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M O N D AY FEB. 2, 2004 Vol. 125, No. 45

Rain to Snow 38° / 19° w w w. s t u d l i f e . c o m

STUDENT LIFE T H E I N D E P E N D E N T N E W S PA P E R O F WA S H I N G T O N U N I V E R S I T Y I N S T. L O U I S S I N C E 1 8 7 8

INSIDE MO Dems to weigh in onTuesday NIHON NIGHTMARES

A look at the frightening films of recent Japanese cinema. Also in Cadenza: good and bad political music reviews, Foodnatic, and this year’s first installment of Random Doodles.

By Nadee Gunasena q Contributing Reporter

Tomorrow will mark the fi rst big wave of Democratic presidential primaries in the U.S. Seven state primaries will be held Feb. 3, leaving Democrats across the country currently holding their breath to see who will come out on top. Now that Dick Gephardt, an obvious choice for Missouri voters, is out of the race, excitement runs high for students on Washington University’s campus. “Now that Congressman Gephardt is no longer in the race, Missouri is anyone’s state,” said sophomore Nicole Soussan, president of the College Democrats. According to political science professor William Lowry, local favorite Gephardt’s decision to drop out of the race on Jan. 20 has dramatically increased the impact that Missouri’s primary—and students’ votes—could have at the national level. “It’s hard to name another state in the U.S. as representative as Missouri is,” said Lowry. “Missouri is fairly ideologically centered. It is mixed on political views, with a Democratic governor

and a Republican legislature.” Recognizing the powerful potentials involved in winning the Missouri primary, three Democratic candidates visited St. Louis in the past week to increase their supporter base. John Kerry, John Edwards and Al Sharpton all made public appearances to overflowing audiences, hoping to persuade Missouri’s Democrats to vote for them in tomorrow’s primary. “In the 20th century, Missouri was considered a ‘bellwether state,’ a very accurate indicator of who was going to win the election,” said Lowry. “In every election except the 1956 election, the candidate who won Missouri went on to win the presidential election.” Missouri’s primary will also provide a good indication of whether or not people will show up to vote in the 2004 presidential election. Although New Hampshire’s primary saw a record turnout, it’s not yet clear whether this phenomenon will be repeated. “[This primary] will probably tell us something about whether Democrats will mobilize in the fall and turn out to vote,” said Lowry.

See PRIMARY, page 2

JONATHAN LANE

A clown turns out for Howard Dean’s rally this past Friday in St. Louis. Tuesday’s contests are key for those candidates trying to avoid being laughed out of the race.

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Faculty responds to performance space criticisms

Olin Ad Bowl

B-BALL ON THE ROAD

By David Tabor q Contributing Reporter

Find out how the traveling women’s and men’s basketball teams dealt with their UAA opponents. Also, Christopher Dart takes on the Super Bowl.

PAGE 7 STUDENT SNAPSHOT

Q: Who would you vote for

in the Missouri primary? A. 19% B. 10% C. 17% D. 54%

Kerry. I mean, A: A.weJohn don’t have any real Kennedys left, might as well go with a fake one. Who’s Ted? B. John Edwards. He’s boyish, energetic and Southern, sort of like Bill Clinton minus the sex scandals—at least so far. C. Howard Dean. His dislike of Bush matches my own, and I admire candidates that tell the truth, even if they venture into the realm of obnoxiousness. D. Al Sharpton. I think it’s really his time. I miss the medallions, but what can I say? I love an underdog. Results are unscientific, based on 114 votes cast.

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INDEX Cadenza Forum Calendar Sports

pages 3-4 pages 5-6 page 9 page 7, 9

PAM BUZZETTA

Students in the School of Business watch the Super Bowl at the Knight Center on Sunday. The event was sponsored by the Olin Marketing Association. During halftime and after the game, business students discuss and rank the Super Bowl’s advertisements.

Amidst growing concerns regarding the facilities available to students, several music department faculty members recently commented on the department’s status. While the feeling is generally one of satisfaction with continued accomplishment, the general consensus was that a desire exists for improved funding. A constant issue for the department has been availability of practice rooms and teaching space, as well as acoustically sound performance spaces. “While there’s not trouble paying for music coaches or buying instruments, the department’s budget doesn’t have space for large-scale projects,” said William Lenihan, director of jazz performance. “What the music department needs is a whole new building.” On top of their worries about available facilities, members of the department have voiced additional, though not new, budgetary concerns. Large-scale building projects aside, some faculty members expressed mild disappointment with gaps in the budget for day-to -day operations. Dan Presgrave, director of the symphony orchestra, expressed a desire for additional ap propriations toward instrument maintenance. He explained that because the department does not stockpile large quantities of instruments as a dedicated conservatory might, maintaining the instruments available is exceedingly important. Director of Vocal Activities John Stewart expressed concerns over operational budgets as well, citing uniforms as an uncovered expense. Car washes and other fundraising activities are used to buy uniforms for new choir members each year. If these fundraisers do not collect sufficient funds, he said, choir members often pay for their own transportation or hotel costs on overnight trips, as budget allotment frequently does not provide for both. “Uniforms are an example of costs necessary to professionalize our programs,” said Stewart. Stewart explained that the level of talent among the students was such that the move to uniforms was necessary despite the costs, given the level at which they compete.

See MUSIC, page 2

Students build community online By Sarah Kliff q Staff Reporter They may not be aware of it, but Washington University students have an opportunity to share their deepest secrets online through the washustudents LiveJournal community. The community gives members of LifeJournal, a publicly accessible online journaling commmunity, a chance to meet and communicate with other students. Freshman Jessica Danziger decided to start the LiveJournal community after observing how many students already kept journals. “This summer, I participated in the Freshman Summer Academic Program and noticed that quite a few of the freshman in the program were LiveJournal members,” said Danziger. “During the program, there was nothing like having a big party and then reading everyone’s LiveJournal to see how they experienced it in their own way. You got a bunch of different perspectives on the same event. You found out all the sides to a story or a conflict and little details that usually get

lost. It was fascinating.” Since Danziger started the community at the beginning of the fall semester, the membership has increased to a group of 82 University students and pre-freshmen. “The community continues to be popular because on a college campus it’s almost impossible to run out of topics to discuss,” said Danziger. “There are always new events and new controversies. It’s an easy and fun way to meet new people. Most important, I also think that freshman have really benefitted from having the advice of the upperclassmen at their fingertips.” Danziger has met many people on campus through the LiveJournal community, one of whom turned out to be one of her best friends. Sophomore David Greenstein belongs to many communities on LiveJournal in order to share his written work. He joined the washustudents group to get more involved in the campus community. “I joined the [LiveJournal] community specifically to help answer prospective students’ questions, meet current

BRENDAN WATSON

Students use this online LiveJournal community to share their musings with University students as well as prospective freshmen.

See JOURNAL, page 2

STUDENT LIFE

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