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NEW ENGLAND S U M M E R 201 9

VERMONT • MAINE • MASSACHUSETTS & MORE

CULTURE & CUISINE Enjoy food, arts festivals

ENGAGE IN HISTORY Tour landmark homes, hotels

Grand Getaways Explore region’s natural, national treasures

Boston Harbor and skyline

FUN IN THE SUN Hit the surf, hike the trails


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CONTENTS

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NEW ENGLAND

TAKE A HIKE Daytrip along the Appalachian Trail

Little Bigelow Mountain, Maine NOELLE TUTTLE


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CONTENTS THE REGION

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This is a product of

CONNECTICUT Inspired design behind state’s must-see architectural marvels

EDITORIAL

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MAINE Find unspoiled charm at Katahdin Woods and Waters

DIRECTOR Jeanette Barrett-Stokes jbstokes@usatoday.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jerald Council jcouncil@usatoday.com

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MASSACHUSETTS The Berkshires offer arts in the great outdoors

MANAGING EDITOR Michelle Washington mjwashington@usatoday.com

ISSUE EDITOR Harry Lister

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Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, Maine

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Exploring Boston can be wicked fun — and free

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MGM Springfield aims to fit in while standing out

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Get the scoop on Cape Cod’s best ice cream

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Festivals on Martha’s Vineyard offer something for every taste

CHRIS SHANE

UP FRONT

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Griswold Inn, Essex, Conn.

PERK UP! How to take best advantage of credit card travel rewards

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HISTORIC HOSPITALITY Landmark inns and resorts offer nostalgic elegance

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Hit the surf for aquatic family fun on Nantucket

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FREE TO ROAM

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NEW HAMPSHIRE

10 CARYN B. DAVIS

Enjoy these national parks that don’t charge admission

For five-alarm views, climb the state’s fire lookout towers

EDITORS Amy Sinatra Ayres Tracy Scott Forson Sara Schwartz Debbie Williams ISSUE DESIGNER Gina Toole Saunders DESIGNERS Hayleigh Corkey Amira Martin Debra Moore Lisa M. Zilka INTERN Ejun Kim CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Ben Abramson, Diane Bair, Joe Cortez, Will DiGravio, Larry Olmsted, Jessica Polizzotti, Rina Rapuano, Robin Roenker, Sarah Sekula, Jen Rose Smith, Nancy Trejos, Valentina Valentini, Pamela Wright

ADVERTISING VP, ADVERTISING Patrick Burke | (703) 854-5914 pburke@usatoday.com

FEATURE

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RHODE ISLAND ‘Bakery pizza’ is a treat unique to the Ocean State

ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Vanessa Salvo | 703-854-6499 vsalvo@usatoday.com

FINANCE

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VERMONT

Billing Coordinator Julie Marco

Historic homes celebrate the state’s notable residents ISSN#0734-7456

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SWEET INDULGENCES The region’s top bakers are serving up creative takes on your just desserts

LAST LIGHT The Portland Head Light in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

A USA TODAY Network publication, Gannett Co. Inc USA TODAY, its logo and associated graphics are the trademarks of Gannett Co. Inc. or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Copyright 2018, USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc. Editorial and publication headquarters are at 7950 Jones Branch Dr., McLean, VA 22108, and at (703) 854-3400.

KRISTIN TEIG

For accuracy questions, call or send an e-mail to accuracy@usatoday.com.

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UP FRONT | TRAVEL

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Perk Up! Take advantage of credit card travel rewards By Joe Cortez

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REQUENT TRAVELERS AND ONCE-A-YEAR vacationers

alike love the idea of earning credit card rewards toward their next big trip. According to a recent NerdWallet study, 68 percent of American adults say they have a card that earns travel rewards. With a travel rewards card, you earn points or miles every time you use the card, but you can often earn more points per dollar in select categories. Some cards, such as the Chase Sapphire Reserve, offer bonus points on any travel spending, while the Marriott Bonvoy Boundless credit card grants bonus points only when

you use the card at Marriott and Starwood hotels. Not all travel credit card points and miles are the same: General-purpose travel credit cards — including the Chase Sapphire Preferred card, the American Express Gold card and the Capital One Venture Rewards credit card — offer rewards that can be used like cash to pay for travel or that can be exchanged for points in airline or hotel loyalty programs. Airline- and hotel-specific cards — such as the United Explorer card and the Hilton Honors American Express card — offer points and miles that can be used only with the brand on the card. (You can, in some cases,

transfer hotel points to airlines, but it’s not recommended because of the decreased value.) Value of points and miles — With general travel cards, it’s simple. They have a fixed value, usually between 1 and 1.5 cents apiece, and you can spend them like cash. With airline miles and hotel points, finding the true value is more difficult. How much value you get depends on how you redeem them. Generally, airline miles go further if you use them for business- and first-class accommodations on international flights. Joe Cortez writes for NerdWallet, a personal finance website and USA TODAY content partner.


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UP FRONT | VINTAGE HOTELS

Historic Hospitality Landmark inns and resorts offer nostalgic elegance By Jen Rose Smith

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REAT YOURSELF TO OLD-FASHIONED

comfort on your next visit to New England, where hotels that combine modern luxury and vintage charm offer travelers a chance to step back in time.

RHODE ISLAND Spring House Hotel Drinks on the lawn of the Spring House Hotel are a Block Island tradition, and pristine rows of Adirondack chairs tempt passing cyclists and walkers to join the fun. Book one of the main building’s 33 guest rooms — each offering sea or island views — to find out why notable figures such as Ulysses S. Grant and Billy Joel have made pilgrimages to this 1852 stunner. If you can tear yourself away, stroll to the island’s North Lighthouse for a seaside picnic. ▶ springhouseblockisland.com

SPRING HOUSE HOTEL


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UP FRONT | VINTAGE HOTELS

MASSACHUSETTS

CONNECTICUT

Red Lion Inn Antique furnishings meet ultrasoft linens in this 1773 Berkshires guesthouse. Its downtown Stockbridge location is ideal for afternoons spent exploring village cafés and country stores. Browse the galleries of the Norman Rockwell Museum: Later in life, the artist called Stockbridge home and included the Red Lion in a 1967 painting. ▶ redlioninn.com

Griswold Inn Fresh salt breezes at the Griswold Inn recall Essex’s seafaring history, and this laid-back escape has welcomed sailors and other travelers since 1776. The nearby Connecticut River Museum celebrates the region’s shipbuilding and related industries, while the vintage Essex Steam Train and Becky Thatcher riverboat combine to take passengers on a 2.5-hour tour of the Connecticut River Valley. New England-made beds by Leonard’s Antiques are right at home in the individually decorated guest rooms. ▶ griswoldinn.com

RED LION INN

NEW HAMPSHIRE Omni Mount Washington Resort This 1902 grand dame in Bretton Woods has White Mountain views, a storied history and even a royal ghost — lucky guests might glimpse Princess Caroline during afternoon tea in the Princess Room. The Mount Washington Cog Railway runs from a nearby station to the summit of New England’s tallest peak. ▶ omnihotels.com/ hotels/bretton-woodsmount-washington

CARYN B. DAVIS

OMNI MOUNT WASHINGTON RESORT

MAINE Claremont Hotel Brush up on your croquet skills on the elegant lawns of a coastal beauty that’s been a summer getaway since 1884. From cocktails in the boathouse to sailing outings, a stay at the Claremont is pure nostalgia on the “quiet side” of Mount Desert Island, and updated guest rooms feature carefully chosen antique furnishings. ▶ theclaremont hotel.com

THE EQUINOX

VERMONT

MAINE OFFICE OF TOURISM

The Equinox Flanked by hiking trails and forests, the Equinox brings updated style to a history-making property in the rolling mountains of Manchester Village. Order a craft brew at the resort’s 1769 Marsh Tavern, where Revolutionary-era leaders once formulated battle plans. The atmosphere has relaxed considerably since then: Come here to book a range of treatments at the on-site spa or reel bass out of ponds on the expansive grounds. ▶ equinoxresort.com


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UP FRONT | NATIONAL PARKS

Free to Roam Enjoying New England’s national parks doesn’t have to cost a thing

Weir House NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

By Harry Lister

DISCOVER AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM

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HETHER YOU’RE LOOKING TO get away from it all or soak

up some history off the more-trodden tourist paths, New England has a national park for you. If your taste runs more toward the Industrial Revolution than the American Revolution, check out Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park or the Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site. Interested in the environmental movement? Marsh-BillingsRockefeller National Historical Park was a key location in its history. And here’s a bonus: These six destinations don’t charge admission fees.

Wilton, Conn. The Weir Farm National Historic Site is dedicated to the life and work of painter J. Alden Weir, a leading figure in the American Impressionist movement. Weir Farm served as his home for nearly four decades, becoming a refuge for friends, family and artists. The home, studio and a significant portion of the 68-acre property remain largely intact. The grounds are open daily year-round; visitors center and museum store open May 1 through Oct. 31. ▶ nps.gov/wefa

DIG INTO THE ROOTS OF CONSERVATION

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

Woodstock, Vt. Vermont’s only national park, MarshBillings-Rockefeller National Historical Park tells the story of environmentalism in the United States. In 1864, George Perkins Marsh, who grew up in the house on the hill, wrote what’s regarded as the first American book about conservation, Man and Nature. Marsh’s writings inspired Frederick Billings, a lawyer and businessman who later bought the home and continued the lessons of environmental stewardship. Furthering the legacy, Laurance Spelman Rockefeller (grandson of John D. Rockefeller), who lived in the home with his wife, Mary French (Billings’ granddaughter), donated the site to the National Park Service in 1992. The park opened in 1998. The Carriage Barn visitor center is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Memorial Day weekend to Oct. 31. The park’s 20 miles of trails and carriage roads are open year-round. ▶ nps.gov/mabi — Brent Hallenbeck


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UP FRONT | NATIONAL PARKS CONNECT TO THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

Roosevelt summer home NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

BE CHARMED BY A FORMER PRESIDENT’S OASIS Lubec, Maine Situated on Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada, across the FDR Memorial Bridge from Lubec, Maine, the Roosevelt Campobello International Park is jointly funded and operated by the U.S. and Canadian governments. The centerpiece is the Franklin Delano Roosevelt summer home, where the family of the United States’ longestserving president vacationed for more than 50 years. Open mid-May to mid-October. ▶ nps.gov/roca

Rhode Island and Massachusetts At the Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park, learn how in 1790, English immigrant millworker Samuel Slater built the United States’ first successful water-powered cotton spinning mill in Pawtucket, R.I. Soon the Blackstone Valley was filled with mills, turning Southern cotton into clothing and other goods and fueling the booming New England economy. The opening of Slater Mill marked the birth of the Industrial Revolution in America. The park is largely an agglomeration of well-preserved places in Rhode Island and Massachusetts that tell the story of the Age of Industry. It doesn’t have a dedicated visitor’s center, but the heritage corridor’s visitor center at 175 Main St. in Pawtucket is a good place to start. ▶ nps.gov/blrv — Brian Barth

Slater Mill NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

EXPERIENCE A BLAST FROM THE PAST Saugus, Mass. The Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site is a reconstruction of the first successful, integrated iron works in the New World, which began producing wrought iron and cast-iron products in 1646 when the original blast furnace roared to life. It includes a blacksmith shop, seven waterwheels and three reproduction industrial buildings. In recognition of its significance, the American Iron and Steel Institute reconstructed the primary elements of the original works following extensive archaeological excavations. Saugus Iron Works Restoration opened to the public in 1954 and was operated as a private museum until the National Park Service began its administration. The National Register of Historic Places calls the Saugus Iron Works “the first chapter in America’s book.” The site is open May to October. ▶ nps.gov/sair

Mount Washington NEW HAMPSHIRE DIVISION OF TRAVEL & TOURISM

ENJOY AWE-INSPIRING VISTAS

Saugus Iron Works NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

New Hampshire The nearly 2,200-mile Appalachian National Scenic Trail, or AT, runs from Georgia to Maine, with popular portions running through New England. In New Hampshire, hikers can “hike the whites” through the state’s White Mountains, which provide 161 trail miles that rise from 400 feet to 6,288 feet above sea level on Mount Washington. The Granite State features more AT miles above treeline than any other state, revealing exposed ridges with amazing views when the sun is shining — and some of the region’s most-challenging weather when storms hit. ▶ appalachiantrail.org/home/explore-the-trail/explore-by-state/new-hampshire


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Taste of the Middle East

Maura Kilpatrick

Sweet Indulgences Regional bakeries are serving up your just desserts

She’s a James Beard Award semifinalist, but getting shoutouts from the Oscars of the culinary world is nothing new to Maura Kilpatrick, executive pastry chef and co-owner of Sofra Bakery and Cafe in Cambridge, Mass. She received James Beard nominations for outstanding pastry chef in 2015, 2016 and 2017 and for outstanding baker in 2018 and 2019. We’d wager that Kilpatrick can bake pretty much anything, but it’s her skill at incorporating relatively exotic ingredients that sets her apart. Flavors and spices such as orange blossom, tahini and rose petals add the “wow” factor to her Middle Eastern-inspired pastries. Kilpatrick’s contemporary versions of traditional desserts from Turkey, Lebanon and Greece are less sweet than the originals, she says, making them more pleasing to the American palate. Prior to opening Sofra with chef Ana Sortun in 2008, Kilpatrick honed her skills in the kitchens of some of Boston’s top chefs, including Lydia Shire and the late Moncef Meddeb. Locals know that anything coming out of Kilpatrick’s oven will be delicious and unusual.

Chocolate-hazelnut baklava

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

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VERYBODY KNOWS NEW ENGLAND is tops when it comes to lobster rolls. Fried clams? Ditto. And the chowder is sublime, too. But don’t underestimate the region’s sweet side.

From the humble (a potato doughnut at The Holy Donut) to the highbrow (lemon olive oil cake with lemon curd at Sift Bake Shop), New England has got the baked goods. Some locals would prefer to keep these

decadent treats a secret, as they feel the lines at some renowned bakeshops are already long enough. But we’re letting the gateau out of the bag. Here’s where to go for the most delicious desserts in the region: KRISTIN TEIG


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Must-tries Earthquakes (chocolate crinkle cookies); chocolate-hazelnut baklava â–¶ sofrabakery.com

KRISTIN TEIG


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Joanne Chang

Chain that launched 1,000 diets Curse you, Joanne Chang, and your addictive pecan sticky buns! If only the Harvard-educated Chang had stuck to applied mathematics and economics, Bostonians wouldn’t have to use every ounce of willpower to resist those Princess Leia-size buns, to say nothing of the flourless chocolate cake oozing with chocolate mousse. It’s getting more difficult to avoid these temptations now that Flour Bakery + Cafe has eight locations in and around Boston. Chang, who had planned to be a consultant, enjoyed baking in her spare time. Once she stepped inside a restaurant kitchen,

Leigh Kellis

Now that’s a doughnut

however, a new career path was charted. After stints in the pastry departments of restaurants in Boston and New York City, Chang opened her first Flour Bakery in Boston’s South End in 2000. Since then, she has authored five cookbooks and now operates a contemporary Chinese restaurant, Myers + Chang, with her husband, Christopher Myers. The joy of baking is as pure as ever for Chang: “I love making people happy with amazing pastry! I know how much absolute pleasure I get out of a perfectly baked croissant or sugary Kouign Amann, and sharing that joy with others is my true passion.”

Portland, Maine, is justifiably famous for its food scene: You must really try the bivalves at Eventide Oyster Co., the crudo at Central Provisions, the Belgian fries at Duckfat, the pizza at Otto … the list goes on. But foodies know that you must arrive by noon to procure Portland’s most crave-worthy desserts at The Holy Donut. Owner Leigh Kellis uses a not-so-secret ingredient in her treats: fresh mashed potatoes from Maine’s Aroostook County. She began making doughnuts in her kitchen before opening the first Holy Donut in 2012; now there are three locations selling more than

2 million hand-cut, scratch-made doughnuts annually. Flavors rotate (about 20 choices daily) and might include maple bacon, toasted coconut, Allen’s Coffee Brandy (it’s a Maine thing) and ginger-glazed sweet potato. While doughnuts aren’t exactly a health food, Kellis does her best to ratchet up the wholesome factor, using unbleached flour, fruit and vegetable juices to color her glazes and 60 percent cocoa chocolate chips. No wonder the gospel of The Holy Donut is spreading beyond New England. “Doughnuts make people happy. We can all use more of that,” Kellis says.

Must-tries

Must-tries

Dark chocolate sea salt and bacon-cheddar-filled doughnuts ▶ theholydonut.com

Pecan sticky bun; Flour’s take on the Oreo cookie ▶ flourbakery.com KRISTIN TEIG

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Joshua Livsey

Harvest of creativity Rhode Island native Joshua Livsey was a finalist on Food Network’s Holiday Baking Championship in 2017 and is currently competing for the title of Best Baker in America on the same network. Off-screen, he has won legions of fans thanks to his glorious creations at Harvest restaurant in Cambridge, Mass. Livsey’s fanciful Buche de Noel was a showstopper on TV, and this telegenic baker makes the competition nervous with his intriguing combination of flavors. For Harvest, his exquisite creations have included yuzu posset with goat cheese ice cream, strawberries and matcha

Adam Young

French-inspired foodie celebrity

cake, and chocolate almond cake with avocado ice cream. The Johnson & Wales University graduate worked as a baker at a golf club and ran his own custom cake business. After a stint at the Four Seasons Hotel Atlanta, Livsey joined Harvest and was named executive pastry chef in 2016. Livsey’s artful pastries draw diners to Harvest, but this self-proclaimed cookie lover is really a kid at heart: His recent doughnut pop-up at Harvest was Star Wars-themed, featuring flavors (Chew-Babka and Obi-Wan-Cannoli) with names as creative as the desserts.

If you happen to see Adam Young in one of his bake shops, or if you’ve seen him on a Food Network baking show, your first thought might be: How does he make such delicate desserts with those big hands? Young, who stands 6 feet, 5 inches tall, was an imposing presence on the Best Baker in America last year. Not only was he the go-to guy for fetching ingredients on high shelves, but he also won the competition, impressing the judges with his version of the ultimate chocolate cake, which prompted judge Jason Smith to proclaim he was “happy as a hog in mud”

while eating it. Young was also a finalist on Food Network’s Spring Baking Championship in 2017. Heady stuff, considering Young had opened his French-inspired pastry shop, Sift, just two years earlier. Trained at the New England Culinary Institute, Young opened his first Sift in Mystic, Conn., in 2016, followed by a bakery in Watch Hill, R.I. “I am blessed with a team that is (as) committed to quality and service as I am — a team of people who don’t believe dessert is an afterthought,” Young says. Join his TV fans in a pilgrimage to Sift, and you, too, can be as happy as a hog in mud.

Must-tries

Must-tries

Lemon tart with Sorrento lemon cream and coconut sorbet; toffee cake with figs ▶ harvestcambridge.com

Chocolate raspberry torte; carrot cake ▶ siftbakeshopmystic.com

HARVEST; DIANE BAIR

ANNA SAWIN; DIANE BAIR


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MAINE Difficulty/length: Moderate/6.2 miles round tri p

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By Robin Roenker THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL WINDS nearly 2, 200 miles from Maine to

Georg ia , but you don ' t have to be a thru-hiker to enjoy its beauty. Accessible day hikes along the northernmost sections of the trail offer a window into the wild , natural beauty of New England. And best of all: Admission is free. Just be sure to pack your hiking boots.

Longfellow's Restaurant offers an array of salads, sandwiches and burgers.


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VERMONT STRATTON MOUNTAIN Difficulty/length: Moderate/7.6 miles round trip

For even more Appalachian Trail day hike suggestions, visit appalachiantrail.org and click on “Explore/ Day Hiking.”

Nearest town: Stratton

For most of its path through Vermont, the Appalachian Trail coincides with The Long Trail, which runs along the state’s famed Green Mountains and holds the distinction as the oldest long-distance hiking trail in the United States. History along this section of the trail runs deep: It was on Stratton Mountain that Green Mountain Club founder James P. Taylor first dreamed of creating The Long Trail in the early 1900s. The scenic beauty here is a top draw for visitors. “There’s a fire tower on top (of Stratton Mountain), so you have beautiful views in all directions,” says Kristin McLane, membership and communications coordinator for The Green Mountain Club, which oversees maintenance of The Long Trail. For a quicker trip to the top, Stratton Mountain Ski Resort offers a gondola ride up the mountain, “and then it’s just a 0.7-mile, relatively flat walk to the summit,” McLane says.

Stratton Village offers an array of dining options for hikers, including pub fare, sushi and pizza, as well as craft brews. Stratton Mountain

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The Cobbles

Rattle River

Bulls Bridge

MASSACHUSETTS

NEW HAMPSHIRE

CONNECTICUT

THE COBBLES

RATTLE RIVER

TEN MILE RIVER AND HILL

Difficulty/length: Moderate/2.8 miles round trip

Difficulty/length: Moderate/3.4 miles round trip

Difficulty/length: Moderate/5 miles round trip

Nearest town: Cheshire

Nearest town: Shelburne

Nearest towns: Bulls Bridge and South Kent

This trail starts in the quaint town of Cheshire (where free parking is ample) and leads to a “stunning overlook where you see the whole side of Mount Greylock, the highest point in Massachusetts,” says Cosmo Catalano, volunteer coordinator of the Massachusetts Appalachian Trail Management Committee, part of the Berkshire chapter of the Appalachian Mountain Club. At the peak, take in views of the town nestled below, plus a nearby lake. “It’s a really iconic New England landscape,” Catalano says.

Avid hikers will tell you that traversing the Appalachian Trail in portions of New Hampshire “requires crawling, hand over foot across some of the steepest, most challenging hiking conditions in the country,” says Rick Silverberg, chair of the New Hampshire chapter of the Appalachian Mountain Club. Not all of New Hampshire’s trail miles are foreboding. The Rattle River hike follows a relatively easy path alongside a stream in the White Mountain National Forest, with side trails nearby that lead to the summit of 4,000-foot Mount Moriah.

With its proximity to the Housatonic and Ten Mile Rivers and access to Bulls Bridge — one of the few original covered bridges in Connecticut — this trail packs scenic splendor and regional charm. “It’s just beautiful,” says Adam Lippman, weekend ridgerunner and patrol volunteer for the Connecticut chapter of the Appalachian Mountain Club. “You walk directly along the river, and you can see the rapids and all the wildlife.” For a postcard vista, Ten Mile Hill offers an overlook of the picturesque valley below.

In Cheshire, Diane’s Twist is a beloved ice-cream shop offering cold treats and drinks, making it a welcomed respite for day-hikers.

EILEEN QUINN

J’s Corner Restaurant & Lounge in Gorham is open for lunch and dinner, offering hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood, soups, salads and sandwiches.

ERIK BARSTOW/RATTLE RIVER LODGE AND HOSTEL

You walk directly along the river, and you can see the rapids and all the wildlife. It’s one of my favorite places to be on the trail in Connecticut.” — ADAM LIPPMANN, weekend ridgerunner, on the Ten Mile River and Hill trail

WHAT IS A RIDGERUNNER?

J.P. Gifford Market & Catering Company in Kent offers all-day breakfast, burgers, noodle bowls and vegetarian-friendly options.

An Appalachian Trail Ridgerunner hikes specific sections of the trail and greets and provides information to incoming hikers and visitors.

DON HICKS

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CONNECTICUT | ARCHITECTURE GLASS HOUSE

PHOTOS BY AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS; ILLUSTRATION: GETTY IMAGES

Inspired Design

New Canaan With its innovative use of materials and seamless integration into the landscape, the Glass House is best understood as a pavilion for viewing the surrounding landscape from its promontory overlooking a pond and woods. Designed by architect Philip Johnson as his weekend retreat and completed in 1949, the Glass House ushered the International Style into residential American architecture.

COVERED BRIDGE

INGALLS HOCKEY RINK

West Cornwall This wooden, one-lane bridge crosses the Housatonic River. The two-span structure dates from 1864 and uses a pier from an 1841 iteration. The “Town Lattice Truss” of closely spaced and crisscrossed red spruce planks is named for inventor Ithiel Town; a queen-post truss and concealed steel deck were later added for support.

New Haven Designed by architect Eero Saarinen, the Ingalls Hockey Rink at Yale University is fondly called “The Yale Whale.” The 3,500-seat arena, with its spine-supported concave roof curves meeting angled convex walls, is named for former Yale hockey captains David S. Ingalls (1920) and David S. Ingalls Jr. (1956).

GILLETTE CASTLE

NORFOLK LIBRARY

East Haddam Built in 1919 with commanding views up and down the Connecticut River, the castle was the private residence of actor William Gillette, most famous in his day for portrayals of Sherlock Holmes. Without any formal training in architecture, Gillette was responsible for the castle design; the result is charmingly quirky.

Norfolk Designed by Hartford architect George Keller and established in 1889 by Isabella Eldridge as a memorial to her parents, the library is an outstanding example of Shingle style architecture. Highlights include the stone exterior, the fish-scale tile shingles on the second floor and the owl-shaped gargoyle adorning the porch.

Must-see architectural marvels in Connecticut By Ben Abramson

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SA TODAY TRAVEL AND the American Institute of Architects teamed up to help travelers find the best buildings in America. Here are five structures in Connecticut that architects and design professionals deem significant:


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MAINE | NATIONAL PARKS

Unspoiled Charm Find fresh adventure at Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument

By Jen Rose Smith

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LEAR RIVERS AND HIKING trails unspool through dense forest in Katahdin Woods and Waters. An ancient landscape, it’s also one of America’s youngest national monuments.

CONTI NUED

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MAINE | NATIONAL PARKS

“It’s so unbelievably serene and untouched. It was just so much more wild than I expected.” — CAIT BOURGAULT, photographer and hiking guide

CHRIS SHANE

Katahdin is more rustic than established parks. BILL BROOKE

“You’re in the Northwoods and things are pretty rustic,” says superintendent Tim Hudson, the sole year-round employee of the monument established in northern Maine in 2016. “But you’ve got great views, three really nice rivers and (Mount) Katahdin staring you right in the face.” Exploring here offers the chance to see a wild New England forest free from crowded campgrounds, traffic — even paved roads. Giving up a developed park’s cushy amenities means roughing it a bit, but it will earn you blissful solitude and the chance to see a new national monument emerge from unbroken wilderness. For many visitors, the first stop is the 17-mile Katahdin Loop Road, a gorgeous dirt track leading to hiking and biking trails. It’s also the starting point for the International Appalachian Trail, an ultralong-distance route that stretches from the Maine woods to Newfoundland and Labrador. Lean-tos and campsites dot the 30-mile stretch within the 87,500-acre national monument, which offers big vistas of Mount Katahdin — at 5,267 feet, the state’s tallest mountain. Cait Bourgault, a Maine photographer and hiking guide, walked the trail soon after the monument was created. “It’s so unbelievably serene and untouched,” she CONTI NUED


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MAINE | NATIONAL PARKS

MAKE A TRIP OF IT Spend the night in a cozy cabin by Millinocket Lake at the New England Outdoor Center, which boasts a sandy beach and fleet of loaner boats. Its River Driver’s Restaurant serves a crowd of locals and hikers, and the monument’s southern entrance is less than an hour away. neoc.com For easy access to the northern edge of the monument, try Matagamon Wilderness, with a campground and cabins that are staging grounds for adventures. Hearty sandwiches in the on-site café are perfect fare for packed lunches. matagamon.com

East Branch of the Penobscot River boasts fine bass fishing. BILL BROOKE

says. “It was just so much more wild than I expected.” After her campfire turned to embers, Bourgault saw the Milky Way transformed into a splashy band of lights. Because the protected land is one of the darkest places east of the Mississippi River, it claims some of New England’s finest stargazing. “The stars just lit up the campsite,” Bourgault notes. “There were times I barely needed a headlight.” And with rivers snaking through the monument’s most remote corners, grab-

bing a canoe paddle pays off in solitude and scenery. “It is a quintessential Maine canoeing experience,” says David Butler, a Maine Path and Paddle guide who leads trips within the national monument. “You definitely get the sense that it hasn’t changed since Thoreau paddled it in the mid-1800s.” The East Branch of the Penobscot River twists and turns past jaw-dropping mountain views. Here, moose and bald eagles materialize from the mist and

paddlers pause to fish for each day’s dinner. Salmon and brook trout dive for flies at the surface of the Penobscot, which boasts some of the state’s finest bass fishing. Even the most veteran nature lovers succumb to the untouched charm. When Bourgault visited the national monument, the native Mainer was astonished by what she found: “If you really appreciate what Maine is, Katahdin Woods and Waters is on the top of your bucket list.”

While there’s no permanent visitor center, parks employees staff seasonal contact stations stocked with maps and information. Visit the Millinocket Welcome Center on your way to the south end of the park, or stop by the Patten Lumbermen’s Museum as you travel to the north gate. The most detailed maps are the waterproof versions from Map Adventures, with tips on hiking, biking, camping and paddling. nps.gov/kaww/ planyourvisit/hours.htm; lumbermensmuseum.org; mapadventures.com

BILL BROOKE


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MASSACHUSETTS | THE BERKSHIRES

Tanglewood STU ROSNER

Alfresco Escape The Berkshires offer performing, visual arts in the great outdoors By Amy Sinatra Ayres

T

HE VILLAGES AND TOWNS

nestled in the mountainous Berkshires region of western Massachusetts provide a cultural haven where you can make music, theater and museums a central part of your vacation — all while enjoying the outdoors. For many people, the Berkshires are synonymous with Tanglewood, the summer home of the Boston Symphony

Orchestra, and Jacob’s Pillow, a 220-acre National Historic Landmark renowned for its long-running summer dance festival. At Tanglewood, located in Lenox, you can buy your ticket, pack a picnic, grab a seat on the lawn and enjoy the BSO starting in July. This summer, you can also catch Josh Groban, James Taylor and Earth, Wind & Fire at this quintessential concert venue. The Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, featuring more than 350 free performances, runs June 19 to August 25.

Tanglewood and Jacob’s Pillow helped put the Berkshires on the map, says Lindsey Schmid, vice president of tourism and marketing for 1Berkshire, but “we have a very cultural scene that happens year-round now.” Tanglewood will open its four-building, four-seasons Linde Center for Music and Learning, home to the new Tanglewood Learning Institute, June 28. The Berkshires’ year-round cultural CONTINUED

Boston Symphony Orchestra HILARY SCOTT


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MASSACHUSETTS | THE BERKSHIRES

Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival

Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art

WHERE TO STAY First opened in 1773, the Red Lion Inn is a Stockbridge institution. redlioninn.com

Norman Rockwell Museum

Jacob’s Pillow

JACOB’S PILLOW DANCE; MASS MOCA; CHRISTOPHER DUGGAN; NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM

scene is highlighted by the expansion of performing arts at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (Mass Moca), which also features sculpture, painting, photography, as well as activities at The Clark art museum in Williamstown, where “you can go to an art lecture or you can bring your kids to an art appreciation class or you can go to a free concert in the summertime,” says Schmid. Located in North Adams, Mass Moca has a busy schedule into the fall, including a performance by The Pretenders in July and the FreshGrass Festival in

September. One of the Berkshires’ best-known sites is the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, which is marking its 50th anniversary with special exhibitions, including Woodstock to the Moon: 1969 Illustrated, running June 8 to Oct. 27 with works by Rockwell and other artists showcasing events such as the first moonwalk and the civil rights movement. Shakespeare & Company in Lenox presents The Taming of the Shrew July 9 through Aug. 17 and The Merry Wives of Windsor Aug. 8 to Sept. 1. Pittsfield’s

Barrington Stage Company, now in its 25th season, will bring Into the Woods to its main stage June 19 to July 13 and the new play Gertrude and Claudius, based on the novel by John Updike, July 18 to Aug. 3. Its season continues into the fall with American Underground, Oct. 2 to 20. WAM Theatre in Lenox, which donates proceeds to philanthropies that benefit women and children, has its next mainstage production starting Oct. 25. Pipeline is a play about an inner-city public high school teacher committed to her students.

Located on the Williams College campus in Williamstown, a new 64-room Williams Inn will open in midAugust. You can stay at the current inn through mid-July. williamsinn.com Home furnishings entrepreneur and Berkshires native Annie Selke curated the eight rooms in the boutique inn 33 Main, located in Lenox. thirtythreemain.com/the-inn Inspired by classic American roadside motor lodges, Tourists Welcome opened last summer on the banks of the Hoosic River in North Adams. touristswelcome.com


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MASSACHUSETTS | BOSTON

Wicked Fun – and Free Nothing but time required to see much of Boston’s rich history

BUNKER HILL MONUMENT

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The neighborhood of Charlestown is rich in history, and this 221-foot granite obelisk commemorates the Battle of Bunker Hill. Rangers provide history, and seasonal musket-firings add a note of authenticity. Make the 294-step climb to the top of the monument for breathtaking views. ▶ nps.gov/bost

WALKBOSTON By Jessica Polizzotti

B

OSTON IS A BUSTLING city with lots to do and see, and

not every attraction requires big spending. Many of the city’s best sites are free, so you can get a true sense of Boston’s Colonial connections without shelling out for a tour. Here are some of the highlights:

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Knowledgeable pros host interesting walking tours year-round, most of them free. WalkBoston routes are different than typical tours, allowing for in-depth exploration of themes or locations. Noteworthy is the Boston Little Lanes tour of secret passageways, helping you navigate the city better than many locals. ▶ walkboston.org

USS CONSTITUTION

ISTOCK/GETTY IMAGES

Climb aboard Old Ironsides at the Charlestown Navy Yard and see a ship constructed using bolts, spikes and other fittings from Paul Revere’s foundry. One of the Navy’s six original frigates, USS Constitution did not lose any of the 40 battles in which it participated. It is the world’s oldest commissioned warship still afloat. ▶ ussconstitutionmuseum.org

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

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THE FREEDOM TRAIL Starting at Boston Common, but easily picked up anywhere along the way, this “hop on and off” trail follows a clearly marked red line to some of Boston’s most special places, such as the Old South Meeting House, Faneuil Hall and the Paul Revere House. Guided tours are available for a fee, but exploring on your own allows you to set the pace. ▶ thefreedomtrail.org

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One of the first public libraries in the United States, this facility houses over 6 million volumes and the creations of visual artists. Many works remain in the library; others are part of a rotating exhibit of sculptures and paintings. The books may draw you, but the building will have you exploring for hours. ▶ bpl.org/bpl-history


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MASSACHUSETTS | GAMING

Bowling alley at the TAP Sports Bar

Presidential suite

South End Market dining hall

Poker room MGM SPRINGFIELD

Community Casino MGM Springfield aims to fit in while standing out By Nancy Trejos

M

GM RESORTS INTERNATIONAL ROLLED the dice

by building a 2 million-square-foot complex with gaming, restaurants, a hotel, spa, movie theater and shops in Springfield, Mass. Less than a year after its opening, the bet appears to be paying off. Billed as New England’s first integrated luxury resort, MGM Springfield has a 125,000-squarefoot casino featuring 2,550 slots, 120 table games, a high-limit room and a poker room with 23 tables. It

also has brought in celebrity chefs Michael Mina and Hell’s Kitchen season 14 winner Meghan Gill to run its restaurants. In a break from the typical casino playbook, MGM is working with local attractions for crosspromotions. The resort offers free bus service that stops at various tourist destinations around downtown Springfield. MGM has also partnered with Springfield Museums to display some of its exhibits within the resort. MGM was deliberate with its design, incorporating such historic venues as the Massachusetts National Guard Armory and

The Armory

Chandler Union Hotel into the 14-acre property to make it feel more like a campus than a big-box hotel. The 19th-century Armory is now the center of an outdoor plaza made to look like a classic New England town common.

MGM Springfield does not have a stand-alone performance venue, but it has entered into partnerships with existing sites such as the 8,000-seat MassMutual Center and 2,600-seat Springfield Symphony Hall. “We purposely sought out not to build everything on property,” says Sarah Moore, vice president of brand marketing and retail for MGM. “People don’t understand the profound history of this city. So much has happened here. It was once a thriving economy. The infrastructure was there. The bones are there, and we’re bringing it back to life.”


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MASSACHUSETTS | CAPE COD

CAPE COD CREAMERY

LEWIS BROTHERS ICE CREAM

South Yarmouth and Hyannis This shop’s dense and creamy flavors are named for local towns and landmarks. ▶ capecodcreamery.com

Provincetown The ice cream is made daily on-site, and its solar-powered ice-cream truck hits local beaches. ▶ lewisbrothersicecream.com Sundae School POLAR CAVE ICE CREAM PARLOUR; GETTY IMAGES

FOUR SEAS ICE CREAM Centerville Try an old-fashioned sundae or frappe at the counter and pick up a quart or cake in the off-season. ▶ fourseasicecream.com

THE ICE CREAM SMUGGLER East Dennis Dig into a sundae made with one of 40 homemade flavors, including gluten-free and vegan options. ▶ icecreamsmuggler.com

Cream of the Crop Get the scoop on the Cape’s best ice cream By Amy Sinatra Ayres

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HETHER YOU CHOOSE AN iconic

landmark that has been around for generations or a newer locale with exotic-sounding flavors, it’s difficult to go wrong at a mom-and-pop ice-cream shop on the Cape. “A Cape Cod day is going to the beach or going on a whale watch, having a barbecue and going out to ice cream,” says Carter Catalano, who owns The Ice Cream Smuggler in East Dennis, Mass., with her husband, Paul. Opening in a new location this summer, the Smuggler’s homemade ice cream has been featured on the Food Network show The Best Thing I Ever Ate. “Virtually every town on Cape Cod has at least one must-go-to ice-cream

shop,” says Mark Lawrence, who with his daughter, Kelsey, owns the Polar Cave Ice Cream Parlour in Mashpee. Lawrence doesn’t just sell frozen treats — he’s a connoisseur of the creamy confection: “Four Seas in Centerville, I love their Cantaloupe in the summer months. Ben & Bill’s in Falmouth makes a Lobster Ice Cream flavor, a must-try-at-least-once kind of thing, just to say you did. ... Steve & Sue’s Par-Tee Freeze is a Hyannis favorite. They only serve soft serve and open for the year in mid-February and like a rite of passage, customers wait in long lines in the bitter cold and rain.” The Smuggler has had families visit with five generations in tow. “It’s really just a sweet tradition of nostalgia; going to the Cape and having this experience,” Catalano says. “We find ourselves a part of people’s vacations.”

POLAR CAVE ICE CREAM PARLOUR Mashpee One of the most popular flavors is Mashpee Mud, a coffee-based ice cream with fudge, Oreos, almonds and dark chocolate chips. ▶ polarcave.com

SUNDAE SCHOOL Harwich Port, Dennisport and East Orleans Started by a teacher and his family in 1976, Sundae School makes its treats in small batches. ▶ sundaeschool.com


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MASSACHUSETTS | MARTHA’S VINEYARD

MARTHA’S VINEYARD FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL Oct. 23-27

Martha’s Vineyard Food & Wine Festival MARTHA’S VINEYARD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE; JOSH ROBINSON-WHITE

Beyond the Beach Island festivals offer something for almost every taste

If you’re looking to avoid the summer crowds and enjoy a quieter weekend, this tasty festival brings in top names from the culinary world, but generally keeps it local with a focus on the Vineyard’s rich traditions of farming and fishing. On tap for this year’s event are delicacies prepared by chef Patrice Martineau of Bettini Restaurant and Roxana Bar at MV’s Harbor View Hotel; Colin Lynch, chef and partner at Boston’s Bar Mezzana; and Justin Perdue, group executive chef for boutique hotelier Lark Hotels. Tickets for the Grand Tasting are $150 for general admission, $200 for VIP; the opening event, Fresh off the Farm, is $75. A portion of the proceeds benefits Island Grown Schools and the Agricultural Society’s Farmers Program. ▶ mvfoodandwine.com

MARTHA’S VINEYARD AFRICAN-AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL Aug. 5-10 The Run&Shoot Filmworks festival, entering its 17th year, has promoted and screened many outstanding films produced by and starring African-Americans, including Spike Lee, who is scheduled to appear at this year’s event. This summer, the Oprah Winfrey Network will be screening its newest drama series, David Makes Man, as well as the returning series Greenleaf. Discounted all-access passes are available for $300 through Aug. 5, with day passes starting at $80. ▶ mvaaff.com

By Valentina Valentini

M

ARTHA’S VINEYARD IS KNOWN for its soft, sandy beaches and plentiful seafood shanties, but the island also hosts a bevy of cultural celebrations that include food, drink, the arts and even agriculture. If you’re planning a trip to the island, consider adding one of these events to your itinerary:

Spike Lee MAX BOSSMAN/MARTHA’S VINEYARD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


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MASSACHUSETTS | MARTHA’S VINEYARD

ROBERTA KIRN

MAX BOSSMAN/MARTHA’S VINEYARD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

BUILT ON STILTS DANCE FESTIVAL

GRAND ILLUMINATION NIGHT

Aug. 8-11, 15, 17-18

Aug. 14

Inside the historic Union Chapel in Oak Bluffs, a celebration of diversity in dance and performance has been gracing the Vineyard for 23 years. Built on Stilts showcases work by local artists as well as those from farther afield. Performances are free and appropriate for all ages. Along with dance, there is live music, storytelling, theater and comedy. What began in 1997 as a one-night event with the goal of creating a grassroots venue for island artists has grown into a lineup of more than 50 original performances featuring new and professional dancers representing diverse styles. Because it’s a free event, make sure to get there early for the best seats. ▶ builtonstilts.org

It might not be a festival or fair, but it’s certainly a festive affair. And the Martha’s Vineyard Camp Meeting Association’s Grand Illumination is extra grand this year as it marks its 150th anniversary. Owners of the famous gingerbread cottages of Oak Bluffs first decorated their homes with paper lanterns in 1869 in tribute to the governor’s visit. The Vineyard Haven Band plays; a community sing-along precedes the lighting, and the glow is cast for visitors and locals alike. The event is free, but donations are encouraged. ▶ mvcma.org/grand-illumination.html

MARTHA’S VINEYARD LIVESTOCK SHOW AND FAIR Aug. 15-18 Don’t be fooled by the name — this fair isn’t all prancing ponies and prize pigs. This 157-year-old event has grown to include rides, games, shucking contests, a skillet toss and woodsmen competition in addition to the horse pull and dog and livestock shows. Let’s not forget about the food: From smoothies to barbecue to local ice cream, there’s something for everyone. Don’t miss the West Tisbury Fire Department’s Burger Booth, which is always a crowd favorite. Tickets are $10 for adults; $5 for children 5-12 and seniors 62 and older; kids younger than 5 are free. Double the fun by attending the free fireworks display Aug. 16 at Ocean Park by the Sea, an idyllic night spent with family and friends just next door to the famous Flying Horses carousel. Music by the Vineyard Haven Band in the gazebo begins at 8 p.m., with fireworks starting at dark. ▶ marthasvineyardagriculturalsociety.org/ annual-fair

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MASSACHUSETTS | NANTUCKET

Hit the Surf Nantucket offers a range of options for aquatic family fun By Rina Rapuano

O

NE OF THE GREATEST features Nantucket has to offer visitors is

“we’ve got different water conditions for everyone,” says Diana Brown, CEO of Nantucket Community Sailing. “We’ve got calm beaches; beaches with big waves and lots of current and beautiful open water with no obstructions.” These conditions make the island a great fit for water sports, offering familyfriendly diversions for various budgets, abilities and time constraints. Here are three surefire ways to add a splash of fun to your summer vacation:

REBECCA LOVE PHOTOGRAPHY; GETTY IMAGES

STAND-UP PADDLEBOARDING The Jetties Sailing Center operated by Nantucket Community Sailing offers multiple ways for families to appreciate the water, including stand-up paddleboarding. The activity is perfect for little ones because it takes place in calm, shallow water, and Jetties has life jackets that fit kids as young as 2. You can even bring the family dog. Board rental prices are $25 per half hour, $35 per hour and $15 for each additional hour and include a quick tutorial, equipment, life jacket and boat pick-up if you get stuck. Jetties also offers kayak rentals by the hour ($25 per single, $35 for a double); sailboat rentals run $150 for two hours and lessons go for $45 to $500. ▶ nantucketcommunitysailing.org


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SURFING Many folks are pleasantly surprised by Nantucket’s surfing conditions. Nantucket Island Surf School owner, Gary Kohner, says that while new surfers might not be ready to tackle Oahu’s North Shore after one lesson on Cisco Beach, they are generally riding waves and having a blast within the first hour. There’s no minimum age to start; it mostly depends on a person’s comfort level in the ocean, swimming ability and attention span. Each lesson begins with a tutorial on the beach, and board rentals cost $15 per hour or $50 daily. Private lessons are $85 per hour; group lessons run $60 an hour per person, and there’s a weeklong mini surf clinic for $500 a week. ▶ nantucketsurfing.com GETTY IMAGES; GARY KOHNER

KITEBOARDING Related to windsurfing (which requires a different board and attached sail), kiteboarding usually takes place in calmer water and is ideal for beginners. Those new to the sport can go to Pocomo Beach to get a hands-on tutorial from KiteTucket on wind, weather, kite and gear. After that, it’s time to get up on the board and ride — and maybe even fly. Gear rental costs $100 for a half day or $150 per day. Three-hour private lessons are $490; add a second person for an additional $245. Six-hour day camps cost $520 per person. ▶ kitetucket.com GETTY IMAGES; KITETUCKET


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NEW HAMPSHIRE | FIRE TOWERS

View from Milan Hill Fire Tower

Five-Alarm Views To fully appreciate New Hampshire’s vistas, climb its fire towers JERRY AND MARCY MONKMAN

By Sarah Sekula

I

F YOU’RE THE TYPE

who travels the country visiting historic lighthouses — or merely seeks the payoff of a tremendous view at the end of a hike — then searching for fire lookout towers will be right up your alley. “Whether it is a beacon of light on a rocky coast or a remote outpost in the forest, (lighthouses and fire towers) both share an important role in our state’s

history,” notes Captain Douglas Miner, a wildfire prevention specialist with the New Hampshire Forest Protection Bureau. Just ask Elizabeth Muzzey. As director and state historic preservation officer of the New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources, she monitors the status of artifacts and structures such as fire towers. “In many places in New Hampshire, if you can get up high enough, the forest dwarfs everything else on the landscape,”

she says. Need a little extra motivation? The New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands, which operates 15 public fire lookout towers throughout the state, offers a complementary Tower Quest program patch to hikers who document visits to at least five. Note that towers, while open daily, are generally staffed only during periods of elevated fire danger. Conquer your lofty pursuits at these must-see fire lookout towers:

MILAN HILL FIRE TOWER Milan If you’re short on time or energy, head to this tower in Milan Hill State Park. A parking lot at the base of the tower makes this an easy jaunt. From the observation deck, spot Kilkenny Range, Great North Woods and Nash Stream (bonus points if you can spot the wind turbines in Dummer). You can typically see the Presidential Range, including Mount Washington, and into Maine. Elevation: 1,737 feet Eats: The Northland Dairy Bar & Restaurant in Berlin is known for its seafood. NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL & CULTURAL RESOURCES


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NEW HAMPSHIRE | FIRE TOWERS MOUNT PROSPECT FIRE TOWER Lancaster The state’s only stone fire tower, it was built as an observation tower on the estate of John W. Weeks, a former congressman and senator from Massachusetts who also served as Secretary of War under Presidents Warren Harding and Calvin Coolidge. Weeks gifted the tower to the state in 1941. At the top, you’ll see neighboring Vermont, the Great North Woods region, Nash Stream, Kilkenny Range, the Presidential Range, Mount Washington and Franconia Notch. Elevation: 2,059 feet Eats: For fine dining, make reservations at Mountain View Grand Resort and Spa in Whitefield.

PAWTUCKAWAY FIRE TOWER Nottingham Visiting involves a moderate 0.4-mile hike on the west side of Pawtuckaway State Park, but along the way you’ll encounter massive glacial boulders. Reopened in 2017 following a renovation, the tower offers exceptional views of Pawtuckaway Lake. Elevation: 908 feet Eats: Johnson’s Seafood & Steak in Northwood serves up lunch, dinner and heaping portions of ice cream, and there’s a new craft brewery on-site. NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE PARKS

MAGALLOWAY MOUNTAIN FIRE TOWER Pittsburg The first tower was installed here in 1910, and getting to the location requires a challenging 0.7-mile hike. Be on the lookout for moose and inquisitive gray jays. At the top, you’ll be rewarded with views of Umbagog Lake and Stub Hill, Aziscohos Lake and other parts of Maine and Canada. Plus, the Presidential Range in the White Mountains is visible to the south and Vermont to the west. Elevation: 3,360 feet Eats: For hiking provisions, pop into Young’s General Store in Pittsburg. NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL & CULTURAL RESOURCES

GREEN MOUNTAIN FIRE TOWER Effingham The 1.4-mile hike is moderately strenuous. Keep your eyes peeled for whitetail deer, red squirrels and lots of songbirds during your excursion. Views include Lake Winnipesaukee, Squam Lake, Wakefield and into Maine. Elevation: 1,907 feet Eats: For pub food and micro brews, stop at MOAT Mountain Smoke House & Brewing Co. in North Conway. NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL & CULTURAL RESOURCES NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE PARKS (2)


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RHODE ISLAND | REGIONAL FOOD

LARRY OLMSTED

Hold the Cheese ‘Bakery pizza’ is a uniquely Rhode Island treat By Larry Olmsted

P

ERHAPS THE MOST UNUSUAL

(and least-known) style of pizza is exclusive to Rhode Island. Virtually impossible to find outside the Ocean State, “bakery pizza” is ubiquitous within its borders. As the name suggests, this local favorite is found not in pizzerias but in bakeries, including the bakery section of many supermarkets. The first thing that sets it apart from traditional pizza is that it is almost always served at room temperature. You could even argue that it

doesn’t meet the basic definition of pizza, because it generally lacks one of the three main elements: cheese. Rhode Island bakery pizza is a rectangular tray of baked dough covered with tomato sauce. It has a thicker crust than most pizzas, and the sauce is almost a tomato paste. Some places sprinkle a little grated cheese on top, but you can forget about a layer of melted mozzarella. To confuse matters, many locals don’t even call it bakery pizza — they simply call it “red strips” because the sheet-pansize pizza is cut into rectangles. DePetrillo’s Pizza & Bakery (depetrillos.com) has four locations that serve traditional pizza;

bakery pizza; “white strips” (focaccia-like crust topped with olive oil, grated cheese and herbs); and “pizza chips,” snack-size versions of red strips on much thinner squares of crust. These are brilliant — the pizza lover’s answer to potato chips. Another major player is D. Palmieri’s Bakery (dpalmierisbakery.com), which opened in 1905 in the Federal Hill neighborhood of Providence and has since relocated to Johnston. But you don’t have to visit the main production facility to try the bakery pizza, as it is carried by Dave’s Fresh Marketplace (davesmarketplace. com), the state’s largest independent supermarket chain.

Stop & Shop’s Rhode Island stores carry red strips in the bakery section, with small quantities packaged in clear clamshell containers and larger portions in plastic bags. Another renowned spot is Colvitto’s Pizza & Bakery (colvittospizza. com), fittingly situated in a Narragansett strip mall. Colvitto’s breaks from tradition by serving its strips warm. Bakery pizza is an excellent food for road tripping through New England since it’s affordable, requires no reheating and is easy to eat on the go. If you are driving through Rhode Island, you owe it to yourself to sample the “pizza” that the locals are so passionate about.


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VERMONT | HISTORIC HOMES

Replica of President Chester Arthur’s birthplace

BURLINGTON (VT.) FREE PRESS

Alive with History Vermont homes celebrate notable residents By Will DiGravio

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HETHER YOU WANT TO re-experience the excitement of a school field trip or are looking to explore the past and learn something new, you’re in luck. Vermont is home to many tourist-friendly historical sites, including the homes of former U.S. presidents and the family from The Sound of Music. Here are five historical Vermont homes to add to your itinerary:

PRESIDENT CHESTER ARTHUR HISTORIC SITE Fairfield A replica of the birthplace of Chester Arthur, who served as the country’s 21st president from 1881-85, this site also includes the North Fairfield Baptist Church, where his father served as preacher. Visitors can stretch their legs down the Chester A. Arthur Walking Trail. ▶ historicsites.vermont.gov/ directory/arthur


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VERMONT | HISTORIC HOMES

HILDENE, THE LINCOLN FAMILY HOME

HILDENE.ORG

Manchester Hildene was the home of Robert Todd Lincoln, eldest son of President Abraham Lincoln and the only one of his children to survive to adulthood. Robert Todd Lincoln was U.S. Secretary of War under Presidents James Garfield and Chester Arthur and ambassador to the United Kingdom under President Benjamin Harrison. In addition to the mansion, the grounds include a welcome center, carriage barn, gardens and observatory, cheese-making facility, a floating boardwalk across the wetland and a teaching greenhouse. ▶ hildene.org

ESTATE OF ELIZABETH REEVES LANG

ETHAN ALLEN HOMESTEAD MUSEUM

ETHAN ALLEN HOMESTEAD

Burlington Ethan Allen is one of Vermont’s most wellknown folk heroes and a notable leader of the Revolutionary War. One of Burlington’s earliest inhabitants, Allen founded the Green Mountain Boys, a militia that famously seized Fort Ticonderoga from the British in 1775. Allen commanded the militia alongside Benedict Arnold. In addition to learning what life was like in 18th-century Vermont, visitors to the Allen homestead can view exhibits about archaeology and history and explore multiple walking trails. ▶ ethanallenhomestead.org

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE

Stowe The hills are alive with the sounds of nostalgia. If you’re a fan of The Sound of Music, then you know it is partly based on the autobiography of Maria Augusta von Trapp, The Story of the Trapp Family Singers. The family’s home has become a 2,500-acre resort with rooms and suites, villas and a guesthouse, all still overseen by a member of the von Trapp family. Complete with maple sugaring, an on-site brewery, gardens and horse-drawn carriage rides, this is a must-visit for fans of the play and Oscar-winning film. ▶ trappfamily.com

HISTORIC SITES OF VERMONT

PRESIDENT CALVIN COOLIDGE STATE HISTORIC SITE Plymouth Notch The birthplace of Calvin Coolidge, who served as the 30th president of the United States, this site includes the Coolidge family home where then-Vice President Coolidge took the oath of office and officially became president in 1923, shortly after receiving word that President Warren G. Harding had died. In addition to the residence, visitors can tour the community church, a cheese factory, general store and schoolhouse, all of which have been preserved to capture what life was like in the early 20th century. ▶ nps.gov/nr/travel/ presidents/calvin_coolidge_ homestead.html


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MAINE | PORTLAND HEAD LIGHT

BEAUTIFUL BEACON The Portland Head Light in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, the state’s oldest lighthouse, went into service in 1791 using whale oil lanterns to mark the entrance to Portland Harbor. It was automated in 1989, and while the light and fog signal are maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard, the grounds are managed by the town of Cape Elizabeth. It is open year-round from sunrise to glorious sunset.

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Profile for STUDIO Gannett

GO ESCAPE NEW ENGLAND 2019  

GO ESCAPE NEW ENGLAND 2019