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V/SUAL ZEITGEIST

Dear readers, that past “Stash” issue I started with - “We had a crazy time to finish this magazine that is for sure, ...” and yes I can say it again. In the middle of production, the area around Bochum, our hometown got hit by a large storm. We had rainy storms before but none like this one. Just to give you a number, the say more than 3000 trees have been laying around in our streets, blocked us to move around, made us walk climb our streets. Our office got flooded due to the heavy rain, but yes, again we made it happen that the magazine gets finished even we felt thrown back into the middle age for some days. Today we can still see these damages but life is back to normal. So yes, our coverstory - it is about a sympathetic guy I was happy to meet only a few month ago. We spend some great time together getting lost but taking images in the suburbs of a funky german town called Wetzlar. The Coverstory is Stephan Vanasco currently living in Los Angeles and better known as “Van Styles”. Mainly he is a photographer with a huge fan base and followers around the world, but also his favorite motives end up on his own brands t-shirts. Next to being the Owner/ Creative Director of V/SUAL he did work for many people, brands, agencies and we can say his images represent a “Future Zeitgeist”. “We live in the age of the image” is the appropriate headline as almost everybody is into taking images and stills via mobile phone or digital cameras. Documenting our culture and the

streetwear today the quarterly magazine for international streetstyles NO 49

T O D AY

V/ S UA L ZEI T GEI S T

IMPRINT ISSN 1860-9996 streetwear today Alte Hattingerstrasse 11 | D-44789 Bochum | Germany | Tel: + 49 (0) 234.6 23 97 89 | office@stw2d.com | www.streetwear-today.com

V/SUAL ZEITGEIS T STEPHAN “VAN STYLES” VANASCO

july, august, september ISSN 1860-9996 | D ¤ 5,00 | USA $ 10,00 UK £ 6,00 | SKR 70 | NKR 85 E, F, I ¤ 9,00 | A, B, L, NL ¤ 6,00 | CHF 10 CNY 100 | HKD 80 | JPY 1400

Cover and Coverstory: Stephan “Van Styles” Vanasco with Leica T-System @leicacraft

Editor in Chief: Martin Magielka (V.i.S.d.P.) | mm@stw2d.com Editor: Erik Hüsken | eh@stw2d.com Editor: Marcus Welt | mw@stw2d.com Editor UK | Jason Jules | jj@stw2d.com Editor USA | David Gensler | dg@stw2d.com Editor: Michael Leuffen | hml@stw2d.com Photo Editor: Bastian Hessler | bastian@stw2d.com Fashion Editor: Sara Magielka | sm@stw2d.com Fashion Assistance: Meike Ratsch | mr@stw2d.com Design: STUDIO F | Anja Steinig, Adrian Staude, Miriam Busch www.studiof.de | as@studiof.de Further contributors in this issue: Tobias Wirth, Bernhard Handick, Ted King, Adam Shatz, Josh Franklin, Amanda Fleming, Roland Wolff, Morgan Winter. many more...

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diversity of esthetics became a very important part in our world. That taste of the times defined in an image. A still, a great moment, a catchy thing sticking out of millions. Well, we are very pleased to introduce you to Van Styles. But sure we have more to offer in our issue stw2d.no.49. Next to Van we had talks with Alexander Matt, Global Marketing Director at the adidas Originals Brand, Jon Kooley, the Creative Director at L1 premium goods and Shawn Hoy, Footwear Product Director at Nike football. These feature tell us more about esthetics in product and design coming out soon. We said hello and happy 20ies anniversary to the estheticians of the Irie Daily Brand. There is the Ucon brand and a talk with its co-founder Jochen Smuda or the interview with the founders of the interesting French Brand Olow which take us thru their tastes and visions. So well there is a lot of different esthetics given in this issue of streetwear today. A big point on my list of things is that we want to bring you even more of this in our next up issue! It is time for our stw2d.no.50 photo edition. This one will be a very special and large photo issue documenting streetwear and its culture releasing for your reading pleasure during the winter times. Be well prepared for that one. But first have fun to read our issue stw2d.no.49.

Martin Magielka for streetwear today.

Marketing, Advertising and Publishing: Heavy Traffic UG Alte Hattingerstrasse 11 | D-44789 Bochum | Germany Martin Magielka | mm@stw2d.com Subscription Service, Retail and Distribution inquiries: Meike Ratsch | mr@stw2d.com www.streetwear-today.com National distributor (Germany): Stella Distribution GmbH Frankenstrasse 7 | 20097 Hamburg www.stella-distribution.de International distributors: Austria: Morawa Pressevertrieb | www.morawa.com Belgium: AMP | www.ampnet.be Brazil: H.B. Revistas | www.hbrevistas.com.br Great Britain (UK): Emblem Group Japan: Kaigai Inc. | www.kaigai-inc.co.jp Netherlands: Betapress B.V. | www.betapress.nl Norway: Listo AB | www.listo.se Spain: Comercial Atheneum | www.atheneum.com

Sweden: Svenska Interpress | www.interpress.se Switzerland: Valora AG | www.valora.com Singapore: Basheer Graphic Books | www.basheergraphic.com Thailand: Peng Ha Shieng Co. Ltd. Printed by: wir machen druck We cannot be liable for unrequested material we receive. Unrequested material can be used any time. Reprinting of streetwear today – complete or in extracts – only by written agreement. Published features from freelancers must not share the opinion of the editorial staff. Place of jurisdiction is Bochum.


Š 2014 adidas AG. adidas, the Trefoil logo and the 3-Stripes mark are registered trademarks of the adidas Group.

#zxflux. infinite.


adidas.com/originals


LIVING OFF THE WALL: A VANS DOCUMENTARY SERIES OFF THE WALL CHINA ALL THE STORIES:

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DOCUMENTARIAN:

VANS.COM/LIVINGOFFTHEWALL


CONTENT

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STW2D.NO.49

3 /2 014 J u l i , A u g u s t , S e p t e m b e r

V/SUAL ZEITGEIST

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Converse Weapon, Vans Vault and The Peanuts, K1X and the Selleck Pack, G-Star Raw for the Oceans, New Balance Neon Lights, G-Shock Camouflage edition, Onitsuka Tiger „My Town My Tracks“ feat. Tosao and Harandia MT, Lakai Echelon edition by Swanski, Guy Mariano and Spike Jonze, Suppa Roos and the Made In Germany thing

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Olow, Ucon Acrobatics, Supernatural

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Once upon a time by Bernhard Handick

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C OV E R

Stephan “Van Styles” Vanasco – V/SUAL ZEITGEIST

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20 years Irie Daily, Dickies Denim, Broken Homme

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Jon Kooley, Creative Director at L1 premium goods

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Cosmetics by Bastian Hessler feat. vegan and organic cosmetics

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Talk to me by Bastian Hessler

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Alexander Matt, Global Marketing Director at the adidas Originals Brand

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Shawn Hoy, Footwear Product Director at Nike football

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Musterknaben by Tobias Wirth

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White Fence, Jungle

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Michael LeSage – Giant Eternal, Scott Campell – If You Don’t Belong, Don’t Be Long, Wes Lang

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Subscription

V/SUAL ZEITGEIST

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P. 28 – Olow

P. 48 - Stefan “Van Styles” Vanasco

P. 66 - John Kooley

P. 86 - adidas Originals P. 92 - Nike football

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CONVERSE

The Weapon Throughout this summer we will see the release of some cool high top sneaker coming from the Converse Brand. It is a collection of five models varying in style. This compilation starts with the one listen to Cons Weapon Patchwork. It is a funky mix of fresh colors, materials and Converse DNA specifications. No shoe looks like the other but the famous Cons Star Chevron Logo stays the same and shines bright due to reflectivity. This outstanding Patchwork model has two similar brothers with two different attitudes. Both come in two color ways. There are two packs, the CONS Weapon Ray Pack and the CONS Weapon Reflective Mesh Pack which hit shelves soon. The Ray ones have a mottled fabric in grayish tonality having a little retro charm, the Reflective Mesh ones play with lights due to their smooth surface with reflective material.

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“We are happy to announce the Launch of the Converse CONS Weapon Sneaker collection. It gives a first view on these refined and revised Cons Weapon model retaining their distinctive character.� says Chris Law, Design Director for Converse Cons.

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SINCE 1922 WWW.DICKIES.EU


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nostalgic footwear

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VAULT BY VANS MEETS PEANUTS

We can call it a blast from the past when we see this fine Capsule collection. It is Vault by Vans “the Peanuts” collection which takes us back over three decades ago. So all time favorite brand Vans reissues two vintage prints created for the Peanuts crew in 1983. These special patterns commemorated the opening of Camp Snoopy in Knott’s Berry Farm and were used on Vans footwear sold exclusively at the Southern California amusement park. Remembering this, these long-gone prints come back in Fall 2014. The “Snoopy and the Gang” print shows up on two nostalgic color ways of the Vans OG Authentic LX and a solo take on the OG Sk8Hi LX. The “Camp Snoopy” motif showcases Snoopy’s alter ego, Joe Cool, in a collage arrangement across dual color-ups of the OG Era LX and an additional installment of the OG Sk8-Hi LX. Check those Sk8-Hi's as they are the real original version without the extended olli pad, which in my opinion gives a more harmonic and aligned overall look. Truly available in adult and toddler sizing at your finest Vans dealers.

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All Burton bags are backed by a Lifetime Warranty.

The Tinder Pack available at burton.com


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PHOTOS: DIRK MERTEN

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The release for this flowery set of goodies is planned for this July in 2014 at selected retailers and for sure you get it on their online spot. Remember to bring flowers especially in summer!

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THE SELLECK PACK

Full on summertime, holidays and a good vibe and yes we talk about a grand gesture... thanks for the flowers. Basketball brand K1X is poised to bring us some flowers to the courts this summer. Mainly black but accentuated with beautiful flowers the “Selleck Pack" features a line of goods including a snapback cap, 5-panel cap, short-sleeve shirt, pocket tee, pocket tank top, mesh shorts as well as the footwear silhouettes “Cali" and “Anti-Gravity". This Pack, the name says it all was named in honor of actor Tom Selleck, who cultivated this iconic look in the legendary 1980ies hit series “Magnum P.I."

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THE O ’ RIGIN AL SIN C E 1 9 5 2 —— ON E I L L .C Om


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G-STAR

as much rubbish is dumped into the ocean as the weight of fish caught – so does the need for a solution. G-Star has joined forces with its partners, using ground-breaking technology to not only retrieve plastic from the oceans, but transform it into a new generation of denim. Matching their internal innovation, the Bionic Yarn denims are printed with an original pattern using the initiative’s mascot, Otto the Octopus.

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We featured the activities of Bionic Yarn, the Vortex Project, Parley for the Oceans and curated by Pharrell Williams in relation to Burton snowboards in one of our past issues. To keep on track with this ambitious Project we show their latest activities with the G-Star Raw Brand. The Line “Raw for the Oceans” is the forefront of sustainable fashion as all pieces are made from Bionic Yarn, an eco-thread of fibers derived from recycled plastic bottles fished out the Ocean. As issue of ocean plastic grows – each year alone, three times

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Raw for the O S N C E A

SUPPORT IT.

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www.facebook.com/ROOS

www.kangaroos.de

© 2014 Bernd Hummel GmbH. „KangaROOS®, ROOS® and the kangaroo device are registered trade marks owned by and used under licence from Asco Group Limited“


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NB Neon Lights

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While the New Balance Brand produced their first shoes already in 1909, they invented their role model with its fabulous name 574 later on in 1988. Since than this retro classic got a bunch of cool colorways and special make up’s with diverse materials to hit their fans. For this summer the NB creatives come up with six new models taking inspiration from colorful 80ies neon signs. Four of those are meant to be worn by men, other four encase those tender feet of some sneaky beauties, so they share two color variations. Mainly seamless, the upper is made from finest microfibre which sits on the proven ENCAP-System midsole with its relevant heel stabilizer. All this on a high end level as know at the New Balance Brand.

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G-SHOCK Deep in the woods

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For their next installment of camouflage patterned models, G-Shock chose the classic woodland camo. The woodland pattern was designed for the US Army and came to life in 1981, it's also referred to as m/81 “Woodland”. Based on the “leaf pattern camo” that was designed by the US Army Engineer Research and Development Laboratory (ERDL) in 1948, the woodland camo is designed with a 60% enlargement of the original drawings and its the pattern that inspired endless knock-offs and alterations. When you think of camo you most likely associate it with woodland.

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Shock Resistant 200M Water Resistant Auto LED Backlight (Super Illuminator) Multi-time (4 different cities) World Time 31 time zones (48 cities + UTC), city code display, daylight saving on/off, home time city/world time city swapping 5 Independent Alarms (one-time or daily) Hourly Time Signal Flash alert Flasher with buzzer that sounds for alarms, hourly time signal, countdown timer time-up alarm 1/100 second stopwatch Measuring capacity: 23:59'59.99" Measuring modes: Elapsed time, split time, 1st-2nd place times Countdown timer Measuring unit: 1/10 second Countdown range: 24 hours Countdown start time setting range: 1 minute to 24 hours (1-second increments, 1-minute increments and 1-hour

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The model selected to sport the woodland camo is the GD-120CM. A new multi-angle printing technology was applied to create the case and band patterns of these models, as well as the patterns of their dials. Intriguing camouflage patterns are reproduced on curved surfaces of the watch case and the band. There are three options to choose from: A subtle brown and green camouflage pattern, a distinguished gray and black camouflage pattern and a posh red and black camouflage pattern. Besides the good look, the GD-120CM comes with features that make every tech specs geek go gung ho:


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Onitsuka Tiger HARANDIA MT suede

Onitsuka Tiger

“My Town My Tracks” It is about an ongoing campaign of the japanese sports fashion brand Onitsuka Tiger. The Brand goes Dutch for this upcoming autumn/winter season. Dutch? Yes they go Dutch with a spotlight on Amsterdam for their next installment of the OT's “My Town My Tracks“ campaign. Produced by creative agency Blast Radius Amsterdam, this next campaign is set in the Netherlands’ cosmopolitan capital where the focus is on Tosao, an energetic halfDutch and half-Japanese entrepreneur. Tosao introduces viewers to his neighborhood, friends and hangouts in De Jordaan, the city centre’s labyrinthine north-west district of quiet cobbled streets, canals, courtyards, boutiques and funky galleries. City explorers are invited to shadow Tosao's journey on foot and by bicycle to venues that capture the city’s rhythm through a series of intimate photographs, videos and many Instagram images. Photographer Fleur Bolt captured the still visuals which accompanies the collection film and seven behind-the-scenes

Instagram videos. As Onitsuka Tiger is a footwear brand the key visual of this campaign is next to Tosao this season’s newest product the HARANDIA MT, a lovely sneaker-boot inspired by winter running styles, crafted for the colder months in an urban environment. The HARANDIA MT features a slick silhouette, bold, refreshing colors and performance enhanced materials. The role model comes along in a soft grey tonality while diverse fresh color options will hit shelves. These will be available in different materiality like tech mesh, synthetic nubuck leather or premium suede executions. It is super comfy thanks to the inclusion of GEL technology married with a SoLyte midsole and High Abrasion Rubber. The shoe’s tongue reminds to their roots “Kobe, Japan Est. 1949”, paying homage to the brand’s birth, while the logo is stamped on the heel counter. A characterize design brought to life with Japanese values and urban culture entwined.

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Tosao an entrepreneur from Amsterdam presents his favorite colorway in a smooth grey with a little white and orange finish.

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Lakai

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Swanski's Camby “Echelon”

Last year we already heard about that new “Echelon” top tier line of the Lakai Brand. Great stylish footwear, but okay let us start with the basics first. Lakai got founded already in 1999 by those two skateboarding maniacs Mike Carroll and Rick Howard. It is a Torrance, California based footwear manufacturer having a great past in the skateboarding world also hobnobbing with the famous Girl and Chocolate brands. For the future they keep on rocking the skateboarding world but also get a bit closer to their lifestyle competence. Especially this Echelon series is meant to raise awareness in the more adult lifestyle scenery. Naturally, mature skater become a driving force in the industry, Lakai, with the help of Artist Swanski, Pro Guy Mariano and Filmmaker Spike Jonze, jaunts into the non-skate performance game. The line introduces great silhouettes in the form of the Albany, Camby and Camby Mid, all crafted out of diverse inspiring canvas and leather uppers with simplistic details such as leather overlays and reasoned lacing. Some unique and sophisticated pattern got created by Swanski, one of our favorite artists. He comes up with some floral designs and gave his iconic hand-drawings to three of the Lakai styles.

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Spike Jonze Albany “Echelon”

“Since 1999, Lakai’s commitment to peak skateboard function has made us the performance footwear choice for skateboarders everywhere. Function leads aesthetic. With Echelon, we’ve flipped these ideals with the freedom to design shoes that maximize style, while remaining true to Lakai’s skate heritage and commitment to quality.”

Guy Mariano Camby Mid „Echelon“

These beautiful editions of the Camby, Camby Mid and Albany definitely highlight this years Echelon collection for sure. Giving a bit more arty cloth into it, Lakai and Swanski added some printed shirts and caps. After we saw revamped styles by team rider and style expert Marc Johnson for past springs Echelon pack, now Guy Mariano gives his reduced to the max taste to Lakai's Camby mid footwear. Mainly black and grey tonality gets slick due to fine tuned detailing in three different versions. Constantly playing a role in Echelon's premium demand it is up to filmmaker Spike Jonze to also decide over style, color and materiality. The Albany silhouette is his weapon of choice. A Variation in a stylish mix of suede and smooth synthetic leather gets inked in a tidy black and slate grey. In conclusion, Lakai has expanded the Echelon Collection into a full line featuring diverse versions of three shoes designed with aesthetics at the forefront and a set of matching apparel. All of the shoes have a white contrasty vulcanized outsole. Great Job.

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Suppa Roos the “Made In Germany” edition

Hey, the release of these shoes a while ago was a great hit. For us reason enough to look closer what it is all about. First, yes, what is Suppa? Suppa is a great sneaker retail space in Stuttgart, Germany. It is the shop and online store of Erdal Ersan, better known as “Froggy” who gained fame since 2012. Since many years before Froggy is known to be on the forefront in this sneaker jungle. Collecting, trading and being now a shopkeeper with that taste of the times, all this has grown organically. Now a well selected amount of sneakers of brands such as Le Coq Sportif, Lacoste Nike, Adidas, New Balance, Asics and Saucony populate the shelves next to the sneaks of the Kangaroos brand. So well as you can imagine it is all about a special sneaker line created in close cooperation in between Suppa and the Kangaroos brand. They created a very limited edition based on the COIL R-1 model made from high-quality materials. The tag “Made in Germany” means that these black beauties are handcrafted near a place called the “shoe city” of

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Pirmasens, known to be the spot with a great shoe history. Strictly limited pairs were handcrafted from black calf leather with leather lining and a custom branded SUPPA logo. Oh well, this iconic COIL R-1 model was first built 46 years ago in 1968 and is fitted since than with their patented DYNACOIL shock-damping system. When it comes to handcrafted it is natural that each shoe is numbered on the inner tongue and gets the matching leather tote bag to underline the lofty style and aspiration.

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Les rêves commencent la nuit. . The french fashion label Olow is not based in Paris. Yes, take that! France, Fashion, Not from Paris. They are in Nantes, in the far west of France and thereby proof, that awesome fashion from France doesn´t necessarily be made in the capital. France has much more to offer than just that one big city. Olow is a brand that focuses on their collaboration with artists, and when you check out their homepage olow.fr, you´ll find not only very cool clothing, but also links and info to many artists that should be seen more often. With our Interview with Co-founder Valentin Porcher, we want to bring this small, but important brand to your attention.

Can you tell us about the genesis of the project, how did it all begin? It started in 2001 when during my studies, I met Mathieu, who is now my associate. We quickly became very good mates and worked together on a lot of creative projects (short films, advertising ...). Some years later, the desire to become our own boss and start building our own art business had really set in. We gathered together our small savings, and launched an online graphic t-shirt shop. The goods were stored at our parents and we worked from a basement in a building in Paris. This was followed by an epic that has lasted for 8 years now … If you had to define OLOW today what would you say? I think it is an art project that is in constant evolution. Progressively, we have gone from graphic t-shirts to ready to wear. Each collection is truly unique and is developed based on our state of mind, desires and encounters ... It's an authentic brand, with a history that speaks to people. It's not just a matter of fashion but really of culture. We create our own films, regularly organise exhibitions, collaborate on events and handcraft some of our POS ... We also have a webzine which not only talks about art but also music, travel etc... Production is centralised in Portugal? Why? We always wanted the proximity to be geographical and human. Indeed it is only a two hour flight away so we can go there regularly as part of collection preparations and also to monitor production. Most of our local partners speak perfect French which really facilitates this exchange. Some producers have even become

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Olow founders Mathieu Sorosina Valentin Porcher

friends over time. To sum up, I would say that Portugal is truly a guarantee of quality and ethics. You have worked with hundreds of European artists, how do you make your choice? We only work with artists whose work we appreciate. Some have a certain notoriety, others are still in school. Some are friends, or friends of friends, others have been discovered through the press or during exhibitions. The goal is to promote them as much as possible through organised exhibitions, exclusive product partnerships, videos ... When it comes to distribution, where can we find OLOW outside of France? The brand is sold in shops in Belgium, Luxembourg, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Czech Republic and soon in England. We are also looking for a distributor in Germany. Can you give us some clues about the next collection? Today we have offices in Nantes (western France) and are committed to discovering everything that revolves around us. It started by collaborations with artists. The next collection continues along this guideline. We chose to call it with the name of a town in a region that is completely unique, surreal and paradoxical. The film & lookbook which is also coming out in September will be really crazy. We chose to make warm clothing, to use beautiful materials and take inspiration from the maritime and industrial city world.

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UCON ACROBATICS I N 201 2 , I N O U R I S S U E N O . 42 , W E TA LK E D TO A RTI ST L EI F P O D H A J S K Y, W H O AT TH AT TI M E C O L L A B O R ATE D W ITH U C O N A C R O B ATI C S . T H E B E R L I N - B A S E D FA S H I O N L A B E L N OT O N LY C O N T I N U E S TH EI R FO RTH G O I N G S E A R C H FO R O U T STA N D I N G C O L L A B O R AT I O N S W I T H A RT I S T A N D B R A N D S , B U T A L S O C O N STA NTLY A M AZ ES U S W ITH C O NTEM P O R A RY FA S H I O N D ES I G N A N D ST YL E . I N TH I S I S S U E, WE S H OW PARTS O F TH EI R C U RRENT C O LLECTI O N I N TH E S H O OTI N G S BY B E R N H A R D H A N D I C K A N D TO B I A S W I RTH , B U T TO A S S U R E YO U R A B S O LU TE AT TE NTI O N TO TH I S L A B E L , W E WA NTE D TH E T W O FO U N D E R S O F U C O N A C R O B ATI C S , J O C H EN S M U D A A N D M A RTI N FU S S EN EG G E R , TO S H A R E TH EI R P H I LO S O P HY W ITH U S A N D TA LK A B O UT U P C O M I N G P R O J ECTS . WATC H O U T FO R U C O N A C R O B ATI C S . streetwear today 3 | 2014


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Moods of the Fall 2014 Collection by Ucon Acrobatics

Hey Jochen, first a question you might hear pretty often, what does Ucon Acrobatics mean? It all started back than with skating. For us a time, where we´ve been permanently looking for new spots to ride and new tricks to conquer. “Ucon” became an acronym for “Urban CONquest”, and “Acrobatics” was the manner of doing things while conquering. Tell us a bit more about the beginning of your brand and give us a short sketch of what will come up in the near future. Quite accurately 13 years ago I founded the Label Ucon Acrobatics with my mate Martin. We started while being at high school and university, quite a challenge. So, like many other labels, we had to manage production and distribution out of our basement. We also sold our goods out of the trunk of my car. Then, after finishing our studies seven years ago, we landed in Berlin. Regarding our future, I can say that on the one side we work hard to define our collections message, next trying to establish the brand more internationally. At this moment we work with seven new distributors in the UK, Russia, Australia, Sweden, Denmark, France and Switzerland. And for sure we also work on interesting new collaborations we´ll present in the next months, for example with a fine backpack label from South Korea.

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Ucon Acrobatics x Haw-Lin Services collaboration for autumn-winter 2014

Since you have been working on Ucon Acrobatics since more than 13 years, how would you outline the brands and your collections development? Every collection is above all a mirror image of the time where it was developed. You can say that over the time, it advances in relation to our personal taste and style and the influences we collect. For us it is very important that we back our products, so an authentic statement can be delivered. As we of course also enhance in our life outside the fashion box, the face of our brand slightly alters too. Today for example, for us the assembly of different materials and the defined overall look of our outfits, is more important than it was in the past. Generally, what's the story behind your constant effort to collaborate with artists and designers? Since a long time artist collaborations are a regular feature in our collections, as we are all very interested in design and art. In the past we worked with artists such as Mario Hugo, Falko Ohlmer, Leif Podhajsky, Christina Magnussen, Monja Gentschow and many more. Since two seasons we even bring these collaborations to another level by offering the creatives the possibility to create an own small collection with us. Till Wiedeck of “HelloMe” had a great start with that last summer. Nathan and Jacob from “Haw-Lin Services” now made a great follow up for the upcoming autumn winter 2014 season. The inspirational theme for this Haw-Lin capsule is motocross. All outfits are reversible, with one side being made from a special, more decent material, and the other side, with an all over pattern print, reflecting the bold side of motocross. To celebrate this new thing we have a launch event at the Voo Store Berlin the 11th September this year. .

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You don't only collaborate with artists a lot, but also other Brands like for example currently with the bicycle brand 8Bar. Tell us about that? Similar to the artist collaborations such brand projects are very important to us. Bringing creatives heads together, that´s what made this thing fruitful. And at the end of the day, we do not want to be reduced to just clothing. Sure, clothes are our passion and main focus but we really like to play out creativity in other projects. You can also see that by checking out our Mixcast series where we offer musicians a platform to present their stuff. Besides you, who is Ucon Acrobatics and how do you work as a team, what are your strong points? We are a team of four people. Martin and I founded the Brand, Fabian and Seppi a while later. Also the team regularly consists of an additional trainee. As in every team each one has its personal interest and strengths. To combine these and together create concepts for a new line is definitely our strong point. We are constantly flipping ideas and discuss whichever themes from several points of view. In the end our customers have the same diversity. As we all have different backgrounds and highly diverse opinions the creative tension is very inspiring for new ideas. Locations for production are a well discussed issue in these days. Can we ask where your products are made? For a brand of our size, production is a complex topic with lots of cha llenges. In the past seasons the variety of materials became very important to us. To find premium fabrics with an interesting look and the needed availability became a very challenging part of our work.

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That´s why we work with a couple of small manufacturers all over the world, wherever we find the right fabrics. Locations are in Europe, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria but also Germany. Further locations of production are in Thailand and China, where we often work with small companies. These countries are well established and very ambitious if it comes to textile production, compared to countries like Bangladesh. For us, bad working conditions or child labour is a no go! We want to wear our clothes with pride and a good conscience every day. That also is the reason why we frequently visit our manufacturers. Closing this interview, I’d like to know how you came up with the idea to build your showroom in a former cowshed?

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It was a friend of us who gave us the hint. Back in the days, cowsheds were placed in the backyards of Berlins blocks of buildings. After we first saw this place we immediately had a clear vision of how it could be but in the beginning everything looked really messed up. But after a year of hard work we had an office which was perfectly fitted to our needs. Now we are here since six years and every day we´re happy to work in such a beautiful office. Everything is under the same roof – showroom, photostudio and office. Ucon Acrobatics created a “Canvas Bag Series” which is based on a modern interpretation of a tote bag that is recognized around the world for over 60 years. Nowadays functionality and esthetics demands are different - that’s why they developed appropriate bags for various situations. All designs are constructed from the highest grade sustainable 16oz canvas. Strong and well crafted, they carry your everyday needs with a clean look and functionality.

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The days of a simple T-Shirt or tank top as undergarment are pretty much over. Especially when it comes to sport activities. One can choose from a broad selection of high end polyester fabric base layers. Problem here is that it can get smelly pretty quick. Mother Earth is also a good source when it comes to functional fibres. Products made from the wool of the Merino sheep are a great choice when it comes to function. Function here means, keep warm if cold, keep cool if hot. Problem here is, Merino is not really soft and if the skin is sensible it can get itchy. super.natural upped the ante for contact fabric that is sympathetically against the skin and combines both worlds – Merino wool and polyester yarn. They developed a special fibre that resembles a climbing rope. A polyester core to provide a higher stabilty is encapsulated with Merino that sits then next to the skin with great dampness absorbing quality. Another advantage is the that the fabric is very soft. super.natural offers a broad range of nicely designed base and midlayer gear that can be worn for sporting activities as well as for the daily business.

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[sn] super.natural – straight to the skin

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Stephan “Van Styles” Vanasco

V/SUAL ZEITGEIS T STEPHAN “VAN STYLES” VANASCO

Almost everyone reading this, in one form or another, uses photography in their day to day personal and professional lives - forcing us to redefine and reimagine the definition of a "Professional Photographer." Few modern professional photographers have entered the industry in a more diverse and entrepreneurial way than LA based VAN STYLES. New York born and LA raised Stephan “Van Styles” Vanasco has continued to expand and evolve his self-taught photography and his company, V/SUAL, to become a global influence within the streetwear and skateboarding communities. Van grew up in the San Fernando Valley where he actively pursued skateboarding and photography. He currently lives in Los Angeles where he is the Owner/Creative Director of V/SUAL.

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Can you start by telling us how you got into photography? My interest in photography began when I would read skateboarding magazines like Thrasher and Big Brother from the early 90’s. While I was skateboarding I fell into an opportunity to produce content in the adult entertainment industry. The job required a considerable amount of content to be created, so photography became an essential part of my daily life. Most of our shoots were photographed by professional photographers, but I would often have to step in when the production turnaround was tight and the photographers had scheduling conflicts. My desire to step-in led to a conversation with the company owner to begin handling all of my stills for the photo shoots; eventually this led to me teaching myself photography. The owner was supportive of my ability to handle my own stills which also allowed me to shoot while hanging out with my friends

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skateboarding. The continued use of photography for my work and in my personal life lead me to grow my talents which sent me travelling and now I literally have the whole world as my canvas. How did you decide to start V/SUAL? I decided to start V/SUAL after doing some fun and well known projects for streetwear brands such as Huf, Crooks & Castles, The Hundreds, JSLV, and Primitive to name a few. After working with these brands and skateboarding companies my friend suggested I do my own thing. It kind of made sense and made me feel like fuck it that is the American Dream, right? I would rather go for it then be 75 years old and wonder what if? So, I partnered with my buddy Jay, who I went to high school with, and he helped me bring the idea of having my own brand to a reality.


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You have a large and global social media following. How important is it for you to have this direct connection with your audience? Direct connection with your audience/fan base is very important in today’s world. All of the traditional walls and barriers of a lot of industries have been broken down by the freedom of the web. A big reason of why I am able to do what I do is because of the people who support my work. That work was simply put out by me and no one else. The people picked it up and spread the word. I think they appreciate the interaction as well. We all have a voice now and it shows them that you are listening. I love it personally, it just reminds you of the power that a collective community and their voices can have. You mentioned you had some new collaborations about to drop. Can you tell us more about the details? Over the upcoming months I have 2 collaborative shoes I did with Lakai Footwear. I was really excited about this one, not only because I am getting my own shoe, but because of the respect I have for the compa-

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ny as a whole. I also respect where the collaboration came from and what it represents; especially since most of the people involved in the project are people I grew up idolizing in skateboard videos. I will also have a camera bag I worked on with Chrome coming out in the fall. It is a great sling pack that works for me and the camera system I shoot with. Chrome is another brand that I dig what they stand for and what they have done. I believe it is all about working with brands and people who I back and endorse personally. What are some of the brands, designers, or other photographers that inspire you? I am continuously inspired by new and old creative talents and brands. Some of the brands that I like; Quite Life, Stray Rats, Huf, 4Star, and Published. I am inspired by a wide array of photographers; Ed Templeton, Daniel Harold, Matt Stuart, Mike Blabac, Bruce Davidson, Richard Kern, Boogie, Bruce GIlden, Martha Cooper, and Jill Freedman. Beyond this, I am inspired by; 13th Witness, trashhand, Travis Jensen, Evidence and Estevan Oriel to name a few.


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LA seems to be exploding with new designers, retail stores, artists, tech companies. What are your thoughts on why LA seems to becoming the obvious mecca for creative talent? I think L.A. just has a lot of resources out here for people to set up whether it is a retail store or an entire company. It is easier to produce and store clothing whether it’s textiles or printing. Retail spaces and warehouse spaces are less expensive than N.Y. or S.F. which has caused a lot of people to transplant from other places. These “transplants” are building a new culture that is more diverse which, in turn, is sparking the next generation of creative talent. We also have amazing weather year round. You travel a lot for work - what are your favorite places to shoot and why? I need to start traveling more, but my favorite places have been the cities I have gotten to visit. Oahu was rad. I just came back from Chicago for the first time and that experience was awesome. New York is a great place to shoot and will also hold a special place in my heart for photography. I don’t think it can ever get old for me.

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Any advice for young photographers or designers just starting out? If I had any advice for young photographers and designers starting out I would say do YOU. Don’t worry about what anyone else is doing. Stay true to yourself and create what you want to create and how you see things. Don’t even let anyone tell you how to take YOUR photos or do YOUR designs. Most importantly have as much fun as possible! What is next for both you and V/SUAL? Personally, I would like to travel more and continue photographing my travels. I just want to experience life and see things. As for V/SUAL, I am slowly growing the brand as well as some collaborations down the road. I feel fortunate enough to be doing this and I want to make it last. I want it to be seen as proof that if you follow what you love and stay true to yourself you can make a living doing what makes you happy. All images: V/SUAL by Van Styles Text & Interview: David Gensler

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20 YEARS OF IRIEDAILY A PEEK INTO THE PHILOSOPHY OF NOT JUST ANOTHER CLOTHING BRAND. Iriedaily the streetwear label straight outta Berlin-Kreuzberg was founded 20 years ago in 1994. 20 years of integrity, social responsibility, tolerance, altruism, environmental awareness, generosity, employee satisfaction and whatnot. Throwback 1994 – Beastie Boys – ‘Ill Communication’; Pavement - ‘Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain’; Soundgarden – ‘Superunknown’; Johnny Cash – ‘American Recordings’; Nas – ‘Illmatic’; Tortoise – ‘Tortoise’. Killing Zoe; Once Were Warriors; Natural Born Killers; Pulp Fiction. A certain box logo started its march around the world and became the epitome of hype. Every brand that came to life in the late 80ies, early 90ies has its origins in rebel culture, meaning skateboarding, surfing or independent music. Walter and Daniel the two remaining (of originally four) founders of Iriedaily are deeply rooted in Punk Rock. Their mindset is inspired from the DIY and “fuck the establishment” ethos of the bands they listened to in their teenage years.

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TRANSITION

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In 1994 Punk Rock as we knew it was more destructive than anything else. For us Hip Hop became more important. It was more about to corrupt the system from the inside than to simply destroy it. Inspiration courtesy of Public Enemy - Fight the Power! Going to a trade show was actually a no-go, but since streetwear was highly influenced by Hip Hop, it was possible for us to go into the world of fashion and commerce. It was also about leaving that parallel world of anti-everything. Besides that, the upcoming SoCal punk bands had a street background, were skaters and such and more open-minded in general. It was a major step for us to join the corporate world and we were overwhelmed to some extent because we got so much props, especially for the designs of Jaybo. His self-confidence and attitude was - We know what´s up! But there was also an inner struggle because we knew that entering the mainstream comes at a price and it was a thin line between corrupting our principles and staying true to ourselves. But we were able to make compromises that we can live with. When you get older not everything is just black and white anymore. Not everything out of your personal radar is just evil. Sometimes it is your own lack of knowledge, but open mindedness means to accept other ways of life, the limit of tolerance gets bigger. The fundamental attitude is still the same though but you´re more conscious and you screen yourself in a different way and more often.

It is extremly important for us that we have a chill vibe in our work environment. The consequence is that all our co-workers need passion for what they do. It might sound a bit outmoded but the way a traditional handicraft business is managed is a good example. It´s almost like a family and everybody works with passion. The same applies to indie-culture. People made fanzines, had record labels, but it was never about money, it was always about passion. This is what we try to transport into our business. It is also important that the salary structure is balanced, the social hierarchy must be on even terms, otherwise dissatisfaction creeps in. You might not make maximum profit but if you work for the long haul it is innate that you don´t make gigantic winnings. We have a highly emotional relation to our company. Everything we worked for and that includes our co-workers is part of our “project” and everybody can give his input. Your workplace is something where you spent a great amount of your lifetime and it should be fun to be there.

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PARADIGM SHIFT Role our co-founder and head of collection left Iriedaily in 2003. We were three buddies that rocked the company and when he left everything changed. He was a defining asset, our designer and supervised our clothing line. We needed a good amount of time to compensate that loss. Sales declined and the existence of the company was threatened. 2005/2006 were rough times for us.

They changed our imagery completely. Their work conveys the new Iriedaily. Berlin is still a place of self-fulfillment for many in all walks of life. Our look and feel carries Berlin as sense of life. In our view that is a certain laissez-faire, skateboarding, bikeriding, exploring the many facets of city with your friends amongst other things.

In this context surfing is a good metaphor. We were riding a wave for a long time but at some point we were in the white water and the thrust was missing. The wave of success decreased. There was urgent need for action. We changed legally from ordinary partnership to limited liability company. We relocated some of our manufacturing locations and hired Patrick as a new designer who provided a new look which eventually brought a new clientele. We changed our CI. It was basically a relaunch of our company. Another eminent factor in this context is Brand New History. It is a creative agency run by our friends Sascha and Sven. They are in charge of our visual communication.

Apart from that we are setting goals internally, not necessarily in terms of only financial success but more in terms of where we want to go with our brand. There´s a steady reflexion, we review where we are placed, we talk with our employes about their goals and try to find out what we can achieve together. Sense of belonging is an important term in that regard. Together we built a stable foundation and are in a state of steady construction to keep the Iriedaily house growing. Our eyes are set on the future.

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The Dickies “Pennsylvania� denim pants have a raw optic. They come in a regular fit selvedge jean made from 13oz 100% cotton yarn. The pants get delivered in a special custom made box. Yes, these are made to last long.

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DICKIES DENIM WORK HARD IN THESE for leisure wear already in the late 20th century. To pick up on this, the Dickies European streetwear section got created only a few years ago and brings us a wide and cool range of street affine work tested products, thus reinventing the American workwear classics in their streetwear collections. Within this feature we take a closer look to the diverse Dickies denim output which is available in different qualities, washes and bleaches. Just to say it loud – they have more great styles in there line but anyway, whatever you do – work hard in these.

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We told you the story of C.N. Williamson and E.E. “Colonel” Dickie and that they began their business careers in the “vehicle and harness” business in Bryan, Texas, around 1918. Then, a bit later in 1922, C. Don Williamson joined with his father and cousin to buy 100% of the overall company and renamed it Williamson-Dickie Manufacturing Company. Since than they do workwear and grew to the max with a well established distribution set up. Being pro in doing it, their products reach a large scale of working people. Their Chino is one of the most sold pant in the world. But since a while it is not only workwear they do. A whole new generation of custom bike builders, tattoo shop owners, skateboarder, bmx biker or just streetwear addicts are aware of those durable and affordable Dickies rugged garments that are stylish but never too fancy, too hip. These cloth have become part of so many various ways of expressing yourself and your specific lifestyle that it is obviously becoming a lifestyle brand. Since denim overalls and trousers worn for heavy labour have demonstrated the yarns durability, a quality that, along with its comfort, made especially the denim jeans extremely popular

Dickies “Michigan” rinsed in a regular fit. 12.5oz 100% cotton yarn and yes rinsed denim is when the indigo color is locked in and will not produce fades.

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Dickies “Louisiana” bleach washed slim fit jean made from 9,75oz 98.6% cotton yarn with 1,4% elastane added on.

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Dickies “Louisiana� black slim fit jean in a 5pocket western styling made from 9,75oz 98.6% cotton yarn with 1,4% elastane added on.

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Sophisticated Ruggedness These boots are made for more than walking

Broken Homme is a 100% American Made leather specific, boot collection. Each boot is built using goodyear welt construction, metal shanks, and cork filled midsoles. Broken Homme is about quality American Made products that combine a contemporary and working class aesthetic to a range of classic silhouettes. Broken Homme is the brainchild of two friends. Jim Leatherman and Josh Johnson are born floridian. They grew up in the nineties, with skateboards, surfboards, motorbikes and all kinds of fun stuff around them. Eventually, they moved to California, Long Beach more precisely, where they got involved in "the Industry", both of them were related to the alternative cultures that are skateboarding and action sports. Josh as a creative and marketing director for different surf and skate apparel brands, jim as the marketing all-rounder for a skate footwear company. At some point they realized that just sneakers were not cutting it anymore for them, and the alternatives on the market weren't really filling this void. They wanted something different, something new, something outstanding. Through his experience with apparel, Josh started getting into footwear design, learning from scratch through friends and more than often, right on the production line. The result are boots that can be worn in urban environments because they are designed with a metropolitan approach. On the other hand the boots are Union approved product design, footwear that can be worn by union workers. This testifies of the highest resistance, durability and safety levels. Perfect for those who run their boots down to the ground. The customer in mind is aware of materials, design and details. He can be a businessman as well as a blue collar worker, a skater or a biker. He grew out of his sneakers, and wears boots to suit his lifestyle. He has a certain aesthetic demand and likes gear that can be used in all walks of life.

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„By embracing life’s consequences, we proudly stand in our own foot print. We walk our own path and build our own future. We are less concerned with nostalgia, and more passionate about building our own history.“ – Quality is victimless –

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L1

outerwear streetstyle It was at past winter fashion weeks tradeshow circus when we had a date with Jon Kooley. I heard about him before - a great guy they say, a snow pro who is not entering boarding competitions but gained fame for his impressive film parts. Well looking even a bit closer he is that kinda streetskater using a snowboard to ride. He kills ledges and handrails, sure big kickers make him spin, deep snow lets him cheer, so I sum it up to - he is an all terrain boarder freak. At least his spots to shred needed a little snow. As clothing has a big focus in our magazine we got to know that Jon is one of those who should get the credit to be first in wearing sort of a streetstyle outfit instead of classic snowboard gear while riding. Adding water-repellent denims and technical checkered shirts to the line, he gave new ideas and street thoughts into it - soon he became the creative director of the L1 premium goods. As we are very much interested in new approaches and brands we are happy to announce that L1 has geared up now for the streets as well. First up to the mountain and now back to the streets again. Still a new territory? So yes, we had the chance to talk some of these points with Jon personally, as you see it was outside on the airfield of the Tempelhof airport and yes it was January. streetwear today 3 | 2014


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Hey Jon, nice to meet you. Could you please introduce yourself and let us know how do you feel over here in Berlin. Hi, my name is Jon Kooley. I am the creative director at L1 premium goods and right at this moment I feel pretty cold here in Berlin. But it’s an amazing city and I am glad to be here. It’s such an interesting city with a lot of history and an awesome vibe.

Being here at a tradeshow and not on a mountain, how do you feel about that? It is a whole different world for me, especially being at a streetwear tradeshow like this is totally new to me. Sometimes I feel like i’m more of an introverted type of guy. At times being in a place this size with so many people can be a bit overwhelming.

But than what is your favorite element? Home in Salt Lake City, or in Alaska where I grew up. Thats where I feel most comfortable.

So how did you get into snowboarding? Actually I lived in Bamberg, here in Germany for 7 years because at that time my Dad was in the army. I got super into skating there and when I moved to Alaska it was just kind of the natural progression to try snowboarding out. I had a bunch of friends who were into snowboarding so I had to sink or swim to keep up with them.

How did you got pro? I think it was 2002 when I first became a pro snowboarder for K2 and back than it was so easy compared to now. Now kids really have to work for it… I just had the opportunity to have a film part in this Mack Dawg productions movie called "shake down" and all of a sudden I was getting paid to snowboard.

You as a Pro Boarder, what is than the reason I never saw you entering a snowboarding contest? I really never done super well in those types of situations… I am just very nervous if people are watching me. That’s why I was drawn to more of the filming aspect of snowboarding. I felt more comfortable when it was just me with the filmer, a couple of good friends and some snow. That’s fun and keeps me going.

So than, what would you call your biggest success in snowboarding? For me the biggest success is being able to do what I love for the past 11 or 12 years and getting paid for it... To me that is successful.

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Okay, but how did you get involved into the whole design process of L1 Outerwear? Well – I used to ride for a company called Holden first, right from the beginning. It was back in the first year I turned Pro. At Holden I didn’t really get the chance to give any input, but when L1 gave me that opportunity "Hey come ride for us, you will be able to give as much input you want and you can work on your own signature line as well" and what can I say - I really liked that idea. One of my roommates at the time was a graphic designer and he taught me about how to use illustrator a little bit and I started designing. Oh maybe not really designing but giving drawings to the designer of L1 and told him exactly what I wanted. Maybe it was even a poor representation of what I wanted, but it just went from there. I work for L1 for six years and not only on my signature stuff but also gave input on things I thought might be cool. Not really full designs but missions and ideas and yeah they just asked me if I would like doing it as a creative director.

Does your work is now in conflict with your snowboarding time as a Pro? Technically I am still Pro because I get a pay check from Nitro to snowboard, and I still have a Nitro Pro Model snowboard. But i’m not going to have a full film part in a snowboarding movie, that is not possible at the moment as I am working one hundred percent on the L1 Lines.

How do you feel about it? It is amazing! My whole body never felt better.

People say you have been the first bringing street style to the mountains but now it feels like you would like to bring the mountain street style to the streets again. That is due to your new L1 streetwear line. Correct? Or what would you call the main inspiration behind your line? I would say with L1 Outerwear we definitely tried to integrate the "streetstyle", and it was a collection of a few people so not just me, who wanted to look and feel more like we are wearing streetwear instead of traditional snowboarding outerwear. With the L1 Premium Goods we took our inspiration for the outerwear from streetwear that we liked. It was just natural that one day we would eventually evolve into adding a real streetwear line.

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Yes somehow, but with streetwear you have a different approach and how much is actually taken from your snowboarding line to the streetline, are there pieces taken down? Yes, absolutely, we have some more technical type of pieces worked into our street wear line as well, so there are still waterproof Jackets. Or like this jacket I’m wearing has a waxed coating on it, but we do have a 2.5 layer jacket that is 5k waterproof and has 5k breathability and a vest thats also 5k and 5k. It’s not as tech as our outerwear needs to be but it more than suitable for someone commuting to work in the rain.

As I saw the line it still feels quite small, can we expect more? What is the plan for the future. For sure every season we want to grow it. With this one we just decided to do it and went for it. It is a small line, an introduction to streetwear. We tried to cover all the bases but not getting over our head to early. The spring 2015 line will be already a lot bigger.

So what might be a vision for L1 Streetwear? I feel like streetwear is a little more forgiving. You can kind of do what ever you want, it is also not as expensive to make as snowboard outerwear is. So if the distributors or buyers for example don’t like it we just don't do it. So far we only have one line but it feels like we can do whatever we want. It seems like there aren’t the limitation for L1 premium goods that we have with the outerwear.

Thank you any last words? Thanks for taking the time to interview me, and I look forward to my next trip to Berlin. This place is so cool.

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SUPERFLIES

„There's a set goin' strong, lotta things goin' on“ In order to get attuned for the World Cup in Brazil and to present their latest installment of visionary soccer boots, the Magista and Mercurial Superfly, Nike opened four temporary spaces in London, Berlin, Paris and Rio de Janeiro – The Phenomenal Houses – with events and action around football, lifestyle and entertainment. Soccer fans had the chance to play small-sided football, dunk themselves in Nike Football innovation, explore the latest in off-pitch style, customize sneakers and yes they could test the Magista and Mercurial Superfly on the spot. On display was also the Nike exhibition "Genealogy of Innovation" – showcasing 30 years of sneaker culture and 20 years of Nike Football. Due to all this we had the opportunity to talk to Shawn Hoy, Footwear Product Director at Nike football, about the inventive new Magista and Mercurial Superfly:

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Ilkay Gündogan and Nike Magista Hi

When a shoe is developed, what has to be done. Planning a new shoe, where does it start, where does it end? The process starts with players and the game. We try to understand what's happening with the players, what´s happening in the game and then we take a look at the consumer's life, what trends, what styles are affecting them. Thats where the insight comes from. Then it goes from insight to design. Imagine the insight being sketched out on paper from there to development and engineering, so how you take that sketch and actually develop a prototype. We take that prototype back to the same players that we talked to the first time. They test the prototype and tell us what they like and what still has to be changed and then it goes back to the process, it's very intuitive. Does this mean that the main focus is on the technical aspects? The style as well, it has to look good. Some of the pro-players are style-icons, but if you look at some of those kids, they have their own unique style, their own edge, their own expressiveness. They don't want what everybody else has, they want to stand out within the context of their own style, so it has to look good for them. Distinction is important. On the pitch we've given footballers an opportunity to be more expressive. I guess the information you get from the players are very important? Our athletes services team in Italy goes out once the players have the boots. We'll get all their feedback, the services team puts it in a huge database that allows us to go through all the information we got. If we recognize a trend, as we think of the development of our next model, we incorporate that feedback. It's a great resource that we have.

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What's the difference between a classic leather shoe like the Tiempo and a Flyknit boot? The Tiempo is for a different consumer, for them it's about the predictable fit and touch that a leather boot offers. They become accustomed to it, they know what size they're buying, how it breaks in, how it molds to their foot. Flyknit has all the benefits of a leather boot, but is executed in a completely different material to offer the same sort of fit and touch, but in a lighter way. It's for two totally different types of consumers. Tiempo tends to be a little bit more for our traditional consumer, the Magista and the Mercurial more for early adopters. It's also that technology evolves. The solution that we have gets problems in the games on all levels. Leather boots were the standard for so long because there wasn't an alternative. Then synthetic came in and offered a similar touch but with water repellency and the shoes were lighter weight. Now, knit offers all of those things but with light weight strength and zonal engineering. It's just natural evolution. What's the difference between the Magista and Mercurial? The Magista is a little bit more wider, a little bit more accommodating. From the touch standpoint, the Magista has this texture which for players is a tool in controlling the ball. For Mercurial – super edited, very minimalistic. The traction is bladed, a lightweight carbon plate, in and out fast, it's designed for progressive flex for players who run the most on the pitch. They have conical studs because the players tend to move a little bit more rotationally so we need to enable them to do that. Other than the Flyknit and the Dynamic Fit, the shoes are totally different. Innovation comes at a prize. What's the target group for a shoe that cost 280Ð? It's targeted at the player who wants our most innovative product.


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Nike Mercurial Hi red edition

Nike Mercurial Hi black edition

Nike Free Mercurial Superfly by HTM (Fragment Design Founder Hiroshi Fujiwara, Nike design legend Tinker Hatfield and NIKE, Inc. President and CEO/ designer Mark Parker)

On June 12 Nike launched NikeLab. Physically present in six cities around the globe - New York, London, Paris, Milan, Shanghai and Hong Kong, Nike will bring to life its design principles at retail. Taking inspiration from product design, each NikeLab achieves maximum performance and aesthetics with low environmental impact. Core Nike design principles such as less is more, lightweight, functionality, and modularity inform the fixtures, materials used in the construction, and the functionality of the spaces. For the rest of the world NikeLab can be reached digitally through Nike.com/NikeLab. NikeLab is a place to showcase how Nike interacts and collaborates with other innovators as part of its larger journey of exploration. NikeLab will present a curated collection defined by product never before imagined paired with new variations of our celebrated performance styles. Limited editions of Nike’s latest performance and sport style innovations that express the intersection of sport, design, and culture will be available.

To mark the opening of NikeLab locations across the globe, on June 12, Nike released the Free Mercurial Superfly by HTM in Stealth Black exclusively within physical NikeLab locations and through Nike.com/NikeLab. The Free Mercurial Superfly by HTM is inspired by the benefits of performance football and also integrates Nike’s most celebrated performance technologies such as Nike Flyknit and Nike Free. To capture the aesthetic language of speed and style associated with the Nike Mercurial design ethos, the shoe retains a lightweight Nike Flyknit upper.,a sock-like fit and high, integrated ankle cuff that eliminates distraction and enhances reaction—on or off the pitch. Likewise, dynamic Nike Flywire cables were preserved to boost support, The Swoosh logo, which is airbrushed and oversized, reflects the Mercurial boot’s trademark look. A Nike Free 5.0 platform sole complements the form-fitting upper and enhances natural motion for a comfortable, flexible ride; the leather heel adds support and premium styling.

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Nike’s heritage styles have also been reinterpreted through creative collaborations, and unique capsule collections from various creative partners. One of these partners is Sophnet. It is a Japanese clothing brand inspired by the street, the outdoors, and traditional men's fashion. They are pretty much focused on materials, detailing, and function. Their designer Hirofumi Kiyonaga is a big fan of soccer. In his mind The FC Real Bristol, an imaginary football club that came to life. Together with Nike, FCRB became a real collaboration brand that provides high-end clothing for on and off the soccer field. Available at NikeLab are Track jackets, pants, and shorts tailored from Nike Storm Fit fabric offer head to toe camouflage patterns inspired by Nike-sponsored national teams U.S.A., Brazil, France, Holland, and Portugal, whereas game jerseys and shorts fuse the print with stripes. Part of the collection is also the Nike Tiempo 94 with camouflage-printed, all-leather upper in four variations.

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Nike FC founding member Luis Figo

Nike's own Football club founded in 1994, went public after 20 years of clandestine existence. Legends like Ronaldo, Luis Figo or Francesco Totti were amongst the founding members. The club´s official representers at the moment are Jack Wilshire, Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior, Pablo Daniel Osvaldo and Kevin-Prince Boateng. These four players stand for individual style, no fear and passion amongst other pivotal characteristics.

The slogan “We are a club for the fearless, for the brilliant”, pretty much says it all. Don't think you can become a member of the club. Only the best players from the best teams were and are recruited for the club. But the nice selection of clothing referring to Nike FC that is wearable on and off the pitch might be a little solace.

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Nike FC member "Neymar" da Silva Santos JĂşnior Nike FC Tiempo Black & White plus Gold

Nike FC member Jack Wilshere

Nike FC member Dani Osvaldo

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MUSTER KNABEN

by TOBIAS WIRTH PHOTOGRAPHER: TOBIAS WIRTH www.tobias-wirth.de STYLING: JULIA QUANTE www.juliaquante.de HAIR & MAKE-UP: KIM KEUSEN www.ace-collective.com

MODELS: LEANDER KIRSCHNER & PASCAL EHRING www.kultmodelagency.com PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSISTANCE: KRISTINA HUSS

LEANDER SHIRT: MINIMUM PULLOVER: VANS VEST: K1X PASCAL SHIRT: VANS PULLOVER: K1X

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PASCAL PULLOVER: LACOSTE LIVE! SHIRT: WRANGLER PANTS: LEVI’S MADE & CRAFTED SHOES: UNITED NUDE LEANDER JACKET: LEVI’S SHIRT: CHEAP MONDAY SHIRT: AMERICAN APPAREL PANTS: LEVI’S BOOTS: DOC MARTENS streetwear today 3 | 2014


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PASCAL SHIRT: MINIMUM PULLOVER: NIKE JACKET: ELEVEN PARIS WATCH: NIXON

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PASCAL JACKET: CARHARTT SHIRT: BARBOUR PANTS: K1X SHOES: VANS LEANDER SWEATER: ADIDAS ORIGINALS JACKET: UCON PANTS: CARHARTT BOOTS: PALLADIUM

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LEANDER BLAZER: HERR VON EDEN POLO SHIRT: FRED PERRY SHIRT: MINIMUM PANTS: DENHAM WATCH: G-SHOCK streetwear today 3 | 2014


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LEANDER JACKET: ELEVEN PARIS SHIRT: FRED PERRY TANKTOP: DRMTM

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PASCAL JACKET: DRYKORN SHIRT: ADIDAS ORIGINALS PANTS: ELEMENT BAG: BURTON SHOES: ADIDAS ZX-FLUX

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LEANDER PULLOVER: CARHARTT SHIRT: LACOSTE LIVE! PANTS: G-STAR BACKPACK: VANS streetwear today 3 | 2014

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White Fence „This is for the innocent“ singer and guitarist Tim Presley chants in the opening track of his new White Fence album „To The Recently Found Innocent“. It is his first real studio album after a string of White Fence longplayers that the Los Angeles based record making machine released since 2010 on labels such as Make A Mess Records, Teenage Teardrops or Woodsist. In-between he played live around the globe, recorded an album with his buddy TY Segall and played long before his White Fence career in projects and bands like The Fall, The Nerve Agents, The Strange Boys, Model American or Darker My Love. All his music is characterized by a love for punk, for garage grooves, sixties atmospheres, airy pop emotions and rage packed in love. For his latest longplayer he joined again forces with Ty Segall, one of the most prolific US-American singer/songwriters of our times. Together they recorded 14 pop songs full of old-school psychedelic guitar vibes and winking truthful lyrics for those who search for a heart of gold. Tim Presley himself describes the driving force and the work behind his latest record like this: „ Fear, anger, pain, anxiety. Guilty! I needed something new. I needed to be free and innocent. I was floating in my room. Sick of the wall Bounce-A-LuLa. I could not get high. I wanted to put some songs in someone else’s room. I wanted to see what they sounded like with a real drummer. I wanted to see what it would sound like using an Aliens ear. For a lack of a cooler/humble word, Ty Segall “produced” this album. I had to choose the songs. We then went into Ty’s Fiat-sized garage and recorded them…. My room was tired of me, so we took a break, and I fucked some other room.” Some meaningful informative quotes from the albums information leaflet, which tell all what he wants to tell about the how and where „To The Recently Found Innocent“ originates. We wanted to find out a bit more and spoke to the monosyllabic answering White Fence mastermind Mr Presley about his music and some things beyond.

Free and acquitted

You released already five albums, some live records, and a collaborative work with Ty Segall in the last three years. Would you consider yourself as a workaholic and how do you get constantly inspired to new music? I am a workaholic. I keep myself inspired by trying to out-do myself. Make the next song better than the last. Chasing the dragon and trying to write the perfect song. We saw you live with your band and solo: what do you prefer more? Band. And what are your biggest musical influences? 50’s rock and roll guitar music. What do you want to accomplish with the music you do? I will probably never know! And where do your melodies come from? My brain.

Hey Tim – can you introduce yourself for us a bit?? White Fence: I live in Echo Park, Los Angeles. How did you first get into music and performing and when did you decide you wanted to make music your career? I’ve always liked music. I never made any decisions about it. How would you describe the music that you release as White Fence to someone that hasn’t heard of it? Good! Any role models, inspirations, or benchmarks for your project White Fence? I either have too many to count, or none at all. Most of the inspiration comes from humans and human interaction.

When did you start writing and performing music - and what or who were your early passions and influences? I probably got serious after Nirvana came out, and then I got heavily into punk. As a kid I taught myself guitar by playing along to The Ramones and Black Flag records. I liked Johnny Thunders too. So after learning guitar basics, I was able to try and write music. I think I started when I was around 11 or 12 years old. And how do you usually start to produce a new piece? I wake up, get coffee, go into my room and make something. Everyday and every night. Which of your own tracks are you most proud of? Sadly, all of them.

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What influence did Ty Segall have on your new album? He got me motivated to pick the best songs I had and record them with him.

Can you please recommend two artists to our readers, which you feel deserve their attention? Cate Le Bon and Jack Name

If you have to describe the meanings of the vocals on your new album in one sentence what would you say? First take. I thought those first takes were going to be re-done, but we kept the originals. So I suppose the performance is very honest because I wasn’t thinking too much about it.

What’s something you’ve learned through music that has helped you in life (and vice versa)? I’ve learned that I can save money by not seeing a therapist by writing lyrics and writing songs.

What do you personally consider to be the incisive moments in your artistic work and/or career? It stems from something too sad to talk about. How do you keep your work fresh and continue to evolve? I wrap it in warm cloth and feed it shark milk. Who is in charge for the cover artworks on your albums? And how important they are for you personally? I do all the art. It’s just an extension of the album’s songs. I think the art can be just as important as the songs.

How do you think your generation is going to leave its mark on music? By not needing major labels, or a ton of money to make a record. What was your musical intake when you were younger? Gangster rap. What was the last track that sent shivers up your spine? “Ship On The Ocean” by the Groundhogs and “Numbers On the Boards” Pusha T.

What was your dream job as a child? I’ve never dreamed about any job.

What are three albums that you’ll absolutely never get tired of listening to? Love: “Forever Changes”, Germs: (G.I.), The Pretty Things: “S.F. Sorrow”.

When or where do you feel most at peace? In the bath tub

And what kind of music would you make in a world without electricity? Do Wop (Acapella)!

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If you could be in any band, living or dead, for a day which band would it be? The Stooges. What superpower would you like to have? Captain Beefheart. What’s your poison? Pills. Where is heaven on earth for you? In my apartment with my cat. Who would you want to play you in film about your life? Bob Dylan. You are located in L.A., right? What are your favourite spots and secrets in your town that you would recommend to somebody that comes around for a visit? What we do is secret… Text and Interview: Michael Leuffen

Do you have any idols when it comes to music? I used to, and then I met some of them ...

Who inspires you? Anyone who gives a fuck!

What can music do which all other art forms cannot? Make you dance!

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If you didn’t do what you do for living, what would you do? Be a monk. If somebody gives you a million quid and you had 24 hours to rinse it, what would you do? Buy me and all my friends a house, buy drugs and Mexican food.

White Fence: For The Recent Found Innocent (Drag City)


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Jungle How to become a new musical sensation? What you need to be in spotlight? Good music for sure. Add an aesthetic concept that distinguishes you from the rest and you can be a winner. The duo Jungle got both. Their self-titled debut album is a vibrant melting pot of laid-back funk, psychedelic spirits, hip hop references, disco textures, driving Post- punk, polyrhythms, sample art and velvety soul chanting. The two guys behind it just want to be called Josh and Tom. For most of their official pictures they hired bizarrely dressed models and hide their identities in a crowd of beautiful hipsters. Their debut album has been produced in their home studio in the West London Shepherd’s Bush district, where they live since their childhood. During school days they been fans of UK hip-hop and they had fun in dissecting albums like The Beach Boys classic “Pet Sounds” down to the last ton. Their own music gives you the feeling of being in the seventies, eighties and 21st century at

(Fame is just a by-product) the same time. It is an imaginary musical never-never land that spreads an almost childlike insouciance. To find out what is going on in their jungle world we had a little chat with Josh about their way of doing music and perceiving popular culture.

Josh, your debut album is very colorful - what where the main influences when you produced it? Josh: London is a very multicultural city. There are all kinds of people living and the cultures are jammed. You can see this everyday on the markets down the road from where we live. Here are many different cultural treats, which subconsciously do have an influence. At large our album is influenced by visual things rather then specific sounds. Games, videos and TV – that’s where we took most of our influences from rather then music. When we produce music we tent not to listen to other musical sources because you end up copying that sound. When you do music and you listen for while to a J Dilla track you will copy it in a way. What

we tended to do was watch’s films and be influenced by games, places, ideas and emotions. So you would say popular culture at large has a main influence on your work. Josh: I think so. A painter does not look at another painting to paint his own picture. He looks at society or a lake or whatever. I think a lot of musicians who start out tent to be confused by this wrong working method. They tent to references more then doing their own stuff. It is like when you learn guitar you learn the rules of your teacher but not to be free and inspired by yourself. We have pianos and organs and we are not pianists or organists but we find new ways of playing them. Which are probably the wrong way to play these instruments but in turn we created sounds, which traditionally would not be around. So it is good not to be a trained musician. Josh: Yeah. It was a kind of sonic experi-

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mentation and doing that trough popular music gave us a lot of fun. A lot of things on the album are accidental. For example if you listen to the track „Drops“ you hear a door. There is a door solo because the door in my bedroom was very creaky at a certain point and Tom walked out when we where recording „Drops“ so it made this sound and we were like: Wow stop. We gave him a microphone and made him do a door solo. It is funny and different. We tried to find new ways in creating something and then make it in something else. For example it sounds like there are a lot of horns or trumpets on the record. But there are no trumpets at all. There are all other things whether it is the sound of blowing into a cup or an empty bottle. We worked then with that sounds until they sound familiar or not quite familiar. That is funny because all the songs sound more like they are well crafted and done by trained musicians. What kind of traditional instruments did you use? Josh: In the studio we keep it simple and it is only Tom and I. We are the nucleus of the atom I suppose. When we talk about instrumentation: we have all the other natural instruments. When you grow up you say: I am going to buy me a guitar and you go to a thrift store and buy yourself one. And then you say: wicked I am going to play guitar. Then you see the Red Hot Chili Peppers when you are fourteen and you say: wow I love Flea and I want to play bass like him. So you do it. I am always the kind of person that when I want something I go and grab it. I try at four in the morning to buy a piano when I think we need a piano even if we do not know how to play it. We basically have a process in the studio. We love the sound of sampling like Kanye West does in great tracks like „Touch the Sky“, which is obviously a Curtis Mayfield riff. You got that riff in this song but you got a modern beat under it and a bass, which brings you into the 21st century. We wanted to create these classic sounds of which you might think they are new. So we thought how we could do that without steeling at all. We don’t want to take others peoples stuff. So we started this process where we write these classic songs and then we sample those songs and write new versions of them. For example our song „Busy Earning“ was called extra large for a long time. There been seventeen versions of the song before it became the

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version that everybody can hear now. Which is mental because when you listen to the different versions they are like psychedelic 12-minute songs. And now the last version we got is the simplest version of all. It has been sampled and sampled from previous versions. Most of your albums songs are around three or four minutes. Why? Josh: I suppose that is inspired by people like Madvillain who in a kind changed the way hip-hop songs are perceived. And there is something guide beautiful about the shortness of a track. Not dragging things out too much. And this we also do with lyrics. Each lyric on our album can be tuned into one sentence for each track. We can say what we want to say in one sort of sentence. The rest is just supporting material. The same is with the tracks. We are not that self indulgent that we do in our young career a concept album on which every track is fifteen minutes long. Maybe we can do that one-day when people respect us enough. Now it is more about getting the core idea quite quickly. Your free wheeling attitude towards making music sounds a bit like a punk. Josh: Yeah. It does in a way especially when we play live because then our music develops backwards and it evolves into a punk funk thing. You can say it is like an Arcade Fire show. The group mentality and energy they have we try to capture too. That comes from a weird process. Instead of starting very punky and then developing in something more sophisticated, it starts very sophisticated and then when it comes to the live situation we almost have to re-learn the cut up bass lines we produced. In the studio we play a bass line and then we sample it over and over. When you want to play it live you need to learn this sampled bass line. That is quite funny and makes everything new when you play it. Are you cautious about being put in a box? Josh: We tend to not stick to any particular genre. We do not listen to one style of music too. I do not only like hip-hop. I like good music in general. Whether that is like a reggae song by Bob Marley or a Sex Pistols song or a Jay-Z track. When it is good music it is good music. It connects with everybody regardless of who you

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are or what style you are in. And with the internet where owner ship is totally changing and where people do not own music anymore in three or four years and where all this big companies make the music accessible everywhere you do not go any more to one store that sells reggae. You have now every record on your fingertips. So it is all about good music. And what you want to accomplish with your music. Josh: At the moment it is just about having fun and not taking it to seriously. This is for us also scary because we are producers that just hang around with friends and do music in our bedrooms. Now suddenly we are in Berlin talking to people from magazines. That is already like “What the fuck?”. We are happy to be in this position and we want to give something back. We took a lot from music when we where young. We saw The Strokes at Shepherd’s Bush Empire and as fourteen year old kids we thought: these guys are like god. Now we hope to be lucky enough to give that experience back with our music. We want to give what we took from the world back in terms of creativity. For us it is not about fame. That is just a by-product. www.junglejunglejungle.com Text and Interview: Michael Leuffen

Jungle (XL Recordings)


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Michael LeSage:

GIANT Eternal Michael LeSage better known as Mike Giant has developed a distinctive aesthetic throughout his career. He started writing graffiti in 1989 which led to a job as illustrator for Think skateboards in 1992. In 1998 he started tattoing full time which he quit for physical reasons after nine years. Since 2003 he is the provider of graphics for clothing brand Rebel8. His artworks have been shown all over the world. His style is influenced by music, cholo culture, lettering, architecture, skateboarding, buddhism and whatnot. He is an avid track bike rider, a theme which is also reoccurring in his drawings. His preference of black and white comes from colorblindness: "The black and white for me is what happened over the course of my life, its just what I gravitate towards naturally, I just fell really comfortable working in black and white." The books visual content is divided in seven parts – graffiti, tattoos, photographs, wheels (meaning skateboard and bicycles), drawings, multi media and commercial work. 680 color and b/w illustrations show the development and work of an artist who´s pivotal process, drawing, made him an icon of black ink.

Michael LeSage: GIANT Eternal Gingko Pr Inc 978-1584235-02-6 http://gingkopress.com/

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Scott Campbell:

If You Don't Belong, Don't Be Long Scott Campbell is a tattoo and fine artist living in Brooklyn and founder of the famous tattoo parlor Saved Tattoo. Throughout the years Campbell developed an amazing technique and style. He is most likely best known for his ink on celebrity skin on the likes of Marc Jacobs or Courtney Hole. But besides that he also gained recognition as fine artist. The book presents his sketches, engravings, carvings and experimental artwork alongside his tattoo work. A comprehensive collection of images documenting his sense of style, with portraits burnt onto tortillas, skulls carved out of dollar bills and flowers inked onto the interior of ostrich eggs. Campbell’s artwork and tattoo work are informed by trends of “new antiquarian” (term coined by the New York Times) style, nineteenth-century hand-lettering, kitsch, and classic tattoo flash.

Scott Campbell: If You Don't Belong, Don't Be Long Rizzoli 978-0-7893-2496-2 http://www.rizzoliusa.com/

Wes Lang Brooklyn-based painter and illustrator Wes Lang gained mainstream attention after he designed the tour merch for Kanye West´s ‘Yeezus’ tour in 2013. But he was no stranger to art aficionados, especially those who have a soft spot for American (sub)culture. Lang´s visual language is informed by tattoo iconography, biker culture, pinups, Native American art and all sorts of Americana. His expertly rendered drawings are also influenced by the likes of Basquiat, de Kooning or Kline. His first monograph gathers a decade´s worth of his work - some sort of American Odyssey. One can get lost in the detailed drawings, there is so much to discover and decypher and the images keep growing, evolving and changing with phrases like "You'll never walk alone" illustrating many of the compositions.

Wes Lang Picturebox, Inc. 978-1939799-11-1 https://www.pictureboxinc.com/

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NO 49

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streetwear today No.49  
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