blackened Catfish. The servings were generous to say the least—no nouvelle cuisine here folks, simply hearty home-style helpings! My catfish arrived over seasoned basmati rice, topped with a shrimp and scallop cream sauce, and served alongside roasted beets and steamed broccoli. The catfish itself was delicious and seasoned well, featuring enough spice to keep a Cajun fan happy without setting off any fire alarms. The pasta was a winner as well—creamy and spicy with plentiful amounts of chicken and andouille sausage. We would have loved to sample their dessert menu, but we got more than our money’s worth with the mains. I guess that just means we’ll have to dress in style and go hog wild, me oh my oh at The Levee again.

Cajun Beef Sliders

The catfish itself was delicious and seasoned well, featuring enough spice to keep a Cajun fan happy without setting off any fire alarms. Pasta Jambalaya

The Levee, 451 Main Street, Suite 8, Placerville. 530-642-8669, mainstreetlevee. com.

May 2014 - stylemg.com 49


restaurantguide Featuring restaurants and eateries in the El Dorado County Foothills ** = MAGAZINE DISTRIBUTION POINT • AMERICAN / CAFÉ / DELI Back Forty Texas BBQ 3977 Durock Road, #205 Shingle Springs | 530-676-4040 Hours: Tue.-Thrs. 11:00a.m.-8:00p.m., Fri-Sat 11:00a.m.-9:00p.m., Sun. 11:00a.m.- 8:00p.m. Cards Accepted: V, MC, D, AmEx We serve authentic Texas recipes. We’ve been voted number one caterer and number one ribs in El Dorado County. Dine-in, Carry-out and Catering services are available. All of our dishes are made fresh from scratch daily. Our meats are slow smoked on our southern pride pit. Please come join us for a Texas-size meal. Bricks Eats and Drinks 482 Main Street Placerville | 530-303-3480 Burger Barn ** 6404 Pony Express Trail Pollock Pines | 530-344-7167 Buttercup Pantry 222 Main Street Placerville | 530-621-1320 Café Luna 451 Main Street Placerville | 530-642-8669 Caffé Santoro ** 2531 Merrychase Drive Cameron Park | 530-387-4432 Centro ** 385 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-5500 Crystal Basin Bistro 3590 Carson Road Suite B Camino | 530-303-3749 Cuppa Coffee and More ** 442 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-9600 Diamond Springs Hotel 545 Pleasant Valley Road Placerville | 530-621-1730 The Forester Pub and Grill ** 4110 Carson Road Camino | 530-644-1818 Heyday Café ** 325 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-9700 Hog Wild BBQ ** 38 Main Street Placerville | 530-622-3883 The Independent Restaurant & Bar 629 Main Street, Suite 102 Placerville | 530-344-7645 50 stylemg.com - May 2014

Log Cabin Café 3220 Pondorado Road Camino | 530-644-0345

Grand China 4340 Golden Center Drive Placerville | 530-626-5679

Mr. Pickles ** 4601 Missouri Flat Road Placerville | 530-642-1677

• FRENCH Allez! ** 4242 Fowler Lane, Suite 101 Diamond Springs | 530-621-1160

New Haven ** 6396 Pony Express Trail Pollock Pines | 530-644-3448 Old Town Grill 444 Main Street Placerville | 530-622-2631 Placerville Brewery ** 155 Placerville Drive Placerville | 530-295-9166 Shingle Springs Coffee Co. ** 4068A Mother Lode Drive Shingle Springs | 530-676-2623 Snooty Frog ** 3300 Coach Lane Cameron Park | 530-677-9025 Sweetie Pie’s ** 577 Main Street Placerville | 530-642-0128 Join us to feast on specialty scrambles, omelettes, pancakes and Belgian waffles hot off the griddle for breakfast. For lunch enjoy our best-seller chile relleno casserole, sandwiches and paninis galore, and delightful salads made with the freshest vegetables and fruits to pair with our hearty homemade soups. Don’t forget to leave room for our wonderful homemade desserts! Torino’s Bar & Grill 251 Main Street Placerville | 530-622-7500 ZacJack Bistro 3275 Coach Lane Cameron Park | 530-676-2969 Z Pie 3182 Center Placerville Drive Placerville | 530-621-2626 • CHINESE/MONGOLIAN China City Restaurant 4100 Cameron Park Drive Cameron Park | 530-672-9888

• ITALIAN Papa Gianni’s Ristorante ** 3450 Palmer Drive Cameron Park | 530-672-2333 • JAPANESE Amerikan Ichi Sushi 1234 A Broadway Placerville | 530-621-2100 Kobe Surf & Turf ** 3300 Coach Lane, #C-1 Cameron Park | 530-672-9210 Shilla Sushi Bar 2943 Paul Bunyon Road Placerville | 530-644-5047 • MEXICAN Cascada Restaurante & Cantina 384 Main Street Placerville | 530-344-7757 Casa Ramos ** 6840 Greenleaf Drive Placerville | 530-622-2303 Que Viva ** 3300 Coach Lane Cameron Park | 530-577-3330 Taqueria Carnival 4340 Golden Center Drive Placerville | 530-344-7246 • SEAFOOD Powell’s Steamer Co. & Pub 425 Main Street Placerville | 530-626-1091 • THAI Taste of Thai 1160 Broadway Placerville | 530-621-9559

If we’ve omitted your favorite restaurant or you find an error, let us know via email: info@stylemg.com.

Diamond Chinese Restaurant 570 Pleasant Valley Road Placerville | 530-622-8188 Dignity Dragon Restaurant 415-A Placerville Drive Placerville | 530-622-4293

For more restaurant listings in the El Dorado County Foothills and surrounding areas, visit our website at: stylemg.com and click on our extensive restaurant guide.


escape

god bless america D-Day Beaches and Cemeteries by LeeAnn Dickson

Utah Beach

56 stylemg.com - May 2014

locations where Allied Forces selflessly joined to save the French people and the world from the continuing horrors of war. The story of World War II and why we needed to take these beaches is long and complicated. However, General Dwight D. Eisenhower was able to capture the essence and the urgency of the mission in his message to the Allied troops before they headed out that faithful day—June 6, 1944. That morning, American troops stormed Omaha and Utah Beaches, English soldiers fought on Sword and Gold Beaches, and Canadians battled on Juno Beach; by day’s end more than 4,000 young brave soldiers were killed, injured or missing. Last September, my travel companions and I descended into northwestern France—ready to take in heaps of history, food and wine while traveling through the regions of Brittany and Normandy.

Le Petit Matin

On our last week, we made it by train (the direct route from Paris is about 2.5 hours) to the tiny village of Bayeux. Tip: Trains run on time in France—make sure you’re on the right platform! We snuggled into our bed and breakfast, Le Petit Matin, which was so centrally located that a quick walk offered easy access to regional food, fun shops, and tons of history. Our host, Pascal, and his wonderfully warm family welcomed

Photos by Dr. Terry Baker.

B

arefoot, I’m standing in the gently lapping waves of the English Channel. The tepid water swirls around my ankles as my feet sink deep into the soft French sand. As a gentle, cool breeze graces my body, I raise my face to scan the horizon where the blue of the sea and sky met seamlessly. I hear sea birds squawking in the distance. In this beautiful serene scene with clear greenish-blue water and golden sparkling sand, my heart aches and my eyes fill with tears. Here—at this water’s edge on Omaha Beach—70 years ago, American blood ran deep, and death commanded this calm and peaceful place. I am not alone. There are dozens of others just like me quietly walking or listening to whispering tour guides. This is not a beach for play; it is for remembering. Omaha, along with Utah, Sword, Gold and Juno Beaches, are hallowed seaside


the throne of England. Tip: All three museums are covered by purchasing an all-inclusive pass; buy one at the first museum you visit to avoid ticket queues. Each village here has a church—from tiny to grand. Don’t miss the Cathedral Notre-Dame de Bayeux on the central square. Consecrated in 1077, damaged and rebuilt in the 12th and 15th centuries, it is a delightful mix of Romanesque and Gothic architecture. On our second day, we excitedly awaited our tour of the D-Day beaches and cemeteries. Although we usually prefer to travel without a guide, we decided to book an organized, guided tour—in order to get a lot of historical information and avoid renting a car or getting lost. After a hearty breakfast of fresh-baked croissants, assorted cheeses and meats, coffee and yogurt, our guide, Magali, pulled up in a comfortable minivan. We piled in, joining two couples from Cathedral Notre-Dame de Bayeux

us as their own. Our rooms, featuring an en suite bath, were beyond comfy in this beautifully restored and maintained 300-year-old building. We spent our first day exploring the Baron Gerard Museum of Art and History, the Memorial Museum of the Battle of Normandy and viewing the famous and fabulous Tapisserrie de Bayeux—a nearly 230-feet linen tapestry that was embroidered in the 11th century and tells the story of William conquering Harold for

Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial

American General Dwight D. Eisenhower sent this message to the young men right before the D-Day invasion. These few well-chosen, inspirational and inspiring words sum up the importance of their mission. “Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon a great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers in arms on other fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and the security for ourselves in a free world. Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle hardened, he will fight savagely. But this is the year 1944! Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 194041. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man to man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our home fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to victory!

Photos by Dr. Terry Baker.

I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full victory! Good Luck! And let us all beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.”

Omaha Beach

May 2014 - stylemg.com 57


escape the U.S., and were off. Magali, who spoke perfect English, was a multi-generational Norman native; she wove stories of our troops and battles while navigating the narrow streets and hidden alleys. Tip: I wore flip-flops on this chilly morning because I wanted to wade in the sea; it’s best to wear sensible walking shoes. Our first stop was the La Cambe German Cemetery, which holds the

La Cambe German Cemetery

Tour group visits Omaha Beach

58 stylemg.com - May 2014

The Spirit of American Youth Rising from the Waves

eternally resting in foreign soil. Here, 9,387 headstones guard over those brave souls who gave their lives so freedom could prevail. There are 41 sets of brothers, four women and 307 Unknowns among the graves. Along the wall in the Garden of the Missing, 1,557 names are inscribed. The 22-foot bronze statue of a young man dominates the memorial. The title, The Spirit of American Youth Rising from the Waves, explains how the French feel about Americans. In this part of the country, they will never forget the sacrifice our nation

and these young men and women made to liberate their country and save the world. Tip: Take plenty of hankies. Taps sounded at 5 p.m. and the cemetery staff lowered the American flag as silence filled the air. I’m always proud to be a citizen of this great nation, but never more than at that moment.

FOR MORE PLACES TO ESCAPE TO, VISIT STYLEMG.COM.

The Spirit of American Youth Rising from the Waves photo courtesy of Valerie Joannon—Normandy Tourist Board. All other photos by Dr. Terry Baker.

remains of more than 21,000 German military personnel. The black rock tombstones and monuments were striking. Next was a short drive to the lovely, tiny village of Sainte-Mere-Eglise and the U.S. Airborne Museum. The night before the invasion, 15,000 paratroopers dropped into the town. After just enough time to tour the museum and the church, we headed to Pointe Du Hoc—the spot where members of the U.S. Rangers had to scale a steep cliff to reach the site and disarm the heavily defended enemy for two days. There are bomb craters, battlements and an overlook to explore. After, it was on to Utah Beach and then Omaha Beach. We had plenty of time to walk, explore and contemplate on our own. Our last stop was the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, which overlooks Omaha Beach, and is one of 14 permanent American WWII military cemeteries where our troops are


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Robin Kruzik

Do you know that our editorial is not paid for, nor can it be purchased? In fact, our Introducing and Dine reviews are not paid advertisements. If you’d like your business profiled, please email Megan Wiskus at megan@stylemg.com. Once we determine when your business will be featured, we will contact you to schedule a time to come out and take a photograph. Thank you!

60 stylemg.com - May 2014

Moelli de Boer

UNIQUE AERIOGRAPHY Camino 530-644-4002 unique-aeriography.com

Describe your business. Natalie (not pictured): My business definitely seized me and gives no indication it will ever let go of my collar. I am a writer and publisher of quality, wholesome books for you and your family—from playful children’s books, humorous Westerns, and even a book overviewing the basics of dyslexia, dyspraxia and ADHD. Our business is female owned and operated, and was made in the U.S. (both the books and us). Robin: I write delightful books for children, and I love to write to speak to the heart of a woman. Writing has become who I am and how I see the world. What life accomplishments are you most proud of? Natalie: My most recent accomplishment was earning a Master of Education, and my most meaningful accomplishment has been helping my mother achieve her dream of publishing her own writing. Robin: Raising four wonderful children to be delightful adults...and surviving it! As a day-care provider, too, having a hand in raising several more little ones continues to bring me joy and writing material. What’s your biggest job perk? Natalie: Doing what I love for hours and hours with no end in sight! Robin: Being able to work any hour around the clock. Where do you and your family go locally to have fun? Natalie: Mom and I take a drive to Negro Bar; I kayak, she writes, and we wrap it up with takeout on the shore. Robin: To friends’ homes, local movie theaters, the library, and live theater. What’s your favorite local event that you go to? Natalie: Apple Hill Robin: Apple Hill, live events and craft shows. What’s your favorite local event that you go to? We enjoy the El Dorado County Fair.

Photos by Dante Fontana.

Describe your business. Did you find it, or did it find you? Unique Aeriography does low-altitude aerial photography with a balloon from 15 to 500 feet, and from different sides at varying angles. Our clients get clear, detailed images that outline precisely what they want to see. Our work is environmentally pure—no noise, no pollutants and no impact. We are winners of the “2013 Sustainable Business” award. My business found me. I started it with my German son, Rainer, who photographed archeological sites for German television with fantastic results. How are you involved with both the community and your customer? We are members of the chambers of commerce in Sacramento and El Dorado County. Before every photo shoot, we meet with our customers at the site to learn what is important to them, and then we deliver that and more. Privately, we are members of the Kiwanis Club of Roseville, and we love Stammtisch El Dorado, a German club that does events like Mayfest, Oktoberfest and more. What life accomplishments are you most proud of? I have raised, as a divorced mother, four loving, caring, supportive and successful children who all live in Germany and have great relationships with each other. What’s your biggest job perk? Seeing the faces of our customers when they look at their photos. What’s your favorite place to eat out locally? I love lobster, so Red Lobster in Citrus Heights, and Cascada in Placerville. What’s your favorite local business other than your own? ArtiFact Ink and Spot-On Signs in Placerville. They support me with all of my business needs and do excellent work. If you could be any other profession, what would it be? A healer. And finally, customer service is…? It is essentially important, combined with doing the best job possible.


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thewhereandwears

flower power 6 Fab Finds in and Around El Dorado County by Rachel Lopez and Kirsten Vernon 3. DRESS TO IMPRESS This beautiful, one-of-a-kind Decaf Plush dress, found at Annieberries in Placerville, is handmade in California. Colorful, floral prints are a perfect wardrobe addition to your little one’s closet this season. $54, annieberries.com

Add personality to plain with a simple pop of color. This floral print accent pillow, made by Newport and available at TJ Maxx in Placerville, will accessorize solidprint décor and brighten up any room. $16.99, tjmaxx.com

1. FLOWER FIELD TRIP Ready to get filled with ideas and inspiration for your garden? Take a picnic and head to Amador Flower Farm where you can peruse their 14 acres of gardens. Open daily this month from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free, amadorflowerfarm.com

4. FLORA, FAUNA AND FOLIAGE For a large array of perennial and annual bloomers, check out Front Yard Nursery in El Dorado. Featuring drought-tolerant, native and unique plants and trees, as well as an array of organic products—El Dorado County’s largest nursery has something for everyone! $1.99+, frontyardnursery.com

2. STYLE YOUR SOLE These floral Faded Tropical TOMS, available at Bella Talloni in El Dorado Hills, are a spring- and summer-approved staple. Paired with jeans and a tee or with your favorite pair of shorts, you’ll be the most fashionable kid on the block. $40.50, bellatalloni.com 62 stylemg.com - May 2014

6. DAISY LOVE We love the flowery disposition of this Tilly’s hat. With “love” and daisies on it, it’s bound to turn heads. Plus, being snapback style, one size fits all. $11.99, tillys.com

Rachel Lopez and Kirsten Vernon are hosts of ‘The Where and Wears’ of El Dorado County. Be sure to watch them on Foothill 7 Television and Sierra Community Access Television 2 and “like” them on Facebook.

Amador Flower Farm photo by Leslie Sellman-Sant. All other photos courtesy of Rachel Lopez and Kirsten Vernon.

5. PRETTY IN PILLOWS


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tom’stake

diamonds are forever Saying Goodbye to Man’s Best Friend

“G

et the ball, Diamond!” Just a whisper of those four words would perk up our Lab’s ears like they were attached to invisible wires. Her dark eyes, set so perfectly inside her square white face, would lock on the tennis ball in my hand and grow wide…attentive…expectant. If she were lying down, she’d sit up. If she were sitting, she’d stand. Her mouth would pull back in one of those goofy grins enjoyed only by happy dogs and mad men. Sometimes I would tease her, cocking my arm as if to throw but then holding it there. And she would wait, eyes still locked on the ball, an eager but limited patience rippling through her body. If I held the pose a moment too long, she’d glance from the ball to me and let out a couple short, pointed barks that were basically dog for, “Throw it, you moron!” And then I would chuck the ball and she would be off like a bullet, racing across the grass of a park, the sand of a beach, or the asphalt of our street. She’d trot it faithfully back and plop it at my feet—where it oozed with an ever-increasing slobber (that I never did quite enjoy)—and she’d wait, still wearing that same drunk smile and panting like a joyful steam engine, until I picked up the slimy sphere and we’d do it all over again, for what seemed like hours, 66 stylemg.com - May 2014

then months, then years. When she grew too old for that, we’d take walks at the creek behind our house where she could get her sniff on. Sometimes I’d still bring a ball and, if she seemed particularly spry that day, I’d surprise her with a “get the ball” and roll it out a few yards in front of us. It was like watching a senior league softball player trying to hoof it down to first, but she’d still go after it, her eyes still full of cheerful eagerness, her mouth carved into another big smile. And if I teased her by holding the ball too long, she’d still bark and call me a moron. We had to put Diamond down in March. Thirteen years she was with us. She used to sleep upstairs in our room and if either Vickie or I got up at night to use the bathroom, Diamond would wake and walk us there— the entire five feet—just to, you know, make sure we made it OK. When she got too old to climb the stairs, she slept at the bottom, and every morning when I came down, she’d rouse herself from her bed and sit up, just in case I needed her for anything. She wasn’t perfect. If she were left alone for too long she became so anxious that she would utterly annihilate curtain sets,

blinds, and the screen door of a friend who was watching her. She was an incorrigible beggar, although that, I acknowledge, was much more our fault than hers. She shed hair like New Year’s Eve confetti. And, most disturbingly, she had an uncanny knack for taking huge dumps at the most inopportune times—usually on a sidewalk, with people around, and on days I forgot to bring a bag. But damn, she was smart. Intuitive. Quiet. Gentle. Beautiful, too: With an arcticwhite coat and coffee-colored eyes, she looked like a fur seal pup. It was really kind of ridiculous. Nothing prepares a pet owner for that moment when you have to decide what’s best for your animal. It sucks, flat out. And there in the vet’s office on that crummy day, all I could do was scratch her ears like she loved, and as she faded away, I leaned down and whispered, over and over, the only words I could think: “Get the ball, Diamond. Go get the ball.”

Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1, email him at tnvmailey@gmail.com, or follow him on Twitter @kncitom.

VISIT STYLEMG.COM FOR MORE TOM’S TAKES.

Photo courtesy of Tom Mailey.

by Tom Mailey


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