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WEDNESDAY DEC. 1, 2004 Vol. 126, No. 35

Cloudy 44° / 30° w w w. s t u d l i f e . c o m

THE END IS NEAR . . .

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DAYS UNTIL FINALS END DAYS UNTIL CHRISTMAS

STUDENT LIFE T H E I N D E P E N D E N T N E W S PA P E R O F WA S H I N G T O N U N I V E R S I T Y I N S T. L O U I S S I N C E 1 8 7 8

SU VP resigns, says Ader n Treasury delays

replacement proceedings

INSIDE

By Roman Goldstein Sarah Kliff Student Life Staff Medical concerns have prompted senior Katie Leikhim to resign from her post as Student Union’s vice president, according to SU President David Ader. Leikhim has been on medical leave from the University this semester, and

although she will be returning in the spring, SU President David Ader said he believed the resignation was in the best interests of all involved. “The Executive Council had some concerns about her health and her ability to perform her job responsibilities,” he said. Numerous attempts to contact Leikhim on Monday and Tuesday were unsuccessful. Twenty-four hours after Ader announced Leikhim’s resignation in an e-mail to members of Student Union, speculation quickly turned to her probable replacement. According to the SU

constitution, both Senate and Treasury must confirm the new VP. In the e-mail he sent Monday night, Ader explained that this process would begin at last night’s Treasury meeting and continue at the Senate meeting tonight. Early yesterday, numerous sources told Student Life that the Executive Council would recommend Senator Pamela Bookbinder, a junior, for the job. But no names were mentioned at the meeting last night after members of the Treasury tabled replacement talks until next week to allow the student body to

Katie Leikhim has resigned from her position as the SU Vice President, according to See SU VP, page 4 SU President David Ader.

Job outlook better for college grads

It was a heartbreaking end to the season for the women’s soccer Bears, with a loss to the University of Puget Sound in Wash.

By Laura Geggel Contributing Reporter

Center. “I want to be involved in all aspects,” said Smith. “I see myself doing individual student counseling and talking to employers.” Smith is an alumnus of the University’s law school, and he has worked there for almost 14 years. After graduating from the University, Smith practiced law for five years, and then returned to become the Associate Dean of Student Affairs at the law school. Smith has also worked in the School of Law Career Center, which he said afforded him valuable insights that he can put to use in his new position. James McLeod, vice chancellor for students and dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, had the fi nal decision in the selection. He said that, although others were considered for the position, Smith possessed all of the qualities they were seeking in a new leader for the Career Center. He was mature and had leadership experience as well as a sense of responsibility, among other attributes, said McLeod. As Career Center Director, Smith would like to focus on making stronger connections between current students and University alumni, connections he has found advantageous of during his time in the law school’s Career Center. Smith said he would miss working in the law school, where he had become close with many of the professors and administrators he had known as a student there. “I have real mixed feelings about leaving the law

Despite tough job markets in past years, a recent job outlook survey from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) predicts that 13.1 percent more 2005 graduates will find work than their counterparts did last year. The survey, released the second week of November, offered encouraging results for Washington University students graduating with degrees in me chanical engineering, business administration, computer science, finance, economics, electrical engineering and accounting. Although they will not be able to tally the total number of job offerings until spring, the career centers in both the Olin School of Business and the College of Arts & Sciences said they had noticed this upward trend, which began late last year. “We are, in general, seeing more jobs being offered to students, particularly because of the improving economy and because more companies are coming to campus,” said Sally Pinkard, the undergraduate adviser at Olin’s Weston Career Resources Center. Over 40 percent of the employers surveyed by NACE said that they plan to visit college campuses in the spring and interview potential new employees. A little less than 18 percent plan to visit in the fall. Kevin Byron, a senior in the business school, is looking for jobs in consulting and investment banking and already has two job offers. “The business career center has been amazingly helpful,” said Byron. Professor of economics Steven Fazzari discussed several factors that have contributed to the current state of the economy. The Iraq war, for example, could be producing both positive and negative effects on the economy. “We have higher budget deficits that the high spending [for the war] creates, and that hurts the economy,” said Fazzari. The indirect effects, he said, are harder to gauge. The war’s uncertainty—its expenses, its affect on oil prices and its influences on the American government—could be discouraging business investment.

See CAREER CENTER, page 4

See MORE JOBS, page 4

PAGE 9 What would Wash U be like if its athletic teams were Division I, instead of Division III? Reporter Sarah Ulrey and some varsity athletes offer a look.

PAGE 9

Are our belongings in danger of being stolen? Craig Pacheco asks in Forum if housekeepers can be trusted not to steal items from students’ rooms and suggests students be able to opt out of the housekeeping system.

PAGE 7

INDEX News Forum Classifieds Crossword Sports

1 6 8 8 10

DAVID HARTSTEIN | STUDENT LIFE

Senior Julia Day is a Career Peer at the Career Center. The job market for college graduates has significantly improved over the past few years.

Career Centers hire new directors By Caroline Wekselbaum Contributing Reporter Both the Career Center and the Weston Career Resources Center are under new management. James J. Beirne, who took the helm at the WCRC Monday, comes to Washington University from a job in human resources at General Mills Inc. Previously, Beirne worked at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania as director of career development and placement. Beirne replaces former WCRC director Greg Hutchings, who resigned in June. Beirne will also serve as associate dean of the Olin School of Business. “Jim has a wealth of experience, a disposition and a professional intelligence that qualifies him to take career services at Olin to the pinnacle of achievement and renown,” said Dean Stuart Greenbaum. Mark Smith, current associate dean for student affairs in the School of Law, has been named director of the Career Center and assistant vice-chancellor. He will start his new position Jan. 1, 2005. “It sounds like a great opportunity and I’m really excited about it,” said Smith. Smith has already begun planning for January. “One of the fi rst things I want to do is to try and reach out to as many undergrads as I can to fi nd out what they want and what we can do to help make the biggest difference,” said Smith. In his new role, Smith would like to both learn and lead by performing different roles within the Career

SHCS to administer FluMist today and tomorrow By Liz Neukirch Senior News Editor In lieu of injectable f lu vaccines, wh ich are in short supply nationw ide, Student Health and Counseling Serv ices (SHCS) w ill be adm in istering FluMist to interested students during clin ics today and tomorrow from 9 -11 a.m. and 1-3 p.m. in the SHCS offices. FluMist, a nasal-adm in istered alternative to the traditional injected f lu vaccine, is a m ist that contains th ree live f lu v irus strains, wh ich have been weakened. The vaccine strains are de signed to reproduce on ly in the nose, remain ing in a weakened form that w ill not lead to a case of the f lu. Th is triggers an im mune system response in the body that helps prevent the f lu for the entire season. “Im mediately after hearing that some of the injectable f lu vaccine had

STUDENT LIFE

been w ithdraw n, the first th ing that we did here is contact the company that makes the FluMist vaccine and get on the waiting list to get as much of the vaccine as we could,” said Dr. A lan Glass, director of SHCS. “Because we were fairly early on that waiting list, we were able to get some.” Possible side effects of the vaccine are m in imal and include ch ills, a sore th roat, headaches and weak ness. MedIm mune Vaccines, Inc. is currently the on ly company that distrib utes FluMist, wh ich is the first f lu vaccine in the Un ited States that is given as a nasal m ist instead of a shot. The vaccine was licensed in 2003. Healthcare prov iders such as private practitioners, private institutions like Wash ington Un iversity and medical compan ies run n ing private f lu clin -

One Brookings Drive #1039 #42 Women’s Building St. Louis, MO 63130

MIKE HASKEY | KRT CAMPUS

Dr. Linda M. Chinn administers a dose of FluMist to another physician at Family

See FLUMIST, page 4 Care North in Columbus, Ga. Newsroom: (314) 935-5995 Advertising: (314) 935-6713 Fax: (314) 935-5938

Editor: editor@studlife.com News: news@studlife.com Calendar: calendar@studlife.com

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