Page 1

Portland Works: Cold Spots Report

Studio Polpo 2014


Portland Works: Cold Spots Report March 2014


INTRODUCTION:

This report pulls together a number of diverse surveys, studies and investigations produced for Portland Works over the previous couple of years. It gives an overview of the information that already exists, comments on what has been learnt so far and identifies areas where there are gaps or unknowns. It also uses this existing information, together with new work and research, to suggest how Portland Works might develop to maintain its character as a lively, creative and innovative hub, based in a much-loved historic building in the heart of Sheffield. This report is a snapshot, bringing the mass of data collected so far into focus, rather than a guidebook explaining what to do next. We hope it will act as a prompt, and provide information and tools that will assist Portland Works in the planning of future works, funding bids and programmes, in a graphically accessible manner. To this end, a number of the documents presented in this report are ‘live’; that is to say they are spreadsheets or documents that can be added to or adapted to suit the changing circumstances or requirements of the Works. Each section includes discussion of key ideas and a description of the diagrams and drawings produced. Related visual information is cross referenced in this text using the arrow symbol (see below an example for the ‘Cold Spots Document Map’). In many cases a graphic explaining how the diagrams can be used is also included at the end of each section. The Cold Spots Document Map shows how each document produced for this report relates to previous studies and future decision making.

Cold Spots Document Map

Studio Polpo, 2013.

4.


CONTENTS:

Introduction

4.

Contents

5.

Cold Spots Document Map

1. Context

Information Produced So Far

6. 9. 11.

Room Data Sheet

14.

Heating Map

15.

Heritage

16.

Metal Trades Diagram

17.

Knife Making Process

24.

Room Significance

25.

Significant Elements

26.

Wild History Photographs

31.

2. Repair and Upgrade Measures

33.

Fabric Build-ups

36.

Fabric Build-up Costs

39.

Retrofit Opportunities

40.

How to Use: Retrofit Opportunities

42.

3. Analysis and Proposals

45.

47.

Data Visualisation

Vision Plan Graphics 1

48.

Vision Plan Graphics 2

50.

Vision Plan Graphics 3

52.

How to Use: Vision Plan Graphic 1

54.

How to Use: Vision Plan Graphic 2

55.

Mapping Occupancy

56.

Proposals

57.

Occupancy Mapping Retrofit Proposals

How to Use: Occupancy Mapping How to Use: Retrofit Proposals

58. 62. 64. 65.

Proposals Diagram 1

66.

Relocation Proposals

67.

Heating Proposals

68.

4. Future Uses

69.

74.

Future use Strategies

5. Funding and Research

77.

Funding Bid Diagram

80.

Funding Opportunities

80.

Research Opportunities

81.

6. Conclusions

83.

86.

Cross Referencing Drawings

Appendix

91. Schedule of Areas

93.

Funding and Costing Examples

94.

Fab-Lab Equipment Survey

95.

5.


Cold Spots Document Map

Portland Works Cold Spots Document Map

comission

QS

VP Graphic 1

Costs and priority of repair works

VP Graphic 2

Building Survey & Repair Schedule

Occupancy Mapping Showing which tenants use the works at which times (1)

Asbestos Survey

Conservation Management Plan

Heating Map

Energy & Sustainability Report

English Heritage Guidance

Current provision

Heating Proposals

Fabric Build-ups

Gazeteer: Room-by-room list of features

SSoA Masters Project 2011

Detailed build-ups of insulation approaches works with costs/m2 and U-values

Diagram Plans: Building elements and age of these

Diagram Live Project 2011

Statement of

FabLab strategies

?

Supporting information to accompany LBldg App

Live Project 2013 EXISTING SUREVEYS/INFO

WESSEX ARCHAEOLOGY

Room Data Sheets

Funding Opportunities Survey of relevant funding opportunities picking up on enterprise strand in particular (5)

Historical Research (ie A.de Lange)

Research Opportunities Survey of relevant opportunities (3)

QS


7.

Block A / Block D refurb

Budget Costs Amount of tenants engaged in metal-related trades (2)

Funding Applications Schedule of Areas

Metal Trades Mapping

Budget Costs

of all spaces with rates allowing costed fabric build-ups to generate cost

FabLab equip Survey Spatial requirements of equipment (4)

Opportunities

QS Proposals

Analysis showing relative ease of upgarding building fabric, space-by-space

space-by -space taking into account current/proposed tenancy and heritage issues

Proposals Diagram #1

Relocation Proposals

Space use strategy (6)

Phasing of Works

Suggested permant and temporary relocations to enable better use of spaces or refurb.

Heritage Partnership Agreement

Revenue & Funds

Works

Agreed document setting out methods for future works and negating further LBC applications

1. 2. 3.

Can assist in relocating tenants to more suitable areas of the Works or programming activities. Allows PWIPS to monitor metal trades as % of tenants and locate new metal-trades tenants. Research may bring funding directly applicable to capital costs (ie material testing) or raising

4. 5.

6.

Allows potential spaces for FabLab activities to be planned/allocated. Allows phasing and funding programmes to

Studio Polpo

funding requirements (ie public involvement, capital/feasibility costs). Initial space proposals for discussion based on other information gathered.

Existing Work by others

Wessex Archaeology Outputs Portland Works Guidance Quantity Surveyor cost check ?

Potential (unknown) link


1. CONTEXT


INFORMATION PRODUCED SO FAR:

Building Survey Report, Bond Bryan, March 2011

Asbestos Report

Energy and Sustainability Report

Bond Bryan were instructed by PW to carry out

A ‘Type 2’ asbestos survey was carried out by First

This survey and report were commissioned by PW

a high-level building fabric assessment in 2011

Order Red for PW in April 2011. This report found

from Nick Parsons of Sustainable Building, and

which summarised the building fabric, condition

that most asbestos-containing materials were

received in March 2013.

and remedial works required. Remedial works are

textile based, the majority of which were in “a

categorised into ‘Health & Safety’ (for immediate

manageable condition although removal may be

The report covers a number of aspects of the Works,

attention) ‘Year 2’, ‘Year 5’ and ‘Year 10’ giving an

the best management strategy for a number of

from material upgrades, to heating, lighting, energy

assessment of priority. Repair and remedial works

items “.

and water and makes recommendations based on

were also priced for budget purposes.

different levels of budget, difficulty and timescale. The report contains photographs and locations of

An inspection of the building and conversations

Bond Bryan point out that not all areas were

all items discovered. It has been assumed that none

with tenants and the building manager also inform

able to be fully accessed, and the drainage and

of these have been removed at this stage.

the approach and recommendations of the report.

mechanical and electrical services were not tested,

Areas containing asbestos have been cross-

only visually inspected.

referenced from the Asbestos Survey and flagged-

Key recommendations are the reduction of heat

up on the Room Upgrade Data Sheets that form

loss through the building fabric; initially by draught-

The document has been looked at by Richard

part of this report. An example sheet is included in

stripping and basic air-tightness measures, the

Fletcher Quantity Surveyors to comment on costs

this report.

prevention of water ingress and damp through

and rates. They were of the opinion that the

repair of rainwater goods, roofs and walls and

2011 prices are still current in July 2013, given the

then insulation (for which various strategies are

financial climate over this period, also that if these

Room Data Sheet

presented). A number of these recommendations

include contractor’s overheads and profit (as

have been adopted by Studio Polpo in the Repair

noted) they would be acceptable to use for current

and Upgrade Measures section of this report.

budgeting purposes. The report also looks at water use, heating, We have used this survey as a basis for outline

waste and power (and to what extent these are

funding strategies, most notably the JP Getty

shared or split into individual tenancies), and it

funding. This survey report is also summarised

is our recommendation that, as future works are

graphically elsewhere in this report (as Vision Plan

planned, the recommendations of the Energy and

Graphic 1) to give a clearer overview of issues by

Sustainability Report are used as initial guidance. An

floor and by block.

outline survey of tenants heating systems has been produced (Heating Map) as part of this report.

Heating Map A research project is also commencing with The University of Sheffield’s Engineering Department to measure the actual performance of the building fabric as well as the air permeability or ‘leakiness’ in order to better inform how to upgrade the building fabric.

11.


MA Sustainable Studies Project 2012

Live Project 2011

A group of students from the University of Sheffield’s

During the writing of this report, a second Live

A further group of students from the University of

School of Architectural Studies (SSoA) focused on

Project was carried out in 2013. This project

Sheffield’s School of Architectural Studies (SSoA)

Portland Works for a six-week period, and a report

focused on three key issues; improving the site’s

looked at building upgrades to Portland Works as

summarises their activities and findings.

currently unwelcoming entrance whilst maintaining

part of their Sustainable Studies Masters course.

security for tenants; introducing a ‘makers lab’ This project had a number of outputs: mapping

with equipment that can be utilised by tenants ,

The students focus on the workspaces of Mick

existing tenants and their processes; material

teaching workshops and other interested parties for

Shaw, Stuart Price and Nuala Price, and to varying

flows to and from the site; mapping the use of

work’s community profit and implementing way-

extents the Works as a whole. They analysed

the courtyard spaces; charting individuals and

finding strategies, that make it possible to find and

current thermal and lighting issues, and developed

organisations involved with the Works; a computer

advertise tenant’s work.

proposals to increase comfort levels and energy

and physical model that can form the basis of future discussions and proposals.

efficiency within the building. The project resulted in an event and an instruction manual providing a range of ideas that Portland

Although technical issues relating to the historic

These studies give an overview of both the

Works could implement, but would each require

building fabric and heritage/planning aspects

operation of the communal and some individual

more detailed input in terms of cost, technical and

relating to the character of the building are not

spaces, and these can usefully inform future

planning/heritage issues.

always examined in depth, these proposals include

proposals. The group also worked on engagement

a range of thought-provoking suggestions, in

strategies with both the public and tenants which

particular with regards to natural lighting.

can serve as useful precedents and tests. The Live Project data provides a valuable tool for those wishing to understand the operation of the Works. Crucially it should inform any strategies that address the communal spaces, and provide lessons in drawing tenants and visitors together through events.

12.


Drawings

Photographic Survey

Funding Bids

Scale drawings of the Works (in CAD format)

A detailed photographic condition survey with

A number of funding bids have been made and

exist of all floors and some elevations. The exact

images referenced to annotated plans was carried

details are held by PW. They include bids to JP

provenance of these is not known, and the

out in the autumn of 2012. This provides very useful

Getty, Garfield Weston Trust and the Architectural

accuracy can therefore not be guaranteed.

evidence of the condition and fit-out of all spaces,

Heritage Fund. These vary in complexity, however

However any check dimensions made so far have

particularly as a number of spaces are difficult to

all contain useful information that should be studied

revealed these to be fairly accurate.

access.

prior to making new bids.

It should be noted that, given the age and nature

This document should be updated as spaces are

See p94 of this report for JP Getty funding

of the building, there are variations and irregularities

altered. It will also be supplemented by works

information.

in the building that are, understandably, not picked

carried out as part of Wessex Archaeology’s

up on the drawings.

Conservation Management Plan.

More detailed elevational drawings produced by Tatlow Stancer Architects for the previous landlord, (as part of the rejected planning application to turn the Works into flats) exist online, on the planning portal. CAD or hard copies are not owned by PW however. We have used the plan and elevation drawings as the basis for areas in our Upgrade Measures, as these are accurate enough to be used for fairly high-level costings. It would be useful to prepare further measured elevational and sectional drawings as well as a roof plan prior to more detailed works being carried out.

13.


Room Data Sheet

14.

PortlandWorksRetrofit RoomDataSheet

Level: Ground

Block: A

Unit: 1A Tenant: KarlWhitham Rental:

RoomHeight 3.00

Room height

FabricofNote(CMP)

Area(m2)

Cost/m2

BudgetCost

CurrentConstruction

RetrofitOption

Walls

solidBrick

IWI.1

48

£86.11

£4,133.28

Ceilings

newsuspended/fibreboard lathe&plasterbelowcorrugatedroof

CE.2

121

£45.35

£5,487.35

Floor

suspendedtimber

CE.2

121

£45.35

£5,487.35

area Windows 16no.timbersash 1.83 1.7 2.5 4.5

9originalwindows

9 3 2 1

16.47 5.1 5 4.5

Doors

1

Heating Electric,wallmounted *AsbestosͲtextileflashpadtoelectrics

Rate / m2 based on proposed build ups

Notes from asbestos report

Area of architectural components

Elements of heritage significance flagged up here

A series of room data sheets have been set up as Excel worksheets. These pick up basic information on each room – floor areas, room heights, historic fabric noted as being of importance, and areas of asbestos picked out in the survey. These can be used to calculate costs of works, or record additions and changes.


Heating Map

15.

Portland Works Space Heating Diagram

32C

33C

31C

This diagram shows heating types installed (by tenants on the whole) in spaces. 34B-2

30D

Unheated

Gas Boiler /radiator

Electric Heater 34B-1

Air Heater 29D

Wood Stove

Second Floor

21C

22C

20C

23B

Meter

23B

28G

26E-3 25E 19D 26E-2

24A

18A

27A

25-A 26A-1

First Floor

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

5C

17G-1

4C

17G-2

14B-1 3D-2 14B-2 14B-3

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B

15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B 2D-2 10A

12E WC

Meter

1A 11A

13A

Ground Floor 0D-1

0A-1

0A-2

Basement


HERITAGE

It is crucial for Portland Works, A Grade II listed

The Conservation Officer recognised however that

building with a key role in Sheffield’s history to be

there are a number of straightforward or urgent

maintained and developed in a manner that both

Wessex Archaeology

repairs of a ‘like-for-like’ nature that can be carried

protects elements of historic significance, and

out without the need to submit a Listed Building and

allows it to function as a lively place of work for

Planning Applications. An outline of the works and a Wessex Archaeology were subsequently appointed

sample of proposed materials (bricks for example)

by Portland Works to carry this out, their scope of

should be sent to the CO for approval prior to any

works being as follows:

of the works however.

metalworking are identified in the Metal Trades

Project Inception Meeting to collate all current

It was also recognised that the fabric of the building

Diagram

data. Wessex were given the draft version of

has undergone numerous changes and ad-hoc

the Cold Spots report as well as other relevant

alterations over its lifetime and this is part of the

documentation.

character of the works, however new work should

skilled and creative tenants. Metal trades are key to the history of Portland Works and spaces within the Works that are still used for

Metal Trades Diagram

Initial meetings were held between Studio Polpo, Zoe Mair, Conservation Officer at Sheffield City Council, and Kathryn Gibson of English Heritage to discuss the approach to any repairs or alterations at Portland Works.

be sympathetic to the nature of the building, Review of Existing Documentation. As consultants

and, in particularly not cause the original fabric

for the previous planning application Wessex

to deteriorate. This is particularly important when

Archaeology already had background information

installing insulation for example.

on Portland Works. There was also research carried out subsequently by group members Peter and Anna DeLange as well as the knowledge of longterm tenants such as Andy Cole that contributed to

Both Zoe and Kathryn were of the opinion that an understanding of what aspects of the Works were of value was crucial. Although it is primarily the arrangement of buildings around the courtyard, and layout of spaces that relate to their use in cutlery and tool manufacture, that is noted in the listing text, certain internal features are of value. English Heritage’s “Planning for the Historic Environment Practice Guide “PPS5, also outlines recommendations for Local Authorities when dealing with Heritage Assets. Policy HE6.1 in particular outlines the need to “understand the nature of the significance of the asset.. the extent of the fabric that holds this interest.. and the level of interest”.

this. Detailed Site Investigation. This was to comprise of a ‘gazetteer’, documenting the significance of fabric and elements room by room and including photographs and exact locations. Summary Report. This report was to pull together all the previous research and gazetteer information to provide a summary and interpretation of the history, development and significance of the site and its built fabric. Consultation Meetings. Wessex were to meet key stakeholders (tenants, steering groups etc) to discuss the findings of their report, key risks, opportunities and future issues.

Both a Conservation Management Plan and Statement of Significance will therefore play a vital role in informing the future of the Works, and to this end Studio Polpo approached three locally based heritage consultants with experience of Sheffield metal-trades buildings to quote for the preparation of the initial stages of a Conservation Management Plan.

16.

Final Report. All of the material would be collated into a report, which would provide an initial set of guidelines and evidence to inform future development.


Metal Trades Diagram

17.

Portland Works Metal Trades Diagram

32C

33C

31C

The Portland Works FLAG group (Finance, Legal and Governance) decided that when considering new tenants, preference should be given to metal trades. It has been agreed that metal trades should make up to 50% of the tenancy of the Works. (Whether this is defined by the number of businesses or by floor area is to be confirmed.) 34B-2

This diagram identifies the spaces currently used by metal trades at Portland Works to give an indication of the current proportion of these.

30D

Areas identified as ‘Potential Metal Trades’ on this diagram are simply those that at the time of writing are empty, and it should of course be borne in mind that the activities classed as ‘Existing Metal Trades’ and future metal trades tenants vary significantly from fairly heavy duty (forging for example) to small scale and delicate (such as jewellers). The nature of the activity will therefore determine the appropriate location and size of space. For example activities requiring large or heavy equipment or material deliveries would be best suited to the Ground Floor whereas lighterweight, more sedentary activities would be beter suited to upper floors.

34B-1

29D

Second Floor

21C

22C

NON-METAL TRADES

20C

EXISTING METAL TRADES

POTENTIAL METAL TRADES

23B

Meter

23B

28G

26E-3 25E 19D 26E-2

24A

18A

27A

25-A 26A-1

First Floor

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

17G-1

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2 14B-3

4C

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B

15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B 2D-2 10A

12E WC

Meter

1A 11A

13A

Ground Floor 0D-1

0A-1

0A-2

Basement


Summary of Conservation Management Plan The two-volume report produced by Wessex

Key Characteristics of Portland Works (as listed by

4. Chimneys denoting the location of hearths in

Wessex Archaeology):

workshops and identifying the locations of hot working practices;

1. The wide range of authentic scales of the workshops, which demonstrates and makes legible

This may suggest prioritising the re-use/lining of

the range of activities once carried out here;

chimney flues to work with any new heating

Archaeology includes a detailed analysis of the

systems, as opposed to needed to install horizontal

history of the Works, a room-by-room analysis of

The legibility and hierarchy of spaces is, more

elements of particular historic interest, and also

than the historic fabric, of significant importance.

information on the comparative importance of

It has the potential to form a basis for future

5. The use of stable doors and unglazed window

rooms and spaces within the Works.

development, and, a means of conveying the

openings, also identifying the location of hot

history of the Works. This should not preclude the

working producing steam and/or fumes;

flues through existing walls.

Wessex Archaeology (WA hereafter) also list a series

sensible sub-division of historically larger spaces

of recommendations for the conservation and

where the new and old fabric are clearly legible

These area of Block B (also picked up in the listing)

future management of the Works as a conclusion

however, where new interventions are removable,

will, realistically, need to remain glazed in order

to their report (although it should be noted

and where this may have greater financial benefits

to function as something other than hand-forges,

that this is included with the proviso that these

for the Works in terms of rental.

however the door, window and shared lintel pattern

recommendations would normally be developed

is distinctive and easy to retain.

in more detail in a subsequent stage). WA point out

2. Circulation within the complex is largely external:

that a Maintenance and Management Plan will

work units being independently accessed from the

6. The differing wall, ceiling and floor finishes, and

be needed for complex Heritage Lottery Funded

exterior (whether at ground or upper floors) with few

fenestration of different blocks, and different spaces

projects and this information can be used to inform

original internal connecting doors;

within blocks which denote the relative status and

such a plan.

requirements of the original activities which took Certain parts of the Works (top floors of Blocks E & A)

place there, and that of their specific user groups;

The findings of WA have been referred to when

do not function adequately in terms of fire escape

established areas of retrofit, new uses and proposals

at present and the addition of external stairs will

A key strategy when assessing the potential to

in this report. We have also used diagrams (as

address this. It is positive that these would be part of

re-fit and insulate internal surfaces has been both

detailed on the following page) to further clarify

an existing language of external access stairs.

the likely use of the space and the nature of its

some of WA’s assessments of the building.

construction – see Retrofit Proposals diagrams on 3. The limited palette of materials and construction,

The WA report ends with a series of constraints

and the uniform and regular positioning of doors

and opportunities, along with recommendations

and windows within individual ranges;

pages 62 & 63.

and suggestions. We have summarised these below, along with a commentary on their specific

This presents no particular issues, it may well help

implications, or issues for debate.

with future repairs in that a more limited amount of materials (i.e. bricks), and approaches (to windows) can be agreed.

Retrofit Proposals

7. The remains of power transmission/line-shafting indicative of the locations of former powered processes. Care must be taken to retain these items, and informing tenants about what, and where they are, will aid this.

18.


Negative aspects of Portland Works (as listed by

of large and bulky materials) and enable tenants

storeys will help reduce heat loss and a degree of

Wessex Archaeology):

of these spaces to have the same benefits through

sound transmission. Removing floor boards in most

other means. In some areas (unit 12E) for example,

cases however, is costly and often very difficult to

This section of Wessex Archaeology’s report

the shutter is an addition to a relatively recent

do without causing damage to the floor boards,

(‘Detracting Features’) illustrates most clearly the

block and was always open when the former

and replacing original damaged ceilings (of which

clashes between a more conventional heritage/

tenants where working, generally all day during the

there are a number due to water ingress and

archaeological reading of Portland Works as a

week, providing useful natural surveillance and a

lack of maintenance over time) may be a better

historic building, with its more recent ‘wild’ history

rare glimpse of activity. Enhanced security at the

solution.

(see pages 30 & 31).

entrances, or better performing, smaller doors/ gates may also be an alternative.

It should also be noted that in many cases the fabric of the ceiling, although original, is not of

Wild History Photographs

3. uPVC replacement doors and windows;

intrinsic interest or value.

It would be suggested that these are replaced if Many interventions carried out in the last 50 years

works are carried out to the block or room in which

5. Blocking of air vents to the rear of Block B;

have been ad-hoc and carried out by individual

these are located, at change of tenancy, or if

tenants without consideration of historical (or in

substantial grant funding is received. At present

It is proposed that the filling of holes, and sealing of

some cases structural) issues, a number of other

however, these may be the best performing doors

gaps around doors and windows (in a traditional

traces illustrate the Works uses as venue for parties,

and windows on site despite being visually obtrusive

manner) will go some way to reducing heat loss

and a home to musicians, artists and smaller less

and detracting from the nature and patina of the

through gaps in the building fabric, and reducing

established makers.

Works as a whole.

drafts, which cause discomfort to occupants. The air vents in question can be re-opened but fitted

1. The corrugated sheet enclosure to the west of

4. Modern inserted suspended ceilings;

the cart passage entrance to the Works;

with simple manual shutters, operated internally, to allow them to function as vents again when

A number of spaces have been used as recording

required.

It would benefit the Works if this ad-hoc storage

spaces or music studios, which has led to the

enclosure was cleared, and the objects stored

construction of sound-proofed rooms-within-rooms,

6. Graffiti in the former high status stairwell (although

within it relocated by the tenant. This space could

and numerous layers of materials (such as foam

of some intrinsic interest) –long term consideration

provide a location for visitor information or way-

and carpet) on walls, floors and ceilings. Now that

of moving the graffiti memorial to a more

finding within the Works. It also encircles a light-well

tenants are moving out, or changing spaces, there

appropriate part of the building.

above which would give daylight and visual interest

is the opportunity to remove these elements.

to the passage.

It is proposed that the history of this piece be In a number of spaces, suspended ceilings have

looked into in more detail to establish what form an

2. Inserted metal roller shutters providing security to

been installed to hide damaged or deteriorating

equivalent memorial might take – this may or may

some units;

original ceilings - a quick and cheap solution. This, in

not be a new piece of graffiti.

some cases, has been beneficial, allowing original These could be removed at change of tenancy – it

ceilings and mouldings to be retained, and the

is important however to establish the reason for

removal of these modern ceilings is straightforward

these having been installed (security or the need to

should there be an opportunity to replace or repair

provide a large clear opening to enable deliveries

ceilings above. In many cases, the insulation of floors between

19.


Wessex met with members of the Portland Works steering group (as well as other groups) in December 2013, to discuss the draft report

Strategic Suggestions

(although it should be noted that many of those present had not seen the report produced by WA before or at the meeting). Discussions at this

Space use

Education

meeting focused around the need for the Works to

One principle to come out of the meeting was to

There is also a suggestion that education and

remain a working building with a consideration of its

align new tenancies and space uses with historic

mentoring opportunities be created through

history and heritage, rather than a historic building

ones as a way of making current and future uses of

building and refurbishment work, but also by

preserved at the expense of working tenants. We

the spaces explain their original uses. This idea is a

trades and tenants. Although a valuable aim, this

have listed strategic, and more fabric-oriented

practical one, as it would locate tenants with heavy

should not, we feel, be specifically linked to any

suggestions below.

and noisy equipment and processes in spaces with

conservation or heritage plan as it may prove too

stronger floors and heavy walls (i.e. Block C, Ground

restrictive. It could however become something

Floor) and tenants with lightweight equipment (i.e.

that is an aspiration or linked to the PW business

artists) at upper levels or nearer the front of the

plan and many funding bids (HLF in particular)

Works, such as in Block E. The Vision Plan Graphic 2

require details of education and learning benefits

(pages 50 & 52) shows the current locations of light/

created.

heavy users. Public Interface Previous issues at the Works with a lack of space for meetings (for steering groups, or with external

Vision Plan Graphic 2

parties) are currently addressed by allowing the use of G.Floor space 1A outside of the tenant’s working hours (and this is a room accessible from the street or courtyard). This may no longer happen

Rental value

if circumstances change however.

WA state that “ there is currently a high demand for units within the complex, but that this is likely

WA suggest a café space in the first Floor Block

to be more to do with the relatively low rents,

E area, however there is some scepticism of

than due to a sympathy with the ethos of the new

whether a café here would work, or indeed be

management. It will be necessary to calculate the

required at Portland Works, with the neighbouring

likely demand for units at higher rents once the

Harland Works operating a successful café for

units have been refurbished.”. The current issues

the John Street Triangle, and numerous food and

around the use of units for storage, or by absent

drink establishments on the nearby London Road.

tenants does reflect the very low rents, however,

Proposals to be able to display work produced

increasingly, new tenants are attracted by the

by tenants could, however be met by display/

ethos, location and spaces at the Works. It is clear

reception space at the end of Block A and plans

that rents will change to a degree, however it

to relocate the artists to Block E and open up

should be recognised that this will reflect spaces

previously blocked windows to allow views into

that are dry, warmer and connected to improved

the former exhibition space will provide a public

facilities and a new type of maker-tenant will form a

interface of sorts.

larger part of those looking to rent at the Works.

20.


Fabric Suggestions

The Works are looking at ways of providing a public

There are three key points made regarding the

in existence, and contained in the Wessex Report,

interface in a number of ways including digital ones

historic fabric at Portland Works in WA’s report.

appear to be montages (albeit old ones) and not

(allowing makers to showcase their work), and series

original images, and care should be taken when

of regular tours and open days which give a good

Wall finishes

using some of these as references for new works.

access to spaces and some of the tenants, but with

“Careful consideration will therefore need to

It is important that conjecture does not play a role

guides, information and facilities that would hinder

be given to the introduction of internal thermal

in removing recent interventions to be replaced

the day-to day operation of the Works otherwise.

lining of solid walls to ensure that this does not

with an idea of what once existed – again many

fundamentally change the character of the

interventions that have taken place in the second

It is also important to ensure that the public are

spaces, and destroy the legibility of the former

half of the 20th Century contribute to the story of

aware that the Works is a working busy building,

functional difference between spaces”. Timber

the Works, it’s idiosyncrasies and patina and to

and recent proposals by students at the University

tongue and grooved match-boarding to blocks

replace them with new ‘historic’ elements would be

of Sheffield’s School of Architecture looked at

A,C and D in particular is picked out as a lining

to erase some of the history of the Works.

methods in which lighting and signage might do

used to create clean spaces. Our retrofit proposal

this. An early intervention when the building was at

diagrams take these recommendations into

Windows

risk of development into flats highlighted the makers

account. The alignment of hot and ‘heavy’ uses

WA note that the Bond Bryan survey recommends

within the Works, and this projection of the activity

(i.e. welding and forging) with exposed masonry

the replacement of many windows. WA propose

and life within the Works to the street, continues to

walls at ground and light, often sedentary uses (i.e.

that repair and refurbishment, and secondary

be a key strategy.

artists) on the upper floors with internally insulated

glazing be investigated as a potential alternative. It

walls then links the strategic desire to use rooms in

is important however, that a study identifies which

The section at the end of the report looks at making

manner analogous to former uses, with a way to

windows are original, or where a range of window

and digital manufacturing as one potential way

maintain wall coverings where required.

types exists in a block, which should be used as a

of bringing the public, academia and tenants

guide for replacements. A definite approach to Value of fabric

new windows, window repair and upgrades is an

A key question has been the approach to historic

important document for the Works and may form

Security

fabric – do elements have to be replaced by

part of a HPA.

Natural surveillance that is a result of presence and

what was originally there for example? WA report

activity on the site is picked up as a good means

recommends that “Historic components will need

of security –the location of tenants that will use

to be repaired or replaced on a like-for-like basis,

the Works at complimentary times will help (and

in terms of both design and materials. Surviving

the diagrams on pages 58 onwards can assist

elements and fabric, and historic images will need

with mapping this), and the different uses of main

to be used to inform the removal of inappropriate

door through Block A to the courtyard, and main

or unsympathetic later interventions and to restore

passage gate (with wicket door) will also act to

known authentic features”.

together, and what the opportunities are for this.

control access. There are questions relating to this that discussions with English Heritage and the SCC Conservation

Occupancy Mapping

Officer will go some way to answering, as would a Heritage Partnership Agreement (HPA). It should be noted that a number of the historic photographs

21.


Heritage Significance Diagrams

The conservation management plan contains a lot of information about the historic activities within of Portland Works and remaining significant features. Some of this information has been represented graphically, so that Heritage considerations can be understood alongside architectural, tenant and environmental interests. The following drawings have been produced:

Knife Making Process

Room Significance

Significant Elements

The Knife Making Process drawing describes how stainless steel knives were produced and maps this process onto the spaces in the Works. The Room Significance Drawing uses the conservation management plans grading system to show the relative significance of whole spaces within the Works. The Significant Elements drawing uses the conservation management plan gazetteer to highlight the individual architectural elements and features that are of most heritage significance.

22.


Signs of active metal trades at Portland Works

23.


Knife Making Process

24.

Portland Works Knife Making Process

32C

33C

31C

Mapping the heritage knife making process at Portland Works

34B-2

30D

34B-1

29D

second floor

21C

22C

20C

7.

6. Taking-in door for first floor grinding

6.

23B

7. Access to workshops via a number of separate doorways to facilitate independant working. Upper floors often accesed via external staircases.

Meter

8. Showroom

23B 28G

9. Warehousing, Packing

26E-3 25E 19D 26E-2 24A

9.

8.

18A

27A 25-A

first floor

26A-1

1. Elaborate cart passage. Unusually there is no evidence of weigh machine

3. e 8C-1

E

8C-2

7C

e

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

17G-1

17G-2

e

3. Grinding located near to engine house

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

2. Yard used as secure place for loading and unloading goods

4C

4.

14F-4

4. Unusual for buildings to be constructed in yard of an integrated works

3D-1 Meter 15G-1 2D-1

5. Knife inspection and packing

9B 15G-2

16G

2.

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A

E

engine house (steam)

e

gas engine

12E

WC

Meter

1A 11A

5.

13A

1.

ground floor

primary steel production at specialist manufacturer (outside pw)

showroom and offices delivery by cart

** primary production of steel

yard used for loading and nloading

forging

(power)

(hand)

grinding and glazing

hafting / cutting

buffing / polishing

inspection and packing


Room Significance

25.

Portland Works

32C

33C

31C

in the Wessex Archaeology Conservation Plan Volume 1, November 2013, page 20.

34B-2

30D

34B-1

29D

Second Floor

21C

22C

20C

Of high intrinsic heritage value and makes an essential contribution to the special historic character and heritage value of the property as a whole, and whose loss or inappropriate alteration should be avoided at all costs.

Moderate intrinsic interest, but makes a key contribution to the 23B

made to retain and enhance these elements.

Moderate to low intrinsic interest, but makes a positive contribution to the overall character and interest of the property, and may be an important element in the understanding of a key phase of the development of the property. Their retention is desirable, but an argument could be made for their removal to allow enhancement of the site as a whole.

Meter

23B 28G

26E-3 25E 19D 26E-2

Element not investigated

24A

18A

27A 25-A 26A-1

First Floor

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

17G-1

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

4C

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B 15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A 12E

WC

Meter

1A 11A

13A

Ground Floor 0D-1

0A-1

0A-2

Basement


Significant Elements

26.

32C

33C

31C

34B-2

30D

34B-1

29D

Second Floor

21C

22C

20C

23B

Meter

23B 28G

26E-3 25E 19D 26E-2 24A

18A

27A 25-A 26A-1

First Floor


Significant Elements

27.

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

17G-1

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

4C

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B 15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A 12E

WC

Meter

1A 11A

13A

Ground Floor

Portland Works Significant Elements In addition to overall room significance, architectural elements of high intristic heritage value have been flagged up using the following symbols: These should be cross referenced with the Wessex Archaeology room data gazetteer

Layout / circulation / access Ceiling

Wall

Floor

Door

Fixtures and fittings

Heating

Power 0D-1

Window

0A-1

Basement 0A-2


Heritage Partnership Agreement Kathryn Gibson of English Heritage suggested that

A heritage partnership agreement may contain

a “Heritage Partnership Agreement” (HPA) may be

provision granting listed building consent in respect

appropriate to Portland Works.

of specified works for the alteration or extension of

(a) must be in writing;

These are defined by EH as:

the listed building to which the agreement relates,

(b) must make provision for the parties to review its

and specify any conditions to which the consent is

terms at intervals specified in the agreement;

subject.

(c) must make provision for its termination and

“A non-statutory agreement which sets out an understanding of the significance of the heritage asset or assets and in particular what is not of

A heritage partnership agreement—

variation;

A heritage partnership agreement may also:

special interest in listed buildings. Once the

(d) may relate to more than one listed building or part, provided that in each case a relevant local

agreement is in place, it can reduce the number of

(a) specify or describe works that would or would

planning authority and an owner are parties to the

occasions when listed building consent is required

not, in the view of the parties to the agreement,

agreement; and

and thereby save the owner and local authority

affect the character of the listed building as a

(e) may contain incidental and consequential

time and money.

building of special architectural or historic interest.

provisions.

(b) make provision about the maintenance and Reaching an agreed and fuller understanding

preservation of the listed building;

The Secretary of State may by regulations make

of significance will reduce areas of doubt or

(c) make provision about the carrying out of

provision—

confusion, aid better management and increase

specified work, or the doing of any specified thing,

the prospect of success for a consent application

in relation to the listed building;

(a) about any consultation that must take place

where it is still required.”

(d) provide for public access to the listed building

before heritage partnership agreements are made

and the provision to the public of associated

or varied;

facilities, information or services;

(b) about the publicity that must be given to

(e) restrict access to, or use of, the listed building;

heritage partnership agreements before or after

“ A Listed Building Heritage Partnership Agreement

(f) prohibit the doing of any specified thing in

they are made or varied;

(HPA) will be a new statutory agreement which

relation to the listed building;

(c) specifying terms that must be included in

sets out an understanding of the significance of

(g) provide for a relevant public authority to make

heritage partnership agreements;

the heritage asset or assets and in particular what

payments of specified amounts and on specified

is not of special interest in listed buildings. Once the

terms—

English Heritage explain further that:

agreement is in place, it can reduce the number of occasions when listed building consent is required.

(Kathryn Gibson, English Heritage, October 2013)

(i) for, or towards, the costs of any works provided for under the agreement; or (ii) in consideration of any restriction, prohibition

The work produced by Wessex Archaeology will

There is no proscribed format for HPAs and each

or obligation accepted by any other party to the

be crucial in this agreement should Portland Works

will be tailored to the particular circumstances of

agreement.

decide to go down this route. Given the long-term

the buildings that it relates to. Key parts will be

nature of any building works programme, an HPA

an understanding of the historic development of

may reduce the costs and work involved in multiple

the building and an analysis of the elements that

Listed Building Consent applications substantially.

make up its significance, considered in terms of their evidential, historical, aesthetic and community values. This will then inform the Conservation Management Plan which should include details of anticipated works and how they are proposed to be carried out.”

28.


Assesment of Heritage Partnership Agreements The “Heritage Protection review: Assessment of

Findings were that documentation should not be

In terms of feedback on the process, those running

eight pilot projects for the Department of Culture,

elaborate and should include:

the site at Darnall felt that a clear and concise

Media and Sport” was commissioned in 2006 to

guide on maintenance and a straightforward

provide an independent assessment of eight

Timeframes and monitoring methods, as

Heritage Partnership Agreement projects, one of

well as parties to the agreement.

which was Darnall Works in Sheffield. All quotes and

specification for repairs (that could be understood and overseen by non-specialist building professionals) to achieve conservation objectives

information below are taken form this report.

Overall conservation philosophy

was important.

The report recognised that Local Authority capacity

Identification of works that will not require

It should be noted that Sheffield City Council felt

was a complicating factor in the initial setting-up of

consent, pre-agreed consent for certain

that the relationship between the HPA and the

these agreements (requiring fairly intense resourcing

other works (routine works otherwise requiring

planning system would need further clarification

initially) however they had the potential to reduce

repetitive consent) and a specification of

and also expressed concern over drawing up and

the workload and expense for the LA once in place.

standard works including methods and materials

policing new HPAs, despite being interested in the

It was also recognised that HPAs were primarily

to be used.

agreements in principle.

to those who are most closely affected by it” and

The report referred to is available here:

making the conservation process something that

that would significantly change the asset).

about “bringing conservation management nearer Excluded works (generally major changes

is “achieved with the owners” and not “done to them”.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/ uploads/attachment_data/file/78120/hrp_breport_

A colour coding approach was suggested to define

eightpilotprojects.pdf

works – either to highlight assets of importance on a Key to the HPA is

larger site, or to differentiate pre-agreed works from works not needing agreement for example, with the

A simplification of the administration of

exact method varying from site to site.

statutory controls, by providing pre-agreement on how various classes of mostly minor works will be carried out, thus removing the need for a

A range of sites were chosen for the pilot, with

long series of individual specific consents”

Darnall Works chosen as a test of the application of the HPA concept to an industrial archaeological

Promotion of “positive long-term proactive

asset. Interestingly for Portland Works, it was noted

strategic management of historic sites by

that there were no urban complexes in the types of

agreeing planned works normally requiring

historical site chosen. In the case of Darnall Works,

consent, enabling effective forward planning for

the Conservation Philosophy “explicitly recognises

example, in the application of grants”

the relationship between the commercial needs of a working industrial site and the responsibilities

“Enhanced certainty and clarity on

attached to historic assets of national or even

works requiring heritage consent; method and

international significance” also likely to be the case

materials used in works”

for Portland Works.

29.


Wild History

The accommodation of unplanned ‘wild’ activities

The images shown opposite suggest some

has been an import trait throughout Portland

modifications and features that add character to

Works’ history. It enabled the manufacture of

Portland Works. They also provide insights into how

stainless steel cutlery and has also characterised

unplanned activities have been accommodated

the buildings more contemporary history. Despite

throughout history. These ad-hoc modifications may

this, the introduction of new, unforeseen and

have a different type of heritage value and should

ad-hoc activities is only briefly mentioned in the

not be removed or taken back to their original state

conservation plan.

without consideration.

Innovation occurred at Portland Works because

It has only been possible to introduce this

in 1914 a scientist (Harry Brearley) and a cutlery

alternative type of heritage as part of the Cold

manager (Ernest Stuart) decided to work together

Spots document. However, this could be the

to experiment with samples of stainless steel. They

starting point for further investigations. These

set out to make stainless steel knife blades, and did

could take the form of research projects or artistic

so despite being told by many other manufacturers

interventions.

that it was not possible. They succeeded because they introduced new knowledge and new

The research group CHAT (Contemporary History

techniques into the Works.

and Archaeology in Theory) within UCL is an example of a university based research platform

More recently the unplanned introduction of

exploring innovative historical approaches by

artists, musicians and other non-metal crafts

valuing contemporary archaeology. Projects such

has led to continued collaborations at Portland

Encounters’ Sharrow Stories use art practice as a

Works. The building has been continually subject

way of encouraging alternative stories and histories

to improvised changes in order to accommodate

to be told.

unforeseen, innovative activities. The intention here is not to glamorise reckless modifications, but rather value the relationships and juxtapositions that tell interesting stories about the Works’ history. These are at risk of being lost since the improvised changes that facilitated them are often considered detrimental to the Works as a whole. By acknowledging and legitimising ‘wild histories’ of Portland Works - in addition to more conservative and conventional ones – a richer, multi-layered and dynamic understanding of the building can be created.

30.


Wild History Photographs

31.

Air Raid Wall Stencil

Tenant Wall Marking

Memorial Graffiti

Coloured Brickwork from Manufacture Process

Painted Door

Painted Border

Access to Roof

Machinery in Yard

Redundant Post Box

Rusted Sign

Brightly Coloured ad-hoc addition that does not compromise older structural opening


32.


2. Repair and Upgrade Measures


REPAIR AND UPGRADE MEASURES

We have looked at a number of measures to

An initial assessment of the U-values of all of these

improve the thermal performance of parts of the

measures (the rate of the heat loss through the

Works, from draught-stripping and gap-filling to

element of fabric) has also been provided. It should

insulation.

be noted that these make assumptions about the wall thicknesses and exact U-values of the existing

A number of sources have been consulted to

structure which may vary somewhat, given the

establish the principles for this: Nick Parsons’

nature of the building.

report, a number of English Heritage’s guidance documents and other sources listed at the end of

There is a Building Control requirement that

the chapter for reference.

elements of a building’s thermal envelope should be thermally upgraded if significant work is carried

Studio Polpo have set out a number of approaches

out on these. There is a recognition that for

to roof, wall and floor insulation that would suit

historic buildings, it may not be possible to bring

Portland Works (Fabric Build-ups). These take into

the performance of existing fabric up to current

account access issues and durability required, both

requirements, either because existing features

of which vary depending upon the spaces and

of interest would be lost (behind insulation for

tenants.

example), and so a reduced U-value is provided. Sheffield City Council’s Building Control Department

Fabric Build-ups

have stated that it would be acceptable in the case of Portland Works, to carry out significant repairs to thermal elements (roofs in particular) at the Works without thermal upgrade, if the affected

Fabric Build-up Costs

spaces/rooms linked to these are un-used, as the purpose of these works would be to prevent further deterioration and damage to the building.

A diagram has been prepared (Retrofit

All of the measures proposed (with exception of

Opportunities) that highlights the relative ease of

some insulation to concrete roofs and floors) are

upgrading the different elements of the building’s

based on natural products and are breathable.

fabric depending on occupancy of the spaces. For

Although this leads to some increase in costs, there

example an occupied space with a complex set up

are many benefits.

of machinery will require a great deal of disruption for works to the floor or walls, but windows may be

In older buildings, where the fabric is moisture

relatively easy to repair or replace.

permeable, allowing water vapour to move through and escape, the installation of modern vapour-closed materials (foam based insulants, cement renders etc.) causes this moisture to

Retrofit Opportunities

become trapped, resulting in damage to the structure and potential health issues from mould. The natural products specified in this report are also safer and more pleasant to work with, (ie not toxic or irritant) and are much less energy intensive to produce. Links to products specified can be found at the end of the chapter. Manufacturers guidance on installation should be sought in all instances.

35.


Fabric Build-ups

36.

Internal Wall Insulation

IWI.1

Breathable, single system by one supplier, bonded to wall

Internal Wall Insulation

IWI.2

Easily removeable, keeps wall behind untouched

ensure ceiling/floor void above insulated to avoid cold bridge and condensation issues, refer to NBT guidance

ensure ceiling/floor void above insulated to avoid cold bridge and condensation issues

existing 350mm solid brick wall with holes and gaps filled and mortar issues addressed by re-pointing with appropriate 8mmmortar. absorbent lime plaster lime

existing 350mm solid brick wall with holes and gaps filled and mortar issues addressed by re-pointing with appropriate 8mmmortar. absorbent lime plaster lime

60mm Pavadentro woodfibre insulation board fixed to wall as per manufacturer's instructions

20mm Gutex Multitherm woodfibre insulation board

10mm NBT lime or clay plaster

vapour control layer

NOTE: insulation to return along internal walls as per NBT guidance. Window reveals to be lined with 40mm Pavadentro

50mm Thermafleece TF sheepswool insulation between 50x50mm timbers studs at 600mm centres 15mm OSB 3 fixed to studs Note: frame sections pre-assembled with Gutex and VCL, VCL joints taped Note: frame sections pre-assembled with Gutex and VCL, taped/sealed between panels

skirting floor detail:ensure floor insulated where possible to avpid cold bridge and condensation issues, refer to NBT guidance

Detail: U-Value installed:

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

skirting floor detail:ensure floor insulated where possible to avoid cold bridge and condensation issues

3

IWI.1 0.46 W/m2K

Detail: U-Value installed:

2

0.30 W/m2K 0.70 W/m2K

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

1

£86.11 80mm

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: A robust system that is breathable. Relatively thick, also has benefits of thermal mass. Not suited to areas requiring a high number of wall fixings or where walls are likely to be subject to heavy knocks or harsh treatment.

Solid Floor Insulation

SFI.1

Replacement of floor slab, heavy duty & well insulated

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

3

IWI.2 0.37 W/m2K

2

0.30 W/m2K 0.70 W/m2K

1

£74.81 110mm

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: A robust system that is breathable. Relatively thick, also has benefits of thermal mass. More easily removable than IWI.1, and could be installed in fron of protected walls, or those with features requiring preservation. Cheaper, but more components and more complicated to install than IWI.1 however as well as being more space intensive.

Solid Floor Insulation

SFI.2

Quick to install and removable but not suited for heavy use.

65mm hydraulic lime screed

existing concrete floor slab

150mm Limecrete slab with expanded clay

damp proof membrane

geotextile membrane

50mmm Jablite expanded polystyrene insulation

150mm layer lightweight expanded clay aggregate

50 x 50mm treated softwood studs 18mm WBP plywood deck fixed to battens

NOTE: Foundation details vary, some are shallow and care must be taken to ensure that these are not undermined

Detail: U-Value installed:

SFI.1 0.30 W/m2K

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

£96.27 Finish height to match existing

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

0.25 W/m2K 0.70 W/m2K

3

Detail: U-Value installed:

2

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

1

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: Requires considerable disruption and removal of exsiting slab which may be a heritage issue. May of limited benefit to small rooms with large perimeter to floor area ratio. Depth of foundations unknown and needs to be checked prior to any works.

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

SFI.2 0.61 W/m2K 0.25 W/m2K 0.70 W/m2K

£43.70 70mm above current floor level

3

2

1

current

target

Notes: Easy to install and can be removed. Less insulative than SFI.1 but cheaper. Not suited to spaces where heavy machinery or loading are anticipated. Will raise the existing floor level which may have implications on doors, thresholds and skirtings.

reduced

new


Fabric Build-ups

37.

Pitched Roof Insulation

PR.1

For laying above flat ceilings where there is a roof void above

Pitched Roof Insulation

PR.2

For pitched roofs where the ceiling follows the roof slope

vapour barrier laid above

Thermafleece 150mm T35 Sheepswool insulation between joists existing (re-laid) slates

Thermafleece 100mm T35 Sheepswool insulation above joists

counter battens sarking membrane

existing rafters existing rafters

Thermafleece 150mm T35 Sheepswool insulation betwen joists on netting support fixed to joists

Gutex Thermoroom woodfibre insulation boards fixed to rafters. NOTE: needs structural assessment of load first

existing ceiling if suitable

new clay plaster finish

Detail: U-Value installed:

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

3

PR.1 0.14 W/m2K

Detail: U-Value installed:

2

0.16 W/m2K 0.35 W/m2K

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

1

£29.86 100mm above joists

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: Simple and easy to both install and remove. Care needs to be taken where electrical cables or lights are run above the ceilings as these may need protective hoods to prevent overheating and fire. Thermafleece may be substituted with mineral wool, or other similar product (see supplier list) of equivalent performance, however supplier should be consulted to check ceiling will take the loading.

Pitched Roof Insulation

PR.3

For pitched roofs where the ceiling follows the roof slope and both roof and ceiling are being replaced

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

3

PR.2 0.18 W/m2K

2

0.18 W/m2K 0.35 W/m2K

1

£137.05 120mm below joists

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: Insulation between and below existing joists leading to reduced room height may not be suitable where there are cornices or windows going up to wall/ceiling junction. Potential weight issues of woodfibre insulation, engineer and manufacturer should be contacted. Works could be done from above (when replacing roof) and below (when replacing ceiling).

Metal Roof Insulation

MR.1

For spaces with a corrugated metal roof that is to be replaced

existing rafters Thermafleece 150mm T35 Sheepswool insulation between joists existing (re-laid) slates

Kingspan KS1000 150mm foam insulated profile steel roof system

counter battens 50mm Gutex Ultratherm woodfibre insulation board as sarking

existing steel purlins (if suitable)

softwood battens existing truss/rafter (indicative only)

100mm Hemp insulation batts below rafters. NOTE: needs structural assessment of load first new plasterboard ceiling

Detail: U-Value installed:

PR.3 0.18 W/m2K

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

£117.65 100mm below rafters, 50mm above rafters

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

0.18 W/m2K 0.35 W/m2K

3

2

Detail: U-Value installed:

MR.1 0.14 W/m2K

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

£75 150mm

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

1

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: Reduced room height if sloping ceiling, potential weight issues of insulation build-up. Needs to be done as part of re-roofing, ridges raised may lead to flashing issues. Ceiling needs to be replaced and increased depth may cl;ash with cornices, or windows at ceiling/wall junction.

0.18 W/m2K NA

3

2

1

current

target

reduced

Notes: Simple and robust roof replacement of existing metal roof with whole new roof system. The system includes rooflight sections, the size and position of these will need to be specified.

new


Fabric Build-ups

38.

External Roof Insulation

ER.1

For flat solid roofs that need to be accessible

Ceiling/Suspended Floor Insulation

CE.1

For rooms where the floor can be lifted or removed

all penetrations, upstands and details as per manufacturer's instructions

existing floorboards lifted and replaced

140mm Celotex TC3000/EL3000 rigid insulation bonded to finish below Firestone TPO roof membrane

existing concrete deck (thickness assumed to be 150mm) existing ceiling retained

existing roof covering prepared to take insulation layer

200mm Thermafleece sheepswool insulation on netting fixed to joists

vapour permeable membrane

existing joists

Detail: U-Value installed:

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

3

ER.1 0.18 W/m2K

Detail: U-Value installed:

2

0.18 W/m2K 0.35 W/m2K

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

1

£85.38 150mm

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: Some detail around rooflights/pipe penetrations need to be carefully resolved. Raises roof height which impacts stairs and doors.

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

3

CE.1 0.18 W/m2K

2

0.18 W/m2K 0.35 W/m2K

1

£23.35 Within existing structure

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: Disruptive to install but allows room below to function un-interrupted. Provides thermal as well as increased acoustic separation.

Ceiling/Suspended Floor Insulation

CE.2

For rooms where the ceiling is being replaced

Basement Tanking

BT.1

Combination of wall & floor insulation with waterproof membrane

Newton system 500 tanking membrane Wall build-up as IWI.2 Cavity drain linked to sump and pump on 20mm clean graded stone

existing joists existing floorboards retained

Newton system 500 tanking membrane 50mmm Jablite expanded polystyrene insulation existing concrete floor slab chopped out to form channel at perimeter 50 x 50mm treated softwood studs both ways 18mm WBP plywood deck fixed to battens

20mm battens existing ceiling replaced with 15mm plasterboard 200mm Thermafleece T35sheepswool insulation on netting fixed to joists vapour permeable membrane

Detail: U-Value installed:

CE.2 0.18 W/m2K

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

£45.35 35mm reduced ceiling height

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

0.18 W/m2K 0.35 W/m2K

3

2

BT.1

Cost/m2: Cost/m Installed thickness:

wall £101.49 / floor £66.11 wall £70.95 (slot drain) + £1,200 sump pump wall: 113mm / floor: 98mm

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

1

current

target

Notes: Disruptive to install but allows the room above to function un-interrupted. Provides thermal as well as increased acoustic separation. If opportunity arises to replace ceilings this is generally easier than lifting and replacing floorboards to the room above to install CE.1.

reduced

new

3

Detail: U-Value installed:

wall: 0.37/ floor 0.61

wall: 0.30/ floor: 0.25 wall: 0.70/ floor: 0.70

2

1

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: A removable tanking solution for basement areas that carries away moisture rather than trapping it in the walls. Does require sump & pump. Uses IWI.2 walll insulation method and SFI.1 floor method. Disruptive.


Fabric Build-up Costs

39.

Portland Work Schedule of upgrade systems

labour

plant

materials m2 cost

labour

REPAIRS SG

RP

CI.1

seal small holes and gaps in wall, especially around services 3m x 6m wall in a poor state; one side only

20.00

5.00

25.00

3m x 6m wall in a reasonable state; one side only

10.00

2.50

12.50 37.50 CI.2

ribbon pointing around doors & windows between frame & wall burnt sand mastic (seal around window frame ext) burnt sand mastic (seal around door frame ext) linseed oil putty (glass bedded into frame); 6 nr pieces putty pointing allowed; no glass allowed

20.00

8.67

28.67 per window (1.0w x 1.65h)

20.00

8.53

28.53 per door frame (1.0x x 2.1h)

30.00

8.66

allow for 6nr pieces of glass per window

30.00

105.00

38.66 per window (1.0w x 1.65h)

INTERNAL WALL INSULATION IWI.1

ERI.1

1.00

0.45

1.45

7.00

14.90

21.90 23.35

Access from room below; Existing Floorboards in place 200mm Thermafleece TF 35 insulation between joists on netting vapour membrane below joists

7.00

14.90

21.90

1.00

0.45

1.45

7.50

4.00

11.50

6.00

4.50

10.50 45.35

15.00

5.00

20.00

12.00 15.00

28.38 10.00

40.38 25.00 85.38

75.00

75.00

EXTERNAL ROOF INSULATION

10mm NBT plaster

6.00

15.18

21.18

Existing flat concrete roof; 150mm build up comprising; patch-repair existing covering

Pavadentro board NBT plaster Has to cover window frame

4.50 8.00

26.98 25.45

31.48 33.45

140mm Celotex TC3000/EL3000 insulation bonded to finish below Firestone Ultraply TPO

Existing 350mm Solid Wall with 78mm build up comprising:

materials m2 cost

vapour barrier over joists 200mm Thermafleece TF 35 insulation between joists on netting

new battens new ceiling (plasterboard and skim??)

135.00 173.66 TOTAL for window only

plant

SUSPENDED FLOOR INSULATION BETWEEN SPACES Access from room via floor; Existing Floorboards (removed and replaced)

86.11 IWI.2

MRI.1

Existing 350mm Solid Wall with 110mm build up comprising: 25mm ventilated cavity 20mm Gutex Multitherm on timber battens on vapour control layer 50mm Thermafleece TF 35 insulation between 50mm timber studs at 600mm centres 15mm OSB; breather membrane

2.50

0.25

2.75

20.00

13.80

33.80

11.50 10.00

11.51 5.25

23.01 15.25

Kingspan KS1000 system 150mm core insulation thickness

PRI.1 SOLID FLOOR INSULATION

150mm Limecrete slab with expanded clay

2.50

11.25

13.75

5.75

11.36

17.11

11.50

25.91

37.41

10.00

18.00

28.00

96.27 SFI.2

Existing slab with 70mm build up comprising:

dpm Jabfloor Classic 50mm EPS insulation 50 x 50mm timber battens at 600mm spacing 18mm WBP ply floor

inc

4.50

13.46

17.96

3.50

6.95

10.45

1.00

0.45

1.45 29.86

PRI.2

65mm Hydraulic Lime screed

inc

PITCHED ROOF INSULATION Cold roof, insulation at ceiling level; 100mm build up comprising: 150mm Thermafleece TF 35 insulation between joists 100mm Thermafleece TF 35 insulation above joists vapour membrane above insulation

Existing earth with build up level as existing comprising: geotextile membrane 150mm layer lightweight expanded clay aggregate

inc

75.00

74.81

SFI.1

METAL ROOF INSULATION Replace corrugated metal roof with 150mm build up comprising:

Warm roof, insulation at rafter level; slightly RAISED RIDGE (heavy); 120mm build up below rafters comprising: 120mm Gutex Thermoroomboard below rafters with clay plaster finish

7.50 10.00

37.15 13.00

44.65 23.00

3.50 1.00

6.95 0.45

10.45 1.45

5.50

2.00

7.50

20.00

30.00

50.00 137.05

6.00

4.50

10.50

3.50

9.00

12.50

3.50

6.95

10.45

5.50

28.70

34.20

20.00

30.00

50.00 117.65

existing rafters

1.00 4.00

0.45 2.25

1.45 6.25

7.50

4.00

11.50

10.00

14.50

24.50 43.70

100mm Thermafleece insulation betwteen rafters vapour barrier 25mm counter battens new spanish slate roofing on battens

PRI.3

The build-up codes in the left-hand column of the tables on this page refer to the fabric build up diagrams on the preceding pages. The initial two sets however, are for sealing gaps (SG) which is an allowance for filling holes in walls, gaps around services etc. that allow draughts and air leakage. The second of these is for ribbon pointing (RP) around doors and windows, again to stop unwanted air leakage and draughts. All rates are square meter rates (for labour and materials) unless noted otherwise.

Warm roof, insulation at rafter level; slightly RAISED RIDGE, access from above/below; 100mm build up below rafters comprising: new plasterboard ceiling/ skim 100mm hemp batts below rafters existing rafters 100mm Thermafleece insulation betwteen rafters 50mm Gutex Ultratherm over rafters as sarking new slate roofing on battens

BT.1

Prepare existing wall as necessary and apply Newton system 500 tanking membrane to wall. Cut out slot within perimeter of existing concrete floor, lay cavity drain inc corners etc on 20mm Clean graded stone, make good all works disturbed. Allow to connect drain to sump and pump. Prepare existing concrete floor and lay Newton 508 clear floor tanking system. Provide and fit 50mm x 50mm softwood treated battens to form stud framework, infill with 50mm Jablite expanded polystyrene insulation, overlay and deck with 18mm WBP plywood fixed to battens. Type IWI.2 wall build up Install sump and pump to remove moisture from walls into drainage system. Provisional Sum allowance – further details required for accurate price.

26.68

per m

70.95

41.80 74.81

1,200.00


Retrofit Opportunities

40.

Easy

32C

33C

Medium

Walls

Floors

Ceiling/Roof

Windows

Doors

Walls

Floors

Ceiling/Roof

Windows

Doors

Hard

31C

34B-2

30D

34B-1

29D

Second Floor

4C-2

Easy Medium Hard

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

17G-1

4C

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B 15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A 12E

WC

Meter

1A 11A

13A w

Ground Floor


Retrofit Opportunities

41.

21C

22C

20C

Easy Medium

Doors

Windows

Ceiling/Roof

Walls

Floors

Hard

23B

Meter

23B 28G

26E-3 25E 19D 26E-2 24A

4C-2

18A

Easy Medium

27A

Walls

26A-1

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

5C

Floors

Hard

25-A

4C

First Floor

Meter

14B-1

17G-1

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2 Easy

Medium

14F-4

Doors

Windows

3D-1 Meter

Ceiling/Roof

Walls

Hard Floors

14B-3

15G-1

Easy

2D-1

Medium Hard

9B Doors

Windows

Floors

Ceiling/Roof

Walls

15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A 12E

WC Occupied

Meter

1A 11A

13A 0D-1

Unknown

w

Unused

Portland Works Retrofit Opportunit Ground Floor

Used as Storage

0A-1

0A-2

Basement


How to Use: Retrofit Opportunities

42.

3.

This drawing provides a clear overview of the retrofit opportunities at Portland Works, based on the ease of upgrading different architectural elements

The diagram shows that this space is currenlty occupied. It would be easy to ugrade doors and windows in it, less easy to upgrade the ceiling and hard to upgrade the walls and floors.

7C

5HWUR多W2SSRUWXQLWLHV

27.

4C-2

Easy Medium

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

17G-1

Doors

Floors

4C

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

Easy

Windows

Walls

8C-1

Ceiling/Roof

Hard

14B-3

14F-4 3D-1

Medium

Meter 15G-1 2D-1

Hard

9B 15G-2

16G

15G-3

Doors

2D-2 10A 12E

4C-2

Meter

WC Occupied

1A 11A

Easy

13A

Medium w

2.

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

4C

Portland Works Retrofit Opportunities Ground Floor

17G-1

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

14F-4

Easy Medium

Doors

Walls

Floors

Windows

3D-1

Hard

Meter

Ceiling/Roof

4C-2

15G-1

Easy

2D-1

Medium Hard

9B Doors

Windows

Walls

Floors

15G-2 Ceiling/Roof

This chart is used to show how easy or difficult it is to upgrage different architectural elements. Each room has been given its own chart, based on current 6C 5C 4C occupancy.

7C

8C-2

16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A 12E

WC

Meter

17G-1

Occupied

17G-2

Meter

1A 11A

13A w

Unknown

3D-2

0D-1

Unused

Portland Works Retrofit Opportunities Ground Floor

Used as Storage

14F-4 0A-1

3D-1 Unknown 0A-2 Unused

15G-1 2D-1

15G-2

Used as Storage

Portland Works Retrofit Opportunities Basement

16G

15G-3

2D-2

1.

12E

1A

13A w

Portland Works Retrofit Opportunities

This key tells you which spaces in Portland Works are occupied.

Doors

Walls

8C-1

Used as Storage

Floors

Unused

Windows

Hard

Unknown

Ceiling/Roof

Windows

Ceiling/Roof

Floors

Walls

10B


Specific Guidance Referred to in this Area:

Product details specified:

Pavadent Woodfibre Insulation, NBT Lime Plaster (IWI.1) Natural Building Technologies The Hangar Worminghall Road Oakley Bucks HP18 9UL Tel: 01844 338 338 http://www.natural-building.co.uk/systems/renovation/pavadentro

Gutex Multitherm, Gutex Thermoroom, Gutex Ultratherm (IWI.2, PR.2, PR.3) Ecological Building Systems Ltd Pacific House Parkhouse Carlisle Cumbria CA3 0LJ United Kingdom Tel: 05600 758025 http://www.ecologicalbuildingsystems.com/products/gutex-wood-fibre/

Thermafleece TF, Thermafleece T35 (IWI.2, PR.1, CE.1, CE.2) Soulands Gate Dacre Penrith Cumbria CA11 0JF Tel: 017684 86285 http://www.thermafleece.com/product/thermafleece-tf35

Jablite insulation (SFI.2) Boothferry Works Howden East Riding of Yorkshire DN14 7EA Tel: 0870 600 3666 http://www.jablite.co.uk

“Heritage Works, The Use of Historic Buildings in Regeneration. A Toolkit of Good Practice.” English Heritage 2013. http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/professional/ advice/advice-by-topic/heritage-and-growth/ heritage-works/

Kingspan (MR.1) Kingspan Insulation Ltd Pembridge Leominster Herefordshire HR6 9LA Tel: 01544 388 601 www.kingspaninsulation.co.uk/

“Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings” English Heritage, 2011. Also English Heritage’s detailed guidelines on the following: Insulating Cold Roofs; Insulating Flat Roofs; Insulating Solid Ground Floors; Insulating Suspended

Celotex Insulation (ER.1) Celotex Limited, Lady Lane Industrial Estate, Hadleigh, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP7 6BA. Tel: 01473 820850 http://www.celotex.co.uk/

Newton Tanking System (BT.1) John Newton & Co Ltd. Newton House, 17-19 Sovereign Way Tonbridge, Kent TN9 1RH United Kingdom Tel: 020 3432 2588 http://www.newton-membranes.co.uk/‎

Floors. These are also available online: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/publications/ guidelines-and-standards/

“Responsible Retrofit of Traditional Buildings”, The Sustainable Traditional Buildings Alliance, 2012. http://www.spab.org.uk/downloads/STBA%20 RESPONSIBLE-RETROFIT.pdf

“Survey and Repair of Traditional Buildings, A Sustainable Approach”, Richard Oxley, Donhead Publishing Lts, 2003

Limecrete Floor (SFI.1) Womersleys Ltd. Walkley Lane, Heckmondwike, WF16 0PG Tel: 01924 400 651 http://www.womersleys.co.uk/acatalog/

Hemp Batt Insulation (PR.3) Black Mountain Insulation Ltd Unit B, Tir Llwyd Industrial Estate Rhyl, Denbighshire LL18 5JA Tel: 01745 361911 http://www.blackmountaininsulation.com

43.


3. Analysis and Proposals


DATA VISUALISATION

Of these three diagrams, the first two show repairs

The third of these three sheets (Vision Plan Graphic

and tenancy data, and the third maps out

3) uses the repair data from sheet one, and

potential funding bids. These have been produced

adds another level of information from the fabric

to make some of the current information (listed

upgrade costs. This sheet can then be used to

in the beginning of this report) more useable by

highlight the breakdown of funding bids and to

As part of this report we have produced a number

tenants and steering groups. It visualises information

compare either different ways of allocating money

of diagrams and charts that map key aspects of

that may be lost or overwhelming in other formats.

in the same bid, or how successive bids might work.

Repairs, Tenancy and Future Funding

the Works in order to provide information to assist

The former may be of use when helping steering

future decision-making, the planning of funding bids

The first of these diagrams (Vision Plan Graphic

groups decide on what elements of work to bid for,

and the phasing of work.

1) displays the cost information from the 2011

the latter when planning bids, or to show funders a

Bond Bryan Condition Survey, relative to the parts

long-term and considered strategy.

The first set of Vision Plan Diagrams use existing data

of the Works that the repair works relate to (this

and make it more accessible.

information has been checked by Richard Fletcher

Again, the sheet is intended to supplement typically

Associates who have confirmed that it is still

rather less engaging spread-sheets, and to make

applicable in 2013).

the connections between sums of money and how

Vision Plan Graphic 1

and where they are being spent, clear. The graphic gives a sense of relative amounts of

Vision Plan Graphic 2

Vision Plan Graphic 3

work per block, and also for each element of the

All of the above diagrams are designed to printed

building (walls, roofs, windows etc). It also gives an

at A1 size for use in meetings, or as information

overview and ‘at-a-glance’ impression of areas of

posters. They are also legible at A3 size. These, (in

priority, representing the recommendations of the

particular Vision Plan Graphic 3), could be updated

Survey for essential and subsequent works.

with new information in the future.

This sheet can used to plan future funding bids, or the allocation of budgets for building works. (The third sheet demonstrates an example of this). The second sheet (Vision Plan Graphic 2) displays tenancy data for the Works. It brings together tenant (individual or business) names, location in block and floor terms, unit size and rental income from the unit. This graphic also gives an indication of the nature of the work being done in the unit, from heavy duty (welding, motor-winding) to studio (art/ music) use, to give an idea of how these uses are spread between floors and blocks. The information on this sheet can be used to understand what thermal or acoustic upgrade measures may be best suited to existing spaces, where there are under-used spaces, and potential locations for new uses.

47.


Vision Plan Graphic 1


49.


Vision Plan Graphic 2

AREA 79.57 (sq.mt)

33C

T21

AREA 39.5 (sq.mt)

32C

T21

AREA 39.5 (sq.mt)

31C

SF

Second Floor

T21

x4 AREA 174.1 (sq.mt)

AREA 82.14 (sq.mt)

27A

22C

Tx

AREA 39.55 (sq.mt)

AREA 40.54 (sq.mt)

26A-1

21C

Tx AREA 57.55 (sq.mt)

34B-2

AREA 53.81 (sq.mt)

25A

T8 T7

T23

SF

T22

x4

FF

T26

23B

FF

AREA 62.15 (sq.mt)

13A

AREA 3

AREA 43.94 (sq.mt)

T18

T6

T8

AREA 85.16 (sq.mt)

8C-1

T5

AREA 57.84 (sq.mt)

14B-3

T9

7C

T1

G D

F

11A AREA 30 (sq.mt)

10A

up p

E A

14B-2

AREA 55.76 (sq.mt)

T8 RENT (per month)

T7

AREA 121 (sq.mt)

Ground Floor

1A

9B

T1

AREA 2

AREA 31.61 (sq.mt)

5C

T4

AREA 3

T7 AREA 93.56 (sq.mt)

T5

4C

AREA 2

T3

GF

TOTAL AREA DIVIDED BY UNIT TYPE (sq.mt)

BLOCK

Basement

T10

AREA 20.19 (sq.mt)

T24

AREA 99.36 (sq.mt)

6C

AREA 20.1 (sq.mt)

10B

A

T--

AREA 10.77 (sq.mt)

14B-1

FF

AREA 2

AREA 11.20 (sq.mt)

B

SF

AREA 1

AREA 10.8 (sq.mt)

C

AREA 6

AREA 86.10 (sq.mt)

AREA 104.23 (sq.mt)

18A

T16

FF 8C-2

First Floor

T25

AREA 173.3 (sq.mt)

20C

AREA 29.07 (sq.mt)

34B-1

AREA 38.05 (sq.mt)

24A

T17

A

TOTAL AREA DIVIDED BY UNIT TYPE (sq.mt)

BLOCK

B

TOTAL AREA DIVIDED BY UNIT TYPE (sq.mt)

BLOCK

C

B


51.

This chart shows how tenants are distributed throughout the works, by block and by floor, the way in which they use their spaces (i.e. music studio, or heavy workshop such as the forge) and the rental income from the spaces. By giving an overview of the distribution of different types of space, but also which spaces may be under- or over-valued, decisions can be made as to the location of new tenants, or changed rental strategies over time. Studio Polpo, September 2013

21

21

21

17

KEY:-

17G-2

25

16

6

T11

1

4

3

UNIT

WORKSHOP (HEAVY)

TENANT

WORKSHOP (LIGHT) STUDIO EMPTY

AREA 67.2 (sq.mt)

30D

Tx

TENANT LIST AREA 83.65 (sq.mt)

AREA 37.63 (sq.mt)

29D

SF

FF

Tx

28G

T20

AREA 56.31 (sq.mt)

5

1

PORTLAND WORKS

17G-2 AREA 106.9 (sq.mt)

FF

19D

AREA 31.37 (sq.mt)

T15

26E-3

Tx

AREA 80.09 (sq.mt)

17G-1

AREA 22.58 (sq.mt)

3D-2

T3

26E-2

T3

AREA 47.23 (sq.mt)

AREA 37.77 (sq.mt)

2D-2

T2

AREA 22.08 (sq.mt)

2D-1

FF

16G

Tx

15G-3

T8

T16 T17 T18

T19 T20 T21 T22 T23 T24 T25 T26 T27

Stuart Mitchell Knives Mick Price Singing Knives Shelley Hughes Carl Whitham Kimmy Yeah Neil Robinson Crown Tools

GF

T13 T0

FF TOTAL REVENUE

TOTAL REVENUE

DIVIDED BY FLOOR

DIVIDED BY UNIT TYPE

(£/sqft/permonth)

(£/sqft/permonth)

AREA 28.87 (sq.mt)

15G-2

AREA 51.66 (sq.mt)

T3

T15

Iron Anchor A.Cole MB Roofing Tolly Boy Portland Committee Sequoia Sound System Artists (Price & Sewell) Walmar Products Pam Hague

SF

T27

AREA 5.45 (sq.mt)

25E

T10 T11 T12 T13 T14

AREA 33.52 (sq.mt)

AREA 88.61 (sq.mt)

AREA 22.29 (sq.mt)

3D-1

T11

T0 Landlord office T1 Square Pegs T2 The Gentleman T3 PML Plating T4 RJS T5 Lynthorpe Joinery T6 Dosh Band rehearsal room T7 Mick Shaw Engraving T8 Quality Cabinetry T9

12E

AREA 67.20 (sq.mt)

T9

14F-4

T12 G

AREA 23.20 (sq.mt)

T10

15G-1

T1

A

F E

B

D TOTAL AREA DIVIDED BY UNIT TYPE (sq.mt)

BLOCK

D

TOTAL AREA DIVIDED BY UNIT TYPE (sq.mt)

BLOCK

E

TOTAL AREA DIVIDED BY UNIT TYPE (sq.mt)

BLOCK

F

TOTAL AREA DIVIDED BY UNIT TYPE (sq.mt)

BLOCK

G C

TOTAL REVENUE (£) DIVIDED BY BLOCK


Vision Plan Graphic 3


53.


How to Use: Vision Plan Graphic 1

54.

This chart shows the nature, location and priority of repair costs.

Reading down this column shows all the repairs required for Block A. It can be noted that this is where the majority of the repair work over the next five years is required.

Vision Plan Graphic 1

1.

2.

These are the repairs required for Block C. It can be noted that the whole block can be repaired with a relatively small budget.

Reading across this row shows all the roof repairs required. It can be noted that this is where the majority of the urgent work is required.

3. Building element types requiring repair

35.

Each bar represents ÂŁ1000 of required repair costs

The bars are coloured to show urgent health & safety repair costs, repair costs that could be done in the next two years and repairs that can be done in the next five years, as outlined in the Bond Bryant report


How to Use: Vision Plan Graphic 3

55.

This chart visualises the repair and upgrade measures that have been included in the J P Getty funding application.

1.

The strategy to use the potential funding to repair as many roofs and prevent damage to the building by water can be seen from the tag positions and

The red tags indicate repair costs that are included in the J P Getty funding application

This scenario focuses on the J P Getty funding application.

The orange tags show additional upgrade costs Vision Plan Graphic 3

39.

2.

A more detailed breakdown of repair and upgrade costs is show here


MAPPING OCCUPANCY

Occupancy Around the Clock

Undersused Spaces

We have produced a number of diagrams linked to that which shows the tenancy data, and

We have also mapped out areas that have been

showing how the Works are used at different times

identified by the Building Manager as either empty,

by different tenants (Occupancy Mapping).

problematic or underused (Retrofit Opportunities). Although some of these spaces are linked to

Occupancy Mapping

tenants (and rented), the way in which they are used is not beneficial to the Works. Examples of this include non-essential storage, sub-letting (and in one case sub-division to create habitable space,

These can inform the planning of new, or shared spaces in terms of their use and location. In particular, any new spaces that are to act as public interfaces, or shared meeting/exhibition spaces may have different uses at different times. These might depend on access to tenants who are makers (and therefore not around at certain times) or require both quiet and evening availability for meetings (and therefore not work well next to band spaces) for example. The diagrams shown here display typical tenant occupancy for a 24hr period on weekdays and weekends, as well as showing this occupancy linked to location to give a sense where the building is quiet or underused. Tenants are, again, broadly distinguished by their work (makers, artists and musicians).

56.

but in breach of an number fire safety guidelines) and areas only accessible by narrow and noncompliant stairs. The diagrams shown previously in this report make this visible and can start a conversation amongst tenants and steering groups as to how best to use the spaces.


PROPOSALS

Other alternatives indicated are biomass boilers

Retrofitting and Relocating

Heating Proposals

and electric heaters. The former can often be employed where there is a steady supply of waste wood on site, or nearby. A number of sawmills, for example, use woodchip boilers to heat their

Through cross-referencing with other diagrams,

The Works is currently either unheated, or heated

spaces. This, at present, could go some way to

suitable new uses can be identified (by looking

by various methods installed by tenants over

reducing the need to accommodate or remove

at times of use and adjacent occupancies for

the years (see heating map). A number of these

waste, and make a good use of timber shavings,

example). Empty or cleared spaces may also be

heating solutions are at best inefficient, and at worst

sawdust and woodchip.

the most suitable for more substantial renovation

potentially unsafe. Due to the nature of the work

and refurbishment works, such as floor and wall

being undertaken in many spaces, there is no need

There is a problem in that the supply of waste

insulation.

for heating (i.e. in the forge or some workshops

wood from site cannot be guaranteed (due to

were the work involves physical activity), however

varying processes or workloads and future tenancy

We have used this information to inform the Retrofit

in other spaces accommodating more sedentary

patterns) and external supplies of wood are

Proposals, Proposals Diagram 1 and Relocation

activity (such as the artists spaces in Block C for

required. Although there are number of woodchip

Proposals.

example) this lack of proper heating, coupled

schemes from local forests, issues are then that

with the poor thermal performance of the building

the growing, or transport of timber, just to be burnt

Likely costs of these works can be obtained

makes the spaces un-useable for long periods at a

causes much higher carbon emissions. These boilers

from the repair charts, as well as more detailed

time during winter.

are also costly so a single unit, burning wood waste

information from the Fabric Upgrade information part of the report.

Retrofit Proposals

Proposals Diagram 1

Relocation Proposals

from the whole site would be best employed to also This variety of both use, and the variety and age of

provide hot water and space heating. However

the building fabric, make any centralised system of

the distribution of heat/water through an efficient

heating unsuitable and problematic.

pipe network and the storage of timber make this a more difficult option.

With the potential to open and refurbish previously neglected spaces however, comes the opportunity

Electric heating eliminates the need for water

to assess how these might be used. A more

pipework but can be less efficient. In terms of

centralised way of heating those used by smaller

sustainability, this becomes a good option should

scale makers and craftspeople (who may be sitting

the grid become substantially ‘decarbonised’, i.e

relatively still throughout most of the day) may well

move away from coal, oil, long-distance biomass

be more cost effective, especially after works to

etc.

reduce ‘leakiness’ of the fabric and insulate. The Heating Proposals Diagram indicates possible

Building Management / Tenancy Issues

networks of small highly efficient gas combi-boilers

Heating Proposals

that could serve a number of rooms and offer simple and intuitive controls to individual tenants. These have been shown serving newly empty spaces in blocks A, D and E. The installation of pipework would have to be carefully considered to ensure compatibility with the old fabric of the building and at a time when other works where being done. The system would allow service contracts to be put in place to cover a number of very similar installations, making running the Works easier.

57.


Occupancy Mapping (Coloured by Tenant Type)

58.

7:00

6:00

8:00

0 5:0

9:0 0

T25 T23 Carl W She hit T16 lly Hu am gh The Art es ists

0 4:0

:00 10

3:0 0

T T17 W 21 Mic kP alma rice rP T12 MB roduc ts Roo fing T8 Qu ality T5 Lynthorpe Cab inet ry T4 RJS

T2 Th eG en tle m en

00 11:

24:00

13:00

mmy Yeah T25 Ki ging Knives T22 Sin uoia q e S 5 1 T

1:00

12:00

T20 Stua rt M i T13 T T18 tchel T11 A ollyboy Pam l Kn ndy Ha ives C T10 Iron gu Anc ole e T7 M hor ick Sha L Plating M P 3 w T quare Pegs T1 S

T6 Do sch

2:00

tland Electrical T9 Por

00 23:

14:0 0

:00 2 2

15 :00

:00 16

2 1 :00

18:00

19:00

20:0 0

sporadic use

00 17:

regular use

summer use only

storage use only

Tenant � Code

Tenant � Name

Tenant � Type

T1

Square � Pegs

Metalwork

T2

The � Gentlemen

T3 T4

PML � Plating RJS

T5

Lynthorpe

T6

Dosch �

T7 T8

Mick � Shaw Quality � Cabinetry

T9

Portland � Electrical

T10

Iron � Anchor

T11 T12

Andy � Cole M � B� Roofing

T13

Tollyboy

T14

Portland � Committee

Musician

Nature � of � Wo r k Manufacture � of� bespoke � patented � coat � hooks � for � schools

Unlike � other � musicians � at � Portland � Works, � The� Gentlemen � are � a� full� time � band. �

De s cr ip t io n � of � Use Since� the � majority � of� work � is� carried � out � during � school � summer � holidays � Square � Pegs � work � patterns � are � split � seasonally .� May�-� Oct� are � the � busiest � period. � During� summer � will� work � long� hours � and� weekends. � During� winter � will� work � more � regular � 9-5� Mon�-� Fri Sporadic � use � of� rehearsal � space � during � the � day,� evening � and� weekend. � More � likely� to � use � the � space � during � evenings. � Big� in� Norway � where � they � will� tour � for � long� periods � of� time. St e a dy� 8am -4pm. � Rarely� evenings � and� weekends Comes� to � the � works � for � half � an� hour � at � the � beginning � and� end � of� day.�

Metalwork Silver � pla t in g Other � craft/ � Maintenance � of� Sheffield � hallam � Student � manufacture/constr properties uction Other � craft/ � Manufacture � of� wooden � double � glazed � sash � Regularly � work � long� hours. � Work� split � between � manufacturing � at � PW� and� manufacture/constr windows on� site � installation, � however � there � is� normally � at � least � one � person � at � the � uction works. � Lynthorpe � have � a� long� waiting � list � which � means � that � their � work � is� less � sporadic � than � other � manufacturers � at � PW.� Musician

"Rock � and� Roll,� Rhythm � and� Blues". � Play� lots � Use � their � space � before � and� after � gigs � to � load � and� unload � equipment. � Could� of� gigs � in� and� around � Sheffield be� unloading � late � at � night. �

Metalwork Metal � etching � Other � craft/ � Bespoke � Kitchen� Fitter � Completely � self � manufacture/constr sufficient. � Workload � varies. � uction Other � craft/ � Repair,� rewind � and� supply � of� electric � motors manufacture/constr uction Metalwork Iron � gate � manufacture. � Motorbike � repair. � Metalwork Manufacture � of� metal � tools. � Other � craft/ � Roofing� and� bu ildin g manufacture/constr uction Metalwork Manufacturing � of� high� end, � bespoke � chastity � belts. �

Steady � 9:30 �-� 5:00. � Might � pop� in� on� weekends. � Length � of� time � at � PW� varies � depending � on� current � workload. � No� Seasonal � patterns. � Not� during � weekends. �

T15

Sequoia �

T16

The � Artists

Art

T17

Walmar � Products

T18

Pam � Hague

Other � craft/ � manufacture/constr uction Metalwork Grinding � cutter � blades � for � the � lino-cutting � trade. �

Musician

Works � part � time. � 3� days � a� week � 10 -4.

T19 T20

Stuart � Mitchell � Knives

T21

Mick � Price

T22

Singing � Knives

T23

Shelly � Hughes

Art

Full � time � a rt is t

Spo ra dic� since � she � is� sometimes � an� 'artist � in� residence' � at � other � locations

T24

Carl � Whitam

Art

Photography. � Specialises � in� industrial � and � architectural � photographs. �

PW� used � for � postproduction. � Away� photographing � for � periods � of� time � (around � two � weeks) � before � returning � to � the � works. � Will� work � evenings. � Lends� space � out � for � exhibitions � since � it� is� accessible � from � the � street. �

T25

Kimmy � Yeah

Musician

Band. � Also� have � other � work � commitments

Metalwork Knife � maker. � Primarily � hunting � knives � and� Steady � 10 -4.� Will� come � in� occasionally � on� sat � (around � once � a� month) the � occasional � sword. Other � craft/ � Full� time � job� elsewhere. � Rarely� at � works. manufacture/constr uction Musician Record � Label,� project � alongside � other � work � weekends � and� evenings, � once � or� twice � a� week. � Occasional � mornings. commitments. � Group� of� five � people � who � use � the � space � a� the � same � time.

� Steady � 7:30 -4:30 � Mon-Fri

Sporadic � .�� Will� sometimes � work � in� the � evenings � and� sometimes � on� Saturdays. � Steady � 9�-� 4.� Will� work � Saturdays � if� there � is� work. � Us e � space � as � store. �

provide � sound � systems � for � Sheffield � dub� sporadic � use � during � evening � and� weekends. � events � Studios � for � 5-6� artists � who � work � at � different � Seasonal. � Becomes � too � cold� to � work � in� winter. � Art� is� a� hobby � alongside � times. � other � permanent � employment � so � will� work � sporadically � for � 2�- 3� hours � at � a� time � throughout � the � week. � Cabinet � m a ke r 9 -4� mon -fri. � Away� for � long� periods. �

Sporadic � 9�-� 4.� Will� also � spend � long� period � in� Australia

USE OF PORTLAND WORKS: WEEKDAYS

Use � space � around � two � evenings � a� week, � including � weekends. � Never � during � the � day.�


Occupancy Mapping (Coloured by Tenant Type)

59.

7:00

6:00

8:00

0 5:0

9:0 0

0 4:0

T16 The Art ists

:00 10

3:0 0

T2 Th eG en tle m en

T6 Do sch

2:00

00 11:

T20 Stuart Mi

tchell Kniv es

T11 A ndy C T10 Iron Anc ole hor

12:00

Pegs

mmy Yeah T25 Ki ging Knives T22 Sin uoia q e S 5 1 T

13:00 14:0 0

00 23:

24:00

1:00

T1 Square

:00 2 2

1 5 :00

00 17:

2 1 :00

18:00

20:0 0

19:00

sporadic use

:00 16

regular use

summer use only

storage use only

metalworkers

other craft / manufacture / construction

musicians

artists

USE OF PORTLAND WORKS: WEEKENDS


Occupancy Mapping (Coloured by Block)

60.

0 5:0

7:00

6:00

8:00 T25 T23 Carl W She hit T16 lly Hu am ghe The s Art ists

he Ge nt lem en

mmy Yeah T25 Ki ging Knives T22 Sin quoia T15 Se

13:00 14:0 0

00 23:

24:00

1:00

12:00

T20 Stu art Mi t T13 Toll T18 chell ybo Pa T11 A m Kni y ndy Ha ve Col T10 Iron e gu s Anc e T7 M hor ick Sha L Plating T3 PM w quare Pegs T1 S

T6 Do sch

2:00

T2 T

00 11:

T T17 W 21 Mic kP alm ric ar T 1 2 M Produ e tland Electrical BR c T9 Por oof ts ing T8 Qu ality T5 Lynthorp Cab e inet r T4 RJS y

:00 10

3:0 0

0 4:0

9:0 0

:00 2 2

1 5 :00 :00 16 19:00 block E

block B

block F

block C

block G

18:00

20:0 0 block A

00 17:

2 1 :00 regular use

sporadic use

summer use only

storage use only

block D

USE OF PORTLAND WORKS: WEEKDAYS


Occupancy Mapping (Coloured by Block)

61.

0 5:0

6:00

7:00

8:00 9:0 0

0 0 : 4

T16 T

he A rtis ts

3:0 0

:00 10

T2 T

he Ge nt lem en

00 11:

T6 Do sch

2:00

T20 Stuart M itchel l Kn ives T11 A ndy C T10 Iron Anc ole hor

12:00

Pegs

mmy Yeah T25 Ki ging Knives T22 Sin quoia T15 Se

13:00 14:0 0

00 23:

24:00

1:00

T1 Square

:00 2 2

1 5 :00 :00 16 19:00 block E

block B

block F

block C

block G

18:00

20:0 0 block A

00 17:

2 1 :00 regular use

sporadic use

summer use only

storage use only

block D

USE OF PORTLAND WORKS: WEEKENDS


Retrofit Proposals

62.

phased, moving storage items to 32C /31C and vice versa if these cannot be relocated.

phased, moving storage items from 32C to 31C (or 33C) and vice versa if these cannot be relocated.

Walls

Floors

Ceiling/Roof

Windows

Doors

Ceiling/Roof

Windows

Doors

Draught Sealing

Walls

Floors

32C

33C

31C

34B-2

30D

phased, tenants moving to block C or D to alloow works to be carried out

34B-1

29D

temporarily relocate 21C tenant during works

relocate 20C tenants to 26E-2, 20C back to heavier use

21C

20C

22C

Draught Sealing

Second Floor

23B

Meter

phased: 18A items moved into 19D and vice-versa

23B 28G

26E-3 25E 19D 26E-2 24A

18A

27A 25-A 26A-1

First Floor


Retrofit Proposals

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1 note: 14B-1 to 14B-3/Meter space changed to light-use units, storage items relocated

5C

17G-1

Doors

Windows

Ceiling/Roof

Walls

Draught Sealing

4C-2

Floors

63.

4C

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B 15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A 12E

WC

phased, moving storage items to 32C /31C and vice versa if these cannot be relocated.

Meter

11A

phased, moving storage items from 32C to 31C (or 33C) and vice versa if these cannot be relocated.

1A

13A w

32C

Draught Sealing

33C

Ground Floor

Doors

Windows

Ceiling/Roof

Floors

Walls

30D

Draught Sealing

34B-2

R

31C

phased, tenants moving to block C or D to alloow works to be carried out

Doors

Windows

Ceiling/Roof

Walls

Floors

Draught Sealing

34B-1

29D

Occupied Unknown

0D-1

Unused

Used as Storage

0A-1

0A-2

Basement

Portland Works Retrofit Proposals Second Floor


How to Use: Occupancy Mapping

64.

This drawing shows how the Works are used at different times by different tenants. It can be used to inform the planning of new, or shared spaces.

24 hr clock

Occupancy Mapping (Coloured by Tenant Type)

0 5:0

This shows that the tenant is typically only at the works during the start and end of the day.

6:00

7:00

8:00 9:0 0

0 4:0 3:0 0

:00 10

2:00

00 11:

1.

1:00

12:00

24:00

2.

13:00 14:0 0

00 23:

This shows that there are likely to be emply music and rehersal spaces during weekdays

42.

:00 22

15 :00

3.

:00 16

21 :00 19:00

20:0 0

sporadic use

18:00

regular use

00 17:

It is likely to be noisy after 6pm on weekdays. Additionally, events after 6pm are unlikely to disturb musicians

summer use only

storage use only

The type of line indicates regular, sporadic or seasonal use.

Tenant Code

Tenant Name

Tenant Type

T1

Square Pegs

Metalwork

Manufacture of  bespoke  patented  coat   hooks  for  schools

T2

The Gentlemen

Musician

Unlike other  musicians  at Portland  Works,   The Gentlemen  are  a full time  band.  

T3 T4

PML Plating RJS

T5

Lynthorpe

Metalwork Silver pla t ing Other  craft/  Maintenance  of  Sheffield  hallam  Student   manufacture/constr properties uction Other  craft/  Manufacture  of  wooden  double  glazed  sash   Regularly work  long  hours.  Work split  between  manufacturing  at PW and  manufacture/constr windows on site  installation,  however  there  is normally  at least  one  person  at the   uction works.  Lynthorpe  have  a long  waiting  list  which  means  that  their  work  is  less  sporadic  than  other  manufacturers  at PW. 

T6

Dosch

T7 T8

Mick Shaw Quality  Cabinetry

T9

Portland Electrical

T10

Iron Anchor

T11 T12

Andy Cole M  B Roofing

T13

Tollyboy

T14

Portland Committee

Musician

Nature of Work

De s cript ion of Use Since the  majority  of  work  is carried  out  during school  summer  holidays   Square  Pegs  work  patterns  are  split  seasonally . May - Oct are  the  busiest   period.  During summer  will work  long  hours  and weekends.  During winter   will work  more  regular  9-5 Mon - Fri Sporadic  use  of  rehearsal  space   during the  day, evening  and weekend.   More  likely  to  use  the  space  during evenings.  Big in Norway  where  they   will tour  for  long  periods  of  time. St e a d y 8am -4pm.  Rarely evenings  and weekends Comes to  the  works  for  half  an hour  at the  beginning  and end  of  day. 

"Rock and Roll, Rhythm and Blues".  Play lots   Use their  space  before  and after  gigs  to  load  and unload  equipment.  Could  of  gigs  in and around  Sheffield be  unloading  late  at night.  

Metalwork Metal etching   Steady  9:30  - 5:00.  Might pop  in on weekends.   Other  craft/  Bespoke  Kitchen Fitter  Completely  self   Length of  time  at PW varies  depending  on current  workload.  No Seasonal   manufacture/constr sufficient.  Workload  varies.   patterns.  Not during weekends.   uction Other  craft/  Repair, rewind  and supply  of  electric  motors   Steady  7:30 -4:30  Mon-Fri manufacture/constr uction Metalwork Iron  gate  manufacture.  Motorbike  repair.   Sporadic .  Will sometimes  work  in the  evenings  and sometimes  on  Saturdays.   Metalwork Manufacture  of  metal  tools.   Steady  9 - 4. Will work  Saturdays  if there  is work.   Other  craft/  Roofing and b uild ing Us e  space  as  store.   manufacture/constr uction Metalwork Manufacturing  of  high end,  bespoke   Sporadic 9 - 4. Will also  spend  long  period  in Australia chastity  belts.  

T15

Sequoia

T16

The Artists

Art

Other craft/  manufacture/constr uction Metalwork Grinding  cutter  blades  for  the  lino-cutting   trade.  

T17

Walmar Products

T18

Pam Hague

T19 T20

Stuart Mitchell  Knives

Musician

Metalwork

provide sound  systems  for  Sheffield  dub  sporadic  use  during evening  and weekends.   events   Studios  for  5-6 artists  who  work  at different   Seasonal.  Becomes  too  cold  to  work  in winter.  Art is a hobby  alongside   times.   other  permanent  employment  so  will work  sporadically  for  2 -3 hours  at a  time  throughout  the  week.   Cabinet m a ke r 9 -4 mon -fri. Away for  long  periods.  

Knife maker.  Primarily hunting  knives  and  the  occasional  sword.

T21

Mick Price

T22

Singing Knives

T23

Shelly Hughes

Art

Full time  a rt is t

T24

Carl Whitam

Art

Photography. Specialises  in industrial  and   architectural  photographs.  

T25

Kimmy Yeah

Musician

Band. Also have  other  work  commitments

Works part  time.  3 days  a week  10-4.

Steady 10-4. Will come  in occasionally  on sat  (around  once  a month)

Other craft/  Full time  job elsewhere.  Rarely at works. manufacture/constr uction Musician Record  Label, project  alongside  other  work   weekends  and evenings,  once  or twice  a week.  Occasional  mornings. commitments.  Group of  five  people  who   use  the  space  a the  same  time. Spo ra d ic since  she  is sometimes  an 'artist  in residence'  at other  locations PW used  for  postproduction.  Away photographing  for  periods  of  time   (around  two  weeks)  before  returning  to  the  works.  Will work  evenings.   Lends space  out  for  exhibitions  since  it is accessible  from  the  street.    Use  space  around  two  evenings  a week,  including  weekends.  Never  during  the  day. 

USE OF PORTLAND WORKS: WEEKDAYS

The colours in this version correspond to the tenant type (ie, artist, metalworker)

See also the diagram for weekends

This table gives a more detailed description of the tenants typical use of Portland Works


How to Use: Retrofit Proposals

65.

3. This drawing provides a clear overview of the retrofit measures proposed for each space in the works.

The diagram shows that the retrofit measures proposed and suitable for this space are draught sealing, windows and doors.

7C

5HWUR多W3URSRVDOV

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1 note: 14B-1 to 14B-3/Meter space changed to light-use units, storage items relocated

5C

17G-1

Doors

Walls

Floors

Windows

Draught Sealing

4C-2

Ceiling/Roof

63.

4C

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1

15G-2

Doors

Windows

Ceiling/Roof

Floors

Walls

Draught Sealing

9B 16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A 12E

WC

phased, moving storage items to 32C /31C and vice versa if these cannot be relocated.

Meter

11A

phased, moving storage items from 32C to 31C (or 33C) and vice versa if these cannot be relocated.

1A

13A w

This chart is used to show proposed retrofit measures. A bespoke chart has been created for each space in the works. As well as current occupancy, the measures proposed also take into consideration location, heritage and likely future use.

Doors

Windows

Walls

Floors

30D

Ceiling/Roof

34B-2

phased, tenants moving to block C or D to alloow works to be carried out

Doors

Windows

Walls

Floors

Ceiling/Roof

Draught Sealing

34B-1

29D

Occupied Unknown

0D-1

Unused

Used as Storage

0A-1

0A-2

Basement

0D-1

0A-1

1.

This key tells you which spaces in Portland Works are occupied.

Doors

Walls

Floors

Retrofit measures

31C

Draught Sealing

2.

Windows

Draught Sealing

Ground Floor

Ceiling/Roof

32C

33C

Portland Works Retrofit Proposals Second Floor


Proposals Diagram 1

66.

Portland Works Proposals Diagram #1

32C

33C

31C

This diagram suggests uses for the currently empty spaces, and indicates the spread of unit types across the works. 34B-2

These proposals do not involve re-locating tenants.

33C:

29D- 30D:

New designer / maker space One large space for a small company or individual with relatively light weight equipment, or small design company

30D

34B-1

29D

New start-up designer/maker spaces for jewellers, product designers, small-scale metalworks

Second Floor

HEAVY WORKSHOP (FORGING, WELDING etc) 21C

22C

20C

MID WORKSHOP (JOINERY, ASSEMBLY etc)

MID WORKSHOP DISPLAY/SHOP

23B

FABLAB / PUBLIC ACCESS

MUSICIANS Meter

ARTISTS / STUDIO SPACE 23B 28G

STORAGE 26E-3 25E

NEW SPACE BROUGHT INTO USE

19D

23B:

Maker space Small unit for maker (ie jeweller).

26E-2/3: 26A-1

New Studio Space Open plan, top-lit artists studio space likely to be occupied when adjoing making spaces empty

27A:

Maker space Open-plan unit for company such as squarepegs (joinery/metal work or other)

26E-2 24A

18A

27A 25-A 26A-1

First Floor

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

17G-1

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

4C

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B 15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2

14B1-3: Meter

1A

FabLab Public-accessible drop-in and digital making lab. Could incorp[orate desk-bnased working doubling as small exhibition/meeting room.

10A 12E

WC

Meter

1A 11A

13A

Carl Whitham Unit This currently functions as an exhibition and event space and is well-positioned for this.

Ground Floor

0A-1 / 0D-1:

Making Space / Digital production unit Open-plan unit for company such as squarepegs (joinery/metal work or other). OR Unit for digital cutting (ie CNC) facilities or publicly accessible workshop space linked to other businesses/Universities and spaces on G.Floor

0A-2

Basement


Relocation Proposals

67.

Portland Works Relocation be able to move into currently empty spaces with a minimum of disruption due to the nature of their business (typically musicians and artists with lighter/more portable equipment). This would allow the full refurbishment and upgrade of their current spaces without requiring tenants to leave the works. Tenants with large or heavy equipment (metal workers and joiners for example) would be very unlikley to be able to move temporarily without disruption to their business activities In many instances, these moves could be permanent as spaces are of a similar size and character.

1. 2.

1.

31, 32 and 33C Reduce then temporarily store items in Block D Refurbish.

2.

34B-1 and 34B-2 Relocate temporarily or permanently into 33C and 32C respectively Refurbish.

2.

Second Floor

HEAVY EQUIPMENT / DIFFICULT TO MOVE

EASY TO MOVE

VACANT SPACES

3. 2.

1.

6A-1, 27A, 26E-2 and 26E-3 Refurbish

2.

21C Kimmy Yeah move to 26E-3

3.

20C Artists move to 26E-2 and 26A-1

4.

28G Stuart Mitchell moves to 27A

4.

1. First Floor

1.

0A-1 and 0D-1 Refurbish

2.

14B-1,2 & 3 move items to 0A-1 / reloacte

3.

2D-2 The Gentlemen move to 0A-1 May be possible to refurbish/upgrade this space with tenant in-situ.

4.

0A-1 cleared for new tenant

3. Ground Floor

2.

1.

Basement


Heating Proposals

68.

Portland Works Space Heating Diagram

32C

33C

31C

This diagram shows potential centralised heating systems, large centralised systems. Wood chip or biomass system may still be suitable to serve woodworking areas where waste timber products (sawdust for example) might be useable on site for heating. It should be bourne in mind that should these tenants move out then the fuel source would need to be brought in from elsewhere.

B 34B-2

new combi boiler to 30D-1

30D

wood chip / biomass boiler radiator

B

34B-1

gas combi-boiler 29D

electric heater

Second Floor Block A 21C

22C

20C

Block B

Block C

Block D

23B

Block E

Meter

Block F

23B

28G

26E-3 25E 19D 26E-2

24A

18A B

27A

25-A 26A-1 new combi boiler to 26A-1 for 26A-1/26E-2, 26E-3, 27A

First Floor

8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

5C

17G-1

4C

17G-2

14B-1

14B-3

3D-2

B

14B-2 14F-4

3D-1 Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B

15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B 2D-2 10A

12E WC

Meter

1A 11A

13A

Ground Floor 0D-1

0A-1

0A-2

Basement


4. Future Uses


FUTURE USES

This report aims to provide Portland Works with strategies not only for repairing and renovating the existing fabric, but also for creating a thriving hub of

Training

makers, artists and musicians. This can be through providing better spaces for existing tenants, but also encouraging positive new tenants to the Works,

The making element, in particular the metal trades

with new skills and ideas.

aspect, is key to Portland Works. Many of the tenants have specialised skills learned from older

Through discussion with the building manager

craftsmen, and are keen that this knowledge is

tenants and steering group members a number

maintained, or passed on.

of issues have been identified in terms of spaces required.

Schemes that allow training, or apprenticeships, and projects that bring in other makers and

There are currently no real spaces that are shared,

designers to collaborate, or learn at the Works can

other than the well-used courtyard and roof spaces.

both ensure the future vibrancy and collective

Unit 1A is currently used for open days and steering

nature of Portland Works continues and thrives.

group meetings by agreement with the tenant. It works well for this, since it is accessible from both the

Additional benefits of this are that these schemes

courtyard and pedestrian street entrance, is finished

may attract different types of funding that may

to a good standard, and has kitchen facilities and

make the further repair and renovation of parts

heating. Should this situation (or tenancy) change,

of the Works more feasible. They may also attract

a space with a similar combined use and easy

income streams that go some way to making the

access would be preferable.

Works as a whole self-sustaining with a diminishing need for grants.

There is also a requirement to be able to store materials related to the Works (drawings,

In the research section of this report, a number

documents) in a secure place on site, and a desire

of further funding schemes are identified, linking

to be able to display these (along with other visual

in particular to training, youth, community and

materials produced) in a an area accessible by the

heritage.

public. The Works should be able to generate an income from spaces that can be put towards the running of the site, and it is important that spaces are not created that sit empty for most of the time. The diagrams, produced as part of the mapping element of the report, start to identify possibilities for multi-, or shared-use spaces. An example of this might be an area that is used for meetings (in-house or bookable by the community) in the evenings, has display material on the walls and is open on weekends, and is used as hot-desking low-impact workspace, or the building manager by day.

71.


Fab-labs

In recent years the rise of digital design and small-

We have also included the basic physical

scale localised digital making (through laser-cutters,

requirements of typical pieces of equipment that

3-d printers and CNC cutting) has made it much

may be required (from desk-top 3-d printers, to

easier for individuals to produce high quality objects

large CNC cutting tables) both in terms of size, but

and one-off pieces in a variety of materials. Tests

also noise, dust and extraction (FabLab Equipment

and prototypes can also be created at low cost.

Survey). This information acts as a guide to locating equipment of this nature in Portland Works and

Fab(fabrication)Labs(laboratories) originated in the

can then be cross-referenced with details of empty

US and have spread around the world. The FabLab

spaces, or use patterns to build up a picture of

in Manchester, MAKLab in Glasgow and Sheffield’s

which locations could be most suitable.

ReFab Space (part of Access Space) are all set up to allow anyone to drop in and use the technology (which also includes hand-tools) to design, create and share. Some version of this model could suit Portland Works, and become an interface for public interaction with designers and makers based on site, as well as resource for tenants to use, with techniques and technologies that may compliment their own, allow for them to innovate, and strengthen the Works as a place of making. We have explored a number of scenarios that examine different models of access, benefits and knowledge exchange (FabLab strategies).

Fab-lab Strategies

72.

Fab-lab Equipment Survey


Portland Works Fab-lab

What is a Fab-Lab

Fab-Labs are generally equipped with computer operated equipment such as laser cutters, CNC routers and 3D printers. (This equipment is sometimes referred to a digital fabrication/ prototyping). Fab Labs provide a viable way for individuals or organisations to intermittently access this type of equipment. At Portland Works the remit of a Fab-Lab could be A ‘Fab-Lab’ or fabrication laboratory

is a small scale workshop that is available for anyone to use. with computer operated equipment such as laser cutters, CNC extendedFab-Labs to include are moregenerally traditionalequipped hand manurouters and 3D printers. (This equipment is sometimes referred to a digital fabrication/ prototypfacturing tools and crafts. Digital fabrication could ing). Fab Labs provide a viable way for individuals or organisations to intermittently access this be combined with the existing skills and manufactype of equipment. turing processes to create an extremely valuable

resource for the community and to continue a his-

At Portland works the remit of a Fab-Lab could be extended to include more traditional hand Digital fabrication could be combined with the existing skills and manufacturing processes to create an extremely valuable resource for the community and to a history of innovative manufacturing on the site. An onsitecontinue Fab-Lab could be central to establishing tory of innovative manufacturing on the site. manufacturing tools and crafts.

connections with the local community and open

(Images of Fab Lab Manchester)

An onsite Fab-Lab could be central to establishing connections with the local community and open up funding opportunities currently unavailable to Portland Works.

up funding opportunities currently unavailable to Portland Works.

? EXISTING MANUFACTURING AT PORTLAND WORKS

NEW MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

INNOVATION!

73.


Fab-lab Strategies

74.

Membership

£

£

£

di gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa c

to ol s

sp ac e

di gi t fa al br ica ti o n so cia ls pa ce

to ol s

sp ac e

e

Drop-In Access

£

PW

fab lab member

PW

£

PW

£

e di gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa c

wo rk

£

drop-in digital fabricator

to ol s

sh op

sp ac e

di gi t fa al br ica tio so n cia ls pa c

to ol s

sp ac e

e

drop-in maker

£

PW

informal peer to peer learning

Drop-In Access:

Membership:

Drop in access suites people who have knowledge about using machienery and are using the fab lab as a viable way of accessing workshop space and equipment. It provides one off access to the workshop for a fixed time and cost. The existing skills at Portland works and potential peer to peer learning may not be important for these users. Drop in sessions could be used to allow infrequent access to hand operated machines or digital fabrication.

For more frequent users a membership system might be more appropriate. As well as providing the ability to use the equipment more frequently a network of regular users could establish a peer to peer learning culture at the FabLab.

Existing Tenant Access gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa c

di

ol s

e ac

to

ls

PW

PW

open workshop access for PW tenant

local business membership

experimentation by PW tenant

gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa c

di

to

ol s

e sp

ac

di gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa c

s ol

ac

£

to

£

sp

£

e

e

e

local business drop-in

sp

di

sp

to o

ac

e

£

gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa c

e

e

Local Business Access

PW

Local Business Access:

Existing Tenant Access:

As well at targeting individuals the services provided as a fab lab could appeal to small businesses in Sheffield. The Wavelab precedent demonstrates how small start up businesses in Sheffield can benefit from access to fabrication facilities. Business access could be agrred on a drop-in or membership arrangement.

It is important not to neglect the benefit that a fab lab could bring to the existing tenants at Portland Works. It could provide workshop space and equipment that would otherwise not be viable for them to purchase. Digital fabrication could allow tenants to experiment with manufacturing processes that are unfamiliar to them and continue a culture of innovation.


Fab-lab Strategies

75.

Formal Teaching e di gi t fa a l br ic a tio n so cia ls pa c

to ol s

sp ac e

di gi t fa al br ic a tio n so cia ls pa c

to ol s

sp ac e

e

Collaborations

PW

tenant peer to peer learning

di gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa c

to ol s

sp ac e

e

di gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa c

to ol s

sp ac e

e

teaching by PW tenant

PW

tenant collaborations

PW

?

digital fabrication teaching

Tenant Collaborations:

Formal Teaching:

The fab lab could be used to continue peer to peer learning and collaborations between tenants at the works. This is already takes place informally and the provision of shared workshop space could only serve to encourage this. A fab lab could foster collaborations between artists and manufacturing at the works.

Alongside informal peer to peer learning and collaboration a fablab space could be used for slightly more formal teaching/ workshops. These could involve the tenants or invited guests with experience of digital fabrication.

Graduate Start-Up to

sp

ac

ol s

e

PW

£

£

£

Links with Universities:

Graduate Start Up:

Links could be made between universities and the fab lab. The diagrams in the previos section show how two course structures would benefit from this. This type of relationship could involve tenants to a greater or lesser degree.

A fab lab could be used to establish start up enterprises. These could work with university based graduate schemes. This type of activity and ambition could attract different sources of funding that have not been tapped into already.

pa

cia

so

gi t fa al br ica

tio n

graduate start-up

di

ls

£

di

ls

PW

£

to o

e ac sp

collaborations with university students

to o

sp

ac

e

£

gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa ce

£

ce

PW

access for university students

ls

£

di gi t fa al br ica tio n so cia ls pa c

e

Links with Universities


5. Funding and Research


FUNDING AND RESEARCH

Smaller scale monitoring and measuring

Funding

Research

opportunities may form part of on-going research, or teaching and should therefore be of no cost to the Works. A pilot project, with the University of Sheffield’s Engineering Faculty is already underway

We have drawn together information on funders

Portland Works offers a number of opportunities for

to test the fabric heat loss of brick walls at the

and schemes that may be relevant to Portland

research from the performance of historic building

Works.

Works in the Funding Opportunities schedule. Again

fabric to metal-working innovation and financial

these are also provided as a spread-sheet that can

models.

be accessed, added to, or altered by the group as required.

Funding Opportunities

Involvement in larger-scale programmes, again where buildings such as Portland Works are required

The Works already have a strong connection to the

to test issues around energy, waste and heat loss,

University of Sheffield, which has been beneficial to

will also bring similar benefits, although the nature of

both parties, and we have looked at areas where

the larger, often EU programmes requires long time-

research could be developed.

scales and may not fit as easily with Portland Works programmes.

There is currently a lack of data on the thermal Some of these awards have requirements which

and moisture performance of traditional (pre 1919

Research initiatives such as the TSB’s Innovation

suggest either technologies, or programmes that

solid-walled) buildings. With the increasing desire to

Vouchers, allow funding for organisations to work

should be part of the scheme should the applicant

retrofit old building stock to reduce levels of energy

with expert consultants on technical aspects of a

be successful – for example renewable energy

use come difficulties and unknowns.

project. This might be building or energy related,

technologies, or a community focus.

but could also look at aspect of manufacturing, or Older buildings are leakier, absorb and expel

materials (particular where this was of assistance to

Shifting the funding focus towards Arts and Youth

moisture, and are heavier weight, whereas modern

the Works as a whole) that may help the tenants.

Enterprise through concentrating on training and

construction materials are often vapour-closed.

digital technology also allows a wider range of

Thermal upgrade measures that do not take

There is also more social research, investigating

funders to be accessed, and these grants can

into account the particular properties of older

models of collaborative working, and how to link

potentially pay for equipment and building work.

buildings can cause damage to the fabric when

and strengthen small networks such as Portland

condensation forms within wall build-ups, or health

Works. Studio Polpo’s Future Mesters project is one

problems due to mould.

of these initiatives being submitted in early 2014.

In all cases, material elsewhere in this report may be useful in providing high-level feasibility (including

Initial data on research opportunities is included in

cost) information, and diagrams to support future

The thermal performance of different types of

bids with evidence of a how a plan sits within an

traditional construction has also been shown to

overall scheme, compliments other works on the

differ considerably from what has been assumed in

site, or achieves a particular aim. The Funding Bid

thermal modelling.

Diagram and Cold Spots Document Map both illustrate how the data produced can assist in

It would be of use to both academics and

planning for bids.

building professionals to collect data on how the

the Research Opportunities document.

Research Opportunities

building is performing now, and to monitor (and

Funding Bid Diagram

compare) how different repair and upgrade measures affect this. This would be of particular importance to Portland Works as results would allow the approaches to any upgrades to be tailored depending on the results, for example leading to a construction detail or insulation type to be altered in subsequent areas to work better.

79.


Funding Opportunities and Funding Bid Diagram

80.

FUNDING BID DIAGRAM Portland Works Funding Streams What is the amount available? Are there restrictions on what this will pay for? (i.e. not fees, only energy-saving works etc). What are the timescales/deadlines? Does the funding provide equipment? Does the funder allow simultaneous bids for other works?

Costs Bond Bryan Costs (current for 2013) (cost of repairs only but include contractors ohp)

Schedule of Works

Refurbishment Build-ups

What is being done to each space? How much can be done with tenants in-situ? Who will move? How far do you want to go with upgrade? What is required in terms of new fittings/partitions and stairs for example?

Different build-ups and refurb measures Selection depends on use of space Costed rate only- require areas to calculate cost Diagrams indicate ease of various measures Add % for contractors costs

Professional Fees

Can calculate based on typical rates for overall value of works or seek quotes

Planning Permission

Will be required for all works that are not a ‘straightforward repair’ fee based on value of work

vision planner diagrams to help decide

Building Control Fee Will be required for all works fee based on value of work

Phasing HPA vs LBC/Planning

Define what forms part of HPA Is there a smaller package of works in a separate LBC?

Heritage Partnership Agreement

Submit typical details and methods of repair and refurbishment Submit CMP Submit drawings and details of the works

Conservation Management Plan Identifies areas/elements of historic importance Needed to accompnay LBC or to form part of Heritage Partnership Agreement

NAME

DISTRIBUTOR

AMMOUNT

RELEVANCE TO P.W.

CONDITIONS

OTHER COMMENTS

TIMEFRAME

CONTACT

General Garfield Weston Biffa Small Grants Scheme

Biffa Award

£250 - £10,000.

Could be used for building improvements /additions that involve a community use, such as a new fab-lab facility. needs to be site based improvement work and not equipment costs, events or feasability studies. "Priority is given to those projects that can demonstrate an innovative use of a community amenity to enhance, maintain or introduce real community led social, economic or environmental improvements." (Biffa Award application form)

1. Demonstrate increased sustainability 2. Demonstrate need in the community 3. Total project cost must be £30,000 or less incl VAT (ie 25k) 4. someone else must contribute 5% of cost 5. 104+ days of puiblic access

PW would fall into the 'Community buildings' or 'cultural facilities' theme.

Rolling

http://www.biffa‐award.org/contact‐us

Could be used for building improvements /additions that involve a community use, such as a new fab-lab facility. needs to be site based improvement work and not equipment costs, events or feasability studies. "Priority is given to those projects that can demonstrate an innovative use of a community amenity to enhance, maintain or introduce real community led social, economic or environmental improvements." (Biffa Award application form)

1.Demonstrate increased sustainability

Biffa Main Grant

Biffa Award

£10,000 - £50,000

chare@rswt.org 01636 670083

Available to PW because it is within 10 miles of a biffa operation (Sheffield Transfer Station) and 10 miles of a landfill (parkwood springs). Inclusion of green technologies prefered

3. Demonstrate need in the community 4. Not purely fabric repairs/energy saving 5. Total cost not above £200,000 6. Someone else must contribute 20% of costs 7. 104+ days of puiblic access

PW would fall into the 'Community buildings' or 'cultural facilities' theme.

Rolling

Available to PW because it is within 10 miles of a biffa operation (Sheffield Transfer Station) and 10 miles of a landfill (parkwood springs). Inclusion of green technologies prefered

1. Project under £500,000 in total 2. Open to public for 104+ days 3. 5% of the total project cost secured before applying 4. Discrete start and end Suitable for a PW project that develops skills within the 1. If a building project, has to be no more than community. Could be used as an initial fab lab step, for £25k incl VAT (ie £20.8k) example the purchase of a small 3d printer. Unlike the 2. improved urban environments Biffa Award this could be used to purchace equipment 3. stronger communities and materials for a fab-lab, host an event or undertake feasability work.

Rolling basis, four rounds every 12 months

Veolia Environmental Trust

Normally £20,000 - £40,000 Maximum £100,000

Big Lottery- Awards for All

Big Lottery

£300-£10 000

AHF AHF English Herritage HLF HLF

£10,000-£50,000

Fab-Lab type activities could attract entrepenerial focused funding, but it could also be used to involve young people in herritage. This would open up funding such as the HLF young roots. PW could use modern fabrication processes to access and better under manufacturing heritage.

1. Engage young people, aged 11 to 25, with heritage 2.Increase access to and knowledge about herritage 3. Demonstrate that herritage will be in better codition or better explained/understood 4. Partnering with youth organisation

Rolling, can apply anytime

0 - £125,000

Grant for collaborations between arts aorganisations, technology providers and research. PW could be technology provider. Demonstrates broadened funding opportunities that could be created by a fab lab and collaborations.

1. Partner with arts organisation 2. Partner with researcher 3. Use digital technology to engage with art or develop new business models 4. Arts organisation led

Available Until 30 December 2013

0-£50,000

Currently PW would not qualify as it doen't have existing formal links with supporting young people. Shows that educational and start up facilities might bring additional sources of funding that are more specific than Big lottery, etc.

1. Existing links with young people 2. Experience supporting enterprise 3. Raise enterprise awareness 4. Support young people aged 13-30 to explore enterprise.

next round of funding opens 2nd Sept 2013.

£1000 - £100,000 over up to three yrs

Could be used to purchase more expensive equipment 1. need to provide at least 10% of total cost that other funding sources wont fund such as cnc or 2. Can include R&D, eqipment, organistaional laser cutter, if artists and art activities were inclued at development PW fab lab. Funding proposal could include a residency programme or digital fabrication research

Heritage Challenge Fund Cold Spots' Herritage Enterprise Young roots

Could be used for building improvements /additions that involve a community use, such as a new fab-lab facility. needs to be site based improvement work and not equipment costs, events or feasability studies.

Two relevant fund categories for PW: Category D - Public Amenities Category E - Restoration of Buildings of Historic Interest

Veolia Environmental Trust

01902 794677

0845 4 10 20 30

Enterprise/Fab Lab Innovation Vouchers

Technology Strategy Board Knowledge Transfer Partnership Digital Research and Development Fund Nesta, Arts Council England, AHRC for the Arts

RBS Inspiring Youth in Enterprise

Social Incubator North Arts Grants for the Arts

Research

RBS Group Inspiring Enterprise

0845 300 6200


Research Opportunities

25*$16$7,21

81.

$33/,&$7,21

)81',1*&267

1$785(2)5(6($5&+

%(1),7WR3:

%(1(),77227+(56

7,0()5$0(

QRQH

6WXGHQWĆ&RXUVHZRUNĆQRĆFRVW

,QVLWXĆ8YDOXHĆPHDVXUHPHQWV

DFFXUDWHĆWKHUPDOĆSHUIRUPDQFHĆGDWDĆRQĆVROLGĆ VWXGHQWĆOHDUQLQJĆODFNĆRIĆ $XWXPĆ EULFNĆZDOOVĆDOORZLQJĆPRUHĆUHDOLVWLFĆSUHGLFWLRQĆRIĆ PHDVXUHGĆ89DOXHVĆIRUĆEXLOGLQJVĆ WKHUPDOĆXSJUDGHĆPHDVXUHV RIĆWKLVĆW\SHĆQDWLRQDOO\

&217$&7

*HQHUDO

%XLOGLQJĆ)DEULF

8QLYHUVLW\ĆRIĆ6KHIILHOGĆ'HSWĆRIĆ (QJLQHHULQJ

ĂďŝŐĂŝů͘ŚĂƚŚĂǁĂLJΛƐŚĞĨĨŝĞůĚ͘ĂĐ͘ƵŬ

8QLYHUVLW\ĆRIĆ6KHIILHOGĆ'HSWĆRIĆ (QJLQHHULQJĆĆ6VRD

&RVWĆRIĆ+\JURSWUDFNĆV\VWHPĆDSSUR[ƅĆ 5HPRWHĆVHQVLQJĆRIĆPRVLWXUHĆOHYHOVĆLQĆEULFNĆRUĆ ORRNĆWRĆFRYHUĆZLWKĆUHVHDUFKĆIXQGLQJ WLPEHUĆYLDĆ+\JURWUDFNĆV\VWHP

DFFXUDWHĆEXLOGLQJĆSHUIRUPDQFHĆGDWDĆRQĆIDEULFĆ ODFNĆRIĆPRLVWXUHĆGDWDĆRQĆUHWRUILWĆ SHUIRUPDFHĆWHVWLQJĆPRLVWXUHĆLVVXHVĆLQĆLQVWDOOHGĆLQVXODWLRQĆLQĆEXLOGLQJVĆRIĆWKLVĆW\SHĆ LQVXODWLRQĆWRĆOHDUQĆIURPĆLQLWLDOĆLQVWDOODWLRQV QDWLRQDOO\

1DWLRQDOĆ,QQRYDWLRQĆ9RXFKHUVĆ0RGHUQĆ %XLOWĆ(QYLURQPHQWĆVWUDQGĆRIĆWKHĆ7HFKQRORJ\ 6WUDWHJ\Ć%RDUG

XSĆWRƅĆWRĆSD\ĆIRUĆVSHFLDOLVWĆDGYLFH

%XLOWĆ(QYLURQPHQWĆ(QHUJ\

6SHFLDOLVWĆ'HVLJQ0RQLWRULQJĆDGYLFH

H[WHQGHGĆNQRZOHGJHĆEDVH

KWWSVFRQQHFWLQQRYDWHXNRUJZHEPRGHUQEXLOWNWQLQQRYDWLRQ YRXFKHUVVFKHPH

(65&

1HWZRUNVĆRIĆ1HWZRUNVĆVWUHQJWKHQLQJĆ PDQXIDFWXULQJVPDOOĆPDNHUVĆLQĆ6KHIILHOG

,QFUHDVHGĆH[SRVXUHĆLQYHVWLJDWLQJĆEXVLQHVVĆ PRGHOVĆDQGĆFROODERUDWLRQ

PRGHOVĆWRĆVWUHQJWKHQĆQHWZRUNVĆRIĆ 7%&Ć GHSHQGLQJĆRQĆVXFFHVV

VPDOOĆEXVLQHVVHVPDNHUVĆ LQFUHDVHGĆUHVLOLHQFH

6WXGLRĆ3ROSR

KWWSVYRXFKHUVLQQRYDWHXNRUJEXLOWHQYLURQPHQWYRXFKHU

)DEULFDWLRQ)XWXUHV

8QLYHUVLW\ĆRIĆ6KHIILHOGĆ 6WXGLRĆ3ROSR

)XWXUHĆ0HVWHUV

$+5&


6. Conclusions


CONCLUSIONS

This report is primarily intended to provide material

The Proposals Diagram 1 uses occupancy data

to aid in decision making and future planning.

to suggest how spaces might be re-programmed

It provides accessible graphic information on

in the future, and the Relocation Proposals tie-in

tenancies, use patterns, repair priorities, and fabric

to this, indicating which tenants may be able to

upgrade potential, with figures allowing budgets

easily relocate (due to small amount of equipment,

and bids to be put together.

or under-utilised space). This relocation may be

At Portland Works change is constant;

permanent or temporary to allow for repair/retrofit

circumstances change; tenancies change,

works to take place.

regulations and approaches change, membership

It also points toward ways in which the creative

Responding to Change

of groups change. During the production of the

and skilled mix of tenants might be strengthened or enhanced by new public interfaces, workspaces or

The Heating Proposals look at how heating systems

Cold Spots report for example, some tenants have

tenants, and how the skills of the makers might be

might be sensibly introduced in a manner that

left, leaving large areas able to be repaired and

shared and passed on to a new generation.

allows overall control and maintenance by the

re-purposed, and this has implications on the

Building Management, suits the proposed use and

strategies and approaches applied.

A number of diagrams suggest courses of action

works with the fabric in the spaces in question. For this reason, many of the charts and graphics

based upon the data gathered. The following pages illustrate how a number of the

in this document can be edited and added to by

The Retrofit Proposals diagram suggests a realistic

diagrams within this report might be used together

others (and will be handed over as digital versions)

approach to upgrading the fabric of the building,

to inform a strategy for one part of the Works, and

to allow updates and alterations over time.

taking into account the ease of moving tenants,

how each can potentially inform the other.

working around heavy machinery and historic

We hope that we have made visible to many

importance of building fabric. For example, it

information previously known by only a few, and

would be very difficult to replace the floor, or

Cross Referencing Drawings

made accessible information that may have been

insulate the walls of the more heavy-duty ground

hard to find or impenetrable. This will, we hope,

floor workshops, but relatively easy to fill gaps and

allow a greater transparency in decision making, It should be noted that this report does not include

but allow the approaches to be discussed and

strategies for new layouts or subdivisions of existing

debated, in line with the vision put forward in the

This has then been cross-referenced with the Fabric

spaces and costs related to these (partitions,

Portland Works Business Plan

Build-ups and the Schedule of Areas to allow

lighting, power and fit-out) will need to be based on

budget costs to be produced for this work.

specific design work and quotes.

replace/repair doors and windows in these areas.

“ Portland Works will be a physically sound, fullyoccupied building owned and managed in a democratic way by its tenants and supporters. It

Schedule of Areas

will provide affordable workshops and studios for craftspeople and the creative industries and for small business start-ups. The management will be responsive to their needs, fostering opportunities for education and promotion of the heritage values of the Works, along with support for workplace training and apprenticeships. We envisage Portland Works playing an important role as the centre of a hub of similar developments in the neighbourhood of Little Sheffield and beyond.�

(Portland Works Business Plan, 2011)

85.


Cross Referencing Drawings to Make Informed Decisions: Upgrading the Building

Vision Plan Graphic 01

34B-1

Thie Bond Bryan information can be cross referenced with the heritage issues picked out in the conservation management plan

Checking this section of the Vision Plan Graphic shows the repairs required for Block C according to the Bond Bryan Report

2.

1. BLOCK C 8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

17G-1

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

4C

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B 15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A 12E

WC

Meter

1A 11A

13A

2


23B

34B-2

30D

87.

phased, tenants moving to block C or D to alloow works to be carried out

Significant Elements

Retrofit Proposals 26.

62.

phased, moving storage items to 32C /31C and vice versa if these cannot be relocated.

phased, moving storage items from 32C to 31C (or 33C) and vice versa if these cannot be relocated.

32C

Walls

Floors

Ceiling/Roof

Windows

Doors Doors

Draught Sealing

Walls

Floors

Windows

32C

33C

31C

Ceiling/Roof

33C

31C

34B-2

30D

34B-2

30D

phased, tenants moving to block C or D to alloow works to be carried out

29D 34B-1

34B-1 29D

29D

Second Floor

21C

22C

temporarily relocate 21C tenant during works

relocate 20C tenants to 26E-2, 20C back to heavier use

21C

20C

Draught Sealing

Second Floor

20C

22C

23B

23B

Meter

Meter

phased: 18A items moved into 19D and vice-versa

23B 28G

23B 28G

26E-3 25E 19D

26E-3

26E-2 24A

25E

Second Floor 19D

26E-2 24A

18A

18A

27A

First Floor

25-A 26A-1

27A 25-A 26A-1

21C

Draught Sealing

relocate 20C tenants to 26E-2, 20C back to heavier use

20C

3. The proposed retrofit measures are shown here. These proposals take in a number of consideration including heritage 23B significance, existing tenant and location.

Ceiling/Suspended Floor Insulation

CE.2

For rooms where the ceiling is being replaced

Internal Wall Insulation

IWI.1

Breathable, single system by one supplier, bonded to wall

External Roof Insulation

all penetrations, upstands and details as per manufacturer's instructions

ensure ceiling/floor void above insulated to avoid cold bridge and condensation issues, refer to NBT guidance

existing joists existing floorboards retained

ER.1

For flat solid roofs that need to be accessible

140mm Celotex TC3000/EL3000 rigid insulation bonded to finish below Firestone TPO roof membrane

existing 350mm solid brick wall with holes and gaps filled and mortar issues addressed by re-pointing with appropriate 8mmmortar. absorbent lime plaster lime 60mm Pavadentro woodfibre insulation board fixed to wall as per manufacturer's instructions 10mm NBT lime or clay plaster NOTE: insulation to return along internal walls as per NBT guidance. Window reveals to be lined with 40mm Pavadentro

20mm battens existing concrete deck (thickness assumed to be 150mm)

existing ceiling replaced with 15mm plasterboard 200mm Thermafleece T35sheepswool insulation on netting fixed to joists

Meter

vapour permeable membrane

4.

Detail: U-Value installed:

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

CE.2 0.18 W/m2K 0.18 W/m2K 0.35 W/m2K

£45.35 35mm reduced ceiling height

3

Detail: U-Value installed:

2

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

1

current

target

Notes: Disruptive to install but allows the room above to function un-interrupted. Provides thermal as well as increased acoustic separation. If opportunity arises to replace ceilings this is generally easier than lifting and replacing floorboards to the room above to install CE.1.

reduced

new

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

IWI.1 0.46 W/m2K 0.30 W/m2K 0.70 W/m2K

£86.11 80mm

vapour permeable membrane

3

2

Detail: U-Value installed:

ER.1 0.18 W/m2K

Cost/m2: Installed thickness:

£85.38 150mm

Target U-Value for this element: Reduced Value for Historic Bldg:

1

current

target

reduced

new

Notes: A robust system that is breathable. Relatively thick, also has benefits of thermal mass. Not suited to areas requiring a high number of wall fixings or where walls are likely to be subject to heavy knocks or harsh treatment.

The proposed retrofit measures can be cross referenced to relevant Fabric Build-Up details. These specify materials, suggest suppliers, give 28G environmental information and provide costs 26E-3

existing roof covering prepared to take insulation layer

skirting floor detail:ensure floor insulated where possible to avpid cold bridge and condensation issues, refer to NBT guidance

0.18 W/m2K 0.35 W/m2K

3

2

1

phased: 18A items moved into 19D and vice-versa

Notes: Some detail around rooflights/pipe penetrations need to be carefully resolved. Raises roof height which impacts stairs and doors.

current

target

reduced

new

Walls

First Floor


Cross Referencing Drawings to Make Informed Decisions: Introducing New Tenants

Vision Plan Graphic 02

Checking this section of Vision Plan Graphic 2 shows existing occupancy type

1.

BLOCK C 8C-1

8C-2

7C

6C

Meter

14B-1

5C

17G-1

17G-2

3D-2

14B-2

14B-3

4C

14F-4 3D-1

Meter 15G-1 2D-1 9B 15G-2

16G

15G-3 10B

2D-2 10A 12E

WC

Meter

1A 11A

13A


89.

18A

27A 25-A 26A-1

Knife Making Process

Use Patterns First Floor

2.

This diagram shows the historic, integrated knife making process at PW. It shows how the current spaces would have fitted unti this process. Understanding historic uses at PW could inform future ones.

3. The set of use pattern diagrams can be used to understand current activities - by block and tenant type - at PW. It can also be used to check impact of new ones.

+

?

Using the diagrams to inform future tenant types for different spaces


Key Recommendations

1.

The layout of the Works, and different

6.

Knowledge Management – recording

characteristics of the spaces, best tell the

lessons learnt, details of contractors, suppliers,

building’s history. Aligning the type of work that

works carried out and building issues in a manner

tenants do with the most suitable space in terms

accessible to those involved in Portland Works in the

of light, structure and location will allow the future

future.

interpretation of past activity, along with having practical benefits.

7.

Establishing an identity for the Works in

the city and beyond, but also on the street. What 2.

Where does ‘history’ or ‘heritage’ stop?

does the name Portland Works mean to people?

Value the patina and small traces that tell the

A building that was saved from becoming flats but

whole story of the Works and that are part of its

why and what is it now? What happens there? How

social and cultural heritage.

do people know?

3.

Portland Works is not a museum – helping

the tenants’ trade flourish is important. Getting the right mix is important, but also allowing spaces and mechanisms for them to collaborate and share skills and equipment, and to work with external partners is key. Made in Sheffield. Made in Portland Works. 4.

Establishing a framework and priorities

for repairs and future works, that does not require constant discussion with heritage consultants, and that can be understood and implemented by tenants and building management, is crucial. A Heritage Partnership Agreement may fit the bill. 5.

Establishing a mechanism for producing

information and guidelines for contractors, forms of agreement and contracts, and CDM/Health & Safety policy for the Works that can cover anything from small jobs and repairs to large scale contracts.

90.


Appendices


56.31 33.52 12.44

38.05 141.32 40.54 47.23 31.37 88.61 82.14 104.23 106.86 173.3 39.55 174.1 86.09 20.85 12.44 83.65

37.63 67.2 37 37 79.57 57.55 29.07

17G‐2 16G Stair

First 24‐A 25‐A 26A‐1 25E 26E‐3 26E‐2 27A 18A 19D 20C 21C 22C 23B Meter B Stair 28G

Second 29D 30D 31C 32C 33C 34B‐2 34B‐1

101 20 62.5 51.66 55.76 19.97

99.63 17.58 26.66

14.22 6.76 30.01 20.1 20.19 9.54 10.8 11.2 10.77 85.16 43.94 57.84 99.36 31.61 31.61 14 22.58 22.29 22.08 37.77 67.2 5.45 23.2 28.87 21.46 80.09

Floor area

WC slot 10A 10B 9B Meter 14B‐3 14B‐2 14B‐1 8C‐1 8C‐2 7C 6C 5C 4C 4C‐2 3D‐2 3D‐1 2D‐1 2D2‐2 14F‐4 15G‐3 15G‐1 15G‐2 Meter G 17G‐1

13A 12E 11A Meter

Ground 1A

Space Basement 0A‐2 0A‐1 0D‐1

external wall area is all  walls in basement

numbers in red are assumptions

Floors total:

£23.35 £23.35 £23.35 £23.35 £23.35 £23.35 £23.35

£23.35 £23.35

CI.1 CI.1

CI.1 CI.1 CI.1 CI.1 CI.1 CI.1 CI.1

£23.35 £23.35 £23.35

CI.1 CI.1 CI.1

£43.70 £43.70

SFI.2 SFI.2

£23.35

£43.70

SFI.2

CI.1

£43.70 £43.70 £43.70 £43.70

£66.11 £66.11 £66.11

Rate

SFI.2 SFI.2 SFI.2 SFI.2

BT.1 BT.1 BT.1

Retrofit

Portland Works Retrofit Costs Table

Cost

£33,633.00

£878.66 £1,569.12 £863.95 £863.95 £1,857.96 £1,343.79 £678.78

£0.00

£0.00 £0.00 £946.61 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £1,917.97 £2,433.77 £2,495.18 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £2,010.20 £486.85

£0.00 £0.00

£0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £416.90 £471.96 £489.44 £470.65 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £1,650.55 £0.00 £0.00 £1,013.84 £1,261.62 £0.00 £0.00

£0.00

£0.00 £0.00 £0.00

£6,586.54 £1,162.21 £1,762.49

3 3 3

2.95 2.96 3 3 3 3 3.18

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3.45 3.45 3.45 3 3 3 3.495

3 3 3.39 3 3 3 3 3 3 3.68 3.7 3.7 3.75 3.7 3.71 3.7 3 3 3 3.04 3 3 3 3 2.8 2.6 5.8 3.53 3.5 3

3 3 3.01 3 3 4.4

Wall height

80 34.4 17.39 17 35.89 21.36 32.47

9.4 14.35 9.1 13.51 11.98 5.53 21.05 47.5 56.17 50.56 9.4 50.77 54.18 18.41 8.7 42.73

17.95 11.4 11.4 4.25 5.2 5.2 9.34 27.56 7.8 13.8 24.37 7.6 27.19 12.48 14.47 9.8 9.8 17 40.08 10.27 9.7 8.3 9.45 5.3 5.6 15.4 11.45 2.38

5.2

48 21.25 22.19 20.47 20.9 7.2

17.63 47.81 20.18

Perimeter

220.00 81.41 52.17 51.00 107.67 64.08 103.25

28.20 43.05 22.20 40.53 19.94 16.59 49.09 142.50 168.51 174.43 32.43 175.16 162.54 55.23 26.10 149.34

60.85 34.20 34.20 12.75 15.60 15.60 28.02 101.42 28.86 51.06 91.39 28.12 100.87 46.18 43.41 29.40 29.40 51.68 120.24 30.81 29.10 24.90 26.46 13.78 32.48 54.36 40.08 7.14

15.60

144.00 63.75 66.79 61.41 62.70 31.68

52.89 143.43 60.54

Ext.Wall area

IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1

£86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11

IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1

£86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11

£86.11

£86.11

£86.11

IWI.1 IWI.1

IWI.1

£86.11 £86.11

£86.11

IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1

IWI.1 IWI.1

£86.11 £86.11 £86.11 £86.11

£86.11

£101.49 £101.49 £101.49

IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1 IWI.1

IWI.1

BT.1 BT.1 BT.1

Retrofit Rate

Walls total:

£18,944.20 £7,010.56 £4,492.36 £4,391.61 £9,271.46 £5,517.93 £8,891.25

£12,859.78

£0.00 £0.00 £1,911.64 £0.00 £1,717.03 £1,428.56 £4,227.14 £12,270.68 £14,510.40 £15,020.34 £2,792.55 £15,082.73 £13,996.32 £4,755.86

£2,796.85 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00

£2,505.80 £2,144.14 £0.00

£4,450.16 £0.00

£0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £1,097.90 £1,343.32 £1,343.32 £2,412.80 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00 £0.00

£0.00

£0.00 £0.00 £0.00

£5,489.51

£5,367.81 £14,556.71 £6,144.20

Cost

£12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50

£12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50

£12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £25.00 £12.50 £12.50 £25.00 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £25.00 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50

£12.50

£0.00 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50 £12.50

£25.00 £25.00 £25.00

Patching

£2,750.00 £1,017.68 £652.13 £637.50 £1,345.88 £801.00 £1,290.68

£352.50 £538.13 £277.50 £506.63 £249.25 £207.38 £613.63 £1,781.25 £2,106.38 £2,180.40 £405.38 £2,189.46 £2,031.75 £690.38 £326.25 £1,866.77

£760.63 £427.50 £427.50 £159.38 £195.00 £195.00 £350.25 £1,267.76 £721.50 £638.25 £1,142.34 £703.00 £1,260.94 £577.20 £542.63 £367.50 £367.50 £646.00 £1,503.00 128.375 £363.75 £311.25 £330.75 £344.50 £406.00 £679.53 £500.94 £89.25

£195.00

£0.00 £796.88 £834.90 £767.63 £783.75 £396.00

£1,322.25 £2,537.25 £2,537.25

£259,140.89

Cost

79.57 57.55 29.07

37.63 67.2 79

38.05 141.32 40.54 47.23 31.37 52.61 82.14 104.23 106.86 173.3 39.55 174.1 86.09 20.85 12.44 83.65

56.31 33.52 12.44

30.01 20.1 20.19 9.54 10.8 11.2 10.77 85.16 43.94 57.84 99.36 31.61 31.61 14 22.58 22.29 22.08 37.77 67.2 5.45 23.2 28.87 21.46 80.09

14.22

121 20 62.5 51.66 55.76 19.97

99.63 17.58 26.66

Ceiling area

PRI.1 PRI.1 PRI.3 PRI.3 PRI.3 PRI.3 PRI.3

PRI.3

ER.1 ER.1 ER.1 CI.2 CI.2

PRI.1 PRI.1 PRI.1

PRI.1 PRI.1

ER.1

CI.2 CI.2 CI.2

TOTAL

£1,123.63 £2,006.59 £9,294.35 £0.00 £9,361.41 £6,770.76 £3,420.09

£9,841.42

£3,675.18 £3,376.78 £7,432.33 £3,904.18 £945.55

£1,136.17 £4,219.82 £0.00 £1,410.29 £936.71 £1,570.93 £0.00 £0.00

£4,807.75

£1,052.12 £1,309.25 £973.21

£1,712.87 £5,040.00

£634.90

£432.64 £489.78 £507.92 £488.42

£905.64

£907.00 £2,834.38

£4,518.22 £797.25 £1,209.03

Cost

Ceilings total:

£29.86 £29.86 £117.65 £117.65 £117.65 £117.65 £117.65

£117.65

£85.38 £85.38 £85.38 £45.35 £45.35

£29.86 £29.86 £29.86

£29.86 £29.86

£85.38

£45.35 £45.35 £45.35

£45.35 £75.00

£45.35

CI.2

CI.2 MRI.1

£45.35 £45.35 £45.35 £45.35

£45.35

£45.35 £45.35

£45.35 £45.35 £45.35

CI.2 CI.2 CI.2 CI.2

CI.2

CI.2 CI.2

CI.2 CI.2 CI.2

Retrofit Rate Area

16 20.41

14.06

16

5.1

14 12 6 324 (total windo

10 13 14

3 24

5 8 3 6 10 0 10 16 19 10 3 29 20

3 3 3

0 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 4 2 3 3 1 4 0 2 2 3 4 4 2 1 0 2 5

5 3 3

15

10 3

No. windows £1,200.00 £1,200.00 0

£70.95 £70.95 £70.95

Tanking Rate

0 0 1

0 2  

Tanking total:

17.63 47.81 20.18

Perimeter

0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 note: 50% of  roof in JPG bid 1 note: roof in JPG bid 1 note: 50% of roof in JPG bid 2

2 2 0

0 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 2 1 2 0 0 1 4 note: roof in JPG bid 1 1 1 1 4

0 3 1 2

1

1 1

Pump

1 1 1 59 (total windows)

No.Doors

£400,295.19 Classed as NEW BUILDING WORK under HLF

£99,046.57

£23,696.49 £11,603.95 £15,302.78 £5,893.06 £21,836.71 £14,433.48 £14,280.81

£1,488.67 £4,757.94 £3,135.75 £1,916.91 £2,902.99 £3,206.87 £6,758.73 £16,485.70 £19,111.95 £20,875.92 £6,574.70 £24,704.51 £21,942.45 £6,878.63 £326.25 £24,567.97

£0.00 £7,193.39 £3,669.27 £767.63 £783.75 £1,301.64 £0.00 £195.00 £0.00 £760.63 £427.50 £427.50 £2,106.81 £2,500.06 £2,535.68 £3,722.12 £1,267.76 £721.50 £638.25 £1,142.34 £703.00 £1,260.94 £1,212.10 £542.63 £367.50 £367.50 £8,459.58 £6,543.00 £128.38 £4,935.51 £5,026.26 £1,303.96 £344.50 £3,202.85 £5,487.27 £500.94 £89.25

£17,794.82 £19,053.43 £11,652.98

Total Costs

£8,474.74

£1,250.85 £3,392.12 £1,431.77

Cost

Partitons Rate

Shedule of Areas 93.


Funding and Costing Examples

Ground Floor Plan

WORKS Funding PORTLAND Bid Example: JP Getty Funding Bid 2013 JP Getty

Basement Floor Plan

C Areas of roof, chimney & rainwater goods repair

A number of sources of data contained in this

D

report were used to help to put together the

B

funding application to JP Getty. The priority of

Areas of roof, chimney, rainwater goods repair and insulation

G

F

works is highlighted in the Vision Plan Graphic 1; the graphic indicating the need to prioritise roof

E

related work to most blocks. From this, and the

A

Bond Bryan survey, costs for these repair items can be assembled.

First Floor Plan

Roof Plan with Block letters

Opportunistic upgrades (such as insulation as a part of roof repairs) have then also been added, with costs and specifications drawn from the

Schedule of Work

Fabric Build-Ups and Build-up costs to put together

Portland Works

the funding application to JP Getty. The cost

JP Getty Funding Application July 2013

breakdown for the application (for works of up to

Building Area Block A

£250,000.00) is shown on this page.

Building Costs Description of Work Renew roof covering (re‐using existing slates), including  £49,250.00 ridge tiles, verge pointing and chimney flashings

Block sub‐total

Isolated structural erepairs including work to some wall  £5,000.00 plates and rafters

Despite this application being made prior to all of the data in the report having been compiled, basic rates, approaches and costs were able to

Renewal/replacement of timber eaves gutter to front  elevation, cast iron and plastic rainwater goods  elsewhere and timber dentils.

£12,000.00

Repoint five chimney stacks, rebed four flue terminals

£6,000.00

be put together fairly rapidly, and different options

Rebuild one chimney stack

£2,000.00

analysed.

Scaffolding

£4,892.44

Rebed ridge tiles, overhaul roof covering, refix loose  slates.

£3,000.00

Check and remedy damp ingress at boundary with  adjacent building.

£500.00

Renew timber gutters and replace gutter supports.

£2,000.00

Scaffolding

£2,087.76

Ground Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Block B

Costing Example: Block A vs Block D

£79,142.44

£7,587.76 Block C

Basement Floor Plan

The data in this report was also used to examine the relative costs of repairing upgrading Areas of roof,and chimney & rainwater the goods repair first areas of Blocks A & E with those of Block D.

Areas of roof, chimney, rainwater goods repair and insulation

Both of these areas (shown on the diagram) are

currently empty. The data can be compared with

£26,700.00

Insulate above existing roof covering with rigid  insulation and new TPO roof covering.

£22,164.65

Renew pitched roof coverings (re‐using slates),  including ridge tiles, verge pointing and chimney  flashings.

£20,000.00

Renew all rainwater goods.

£6,600.00

Scaffolding

£3,845.22 £79,309.87

Block D

relative rental gain in bringing these areas back into re-use to help make a decision, however in this

Patch repair asphalt roof including upstands to  balustrade, renew all three rooflights.

Renew lead flashing to ridge, rebed copings to gable  elevations and repoint.

£700.00

Scaffolding

£2,415.60 £3,115.60

Block E

Replace corrugated steel roof section with new  insulated slate roof

£9,059.05

require a new external access stair distorts the costs

Replace flat asphalt roof covering with new rigid  insulation and TPO membrane

£3,756.72

somewhat.

Renew slate roof covering (re‐use slates) including ridge  tiles, verge pointing and chimney flashings.

case, the fact that the top floor of Block D would

£10,746.00

One interesting point is that the greater external wall area to floor area ratio of Block D, together with the much larger amount of windows makes this

Scaffolding

£1,846.69

Replace corrugated metal roof with new Kingspan  insulated metal roof.

£7,425.00

£25,408.46 Block F

generally more costly per m2.

Renew all rainwater goods and downpipes.

£2,000.00

It should be noted that factors such as contractor’s

Scaffolding

£954.00

& consultant’s costs, site costs and the planning

£10,379.00 Block G

and listed building process (and fees) have been taken into account in both applications, but

Renew roof covering of main duo‐pitched roof, re‐using  £13,000.00 slates and clay ridge tiles. Renew all rainwater goods

£5,300.00

Scaffold

£2,415.00 £20,715.00

guidance on allowing for these does not form part of this report. In Block D, for example, the works would also involve Planning & Listed Building consent, and the increased cost and timescale of this is not picked

£385.00 £1,040.00 £22,340.15 sub‐total

£23,765.15

TOTAL

£249,423.28

up in the straight cost comparison. Again, this exercise was carried out during the creation of the Cold Spots report, with emerging cost data and areas.

£225,658.13

sub‐total Planning Listed Building Consent Fee Building Control Fees Consultants Fees

NOTES:

All costs include an allowance for contractors overheads and profits Costs based on Bond Bryan condition survey with budget costs  2011, cost checked by Richard Fletcher Associates (QS) 2013, and  QS costed rates for new insulation and associated works based on  Studio Polpo (architects) details 2013 All costs exclude VAT, PW is VAT registered Professional fees based on the following %'s of build cost: Architect  6.5%, QS 2.2%, CDMC 0.4%, Str.Engineer 1.9% and reduced to 90%  as there is no feasibility stage.

94.


Fab-lab Equipment Survey

95.

Laser Cutter - A4 Desktop

Laser Cutter - A1

Description:

Description:

Laser cutters can be used to cut and engrave a wide variety of material including thin plywood, mdf and Perspex. The maximum material sheet size that can be cut depends on the size of the laser cutter bed. This ranges from a4 to a1+. In addition to the laser cutting machine extract pipes and ventilation pumps are required to remove smoke from the machine.

Laser cutters can be used to cut and engrave a wide variety of material including thin plywood, mdf and Perspex. The maximum material sheet size that can be cut depends on the size of the laser cutter bed. This ranges from a4 to a1+. In addition to the laser cutting machine extract pipes and ventilation pumps are required to remove smoke.

 Â 



The laser cutter shown on this factsheet is the Epilog Legend 36EXT. This model was used to make the Portland Works model.

The laser cutter shown on this factsheet is the HPC Laser LS3020 pro

   

Fab-Lab Equipment Factsheet_02

Fab-Lab Equipment Factsheet_01

                 �   �         �       

Space Required:

Â? Â Â? Â 

Space Required:

   

2. 2. 1.

3.

 

1.

2.

1. 3.

5.

4.

4. 3.

Scale 1:20 1. Makerbot Replicator 2 2. Space for Material Spool 3. Desk 4. Space to sit infront of machine

Scale 1:20 1. A4 Laser Cutter 2. Desk 3. Space for operating machine

Scale 1:20

Scale 1:20

1. A1 Laser Cutter 2. Desk for computer input 3. Space for sitting at computer 4. Space to load machine 5. Space for extractor pumps

1. Powder 3D printer 2. Desk for computer and 3. Space for operating co

3D Printer - Small Desktop

3D Printer - Powder

Description:

Description:

There is a large variety of 3D printers available. These can vary in size from a small desktop printer to a large machine requiring a whole room. There are also different technologies available. The simplest 3d printers, such as the one shown on this factsheet, construct objects by melting and layering up plastic material. No extract is required.

More sophisticated and larger 3D printer machines are powder based. These can make more detailed and complicated designs. The 3D printer shown here is restricted to white models, but some powder based machines can print in full multicolour. The 3D printer shown on this factsheet is the zprinter 350

Fab-Lab Equipment Factsheet_04

Fab-Lab Equipment Factsheet_03

The 3D printer shown on this factsheet is the Makerbot Replicator 2.

Space Required:

2.

2. 2.

1.

3.

Space Required:

2.

2.

1.

3.

1.

3. 4.

1.

1.

3.

5.

1.

5.

4.

4.

Scale 1:20

Scale 1:20

1. Makerbot Replicator 2 2. Space for Material Spool 3. Desk 4. Space to sit infront of machine

1. Makerbot Replicator 2 2. Space for Material Spool 3. Desk 4. Space to sit infront of machine Scale 1:20 1. A1 Laser Cutter 2. Desk for computer input 3. Space for sitting at computer 4. Space to load machine 5. Space for extractor pumps

3.

4.

3.

Scale 1:20

Scale 1:20

1. A1 Laser Cutter 2. Desk for computer input 3. Space for sitting at computer 4. Space to load machine 5. Space for extractor pumps

1. Powder 3D printer 1. Powder 3D printer 2. Desk for computer and ďŹ nished models 2. Desk for computer and ďŹ nished models 3. Space for operating computer and machine 3. Space for operating computer and machine

Scale 1:20

2.


Fab-lab Equipment Survey

96.

CNC Machine Description: CNC machines combines the cutting power of drills and routers with the accuracy of computer control. They can be used to cut much thicker material than laser cutters and tend to have a much larger cutting bed. They create a dusty and noisy space and require an extract. Since they are used to fabricate large furniture etc, space for material storage and product assembling needs to be considered.

A4 Laser Cutter A1 Laser Cutter

Fab-Lab Equipment Factsheet_05

The CNC machine shown here is the one installed at Wavelab in CADs

Desktop 3D printer

Space Required:

1.

2.

5.

4.

3.

CNC Machine

All Scale 1:50 Scale 1:50 1. CNC Machine 2. Desk for computer input 3. Storage for Parts 4. Space for operating machine and computer 5. Space for material storage and assembly

Powder 3D printer


Produced by Studio Polpo www.studiopolpo.com office@studiopolpo.com

Coldspots report final  

A report produced by Studio Polpo for Portland Works, and funded by the Architectural Heritage Fund.The document brings together existing an...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you