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december TA BL E OF C ON T E N T S

VISIONARY DESIGN PAGE 28 Check out the designs of Lara Tabak, the awardwinning FIT student behind the out fit s modeled in our New York photo shoot.

Katia Michalopoulos @katiamichalo FIT

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T HE TA B L E OF C ON T E N T S D E C E M B E R 2 016 • S T U DY B R E A K S .C O M

ONLINE THIS MONTH

THE MEAL PL A N

PAGE 8

This winter, reward yourself

PAGE 24 with a Chestnut Praline Latte

GROUP WORK

By Ter r y Ng uyen

PAGE 14 Swing Dance Club brings

STUDENT ISSUES

WHAT’S YOUR MAJOR?

the like-minded and

PAGE 20

PAGE 22

PAGE 26

footloose together

Do efforts to relieve stress

For Turfgrass Science

As the holidays approach,

By Michel le Cr iqu i

actually reach the students

majors, the grass could

these #GiftHacks will help

COVER SPOTLIGHT FAITH FA SAKIN

At James Madison, the

#COLLEGEHACKS

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always be greener

you survive

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By A lec C ud more

By Cr i s sona Ten n i son

Photography by Jordi-Lakeem Foster

EXTR A CREDIT PAGE 46 Meet De’Andre Wigfall, one of Houston’s most exciting student designers By L i nd sey Dav i s

OFFICE HOURS PAGE 16 At UNC, Dr. Jane Thraikill is giving “medical literature” a whole new meaning By Joseph i ne Wer n i

UNIVERSIT Y REPORT

STUDENT EXHIBITION PAGE 10

MEET THE PRESIDENT

PAGE 18

The photography of NYC student Gianna Leo Falcon uses monochromatic coloring

PAGE 48

The biggest news from

to distort the reality of her haunting stills

USC’s Edwin Saucedo

colleges across the country By A a ron Ly nch

By Aliyah Thomas

talks LA’s food culture and advising the G20

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STUDENT ST YLE PAGE 42 Curated tips from student influencers for looking st ylish this season

Name: Sinclair Temple School: ACC Major: Biochemistry

STUDYBREAKS.COM

DECEMBER 2016 //

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CONTRIBUTORS

student writers Study Breaks is written exclusively by a team of student interns from across the country. These writers work with the editorial team to pitch and submit one piece a week for the website, in addition to writing for the monthly print magazine.

JOSEPHINE WER NI

LINDSEY DAVIS

DA NIEL WILCOX

@jcwerni

Iowa State University

UTSA

University of Minnesota Twin Cities

English and Journalism

Psychology

English

Extra Credit

College Issues

Office Hours

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MICHELLE CR IQUI

TER RY NGU Y EN

ALEC CUDMOR E

@michellecriqui

@nguyenterry

@acudi33

James Madison University

USC

St. Edward’s University

English

Journalism & Political Science

English Writing & Rhetoric

Group Work

The Meal Plan

What’s Your Major?

PAGE 14

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ALI YAH THOMAS

A ARON LY NCH

CR ISSONA TENNISON

@aliyahthomas

Front Range Community College

@cjtennison

Mount Saint Mary College

Journalism

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English

Around Campus

English Literature

Student Exhibition

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#CollegeHacks

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Spring internships run from January 28th to May 28th, and applications close January 14th. If interested, email editorial@ studybreaks.com with “Student Writing Internship” in the Subject. Introduce yourself in the body, making sure to include your name, school and major. Please attach at least two samples of your work. Ideal writers are intelligent, funny and talented, though no formal experience is necessary.

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study breaks JULI A DIXON

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Fashioning Gender

The Future of Fashion

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JOR DI-L A K EEM FOSTER

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STUDYBREAKS.COM

WHO Study Breaks is written and photographed exclusively by college students from across the country. The website is an online forum for writers to talk about everything from specific, college-related issues like campus carry and trigger warnings, to pop pieces like album reviews and op-eds about Donald Trump. HOW In addition to the website, Study Breaks is also a print magazine circulated on twelve campuses in four cities throughout Texas. While still produced entirely by students, the magazine focuses more on features, interviews and profiles rather than opinion pieces. Though published in Texas, the content still centers around the national college experience. WHY Study Breaks was born out of a desire to provide talented student writers with a medium to publish their work, but has since expanded its goal to empowering college students of all backgrounds. Whether it’s by publishing their writing and photography, or by providing them with exposure in interviews and features, Study Breaks is designed to highlight remarkable students across the country.

DECEMBER 2016 //

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A NOTE FROM THE EDI TOR

the fashion issue

in

recent centuries, the democratization of art has rendered almost every sophisticated field accessible to the average person. Breathtaking paintings hang in affordable museums; brilliant literature lies waiting in free libraries; inspiring music is just a Google search away and innovative architecture dots the landscape of nearly every major city. Indeed, it seems with the exception of the fashion industry, the haute has come home. In the world of clothing, however, not only is there a stark difference between high and quotidian couture, there is a palpable sense of exclusion. Fashion shows are often closed to the public, and even local outposts of leading designers are rarely inviting. Often decried for their pretention, many a shopper has vicariously shared in Julia Roberts’ sense of vindication in “Pretty Woman,” when, after being rebuffed by the sartorial gatekeepers of Rodeo Lane, she returns, dressed exquisitely, to tell the boutique retail workers what a big mistake they made by previously expelling her. Ironically, the scene is less heartening than it might appear, as it reveals an unpleasant truth: There is no changing the culture of high fashion; there is only buying your way into it. As a result, though the industry takes many of its cues from the top-down inf luence of its icons, the fashion world has always relied on the innovation of sartorial mid-

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dlemen to translate the exclusive, unrealistic designs of haute couture into friendlier, more accessible forms. Specifically for students, who are often strapped of cash and time, the world of fashion comes primarily through these adapted forms, which means these fashion mediators, whether bloggers, street stylists or vintage curators, have just as much impact on the world of fashion as its scions do. In putting together our fashion issue, then, we knew that both camps must be present. We needed the innovators, the people who are moving clothing forward conceptually, and we needed the adapters, the people making those nebulous concepts into wearable outfits. In our feature, read about Fashion Institute of Technology’s Lara Tabak (pg. 28), a visionary mind who may be the most talented student designer in the country. And though they may have been scattered across the world, Texas State’s Julia Dixon helped curate some of the most creative student influencers so we could pick their brains for for some fashion tips (pg. 43). A little closer to home, Houston student De’Andre Wigfall talks handmade design and making it New York (pg. 46). If fashion isn’t your style, check out NYU student Gianna Leo Falcon’s haunting monochromatic stills on page 10; or, if you’re not sick of thinking about finals yet, head to page 20 to read UTSA student Daniel Wilcox’s story on the failure of universities to provide effective stress relief during exams week. Finally, from all of us at Study Breaks, good luck on finals and enjoy Winter Break. You deserve it.

MARK STENBERG EDITOR IN CHIEF @MarkStenberg3


STUDYBREAKS.COM

DECEMBER 2016 //

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“This writer likes to say they have a ‘dark, artistic soul,’ but your class will more accurately describe it as a ‘pathological need for attention.’” Heather Ware, Bowling Green State University The Worst 5 People in Every College Writing Workshop “Jeez, why I am being so judgy in this article?” Mattie Winowitch, Waynesburg University Why Voluntourism Doesn’t Actually Help Anyone but Yourself “‘Maybe it’s because the Brits were keen enough to pull the plug on their version of ‘The Bachelor,’ cocktailf low.com

while we keep devising new variations of it.” Daniel Wilcox, University of Texas San Antonio A Comprehensive List of Creepy Novels That You Haven’t Read Yet “Perhaps the stovetop hasn’t been cleaned in two moons, or maybe your roommate keeps leaving his weed baggies where the cat can get into them.” wegeekgirls

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How Spock Helped Me Come to Terms with Being an LGBT Mormon Though the comparison may look odd on its face, writer Andy Winder, a student at BYU, points out a half dozen similarities between queer Mormon culture and the Star Trek savant. Even more astoundingly, the article’s comment section was soon filled with similar testimonials.

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DECEMBER 2016 //

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STUDENT EXHIBITION

GIANNA LEO FALCON THE MONOCHROMATIC VISION OF

By Aliyah Thomas, Mount Saint Mary College

Born and raised in New York Cit y, GIANNA LEO FALCON is a New York-based photographer currently at tending New York Universit y as a Mental Health major. ¶ Although photography had been a mere pastime in her early years, Falcon came to realize that by dabbling more in the visual ar t s, she found herself enamored with the medium. Falcon spoke with “Study Breaks” about her work, her st yle and her plans for the future.

ALIYAH THOMAS: When and how did you get into photography? GIANNA LEO FALCON: I star ted shooting just out of interest when I was about four teen or fif teen—I had a camera and I took some pic tures. But it wasn’t until I was in my early t wenties that I star ted to become more interested and, over the past five to ten years, I’ve kind of taught myself photography and star ted to build it up as a passion. AT: The photos on your website are amazing. I’d imagine that it takes some editing to get them the way you want them to look. GF: Ver y limited. Ver y minimal editing. AT: Really? That ’s interesting. Do you have a specific method for post-processing? GF: Exac tly. I already have a method, so it doesn’t take me ver y long. AT: Do you use any kind of editing sof t ware? GF: Capture One. AT: A lot of your photos utilize monochrome. Is there a reason why you lean toward black and white as opposed to color? GF: No, just aesthetic. I like the way that it looks better. And it ’s a lot easier to match something or—how do CONTINUED

10

A self-portrait of Falcon // DECEMBER 2016


GIANNA LEO FALCON SCHOOL:

New York Universit y MA JOR:

Mental Health HOME TOWN:

New York Cit y INS TAGR AM:

@gianna_leo_falcon

STUDYBREAKS.COM

DECEMBER 2016 //

11


CONTINUED

I explain it? So, especially when you’re doing fine ar t nudes, I feel like black and white gives you more leeway to be aggressive with an image without it looking real, because monochrome is not realit y. AT: Speaking of monochrome, there’s your “ Visual Diaries” photoset. Is there a stor y behind that? GF: They’re just visual diaries. Just kind of like a look into my mind. AT: That photoset and a lot of your other work is comprised mostly of people. You seem naturally

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// DECEMBER 2016

inclined to photographing them, but are there other things that strike you? GF: No. That ’s it really. People are interesting. AT: So, sor t of in the same token, what is the per fec t pic ture to you? Is there a “per fec t ” photo you could take? GF: Um, I don’t know if I ever really thought about it like that. I don’t ac tually know if I can answer that question for you. It ’s more like a feeling, or like I just felt that we really nailed it or I was on that day and I took a really good photo, but I can’t imagine the

best pic ture. It ’s just about how the photo makes me feel, I guess. AT: How would you advise someone with no solid experience with images to get into photography? I hear, “Pick up a camera and take pic tures,” but do you have any other advice? GF: No. That ’s the most impor tant thing that a photographer can do: To spend time with their camera. It ’s like the only thing that ’s gonna make you bet ter— taking photos, making mistakes, learning from your mistakes. It ’s not just taking photos, but it ’s


processing them, editing them, becoming familiar with your camera, watching YouTube videos. Like really get ting to know your camera so that it can become almost like a second nature, you know? AT: Yeah, definitely. So if you could go in any direc tion you wanted to with photography, would it take you somewhere other than where you are now? Are you content with the work that you’re doing? GF: I have a tenyear plan. I’d like to have books of my work published and have really proper STUDYBREAKS.COM

galler y openings where I’d have representation, so that is certainly a dream of mine. But I’m not in a rush. I don’t think ar tists are made overnight, and I think I’m doing pret t y well in the presence of my contemporaries and people that I admire. So, I mean, I’m not content with where I am, but I think that I’m in an okay place. AT: Are there any photographers who really influence you to do bet ter for yourself? GF: Oh, definitely! There’s a photographer named Sally Mann, and there’s also Fran-

cesca Woodman, but mostly Sally Mann. And I’ve also been in the company of some pret ty talented ar tists as well, so I feel kind of inspired by some of my friends. And also, sometimes, to be honest with you, I tr y not to look at too much photography because I don’t want to get influenced. I don’t want to look at something and want to copy it. All of a sudden, the lines are blurred. So sometimes it’s nice to kind of keep your palet te empty, you know? You got ta just go with what you want to do in your mind.

DECEMBER 2016 //

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A Different Kind of Swinger Members of James Madison University’s Swing Dance Club boogie down weekly with their fellow footloose partners. BY MICHELLE CRIQUI, JA MES MADISON UNIVERSIT Y PHOTOGR APHY BY SA MIA JR AB, JA MES MADISON UNIVERSIT Y

s the beat of 1940s-style swing music sways through the auditorium, lead dancers grab their partners’ hands and twirl in time with a melody provided by the band. Girls’ dresses flutter around them as they spin, and guys’ button-down shirt sleeves are quickly rolled up to their elbows as dancing continues into the night. For the James Madison University Swing Dance Club, nights like this are anticipated all year round. The organization holds six dances each semester, in which JMU swing dancers, along with those from other universities across the state, such as Virginia Tech and the University of Virginia, are invited to show off their best swing moves. Each dance has its own theme, complete with lights and decorations, such as the “Harvest Moondance” in October and the “Holly Jolly Lindy Ball” in December. Ever since its inception in the mid-1990s, the JMU Swing Dance Club has given students the chance to learn the techniques of this classic dance style, as well as sharpen the moves they may already know. As an entirely student-run organization, undergraduate instructors teach weekly introductory lessons to beginners, along with demonstrating more advanced moves for their intermediate group. “I love seeing people enjoying themselves,” Spenser Codella, a senior Biology major and one of the club’s instructors, says. “I love watching beginners who love it…[and I] also love it when people come up to me and ask me how to do that move that I just did.” There are several different styles of swing dance, which originated back in the Jazz Age of the 1920s-1940s. JMU’s Swing Dance Club teaches the primary styles of the Lindy Hop, Charleston and blues, which are traditionally danced with a partner—although some techniques allow for complex solo moves. For Codella, a large part of the appeal of participating in a swing dance club while in college is the welcoming atmosphere it provides. “I hate to say that we naturally are just really friendly, but we really love all people,” Codella said. “A lot of people come in, and for whatever reason, they just love the feel [and] the style of swing dancing.”

A

At JMU, interest in this vintage style of dance brings in a wide variety of students, who in turn invite their friends to come along, regardless of any prior dance experience. “I really like to describe [the club] as a motley crew… It’s a lot of different people from a lot of different walks of life, coming together and just enjoying themselves,” Codella said. “We have people who are typically jocks, and I’m a nerd, [and] we have a lot of people who aren’t really in other extracurricular things; just people from all over the place. That’s who we are as club. We all unite over… this fun style of dance.” One such member is freshman Jacqueline “Jackie” Froede, a Chemistry major on the pre-med track, who sees Swing Dance Club as a way to escape the pressures of the classroom. “This is my favorite club,” Froede said, wearing her JMU Swing Dance hoodie after a couple hours of dancing with friends during one of their weekly meetings. Along with hosting their own dances, the club also travels up to Washington, D.C. every spring for the D.C. Lindy Exchange, or DCLX. The annual convention attracts dancers from across the country to exhibit their freshest moves, dedicating an entire weekend to dancing until long after their feet are sore. The club also gets the chance to meet and dance with a variety of other swing lovers at DCLX, each of whom brings their own individual flair to the dance floor. “Swing dance is a lot of personality,” Codella said. “I’ve seen people who’ve done ballet, and they’re very crisp and upright and straight. And then there’s people like me, who are just bouncy, and you can just tell that I’m making my stuff up… And then, you have people like [club president] Brigitte, where it’s just purely passion. She has a smile all the time when she’s dancing. It’s personality and communication between two people, in a dance.” No matter where they’re dancing, the energy in the room seems to buzz as club members swing along to the upbeat, bigband music, combining their individual attitudes and styles to create something that is distinctly their own.

THE STUDY BREAKS DOSSIER GROUP NAME: Swing Dance Club SCHOOL: James Madison Universit y PRESIDENT: Briget te Criqui NO. OF MEMBERS: 60 FOUNDED: 1992 REASONS TO JOIN: A chance to learn a classic dance st yle or add new moves to your reper toire

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// DECEMBER 2016

Photography via Samia Jarab

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Making Medical Literature Great Again By connecting the past, present and future of medicine to literature, Dr. Jane Thrailkill is paving a new path in public health. BY JOSEPHINE WERNI, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALEX KORMANN, UNC

J

ane Thrailkill is a professor in the Department of English at UNC Chapel Hill, as well as the director for both the M.A. program in the Health Humanities Lab (HHIVE) and Literature, Medicine and Culture. Her passions lie in studying the complex relationship between medicine and the humanities, which has led her to teach multiple interdisciplinary courses on the topic.

How many of these interdisciplinary classes are you teaching currently? I’m teaching two this semester. Next semester I’ll be teaching one American Literature course, and the other will be a first year seminar in health humanities. UNC Chapel Hill is what is known as a Research One university. Because of this, faculty members never teach more than two classes a semester. How are the classes typically structured? The courses are different and they serve different purposes. This one I’m teaching now is called Literature, Medicine and Culture, or English 268. You could call it an introductory course to the study of health humanities. It’s really teaching students a lot about the theory, philosophy, iconic texts and ways of thinking that fall under the umbrella of health humanities or medical humanities. We read novels and poems, as well as articles about the history of medicine. We hear from

anthropologists who explain how culture affects peoples’ attitudes toward life and death, toward what counts as healing, what counts as restorative, the relationship between the spirit and the body, and so on. All of that is what goes on in English 268. I also teach a course called English 695, which is quite different. How so? Well, 268 is an 80 person lecture with discussion sections, and it’s made up of undergrads from all different majors. English 695 is a small, intensive research methods course. Students from all levels enroll. In this class, we have them conduct original research in teams and for their final project. What sorts of research topics have been explored? Last year, one of the research projects we did was called Writing Diabetes. Our concept begins with the fact that we know how to teach reading, writing and composition. Composition is all about taking the chaos and

the endless possibilities of a topic and organizing it into a cogent form—into a narrative that makes sense. With a diagnosis such as type two diabetes, there tends to be a bit of a life profile, in the sense that sufferers live more complicated lives. Our goal was to find out if individuals who deal with chronic illness would benefit from writing about their experiences, as well as from the discipline that comes with showing up each week and revising. We could check on things such as their circuit level, blood and their sense of coherence and wellbeing. We’re still crunching the data on that. There’s also an entire M.A. program at UNC dedicated to medical humanities as well, correct? Indeed, so far it’s really kind of a boutique program. For instance, Colombia University and Vanderbilt University have larger, more traditionally departmental programs in health humanities. What would this degree qualify students to do?

For some, it helps to confirm that they want to go to medical school. It also provides a way to really get a broad, humanistic, interdisciplinary foundation before going straight into vocational school—whether they’re going to be an occupational therapist, a physician assistant, a nurse, a clinician or simply go full blown public health. Are there any plans to change or extend the program in the future? We’re really evaluating that right now, actually. We’re wondering if it might be good to develop a condensed program that can be done in one year so that medical students could do it during their third and fourth year in med school. We’re thinking maybe we should adapt our program to be less of a full-blown two years Master’s degree, and more of something for people in the health field to take at a certain moment in the course of their medical training.

THE C.V. NAME: Jane Thrailkill SCHOOL: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill EDUCATION: B.A. in English at Amherst College; M.A. and Ph.D. in English and American Literature at John Hopkins University BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS: “Being Mortal” and “Complications” by Atul Gawande LEARN MORE: Search “Empathies Inc.” on YouTube

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DECEMBER 2016 //

17


UNIVERSITY REPORT

Around Campus The biggest news from colleges across the country. BY AARON LYNCH, FRONT RANGE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

THE SPOTLIGHT: DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE he Dakota Access Pipeline has garnered national attention due to the apparent disregard for sacred Native American burial sites. The pipe is also scheduled to run through land near Oahe Lake, the local Sioux tribes’ primary source of water. Protesters have expressed concern for not only the burial ground, but also for the possibility of future spills that would taint the Sioux tribes’ drinking water. Kelcy Warren is head of Energy Transfer Partners, the Dallas-based company behind the DAPL and other pipelines being built throughout Texas. Warren also serves as the commissioner of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department; protesters outside their Dallas headquarters cite holding both positions as a conf lict of interest, demanding that Warren step down and that construction plans be redrawn to accommodate the needs of the Natives.

T

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

THE BUZZ

Eye of the Tiger The night before the high profile football match-up bet ween the LSU Tigers and the Alabama Crimson Tide, t wo Alabama students broke into Tiger stadium and vandalized the eye of the tiger at midfield. The youths posted photographic evidence on Snapchat and were subsequently arrested the following day.

Shingle Me Timbers Tesla founder Elon Musk announced his company’s newest projec t of solar roofing tiles. Sleek, st ylish and ef ficient, Tesla aims to make their solar roof af fordable to all.

Per fec t Attendance Sarah Thompson, a student at Lander Universit y of South Carolina, began her semester nearly nine months pregnant. Post-deliver y, she expec ted her return to the classroom to be business as usual. Her professor however, Dr. Josie Ryan, anticipating the dif ficult transition, “begged” Thompson to bring her newborn to class. Ryan even teaches with one hand while holding the snoozing infant in the other.

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// DECEMBER 2016

Red Carded The Har vard men’s soccer team has

SENTENCE OF THE MONTH

for feited the rest of its season af ter it was revealed that the team was using spread sheets and lewd terms to rank their female counterpar ts. Railing Red Bull A study conduc ted at Purdue Universit y determined that mixing alcohol with Red Bull has a similar

ef fec t on brain chemistr y as taking cocaine. Sandusky Sanctions Penn State Universit y has been fined a record $2.4 million by the US Depar tment of Education for its failure to ac t upon knowledge of the Jerr y Sandusky situation.

“We’ve seen a rash of hate crimes, of hate rhetoric, racist graffiti in campuses around the country. We have seen Klan literature drops, we have seen that suicide hotlines are ringing off the hook, and we are hearing of very extensive bullying in and around schools. It’s really very extraordinary.” MARK POTOK, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center, following Trump’s election

MEANWHILE, IN TEXAS THE STRAIGHT AGENDA According to the Texas Association of Business, anti-LGBT legislation could cost the state’s tourism industry 185,000 jobs and $8.5 billion. /// PROFESSOR BUSH Former Florida governor Jeb Bush will be teaching a ten-day course on government leadership at his alma mater, Texas A&M. /// OBSERVING SAN MARTIANS The Center for Global Engagement at Baylor took 39 international students to the Texas State Fair as a way to experience American culture. /// SHIT SANDWICH San Antonio police officer Matthew Luckhurst has been fired for attempting to feed a fecal sandwich to a homeless person. /// GREEN RICE All six of the serveries at Rice University have been certified by the Green Restaurant Association for their efforts in reducing consumption and waste. /// HAVE YOUR BACK Researchers at UT Southwestern are developing new ways to regenerate spinal nerve cells in mammals, bringing hope to those who’ve suffered severe back injuries.

Image via Retail Hell Underground


STUDYBREAKS.COM

DECEMBER 2016 //

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STUDENT ISSUES

The Finals Week Sweat Lodge Though nearly all universities of fer programs to reduce stress during exam week, do they really want ever yone using them? BY DANIEL WILCOX, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO

f you’re reading this then what the hell is wrong with you? You should be studying for finals. My editor would likely take issue with me advising you to put down this magazine, but I care about your grades. I care about your emotions. Because if you’re anything like me, you’re probably balancing your time between taking occasional glances at your notes from the semester and crying blood from the stress. Finals can be a nasty time, one in which you weigh your accumulated knowledge from the semester against the pressure of the ultimate exam, only to find the stress winning by a profound margin. That stress can be overwhelming, and it drives some students to dire and alarming means. Witness Harvard student Eldo Kim, who, in 2013, delivered a bomb threat the week of finals, allegedly to get out of taking an exam. That’s an extreme measure to say the least, but what sort of environment facilitates a level of tension in which a student would see a bomb scare as valid recourse to taking a final? Granted, not all of us attend Harvard, an institution renowned for its competitive academic field (the average grade earned is an A minus). But for the rest of us plebeians attending state schools and smaller private colleges, the pressure to ace finals and finish the semester strong is still palpable, and one that warrants examination from the schools themselves. Kim’s response to that stress—heinous though it may be— makes you wonder: What are schools doing to help students manage the stress of finals? At UTSA, initiatives are planned far in advance. Taking cues from what other schools have done during finals week, Darrius Greaves and Kemi Asenuga in the Student Services office plan to offer free massages for stressed students to relax, and sumo wrestling suits for them to blow off steam. Says Asenuga, “Last year we also had these balloons you could write your problems on and then stomp out, like you were literally popping your problems.” They’ve even brought in puppies and kittens from nearby shelters for students to snuggle with (and hopefully adopt).

I

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// DECEMBER 2016

The problem, however, is that I’ve been present for some half-dozen finals weeks at UTSA and not once has anyone offered me a massage or a kitten to squeeze. How could I have missed out on this? I’d wager my ignorance (and other students’ as well) hinges on the size of the campus. Peter Illing is a junior at UTSA, having transferred from nearby Northwest Vista College. He recalls a bouncy castle being brought out into the quad of NVC during finals week, granting students a brief moment of weightlessness. But was it effective? “Definitely,” says Illing. “Really helped take my mind off that biting feeling in my neck from having to cram so much in my brain.” What allowed Illing and his classmates to relish in a stress-relieving, stocking-footed bounce was the widespread knowledge of it on campus. NVC is considerably smaller than the campus Peter attends now, its enrollment dwarfed by UTSA’s 30,000 strong. If a larger school like UTSA were to implement something like a bouncy castle, would most students even know? Earlier this month, Student Activities arranged a 30-year anniversary party for UTSA’s University Center (our quad, in essence). When I asked fellow classmates if they were attending, most of them were oblivious to what I was referring to. I might as well have been talking about the Enchantment Under the Sea Dance. When taken to task over their perceived ambivalence toward finals-related stress, Harvard was quick to point out that, like most schools, they provided a range of activities to keep students’ minds calm during finals. Still, I can’t help but wonder if the sheer size of the Harvard campus keeps these activities an innate secret from some of the student body. I know that was the case for me; had I not gone searching for answers, barging into offices and asking questions, I would’ve never known that a free massage would be waiting for me come finals week. It may be that Eldo Kim would have been less likely to call in that bomb threat had someone just handed him a puppy for a few minutes. Illustration by webslinger9


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WHAT’S YOUR MAJOR?

This Month, We’re Studying:

Turfgrass Science BY ALEC CUDMORE, ST. EDWARD’S UNIVERSIT Y

ver been bothered by the lack of turfgrass educational offerings at US colleges? Penn State may have the solution. By offering a Bachelor’s in Turfgrass Science, the Nittany Lions have effectively mowed down rival claims to having the most stupefying major in the country. Still, though watching grass grow is colloquially considered as engaging as watching paint dry, the field is certainly recession-proof, just as a turf with good spring should be impression-proof. Also, it’s not as easy as it may sound. By requiring a mix of hands-on application and a knowledge of topics ranging from genetics to plant nutrition, excelling in Turfgrass Science really requires being outstanding in your field.

E

KEY TERMS

POTENTIAL JOBS: GOLF COURSE SUPERINTENDENT (GCS): Essentially the groundskeeper for a golf course, the GCS manages the materials and financial resources in order to care for the grass. You are Papa (or Mama) Turf. TREE TRIMMER: This really was on the list of jobs that may await you; it’s exactly what it sounds like.

MYTH AND TRUTH MYTH: Turfgrass students are a bunch of grass-loving weirdos. TRUTH: In reality, the degree is about much more than loving lawns. Though some students may be passionate about turfgrass, the degree plan is designed to set sod aficionados on a career path that deals with the poaceae family as just one commodity within a larger industry.

MYTH: Overspecialization so early in life stunts future opportunities. TRUTH: Actually, Turfgrass Science and many other agricultural majors are a result of industry leaders asking colleges to create students that can satisfy their need for experts. Turfgrass can lead to a fulfilling career. Granted, one that deals predominantly with turfgrass.

MYTH: Grass is meant to be stepped on, not studied. It is below us. TRUTH: While the degree is certainly out there, studying sod gives students the opportunity to tap into a niche job market with plush perks, such as fieldside access to legendary arenas and unlimited amounts of fresh cut grass smell.

S TA R T I N G S A L A R Y

$35,000

TURFGR ASS Any kind of grass that is grown to form turf, often for golf ranges. Only cool Turfgrass Science majors call it turf. SPROUTS The lowly plebeians who have yet to pass the turfgrassian feats of strength. GOLF COURSE SUPERINTENDENTS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA (GCSA A) Really the who’s who of lawn care, Turfgrass Science majors can earn credit as undergrads to help them gain access to this secret society. Crop circles may be involved in initiation. TURGR ASS ALUMNI Though few are household names, marquis de sod are scattered like seed across the country. In one online alumni map, the blanket of veteran green growers spread out much like turf would. It’s beautiful, and given the way turfgrassers think, likely intentional.

FUN FACT: CONVERSATION STARTERS “This par ty is boring. Can anyone here tell me about tur fgrass?” • “What’s your favorite kind of grass to study about for four years?” • “I find the state of the tur fgrass industr y to be positively (inser t any thing).”

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// NOVEMBER 2016

Though Augusta National Golf Club’s Brad Owen may disagree, the job of Neil Stubley, the head groundsman at Wimbledon, is considered the holy grail of turf management. Images via shutterstock.com


HOME! welcome a year under the texan sun

DOBIETWENTY21@TRINITY-PM.COM | 855.257.3842 2021 GUADALUPE ST. | AUSTIN, TX 78705 | DOBIETWENTY21.COM


THE MEAL PLAN

INGREDIENTS: • Five (5) fresh

• ¼ cup sugar

whipping cream

chestnuts(or pre-

• ½ cup pecans

• 2 shots espresso (or

1.

cooked ones)

• ¼ brown sugar

extra-strong coffee)

If using raw chest-

• ¼ cup heavy

• Milk (recipe follows)*

nuts, heat oven to 350° F and roast for 35 minutes. 2. Meanwhile, in a saucepan over medium heat, combine sugar with ¼ water and stir until dissolved. Remove

* STEAMING

from heat and stir in

MILK WITHOUT A

pecans. Transfer with

STEAMER 1. Pour milk into a jar

a slotted spoon to a baking tray lined with

with a lid, no more

parchment paper.

than halfway. Screw

Roast with chestnuts

the lid on and shake

for 10-12 minutes.

vigorously for 60 seconds, or until the

3.

milk is frothy and has

Add a sprinkling

doubled in volume.

of brown sugar to

2. Remove the lid

cooled pecans and

You Deserve a Chestnut Praline Latte

and microwave for 30

combine in a food

Because nothing says “holiday season” like obnoxiously spiced milk drinks, here’s a recommendation and recipe for one that’s ac tually wor th burning your tongue.

warm milk into your

seconds.

processor until

3. Using a spoon,

roughly chopped.

obstruct the foam

This is your praline

while you pour the

topping.

desired amount of drink. Spoon milk foam onto the top.

BY TERRY NGUYEN, USC

4. When chestnuts have finished, crack and chop them, then place into a food processor. Over me-

t’s hard to feel the spirit of the season (aside from those dangling fairy lights in every girl’s dorm) when all you want for Christmas is a 4.0 GPA, which may explain why, comes finals season, so many of your friends have crammed themselves into a Starbucks to study. The draw of cheaply brewed energy helps explain the coffee corp’s appeal, but there’s more to it than caffeine. Whether it’s the inviting scent of peppermint or the distracting hiss of milk steaming, something about Starbucks makes the torture of all-nighters a little more bearable, the crippling fatalism a little farther out of reach. Maybe you associate the chain with home, or maybe it’s their contrived recreation of a homey environment, but whatever it is,

I

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// DECEMBER 2016

you’ll likely find yourself lured by the green siren song into a Starbucks at least once this finals season. So, while you’re there, camped out near a power outlet and entering Platinum status on Quizlet, do yourself favor: Indulge in a little self-care with a Starbuck’s Chestnut Praline Latte. The CPL may not be the most popular seasonal drink, but it is perfect for conjuring up the perfect pitch of holiday nostalgia. The whiff of roasted chestnuts will transport you to a toasty fireplace, devoid of any imminent student responsibilities, while the bitter shots of espresso, strong enough to snap even a post-library slump, will whet your appetite for all the sleeping you’ll be able to do when finals have finished. Remember, the golden rule is death before decaf — no matter what time of day it is. You

might be rapidly approaching your quarter-life crisis, but only at a midlife crisis is anything close to depresso allowed. As your drink will likely be brewed by baristas who are nothing more than your classmates working a part-time job, prepare yourself to savor the caramel aftertaste of a burnt tongue. Cauterizing your taste buds will help mask the bitterness and bile of your exams, so drink deep. But, if Starbucks’ godless red cups offend you, or the cross-campus trek proves too daunting, making your own Chestnut Praline Latte is not out of the question. No promises that it holds up to Starbucks’ gold star standards, but saving a couple of bucks does seem equally appetizing. Here is a quick recipe for homemade CPL that requires only basic kitchen utilities.

dium heat, combine ¼ cup brown sugar with ¼ cup water until dissolved, then pour over chestnuts. Blend until syrupy, then strain. This is your chestnut syrup. 5. Prepare espresso or strong coffee. Pour desired amount of syrup into the bottom of a mug, and then pour espresso over. 6. Add warmed milk and top with milk foam.

Photography via Ian Friedel


BRING IN THIS A D F O R WA IVED SIGNING FEES

270 4 R IO GR AN D E ST. AUSTIN, T X 7870 5 | 512.236.19 03 | R IOWESTSTUD ENTLIVING.COM STUDYBREAKS.COM

DECEMBER 2016 //

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S T U DY B R E A K S PR E S EN T S

#GiftHacks SECRET CRUSH

Can you match the gift you bought with its intended recipient? ROOMMATE

SECRET CRUSH

PROFESSOR

MOTHER

GRANDMOTHER

A. CELEBRITY MEMOIR

B. FEBREZE AIR EFFECTS

How to cherish your loved ones without spending a dime.

C. MICHAEL BUBLE’S “CHRISTMAS”

By Crissona Thompson, UCL A It’s Christmastime, which means your friends, family and grumpy professor will be expecting you to scrounge the bottom of your roommate’s couch for enough change to buy them presents. ¶ If you don’t have the resources to give as freely as you’d like, the holidays can feel like just another obstacle following finals and grad school applications. But while it might be tempting to plead for mercy and defer gift-giving to a more financially solvent period of your life, remember that when you’re older one day, you’ll be expecting presents from the thankless college students in your life too! So, here’s how to give gifts that, with minimal physical and financial strain, show your Christmas spirit.

D. CASH

E. NETFLIX MEMBERSHIP

VACATION DAZE: THE GAME OF HOLIDAY REL A X ATION

It ’s Winter Break and you’re intent on doing as lit tle as possible, but will your “responsibilities” get in the way?

Nobody wakes you up and you sleep till noon. SPIN AGAIN

You woke up too late and missed the brunch your parents made. BACK A SPACE

The pancakes are still warm though, and way less cot tony than the ones at school! MOVE AHE AD T WO SPACES

Your mom reminds you that you have shopping to do, and the lines are terrible. BACK TO START

You run into your high school nemesis outside a Hot Topic. They dropped out of college are doing yo-yo full time now! SPIN AGAIN

Your other granddad, waving off the now-unamused protests of your parents, makes you another Old Fashioned. MOVE AHE AD T WO SPACES

That night, you eat the bes t meal you’ve had in six months. SPIN AGAIN

Waving of f the protes ts of your parents, your granddad makes you an Old Fashioned. SLIDE FORWARD THREE SPACES

Your younger cousin Grayson will be there. He wears a fedora and loves “grown-up conversations.” RETURN TO START

When you get home, your mom reminds you that your ex tended family is coming. LOSE A TURN

While shopping, you’re reminded of how lit tle money you have. BACK T WO SPACES

Your parents say you can hang out with your friends, but only if you’re back by midnight. LOSE A TURN

While out, you see your high school ex with a new beau, and they seem cooler than you. LOSE A TURN

The new S.O. gets drunk and throws up on your ex! You’re still the one that got away. SPIN AGAIN

You return home to a well-stocked fridge, make an ex travagant sandwich and pass out in bed watching Net flix.

START!

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// DECEMBER 2016

YOU WIN!

L-R, Images via www.theodyesseyonline.com • wvwww.f lavorus.com

Key: Grandma = Michael Buble’s “Christmas”; Roommate = Febreze Air Effects; Professor = Cash; Secret Crush = Netflix Membership; Mom = Celebrity Memoir

#COLLEGEHACKS


#COLLEGEHACKS

HOW TO

Make the PERFECT HANDMADE GIFT 1

Buy pre-primed canvas and acrylic paints.

2

Use fingers to apply paint to canvas; do not worry about trying to achieve a certain effect. Wait for canvas to dry.

3

Instead of wrapping the painting, leave it on an easel dramatically covered with a sheet and a large bow.

4

On Christmas morning, theatrically unveil your masterpiece.

5

Explain how it represents your relationship with the recipient. Your loved ones will be impressed with your artistic vision, especially if they don’t understand it.

Bonus

Make sure they display your creation prominently. Act hurt if they don’t.

STUDYBREAKS.COM

R E G A R DI NG

R

RE -GIF T ING

e-gifting is a huge no-no, so it is important to avoid being caught while doing it. ¶ That old sweater that Grandma knit for you in sixth grade? It doesn’t fit your aesthetic these days, but it might work for that BFF still clinging to hipster fashion choices. That vase from your boyfriend with the dead flowers in it? It might be a better fit for your friend in Gardening Club. ¶ The key is to keep the prior giver separate from the future recipient. That means your bestie can’t come to Grandma’s weekly tea parties, and your boyfriend will have to sit out ladies’ night.

THE ENDORSEMENT

HAND MADE GIFTS

Because of the perceived amount of effort that it takes to make a gift, the best thing about handmade presents is that they can be utter trash. Tired grandmothers have been capitalizing on this loophole for years, but to improve on the model go for something that seems complicated to the kinetically stunted, but in reality requires no more than the motor skills of a newborn. Ideas include: tiedye t-shirts, personalized cell phone cases and “abstract” paintings. (If you’re a real bummer, you can make one of those “gift coupon” books.) DECEMBER 2016 //

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After emigrating from Israel to study in New York City, Tabak’s distinct vision has made her one of the most talked about students in the fashion industry.

/// HAVING A STYLE OF ONE’S OWN

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// DECEMBER 2016


Katia Michalopoulos @katiamichalo FIT

Maria Sophia Hernandez @mariasophiaht NYU

STUDYBREAKS.COM

DECEMBER 2016 //

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L ARA TABAK THE AWARD-WINNING STUDENT DESIGNER TURNING HEADS IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY

BY RILEY HERUSKA, AUSTIN COLLEGE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JORDI-LAKEEM FOSTER, NYU

30

// DECEMBER 2016

/ / PA G E T H I R T Y-T W O / /


// the mind behind the future of fashion // Twenty-six-year-old fashion designer and FIT student Lara Tabak has spent her last year of school walking red carpets and preparing to enter the world of fashion full-time as the next big designer. Driven by a passion for creation and self-expression, Tabak has dabbled in various areas of the fashion industry, from sportswear and lingerie to fine evening wear. This past September, she received the prestigious Infor/ FIT Fashion Design ICONS Award. The striking gown she designed was modeled on the red carpet during New York Fashion Week, and Tabak attended the glamorous event alongside the fashion editor, Kristen Ingersoll. Tabak lived with her family in Israel for most of her adolescence, and had no idea for some time that she would become a prominent student designer. “It wasn’t until I was about fifteen that I got really interested in fashion design,” Tabak says. “I’ve always loved the concept of telling stories and relating to culture, and fashion lets me do that.” Her seven siblings lived with her in a full house, and Tabak quickly became accustomed to wearing hand-medowns. However, this did not prevent her from spicing up her outfits with glue and scissors. “I tried sewing by hand, and I drew on my clothes with permanent markers. I loved thinking of how I wanted to represent myself and making that happen.” Upon her decision to move to NYC and study fashion when she was 23, Tabak packed up her bags and enrolled as a student at the Fashion Institute of Technology. There, she has attended a wide variety of courses, from hands-on creation classes to art history lectures. Her studies, along with three valuable internships outside of class, only increased her love of design. “I cannot even list all of the people who have supported me along the way,” she says, “and I am incredibly grateful to them for all they have taught me. You never know when you are going to meet the person who is going to teach you the one thing you need to know.” Having lived in both the United States and Israel, Tabak has a unique perspective on culture and its influences on self-expression through fashion. “I feel like when you are

exposed to a new culture, you really start to have a better understanding of culture than beforehand. Without comparison, I think it’s a difficult concept to grasp. What is purple without green, what is red without yellow? My whole perspective on identity has changed.” In her designs, Tabak strives to incorporate this understanding and to bring out various aspects of culture in the clothing. To the common eye, fashion seems to be separated into various different categories of apparel. To Tabak, however, it’s not that black and white. “It’s all design to me, and my designs incorporate the philosophical or aesthetic approach that I’m currently taking,” she says. Tabak has a special passion for designing intimate apparel. “I think fashion is very personal, and intimates can help you to express yourself on the outside. I think a big part of the creative process is thinking about what kind of mask you are creating for people, and also being able to experiment with yourself. It can be a very mind-opening process.” In today’s society, fashion plays a huge role in the development of self-identity, and Tabak recognizes the immense impact it can have on body image. “I think Western culture has a love/hate relationship with fashion, and it’s an interesting dynamic. Cultural influences have led to misrepresentations that can be unhealthy, and the more we are aware of that, the more we can fight back. Trends used to be cookie-cutter and easy to follow, but now people are learning to embrace individuality.” As Tabak nears graduation, she hopes to enter the fashion industry as a competent and passionate designer. “It is really important to know every aspect of the industry, but to also know how to set yourself apart,” she says. “I am trying to gain as much knowledge as I possibly can and then start something that I really believe in, and make sure it stands out. There are so many people in the industry who make a difference every day, and I want to be one of them.” Thousands of girls hope to be the next big thing in the world of fashion, but there are few that shine as brightly as Lara Tabak. With her impressive background and original take on design, Tabak stands out as one of the next stars. The outfits on the following pages are Lara Tabak designs

STUDYBREAKS.COM

/ / PA G E T H I R T Y-T H R E E / /

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Katia Michalopoulos @katiamichalo FIT

/ / PA G E T H I R T Y- F O U R / /


Rachel Spang @rachel.spang NYU

STUDYBREAKS.COM

/ / PA G E T H I R T Y- F I V E / /

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Katia Michalopoulos @katiamichalo FIT

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/ / PA G E T H I R T Y- S I X / /


STUDYBREAKS.COM

/ / PA G E T H I R T Y- S E V E N / /

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Faith Fasakin @faith_fasa NYU

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// DECEMBER 2016

/ / PA G E T H I R T Y- S I X / /


Maria Sophia Hernandez @mariasophiaht NYU

STUDYBREAKS.COM

/ / PA G E T H I R T Y- S E V E N / /

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FOR OU R FA SH ION I S SU E ,

the style guide

Study Breaks asked Julia Dixon, the founder of Trash Vintage and a student with whom we’ve collaborated in the past, to connec t us with student luminaries whose style and aesthetic help inform hers. Studying in London, Austin, Savannah and Los Angeles, her four style curators of fered fashion tips tailored for students, as well as their personal inspirations and opinions. On the next page are the four student aesthetes, and in the following pages are snippets from their conversation.

Photography by Thea Robinson, UT

38

// DECEMBER 2016

/ / PA G E T H I R T Y- E I G H T / /


the student curators JESSIE COLLIER (@jussssie) /// Jesse is a Fashion Media and Communications major at London College of Fashion, where she focuses on fashion photography. She is currently taking a gap year to explore fashion media, as well as create connections, do solo projects and freelance for JUSSSSIE before returning to finish college. Collier wants to be part of the sustainable fashion movement and use visual storytelling to push for mindful thinking within the industry. /// STYLE INSPIRATION: @thelinebyk, @rabbitholelndn, @_norm /// GO-TO LOOK: “Cropped hem denim jeans with a tank top or an oversized top with my Nike TNs.” /// JUST A THOUGHT: “Casual trousers for guys are really underrated in the States. In London, guys wear loose-fitted dark-colored trousers with simple tees, and it is an easy way to look relaxed yet put together, perfect for running around town.”

JESSIE COLLIER (@jesusacostx) /// Jesus, a student at the University of Texas, is a 22-year old graphic/web designer, photographer and illustrator living in Austin. When he is not designing and coding, you can find him tweeting about pop culture, taking pictures of cool objects against bright colored walls, watching “Shrek” in Spanish because it’s a billion times funnier or drinking taro bubble tea. Acosta contributed illustrations to the November issue of Study Breaks. /// STYLE INSPIRATION: @gq, @complex, @asos /// GO-TO LOOK: “Ripped black jeans, a shirt with a crazy pattern and a denim jacket always. I’ve been really into monochromatic outfits lately, though.” /// JUST A THOUGHT: “Zendaya always looks incredible. She is so young and already a style chameleon. I’m also a big fan of Rihanna’s style. Who else could get girls to want to wear fur slides? No one. Also, Kristen Stewart. I’m so into her new androgynous style. She is killing it.”

KELSEY CADENAS (@KelseyCadenas) /// Kelsey is a student at the Savannah College of Art and Design studying Fashion Marketing and Management. She has interned for CollegeFashionista for three years, working in positions such as Style Guru, Social Media Intern and Lifestyle Editor. Cadenas is also a Stylist for Tipster, an online fashion consulting app, where she gives fashion and styling tips to users. As a student, she has created collaborative content for companies such as Urban Outfitters, MTV Style and Palmers. /// STYLE INSPIRATION: @refinery29, @thefashioncitizen, @amyvagabondd /// GO-TO LOOK: “A Bardot bodysuit, distressed denim and a statement shoe. I never go anywhere without a good pair of statement shoes.” /// JUST A THOUGHT: “As people spend more money on wearable technology, fashion will become a mixture of tech and clothing. There have been talks about garments that change clothes, styles that shift shapes and jackets that have built in body temperature control.”

SARAH HALLAL (@sarah.hallal) /// Sarah recently completed her degree in Fashion Design from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, and is now continuing her studies in the school’s International Manufacturing and Product Development Advanced Program, where she is working with a team of twelve other students on a design project for Nike. Hallal plans to complete her Bachelor’s degree in Business Management, and wants to begin her career by working as an assistant designer in luxury fashion markets. /// STYLE INSPIRATION: @dchaussee, @marni, @miumiu, @designmilk, @saintheronshop /// GO-TO LOOK: “A fine gauge knit turtleneck under a pair of thrifted American Apparel brushed denim overalls with Adidas trainers, my optics, and an overcoat when it’s cold.” /// JUST A THOUGHT: “The blend between sport and high fashion will continue to grow, as well as the desire for long-lasting, better quality and environmentally friendly products.”

STUDYBREAKS.COM

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the student curators

JESSIE COLLIER (@jussssie)

JESUS ACOSTA (@jesusacostx)

WHAT IS ONE THING YOU WISH GUYS WOULD STOP WEARING/DOING AND WHY? Fedoras—they don’t add much to outfits. This is probably the first thing that everyone thinks about when asked this question, but flip-flops. Come on. Just don’t. I kind of wish guys would stop wearing open-toed sandals. Though they may be the most convenient shoe when it comes to the summer months, there is something about flip flops that is very unsettling to me.

WHAT DO YOU PREDICT WILL BE A POPULAR TREND IN WOMEN’S CLOTHING THIS WINTER SEASON? Kimonos! I am looking forward to sporting mine when the weather gets a bit cooler. Velvet. Whether it’s on jackets, dresses, boots, socks, hats or bags, bring out those velvet pieces. WHAT DO YOU THINK IS A SIMPLE TREND GUYS CAN WEAR TO BE MORE STYLISH? Cuf fing the sleeves to shir ts is a really good trick. It makes the shir t look more fit ted, and it can show of f arms. It pulls an outfit together to feel more polished. Bandanas! They’re so simple and make you look like you know what you are doing. A nice white, oversized t-shirt over a pair of worn-in denim jeans.

WHAT DO YOU THINK IS A SIMPLE TREND WOMEN CAN WEAR TO BE MORE STYLISH? Baseball caps. I love that look. Put a pair of glitter/metallic anklet socks under loafers, or a cropped boot for some autumn sparkle.

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// PAG E F O R T Y //

WHO ARE THREE MALE FASHION ICONS AND WHY? Adam Gallagher, Dany Dos Santos and Isaac HindinMiller. Gallagher has more of a classic look, Dos Santos has street wear and Hindin Miller is more casual everyday wear. All three guys have different aesthetics, but their styles are clean.

WHO ARE THREE FEMALE FASHION ICONS AND WHY? Christina Paik, a street and portrait photographer, has paved her journey without a degree, just trusting her vision to get to where she is today; Yael Aflalo, the CEO of Reformation, is a badass and found a space in the sustainable fashion sphere that is really successful; and Sarah Harris, the fashion features director of British “Vogue,” because she embraces the long gray hair and stays grounded.

WHAT ACCESSORIES SHOULD GUYS FOCUS ON MORE? Rings. They’re such an underrated accessory. Wearing rings is such an easy way to make a statement. I feel like guys should focus more on watches. They’re not only a classic accessory, but can say a lot about a person and their taste in handcrafted goods.

WHAT KIND OF RETRO LOOKS FOR WOMEN ARE POPULAR RIGHT NOW? Wide leg pants are very trendy right now, which I love. An easy trend to pull off is layering a mock neck or turtleneck shirt under a slip top. Striped rib-cuffs on bomber jackets, flared leg trousers, and matching track suits.


KELSEY CADENAS (@KelseyCadenas )

WHAT KIND OF MEN’S RETRO LOOKS ARE POPULAR RIGHT NOW? In Texas, the retro Western shirts with the pearl snaps will always be in. Also, Levi’s have made a comeback, so wearing vintage jeans or a cropped/frayed cut is pretty stylish. I think Cuban collars, heavily distressed jeans and flare pants are making a comeback. Tom Ford’s Fall 2016. You have combinations of browns and yellows, turtlenecks with blazer-type jackets, trousers and loafers. It takes you back to the 70s, where patterns and analogous colors were a big thing in the fashion world.

WHAT ARE SOME WOMEN’S BRANDS YOU’RE EXCITED ABOUT RIGHT NOW? I love Rachel Antonoff’s latest collection and its lookbook; her “Betty and Veronica” collection is also very creative and fresh. Acne Studios and Marni have always been my favorites, but currently I’m really loving J.W. Anderson, Off-White and Outdoor Voices.

AS COLLEGE STUDENTS, WHEN GUYS ARE DRESSING THEMSELVES WHAT SHOULD THEY KEEP IN MIND? I would say that we should keep in mind that comfort and style are not mutually exclusive. It’s so easy to look put together. It’s not time consuming and it really makes a difference. Guys should always keep in mind that the fit is everything. You want to wear clothes that hug you in all the right places. The days of baggy pants and oversized shirts is long gone.

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SARAH HALLAL (@sarah.hallal)

HOW BIG OF A ROLE DOES THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF A CLOTHING BRAND PLAY IN YOUR DECISION TO BUY OR NOT BUY FROM THEM? A brand’s message and identity is super important to me. I always look to see if they are involved in any recycling initiatives, where they manufacture their products and if they are a part of any ethical protection organizations like the BlueSign® Standard, BCI, SAC, The Higg Index or Fair Trade Federation. *To read more about the environmental impact of fast fashion, flip to page forty-three

HOW IS THE FASHION INDUSTRY DIFFERENT THAN IT WAS FIVE YEARS AGO? Instagram in particular has changed how blogging platforms work and how brands can tell their story. Nowadays, social media moguls, without any experience in the fashion industry, are being hired as models for huge campaigns. I feel like the fashion industry now takes a lot more risks and has a lot more to offer to us as consumers. The fashion industry has become faster than ever, but whether or not that’s a good thing is up for debate.

WILL GENDERED CLOTHING EVER FULLY DISAPPEAR? SHOULD IT? I do believe gendered clothing could disappear in the future. The concept of gender-neutral clothing has moved into the mainstream, and it’s starting to catch on. We have seen big name brands moving away from gender-specific items, such as toys, so it’s not completely impossible. I’m here for it. *To read more about genderless clothing, head to page forty-five

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fashion MEN’S

Name: Sinclair Temple School: ACC Major: Biochemistry

“I don’t think the bomber/souvenir jacket trend is going anywhere anytime soon, and I honestly love it.” -JA

“I think cropped and frayed denim is going to be popular this season. Also, wide-legged pants. I would love to see super wide-legged pants on some guys.” -JC

Photography by Thea Robinson, UT

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/ / PA G E F O R T Y-T W O / /


STUDYBREAKS.COM

/ / PA G E F O R T Y-T H R E E / /

J UL I A DI XON I S A ST UDEN T AT T EX A S STAT E UN I V ER SI T Y, A ND T H E PROPR I ET R E S S OF T R A SH V I N TAGE (@SHOP T R A SH V I N TAGE), A POP-U P CLOT H I NG BOU T IQU E

As a result of the human desire for instant gratification and the protean nature of fashion trends, consumers worldwide have unwittingly allowed the companies they love to turn the clothing industry into a tangled web of environmentally threatening mass production. Though the ramifications of such a hazard are many, by far the greatest danger is the threat fast fashion poses to the environment. According to Forbes, the textile industry accounts for 10 percent of global carbon emissions and is the second largest industrial polluter behind oil. Part of the problem is that many textiles are made of synthetic fibers, whose inorganic composition makes for environmental disaster. Polyester, for example, the most commonly used fabric in the world, takes nearly two centuries to decompose, and in 2015 required 70 million barrels of oil to BY JULIA DIXON produce. Texas State University And while the use of synthetic fabrics is worrisome, their improper disposal is an ecological nightmare. Because they deteriorate so slowly, if mismanaged, rather than being donated and reused, clothing made from artificial fabrics will waste away in landfills forever. Waste at this scale should alarm students, because even if you dislike shopping secondhand or want to avoid changing your shopping habits, you can still help the environment, not to mention someone in need, by donating your clothing. I admit that before learning about the repercussions of mass consumption and its impact on the environment, I used to throw away my clothes, much of the time without thinking twice. It wasn’t until I grew frustrated with my clothes fading and falling apart that I stopped shopping at fast fashion retailers such as F21 and H&M. When I began working at a vintage store, I realized that all of the clothing was at least 20-years-old, but still in pretty incredible shape. The garments owe their durability to when and where they were made, as many of them were produced before the ’90s, which was when many American companies began outsourcing their labor. My obsession for vintage and thrift stemmed from that realization, and from then on I associated the cheap price tags of fast fashion with low quality and unethical practices. Outsourcing not only allows companies to produce more merchandise in less time, but it also significantly improves their bot-

The fashion industry is one of the worst environmental offenders in the world, but there’s a simple, stylish way to reduce your outfit’s carbon footprint.

Photography by Thea Robinson, UT

tom line. Unfortunately, those gains come at the cost of fair wages, humane working conditions and workers’ rights. What’s more, children in the third world are being exploited right alongside the adults. Imagine your little brother or sister working in a small room packed with people and machinery and being denied windows, air conditioning, food, water or breaks. Meeting the fast fashion cravings of the West can only come as the result of unethical practices, and companies will continue to behave criminally so long as our purchasing behaviors validate their choices. So how can you make the switch from fast fashion brands to environmentally conscious companies? Many students are under the impression that eco-friendly options are expensive and therefore infeasible. You might think the only way to make a difference is by shopping for new clothes, made in house, by ethical brands. As a college student though, since you likely cannot afford to shop those brands, consider thrifting or shopping vintage, choices that are cheap, effective and even charitable at times Although you might thrift brands that have participated in unethical outsourcing, by getting the clothing secondhand you are shopping garments that have already been produced. As a result, you are still supporting the names you like without feeding into their bad habits. What’s more, aside from the environmental benefits, thrifting or shopping vintage makes it easier to curate an individual style. When shopping fast fashion, you are choosing from the same racks of clothing as everyone else in the world. As someone who feels that fashion is a huge part of self-expression, I love knowing that shopping recycled ensures that you will dress in clothing that no one else will have. Whether you embrace secondhand shopping or not though, students need to start holding their favorite companies accountable for their modes of production. Once you do, real changes will follow quickly behind. DECEMBER 2016 //

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fashion WOM EN ’ S

“A plain outfit can take on a new life if you have the appropriate statement shoe. A shoe can be the subtle pop of color or ornamentation that really ties a look together.” -KC

Name: Gab Soong School: UT Major: Radio/Television/Film Instagram: @gabsoong

“Spend money on jeans that fit you well and that you feel really comfortable in. Vintage Levis are on trend and have gone up in price in consignment stores, but if you find a pair that fits you well, there’s nothing like it.” -JC

Photography by Thea Robinson, UT

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/ / PA G E F O R T Y- F O U R / /


// fashioning gender //

Gender and clothing have long been defining factors in how individuals represent themselves. As the social construction of gender normativity continues to deteriorate though, the fashion industry has responded by moving in the direction of androgyny: What was once deemed “gendered” can now be worn by anyone. As a result, now more than ever fashion has become a stage for pure self-expression. Individuals can wear what they desire, paying no attention to the archaic connotations of their clothing. “Clothing today is more open than it ever has been,” says Ockhee Bego, a Department of Textiles and Apparel Professor at the University of Texas and part time fashion designer. After more than thirty years in the industry, Bego has witnessed firsthand the change in the definition of fashion. Growing up in her native South Korea, Bego discovered her niche as a clothing designer and took to fashion, leading her to California and New York City at the Fashion Institute of Technology. She recalls men and women adorned in “proper wear,” meaning men donned suits and women wore dresses. Looking back, Bego can more easily chart the evolving notions of gender in the industry. Now when it comes to normativity in clothing, Bego makes it clear that of all of her students, “not one is small minded.” Her fashion students rarely delineate certain clothes for certain genders; instead, inspiration BY HUNTER TANEM drives their production, allowing the clothes to be worn by anyone. Other University of Texas than tailoring garments differently to account for anatomy, Bego’s stuat Austin dents focus on exploring constructions of clothing that, decades earlier, would likely have been deemed either masculine or feminine. The 2016 UT senior fashion show, “Elements,” showcased several designs that eschewed typical gender conformity. One designer created a streetwear outfit that tied in historically feminine pieces, such as a corset and long train. Although traditionally feminine, the reinterpretation questioned what makes an item unmasculine. Bego also mentions the curious 2017 Fall/ Winter Prada collection, in which women’s button-downs were constructed in the way men’s are, with the buttons on the right of the shirt. Though explanations vary for why button position is gendered at all, Prada’s reversal of the socially ingrained constructions was a deliberate attempt to question the relevance of such distinctions. In a nod to the Italian house’s departure from gender status quo, a senior designer at the “Elements” show incorporated the same concept into their line, tailoring the garment such that the buttoning detail of the women’s coats were like those of the men’s, making the clothing essentially unisex. Through the exploration of gender in clothing, Bego sees design evolving in the hands of her students, mirroring the industry at large but also pushing it further. IncreasI NSTAGR A M: @HUN T ERTA N EM ingly, fashion is about self-definition through SCHOOL: UN I V ER SI T Y OF T EX A S AT AUST I N // M A JOR: R A DIO/ T EL EV I SION/ F I L M the clothes you wear. There are no gendered garments; there is just clothing. And as Bego says, “Being a college designer allows you to open doors for society, which is a great power and responsibility.”

STUDYBREAKS.COM

As the divisions of gender in the fashion industry continue to erode, how are student designers responding to the new, boundaryless world of clothing?

/ / PA G E F O R T Y- F I V E / /

DECEMBER 2016 //

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EXTRA CREDIT

Get ting to Know:

DE’ANDRE WIGFALL

By Lindsey Davis, Iowa State University Photography by Anjani Stewart, University of Houston De’andre Wigfall began his collegiate journey with dreams of playing basketball and pursuing Kinesiology, though after circumstances forced those aspirations to fall through, the Houston Community College sophomore began to search elsewhere for his calling. ¶ Now a Fashion Design major, Wigfall focuses his creative passions on his urbanwear fashion line, Yvesdre. I’ve been into fashion my whole life. I was inspired by my favorite brand, Yves Saint Laurent, and then Dre comes from my name. It’s like a street brand mixed with high fashion.People will contact me through social media. If they’re in my city, I’ll meet up with them, or if they’re in another state or city I’ll ship it out. Right now it’s in Texas, but it’s slowly starting to get out there to other states. I feel that art gives me inspiration to make something. I definitely would like to move to Los Angeles or New York. It’s just completely me. I have friends that will model for me. I prefer making urban wear. I’m not really into dresses or anything. It’d probably be A$AP Rocky or Rihanna. I would probably try to go to a major fashion school and network out there and grow my brand. I’ve hosted plenty of fashion shows in Houston. I’ve traveled to Dallas, and I went to some New York fashion shows this past summer. I plan on going back in February to do another fashion show. I know a different guy that’s throwing one, so hopefully everything works out and I go. They have what you call a workforce program and degrees that you want to pursue, so I’ll do do my two years and then I get my Associate’s degree; then they’ll set me up with different jobs. I know I would definitely want to travel to another state to do it. I started at the University of Texas at San Antonio. It was amazing. That was my first time ever going to New York. So just to see the culture and environment there, it’s so fast-paced. To see the different styles and everything was a great experience. Coming up in high school I was really good at basketball. From then on, I can try to go to Central St. Marcus or New York—a big fashion school with my associate’s. I was supposed to have a basketball scholarship, but it didn’t work out. I knew I had to go to school, of course. Especially with my mom being in the medical field, I knew I had to go. I went up there and I really looked at the campuses and their environments. I didn’t all the way want to be there because I wanted to be playing basketball. I did Physical Therapy and Kinesiology, but it wasn’t me. I didn’t feel comfortable. I didn’t think it was for me. I never took fashion that seriously. While I was up there, I started to really study it. When I came home that summer, I said I was going to create my own line, and after that it just took off. I kind of wish that I knew back then that I wanted to do this. Everything is a learning experience for a reason. I don’t drink. I’m kind of that friend where we go out and I don’t do anything. I take pride in being that friend.

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CHEAT SHEET Name

De’Andre Wigfall College

Houston Community College Instagram

@yvesdre Year

Sophomore Brand

Yvesdre Major

Fashion Design Hometown

Houston, TX STUDYBREAKS.COM

DECEMBER 2016 //

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president MEET THE

What is your major? I am a double major in Political Science, as well as Public Policy, Planning, and Development with an emphasis in Sustainable Planning

What historical figure do you admire? I admire Hillary Clinton. Her resilience and strength to always keep fighting and never give up is something I have always admired about her.

What movie has had the biggest impact on your life? “The Lion King.” As a kid I used to watch it at least once a week, so by far one of my favorite movies. Also, where else would you get tips on leadership?

What is your dream job? If I had to pick, probably being the Mayor of Los Angeles. What academic focus most interests you? Within Political Science, I have really focused on Asian American and East Asian Politics. In my Public Policy degree, my focus is on Community and Economic Development.

Where do you take most of your selfies? At football games when I run into random friends. Who is your favorite person to follow on Snapchat? No one in particular. I am bigger fan of following people on Instagram.

What will you never understand? I will never understand traffic. If all the cars are moving and there are no accidents, why does it always take two hours to travel fifteen miles in LA?

What is your favorite Instagram account? @lafoodieguy Everything he posts just makes you hungry.

E DW I N SAUC E D O

Student Body President of the University of Southern California What is your most marked characteristic? I love to think big picture and vision. I never want to constrain myself to what is, but instead I like to think about what could be. What angers you? The political apathy of a lot of our college students and young adults. The refusal to engage in the political system disappoints me.

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// DECEMBER 2016

What music are you into at the moment? I am really into the new Frank Ocean album. My taste in music is pretty subpar, though; you can catch me listening to Top 40 most of the time. What is your favorite place on the internet? I read Politico religiously; I always get a good laugh from Buzzfeed and spend too much time on Facebook.

What are your intellectual strengths? Curiosity, critical thinking and reasoning

What qualities do you most admire in a person? I really admire people who are able to get back up no matter how many times they fall down. I have admiration for resilience, perseverance and drive.

Who are some of your favorite authors? Malcolm Gladwell, J.D. Salinger and Michelle Alexander

What is your motto? “Those who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do.” -Steve Jobs

What fictional character do you most identify with? I haven’t read a lot of fiction in the last couple of years, but I always resonated with Holden Caulfield from “Catcher in the Rye.”

What is your favorite meme? All of the memes that came out after Melania Trump plagiarized Michelle Obama’s speech at the RNC always give me a good laugh.

What is your greatest achievement? This summer I represented the United States at the G20 Youth Summit in China, where I gave a speech on segregation across the world and led negotiations on behalf of our country. I also pride myself on being the first in my family to go to college, as being the Student Body President of USC was always a dream of mine. What is your most treasured possession? My passport. I love traveling and exploring new countries.


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