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MayorĘźs Office of Criminal Justice

Neighborhood Activation Study

Completed on December 20th 2017


Table of Contents Introduction Executive Summary Design Principles

03 04

Approach Find Opportunity in Places with Need See, Listen, and Learn Identify Points of Convergence Start With What's There Match What's There with What's Possible Measure Impact Neighborhood Activation Approach

06 12 22 25 32 41 43

Studio Gang 2


Executive Summary As part of the Mayor始s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety, in May 2017 the Mayor始s Office of Criminal Justice (MOCJ), Police Department (NYPD), and Department of Design and Construction (DDC) engaged architecture and urbanism practice Studio Gang to study how design can be a tool to help reduce crime and build positive relationships between police and the people who reside in the neighborhoods where they serve. The result is a Neighborhood Activation Study that offers methods and specific urban design and architecture recommendations for two New York neighborhoods. These recommendations touch police stations, parks, libraries, streets, and other parts of a neighborhood始s built environment. They are grounded in months of research, site investigations, and discussions with people who live, work, visit, and care about these communities. The Study identifies and illustrates design and construction projects in Brownsville (Brooklyn) and Morrisania (the Bronx) that could be incorporated into the City始s capital improvement plans. These ideas and the principles they are founded on are also meant to be instructive for projects in other neighborhoods. Toward that end, the Study shares its methodology for determining

what kinds of projects should be undertaken and how to make decisions about where those investments should occur. Finally, the Study suggests policies, programs, and partnerships that may serve as vehicles for the implementation and stewardship of these projects. Like many low-income neighborhoods in New York City, a large proportion of the built environment of Brownsville and Morrisania is publicly owned and receives significant city investment from many offices, agencies, and authorities. Additionally, these neighborhoods are highly fragmented, and the pieces can be antagonistic to each other. This Study illustrates how a coordinated effort from public entities in partnership with communities can connect and reestablish flow between the disparate parts to make it possible to rebuild relationships and rejoin the pieces. A critical insight gained from extensive engagement with experts, agencies, and residents, as well as a broad review of related literature and studies, is that shifts in neighborhood safety and well-being require coordinated changes in the built environment, programming, policy, and practice. These include activities

associated with policing strategies but extend to conditions of local employment, youth engagement, access to education, and economic activity, as well as the quality of streets, open spaces, and public buildings. Because the forces that influence neighborhood safety are diverse, complex, and unevenly distributed across communities, the design response must be equally diverse, meet complexity with clarity, and seek equity in its distribution.

Studio Gang 3


Guiding Principles Engage the real experts. Community residents and stakeholders are the real experts on their neighborhoods and should be engaged at every stage of design and development to ensure community ownership and long-term success.

Co-locate activities, community organizations, and service providers. If programmed and maintained, community rooms and public spaces can bring different groups of people together to generate social cohesion and civic engagement.

Prioritize youth. In many high-crime neighborhoods, the combination of youth crew activity and police enforcement restrict access for youth to outdoor public space. Consider how youth are engaged in the design process, given opportunities during installation or construction, and welcomed into public space.

Reduce territoriality. The safe movement of young people is often limited to specific developments. Moreover, control and maintenance of public spaces are divided by agency. Break down traditional and often invisible boundaries to create more neutral spaces for young people and facilitate new opportunities for unusual intermingling of programs and agencies.

Enable social connections. Places to gather, socialize, and access cultural resources reduce crime and inequality, promote stewardship and collaboration, and build collective efficacy. Address the complex roots of crime. Safety is not just a law enforcement issue. Design strategies must address the complex roots of crime: social, economic, environmental, and educational. Safe spaces are hubs for opportunity that bring partners together to address many issues at once. Start with what’s there. Every neighborhood has assets that strengthen and support residents. Build off extant assets, existing plans, and future investments to maximize available resources.

Expand activity on public property. Cultivate civic buildings and adjacent property to host activities and services and engage new participants. Use these existing assets to improve neighborhood safety and create neutral ground in the plazas and sidewalks immediately surrounding them. Light the night. Dark empty streets, locked parks, and vacant lots make neighborhoods feel unsafe at night. This is exacerbated by the many public spaces and programs that close by 6 pm. It is also correlated with the majority of crime, which takes place between 6 pm and 1 am. Do more to brighten up neighborhoods with creative lighting and provide safe evening activities.

Reduce barriers to local commerce. Community stakeholders frequently raised the need for more local business opportunities, especially street vending. Well-managed street vending can be an important path for local entrepreneurs, while also bringing spaces to life. Less red tape could result in more creative partnerships like Green Cart NYC, which expanded permits for pushcarts in lowincome neighborhoods, helped create jobs for entrepreneurs, and increased access to healthy foods where it’s needed most. Invest in dignity. Data shows that plazas, parks, and streetscape greenery build trust in police and among neighbors, foster positive relationships, and improve social cohesion. Every community deserves spaces that are clean, beautiful, and welcoming. Provide equity in maintenance. Clean, well-maintained spaces make a difference in perceptions of safety and trust in government. Many low-income neighborhoods lack maintenance partners with the capacity to sponsor public space programs or the staffing to keep spaces open for extended hours. Equitable investment is needed for staffing and capacity building to ensure the success of neighborhood activation strategies.

Studio Gang 4


Where to focus?

Studio Gang 5


Find Opportunity in Places with Need Overview Where do we focus? To drive lasting positive change, wisely invest precious resources, and accomplish the greatest good, we must find opportunities where public action can strengthen ongoing community initiatives, agency efforts, and planned capital expenditures. This Study suggests a two-tiered approach that starts at the scale of the city to identify neighborhoods facing acute hardship and then focuses in on the scale of the neighborhood to locate zones of a few blocks where targeted action will reverberate out to the broader community. This process of researching and mapping must be inclusive and transparent, done in collaboration with communities and agencies.

Neighborhood Selection Criteria Looking at the city as a whole, identify focus neighborhoods with the greatest need. To develop a more complete understanding of need, find the overlap within the following two data sets. • •

No Longer Emptyʼs family arts event, Old Bronx Borough Courthouse (Photo: No Longer Empty)

Mayor's Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety Hardship Index

Focus Area Selection Criteria Once the neighborhoods with the greatest need have been identified, locate the areas with the greatest opportunity. Opportunity is defined here as the points of convergence within the following seven data sets. • • • • • • •

Density of Youth Credible Community-Based Organizations Critical Mass of Civic Assets Underutilized Public Space Mix of Street Types Planned Capital Investment Economic Opportunity

Howard Houses Farm (Photo: Green City Force)

Studio Gang 6


Where to focus? – Neighborhood Selection Criteria

Mayorʼs Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety (MAP)

42

The first element of the neighborhood selection criteria is data from the Mayorʼs Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety. This analysis overlaid NYPD crime data onto New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) campuses to display that, although crime is down city-wide, it remains stubbornly high in many neighborhoods with large amounts of public housing.

Butler Polo Grounds

Castle Hill Paterson

St. Nicholas Wagner

Using this data set, the Mayorʼs Office of Criminal Justice is implementing an ongoing effort to reduce violent crime in fifteen NYCHA developments. These locations experience almost 20 percent of all violent crime in New York Cityʼs public housing. Two neighborhoods with MAP sites were selected for the purposes of this study: Morrisania, home to the 42nd Precinct, and Brownsville, home to the 73rd Precinct.

Queensbridge

Bushwick Bushwick II Ingersall Tompkins Red Hook Brownsville

Van Dyke Boulevard

73 Stapleton

Crimes per 1000 Residents by Precinct 1/1/2017 - 8/31/2017 8.8

81.5 NYPD Precincts Selected Precincts

NYPD Precincts Selected Precincts Crimes per 1000NYPD Residents by P Precincts 1/1/2017 - 8/31/2017 Selected Precin 8.8

MAP Sites

8

MAP Sites 0 0

1 MI

1 MILE

Studio Gang 7


Where to focus? – Neighborhood Selection Criteria

Hardship Index The second element of the neighborhood selection criteria, the Hardship Index, was developed by Studio Gang‘s data analytics consultant, Will Synder, in collaboration with Presence Health. The index evaluates economic hardship faced by a community by analyzing six topics from the American Community Survey to produce a single score that enables comparison between geographies. The Hardship Index is highly correlated with other measures of economic hardship, such as labor force statistics, and with poor health outcomes.

42

The Hardship Index clarifies that crime rates do not always correlate with issues of poverty, unemployment, inadequate education, and social disorganization. Midtown West, for instance, has a high crime rate, but a very low hardship score. Crosscomparing this index with the previous crime map, it becomes possible to prioritize action in neighborhoods such as Brownsville and Morrisania because each scores high on both metrics. Attributes analyzed by the Hardship index (see Technical Background for methodology) • Crowded housing • Poverty rate • Unemployment • Adults without high school equivalence • Age dependency ratio • Per capita income

73

NYPD Precincts 8.28.2

24.2

Selected Precinc

34.6

NYPD Precincts Selected Precincts

Hardship Score 8.2

24.2

34

MAP Sites 0 0

1 MI

1 MILE

Studio Gang 8


Where to focus? – Focus Area Selection Criteria

Mapping Opportunity

Density of Youth

Community-Based Organizations

Critical Mass of Civic Assets

Underutilized Public Space

Number of residents <18 years old

CBOs funded by Dept. of Youth & Community Dvlpmt. or city agencies

City services and community-based organizations

Publicly owned vacant land

Mix of Street Types

Planned Public Investment

Economic Opportunity

Types of streets distinguished by average daily traffic

Planned investments from all agencies

Index of economic indicators: transit, investment, and density of office space

Studio Gang 9


Where to focus? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Focus Area Selection

Selected Focus Areas

Br oa dw ay

Cla rem ont

Av e.

Atlantic Ave.

Cr oto na

3rd Ave .

Data Sources: NYC DoITT 2017: Open space NYC DCP 2017: Vacant land, precincts DDC, HPD, NYCHA 2017: Planned public investments Hester Street 2017: CBOs, Assets

We bst er Ave . Par kA ve.

With residents, specialists, and agencies, Studio Gang uncovered areas of density and overlap between the focus site selection criteria and located focus area zones where targeted action will reverberate throughout the neighborhood.

. ore Ave Glenm Pkw y

Rd. ton Bos

Ave. Pitkin

73

. nt Ave Belmo

Eastern Pkwy

Crotona Park

Ave. Sutter

Houses . ve kA or Y ew EN

169 th S t.

sville Brown s House

e Van Dyk s House

Ave. Blake . nt Ave Dumo Ave. Livonia

Betsy Head

167 th S t.

. n Blvd r Gasto Mothe

Open Space

n St. Osbor

e. way Av Rocka

165 th S t.

Key NYCHA MAP Sites Police Precincts CBOs Community Assets

42

Vacant Land Capital Projects Focus Area Boundary

0

Morrisania (42)

0.063

0.125

0.25 Miles

Brownsville (73)

Studio Gang 10


How to gain understanding?

Studio Gang 11


See, Listen, and Learn Overview For neighborhood activation to succeed, its proposals must be grounded in agency initiatives and tool kits, the aspirations of local community members, expert opinion, relevant precedents, and the physical, social, and political realities of each neighborhood. This section outlines how to facilitate this process by illustrating Studio Gangâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s methodology for gathering information during the study. Our six steps are outlined below.

Interview Agencies Deep but often siloed knowledge of current initiatives, planned capital investments, and policy exists among agency employees. As a first step, interview agency stakeholders to centralize their knowledge base.

Engage Communities

Morrisania community workshop (Photo: Hester Street)

Community residents and stakeholders are the real experts on their neighborhoods. Gaining their knowledge of what works, what doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;t, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s underway, and what needs support to get started is paramount.

Review Literature Search out information and data points that portend effective strategies for improving social cohesion and economic opportunity.

Explore Precedents Excellent strategies for leveraging public action with community efforts to improve neighborhoods have been pioneered in Los Angeles, Tokyo, and Boston. Learn from these examples and search out others.

Investigate Sites

Exhibit on the history of redlining (Photo: No Longer Empty)

Walk the sites, meet the actors, and experience the programs to know how to reinforce what already works.

Studio Gang 12


How to gain understanding?

Interview Agencies Overview Learn about ongoing initiatives, how to leverage existing tool kits, and uncover opportunities for collaboration and coordination. Meet with agency leadership who are defining strategic goals and local operators who work on the ground in focus areas. Interview complementary agencies together and communicate all findings to all agencies in order to foster information sharing and explore possibilities for collaboration.

Approaches â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Learn about existing initiatives. Research existing tool kits. Identify opportunities for coordination and collaboration between agencies and with CBOs.

Studio Gang 13


How to gain understanding?

Engage Communities Community residents and stakeholders are the real experts on their neighborhoods and have the most at stake. Engagement should happen at every stage of the design process to ensure long-term success and community ownership. Studio Gang and Hester Street created a multi-phased community engagement process that was community-driven, iterative, and collaborative.

Approaches • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Partner with local groups Encourage collaboration Support community leadership Create resident-driven policies Involve youth Build on previous work Support ongoing work Make information accessible Create clear expectations Meet people where they are Conduct one-on-one interviews Meet with focus groups Attend informal events Map assets

Site investigation, June 15, 2017

Project kick-off meeting, June 27, 2017

Theater of War performance, July 15, 2017

Economic development meeting, July 24, 2017

Studio Gang 14


How to gain understanding?

Engage Specialists Including different kinds of specialists on the project team allows the work to incorporate cutting-edge research, leverage new tools, and gain a broader perspective on the opportunities and challenges of a neighborhood. Work with specialists at every stage of project development so that they can respond to the conditions of sites, spark ideas, influence principles, and critique design proposals.

Approach • • •

Engage early and often. Facilitate collaboration, not just consultation. Engage individually and as a collective.

Mindy Fullilove, MD, Hon AIA Mental Health Specialist

Stacey L. Barrenger, AM, PhD Criminal Justice Specialist

James Lima

Will Snyder

Economics of Placemaking Specialist

Data Analytics Specialist

Studio Gang 15


How to gain understanding?

Review Literature

Approach â&#x20AC;¢ â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

Review previous studies to learn from existing work and find points of convergence. Study the cultural history of the neighborhood and community to design from a more informed perspective. Survey historic and contemporary literature on neighborhood safety to learn from othersʼ work.

ACTIVE DESIGN GUIDELINES

Every place has a unique past and present. Review recent and historic planning developments and learn about an areaʼs cultural history. It is also important to survey literature on the relationship between the built environment and crime prevention, mental and physical health, and access to opportunity.

ACTIVE DESIGN GUIDELINES PROMOTING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH IN DESIGN

Looking back on 2016, it is hard not to smile on all of the great work accomplished. Each individual and organization within Claremont Healthy Village Initiative exhibited tremendous growth and progress throughout the year. With the close of every year it is fun and important to reflect on achievements and lessons learned, while maintaining an eye on future successes Happy New Year to all, and a final 2016 Thank You for your hard work and dedication. Closing out the year, just a few 2016 highlights (apologies for not being able to include it all): x Youth are the Future: Funded by the New York Community Trust, led by Claremont Neighborhood Center and Family Medicine, CHVI embarked on the ambitious multiyear goal of recruiting and training in leadership 180 youth from the Claremont community. 2016 resulted in successful recruiting of 45 youth, with 36 completing training. Youth were then funneled into paid internships established with CHVI partners. In the second half of the year the youth focus hit new strides welcoming a reinvigorated DFOY and new partner MS 219. In early 2017, a Youth Leadership Subcommittee will carry on this great work continuing to provide opportunities for youth to find their path to a successful life. x Community Activation: Claremont community leaders in 2016, as they do every year, turned up for their constituents. Early in 2016 community leaders participated in the Building Capacity Institute, a leadership training that took place over 16 weeks funded by MEDICC and CPHE. Some of the skills learned in this training contributed to the expansion of community events and partnership growth, including co-hosting a Stop the Violence and Bringing in the Peace rally. PSA 7 police council, in partnership with Morris NYCHA Tennant Association, held the annual National Night Out event. Webster NYCHA Tennant Association was proud coordinators of their Girl Power, and sponsoring a championship youth soccer team. Community Leaders also received funding from the New York City Council to expand lunch programs, refurbish playgrounds and gyms, expand presence of security cameras as well as bring many other great resources to the neighborhood. Health First continued its community events with their massive Health Expo at the Gouveneur Playground in early summer. A crowning achievement, led by Claremont Neighborhood Center in partnership with NYC Councilwoman Vanessa Gibson, was the Claremont community hosting Mayor Bill de Blasio for his first Bronx Town Hall at the CNC gymnasium.

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COMMUNITY HEALTH PROFILES 2015

COMMUNITY HEALTH PROFILES 2015

Brooklyn Community District 16:

Bronx Community District 3:

BROWNSVILLE

MORRISANIA AND CROTONA

(Including Broadway Junction, Brownsville and Ocean Hill)

CLAREMONT HEALTHY VILLAGE INITIATIVE Community Needs Assessment Report

(Including Claremont, Crotona Park East, Melrose and Morrisania)

BROWNSVILLE, BROOKLYN, HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Evaluating social entrepreneurship programs by recognizing and promoting local context - 2015

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Prepared by Arafat Omidiran, MHA Candidate Columbia University, Mailman school of Public health July 2015 Rose Jackson, Ernestine Hodges, Sang Cho, Maxine Dotson, and Andrea McCullough pictured above at HIA workshop

Health is rooted in the circumstances of our daily lives and the environments in which we are born, grow, play, work, love and age. Understanding how community conditions affect our physical and mental health is the first step toward building a healthier New York City.

Health is rooted in the circumstances of our daily lives and the environments in which we are born, grow, play, work, love and age. Understanding how community conditions affect our physical and mental health is the first step toward building a healthier New York City.

HHS Public Access Author manuscript

Int J Emerg Ment Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 February 01. Published in final edited form as: Int J Emerg Ment Health. 2013 ; 15(4): 217â&#x20AC;&#x201C;228.

Life Expectancy in Police Officers: A Comparison with the U.S. General Population

CULTURE IS... HISTORY. FOOD. ART. PAINTING. THEATER. QUILTS. MUSEUMS. DOMINOES. FAIRS. MUSIC. LIBRARIES. POETRY. DANCE. FASHION. PARADES. CELEBRATIONS. ZOOS. GARDENS. SCIENCE... AND MORE!

ABOUT THE From August 2016 June 2017, New Yo from all walks of li help shape the fut arts and culture in CreateNYC will inc intensive public in an in-depth evalua the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cultural a comprehensive cul CreateNYC is an ex opportunity to cre long term roadma promoting greater access, diversity an vibrancy, and expa opportunities for A New Yorkers to ac participate in the c cultural life.

CULTURE IS WHO WE ARE AND WHAT MAKES OUR CITY

SHOW UP! SPEAK UP! STEP

TO HELP US CREATE A PLAN FOR ALL NEW YOR

John M. Violanti, PhD, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, in Buffalo, NY.

1

One New York The Plan for a Strong and Just City

Looking back on 2016, it is hard not to smile on all of the great work accomplished. Each individual and organization within Claremont Healthy Village Initiative exhibited tremendous growth and progress throughout the year. With the close of every year it is fun and important to reflect on achievements and lessons learned, while maintaining an eye on future successes Happy New Year to all, and a final 2016 Thank You for your hard work and dedication. Closing out the year, just a few 2016 highlights (apologies for not being able to include it all):

Tara A. Hartley, PhD, MPA, MPH, Biostatistics and Epidemiology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, West Virginia.

Guiding Principles

Ja K. Gu, MSPH, Biostatistics and Epidemiology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, West Virginia. Desta Fekedulegn, PhD, Biostatistics and Epidemiology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, West Virginia. Michael E. Andrew, PhD, MA, and Biostatistics and Epidemiology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, West Virginia. Cecil M. Burchfiel, PhD, MPH Biostatistics and Epidemiology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, West Virginia.

Abstract Previous epidemiological research indicates that police officers have an elevated risk of death relative to the general population overall and for several specific causes. Despite the increased risk for mortality found in previous research, controversy still exists over the life expectancy of police officers. The goal of the present study was to compare life expectancy of male police officers from Buffalo New York with the U.S. general male population utilizing an abridged life table method. On average, the life expectancy of Buffalo police officers in our sample was significantly lower than the U.S. population (mean difference in life expectancy =21.9 years; 95% CI: 14.5-29.3; p<0.0001). Life expectancy of police officers was shorter and differences were more pronounced in younger age categories. Additionally, police officers had a significantly higher average Correspondence regarding this article may be directed to Dr. Violanti at violanti@buffalo.edu..

The City of New York Mayor Bill de Blasio Anthony Shorris First Deputy Mayor Bill de Blasio Mayor

Dr. Feniosky Peña-Mora Commissioner

x Youth are the Future: Funded by the New York Community Trust, led by Claremont Neighborhood Center and Family Medicine, CHVI embarked on the ambitious multiyear goal of recruiting and training in leadership 180 youth from the Claremont community. 2016 resulted in successful recruiting of 45 youth, with 36 completing training. Youth were then funneled into paid internships established with CHVI partners. In the second half of the year the youth focus hit new strides welcoming a reinvigorated DFOY and new partner MS 219. In early 2017, a Youth Leadership Subcommittee will carry on this great work continuing to provide opportunities for youth to find their path to a successful life. x Community Activation: Claremont community leaders in 2016, as they do every year, turned up for their constituents. Early in 2016 community leaders participated in the Building Capacity Institute, a leadership training that took place over 16 weeks funded by MEDICC and CPHE. Some of the skills learned in this training contributed to the expansion of community events and partnership growth, including co-hosting a Stop the Violence and Bringing in the Peace rally. PSA 7 police council, in partnership with Morris NYCHA Tennant Association, held the annual National Night Out event. Webster NYCHA Tennant Association was proud coordinators of their Girl Power, and sponsoring a championship youth soccer team. Community Leaders also received funding from the New York City Council to expand lunch programs, refurbish playgrounds and gyms, expand presence of security cameras as well as bring many other great resources to the neighborhood. Health First continued its community events with their massive Health Expo at the Gouveneur Playground in early summer. A crowning achievement, led by Claremont Neighborhood Center in partnership with NYC Councilwoman Vanessa Gibson, was the Claremont community hosting Mayor Bill de Blasio for his first Bronx Town Hall at the CNC gymnasium.

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How to gain understanding?

Explore Precedents Studying precedent buildings can lead to discoveries about the relationship between the built environment, police–community relations, and neighborhood safety. Go beyond the image: research the response to the built work and, if possible, speak to people who encounter it on a daily basis to uncover its impact on those who use and experience it.

Approach •

Study existing buildings and spaces that incorporate features to address neighborhood safety. Search for regionally diverse examples but be mindful of their relevance to a specific climate and culture. Analyze the physical interventions and the patterns of programmatic use to further understand their potential benefits.

Rampart Station, Los Angeles, 2008 Perkins + Will Architects

Dudley Square Station, Boston, 2011 Leers Weinzapfel Associates

Skiyabashi Koban (Police Box), Tokyo, 1982 Yamashita

121st Precinct, New York City, 2013 Rafael Viñoly Architects

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How to gain understanding?

Investigate Sites Visiting a neighborhood is not enough; it takes exploring a space with residents and specialists to build relationships and develop a deeper understanding of a place.

Approach • • •

Explore the neighborhood with resident leaders, service providers, and specialists. Talk to people of all ages to hear different perspectives. Walk the neighborhood at different times of day.

NYPD ride-along w/ Officers Hossain and Jamil

Specialist site investigation w/ Mindy Fullilove

Community-led night tours

Studio Gang site investigation w/ Jeanne Gang

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How to gain understanding?

Findings From Agencies

From Communities

From Specialists

Initiatives • Vision Zero NYC Dept. of Transportation (NYC DOT) • Parks Without Borders NYC Parks Dept. (NYC Parks) • NextGeneration NYCHA NYC Housing Authority (NYCHA) • Green Infrastructure Program NYC Dept. of Environmental Protection (NYC DEP) • Mayorʼs Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety Mayorʼs Office for Criminal Justice (MOCJ) • Mayorʼs Office of Tech + Innovation (MOTI) • Building Healthy Communities Mayors' Office of Strategic Partnership (MOSP) and the Fund for Public Health in New York

Partner with local groups. Community-based organizations and stakeholders are experts in their communities. Lead with local knowledge, skills, and services.

Mental Health Insights, Mindy Fullilove Neighborhoods suffer because they are cut off from social and economic systems, which in turn inflames crime and drives negative public health outcomes. Decades of slanderous statements directed against public housing must be reversed; though imperfect it is a valuable asset that backstops the economic wellbeing of disadvantaged New Yorkers. Multi-system, multi-scale interventions—sensitive to local culture and local voices—are required to address the social inequalities and injustices that drive crime.

Tool Kits & Public Resources • Neighborhood Coordination Officers (NYPD) • LinkNYC (MOTI) • Rain Gardens (DEP) • Green Carts (NYC Health) • Movies Under the Stars (DPR) • Street Seats, Plaza Program, Under the El (DOT) Opportunities for Coordination/Collaborations • Lighting • Art in public space • Library programming • Edges of NYCHA campuses • Streets and sidewalks next to civic property • Intersection of civic spaces and transportation

Encourage collaboration. Build coalitions to strengthen community partnerships and leverage skills, knowledge, and joint funding opportunities. Support community leadership. Properly recognize and compensate participants for their time. Create resident-driven policies. Engage residents in the design and implementation of policies that pertain to neighborhood safety. Involve youth. Involve youth in design and development processes in meaningful ways. Engagement is key to project viability. Build on previous work and support ongoing work. Build on existing plans and future capital projects. Connect to existing programs, initiatives, and design proposals. Much work has already been done; use it! Make information accessible. Share collected data and information back with the community to help leaders make informed future decisions. Create clear expectations. Communicate project goals, deliverables, and timeline. Don't over promise and under deliver.

Criminal Justice Insights, Stacey L. Barrenger To successfully combat social disorganization leading to increased delinquency, crime, and perceptions of dangerousness, it is imperative to increase opportunities for social interaction between community members and to foster increased informal social control and collective efficacy. Economic Insights, James Lima Residents perceive the streets and public places in the study areas to be dangerous, thus limiting the viability of a commercial environment. Place-based economic development approaches, formulated and driven by the community, are best suited to reverse this trend because the problems and solutions are more accurately and contextually defined. Data Analytics, Will Snyder The Hardship Index offers a more complete picture of an individual's economic challenges than any one data set. The usual link between neighborhood average income and social engagement is negatively affected by local levels of economic inequality.

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How to gain understanding?

Findings From Literature

From Precedents

From Sites

The Value of Parks and Plazas People with abundant access to parks and plazas are 28 percent more likely to trust police (Center for Active Design and the Knight Foundation, “Assembly Research Brief No. 1”).

Transparent and Welcoming Entry, Rampart Station Rampart uses two transferable strategies to create a sense of welcoming. A gracious lobby oriented toward an adjacent community garden, combined with extensive glazing, creates a sense of arrival and welcoming for visitors to the station. This community-oriented design is reinforced by the clear visual connection from the waiting area to the community multipurpose room and the community relations office, and other publicly oriented services.

NYPD Ride-Along Officers Hossain and Jamil of the 44th Precinct took Studio Gang on a night patrol. It was important to see the consistent dispersal of groups in public spaces, hear why it was important, and learn how officers on foot versus in a car respond differently to incident reports.

Evidence for Green Streets Streetscape greenery improves neighborhood social cohesion, trust, and positive relationships (de Vries et al. [2013]. “Streetscape greenery and health: Stress, social cohesion and physical activity as mediators”). Support for Program Activation People with access to community events are 13 percent more likely to trust police (Center for Active Design and the Knight Foundation, “Soul of the Community”). Rationale for Community Events Getting together once a year or more with neighbors reduces crime (Bellair, Paul. [1997]. “Social interaction and community crime: examining the importance of neighbor networks”). The Case for Culture Access to cultural resources is linked to a 14 percent decrease in child abuse and an 18 percent drop in crime (Stern, Mark and Susan Seifert. [2017]. “The Social Wellbeing of New York City’s Neighborhoods: The Contribution of Culture and the Arts”).

Prominent Community Room, Dudley Square Station Dudley Square demonstrates how to raise awareness of police outreach efforts by making the community room a literal beacon for the neighborhood. The doubleheight space is prominently located at the front corner of the building in a glass volume, announcing its presence by glowing at night. The room and other community-related offices are directly accessible from a corner entry. Entry Greeters, Skiyabashi Koban (Police Box) Skiyabashi exhibits a transferable strategy for strengthening ties between residents and officers: move the point of contact outside. Officers positioned in public space greet visitors, answer questions, and make the police building more approachable and connected to the street. Greenery and Stormwater Retention, 121st Precinct The 121stʼs community green space and rain garden visually manifest a commitment to public stewardship, shared values, and community outreach by placing a well cared for neighborhood amenity in public view. This strategy of using small gestures to demonstrate broader values can be deployed at other precincts throughout the city.

Specialist Site Investigation Studio Gang walked the sites with Mindy Fullilove, James Lima, and Hester Street to gain their unique perspectives of each neighborhood and to talk to people, like Chino (page 18, top right), about the challenges and opportunities they see. Community-Led Night Tours To complement the NYPD ride-along, Studio Gang walked Morrisania at night with Five Mualimm-ak to learn what activities happen at night and where. Studio Gang Site Investigations By walking the streets, interacting with local businesses and CBOs, and speaking to residents, Studio Gang gained an understanding of the context in which the physical and social networks of each neighborhood exist. Studio Gang used this grounding to develop strategies and interventions that will effectively bridge gaps and connect disparate places and people.

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WhatĘźs important?

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Identify Points of Convergence Experts determined, and community members confirmed, that neighborhood safety involves a wide variety of issues, all of which need to be addressed simultaneously to make lasting change. Identified through multiple workshops and meetings, these issues were categorized into six families of related challenges and opportunities.

Youth Engagement Violence Prevention Culture & Community Built Environment

Jobs & Small Businesses Health & Wellness

• High proportion of ”disconnected“ youth (ages 16–19, out of school and work) • Lack of programs that appeal to youth • Negative relationship between police and community and between police and young men of color • High levels of incarceration and recidivism • High levels of returning citizens • High crime in and around NYCHA • Youth crew territories negatively affect area • Territories are barriers to services • Need better lighting throughout neighborhood • Crime around transit hubs • Need neutral space • Lack of awareness of available services • Need intergenerational space • Need diversity of recreation options • Lack of spaces for visitors • Informal barriers to use of assets • Underutilized land • Underutilized assets • Broken commercial corridors • Outstanding NYCHA maintenance issues • Businesses are closed in evenings and at night • Lack of workforce training for women, youth, incarcerated, and formerly incarcerated • Landlords holding property hostage • High obesity rates (32–35 percent) • Poor overall health of residents • Need access to healthy food and food education • Limited places to spend discretionary time Studio Gang 22


WhatĘźs important?

uth nt Yo eme g ga En Violence Prevention

Safe Space

Jobs & Small Businesses

nt me on vir En

Cu Co ltur mm e & un ity

The "policy wheel" is a graphic expression of the broad range of issue types under consideration in this study. Organized as a circle, it is immediately clear when one category or another is absent. Throughout this document, the wheel appears as a quick graphic summarizing the effects of a given place or program, whether proposed or existing. Studio Gangâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s ambition is that such a graphic leitmotif serves as a check ensuring that designs reflect the needs and aspirations of the people with the most at stake, which in turn greatly increases the potential that they make lasting impacts. This framework of toggling between design and evaluation can be used to address any complex policy issue.

He We alth lln & es s

Organize the Issues

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Where to start?

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Start With WhatĘźs There Studio Gang worked with community members, specialists, and agencies to identify people, programs, and places that are assets in each community. Additionally, there are elements that are held in common on every block and planned public investments that can be leveraged to contribute to neighborhood safety. Mapping these discoveries spatially and temporally can reveal key opportunities for design to support, fill in the gaps, and connect the existing assets in each neighborhood.

Be on Belmont at Osborn Plaza, September 1, 2017 (Photo: Made in Brownsville)

169th Step Streets (Photo: Studio Gang)

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Where to start?

People n Ave

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5

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Community Based Organizations Made in Brownsville

Neighbors Brownsville residents

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Resident Leaders At the Langston Hughes Senior Center

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Local Business Owners Ionna, Diana, and Melissa Jimenez

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Work with communities to identify people who are neighborhood assets. Engage them to learn how and where design can support their projects and initiatives. Some examples in Brownsville include:

2

Sutt

e er Av

Case Study, Belmont Avenue, Brownsville

National Agencies with Local Presence Center for Court Innovation

City Agencies NYPD

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Where to start?

Programs and Places Pitki

ast er G

Watk

lvd on B

t ins S

t rn S

ford Ave

Belm

ve ont A

Rock

Brownsville Community Justice Center Community Solutions Langston Hughes Senior Center 3 Black Cats Cafe Mayorʼs Office of Technology and Innovation Made in Brownsville Department of Transportation Pitkin Avenue BID Belmont Medical Family Services Network of NY

Osbo

That

Local Program Providers • • • • • • • • • •

n Ave

Moth

Work with communities to map programs and places that are neighborhood assets to reveal patterns of programmatic use. By revealing whatʼs there, you can identify what and where to introduce new or additional programs. Program providers include residents, agencies, schools, community based organizations, not for profits, businesses, and others.

away Ave

Sutt

Health + Wellness Jobs and Small Businesses Youth Culture + Community Violence Prevention

e er Av

Case Study, Belmont Avenue, Brownsville

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Where to start?

Analyze Hours of Operation Summer Weekday on Belmont Ave.

Chart hours of operation and the times of formal and informal programming, looking for gaps in types and at specific times of day. For a full analysis of both study areas, see Appendix 3 Hester Street Community Engagement Report.

2017 Crime 31

01 AM

51 38 37 24 23 26

06 AM

Time of Day

6 1

6 7 1 2 3 4 5

1

4

9 10 8

12 PM

1 2

2 3

46 37 36

1

4

2

4 2

3

49 46

3

60 62 48 50 72

5

06 PM

High Crime

Activity Gap! 12 AM

0

Health + Wellness

82 68 76 69 70 66 68

50 Major Crimes / Hour

Belmont Avenue, Brownsville The chart above illustrates when services are available on Belmont Avenue, a historic commercial corridor between two public housing developments that has been adopted by CBOs but still feels unsafe at night due to a lack of lighting and inactivity. The programs are charted relative to crime to investigate correlation between program-deficient times of day and crime.

Health + Wellness Jobs and Small Businesses Youth Culture + Community Violence Prevention

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Where to start?

Assess Programs Review types of programs that exist and those that are absent but desired to assess their potential to support neighborhood safety.

Town Hall

Grocery Store

Barber

Beauty Supply

Clinic

Bank

Daycare

Cafe

Gym

Library

WhatĘźs there

Retail

+

Media Lab

Boxing

Co Working Space

Indoor Performance

Kitchen Collective

Meditation Garden

Workshop

Farmer's Market

Dance Studio

Construction Training

Rock Climbing

WhatĘźs possible Studio Gang 29


Where to start?

Identify the Anatomy of the Block There are many elements of the city that are owned in common. Highlight those that are contributing or have the potential to contribute to neighborhood safety.

City-Owned Building

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Streetlight

O s b o r n S t.

Bus Shelter

City Bench

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Tree + Bioswale

Bike Racks

Link NYC

Playground

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What can design do?

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Match What's There with What's Possible

Cu Co ltur mm e & un ity

Cu Co ltur mm e & un ity

He We alth lln & es s

He We alth lln & es s

What始s Possible

=

Violence Prevention

Safe Space

Jobs & Small Businesses

nt me on vir En

Cu Co ltur mm e & un ity

Jobs & Small Businesses

nt me on vir En

nt me on vir En

What始s There

+

Violence Prevention

uth nt Yo eme g ga En

Jobs & Small Businesses

uth nt Yo eme g ga En

uth nt Yo eme g ga En Violence Prevention

He We alth lln & es s

Match what始s there with what始s possible to maximize the impact of interventions and address all of the core issue types on every site.

Safe Space!

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What can design do?

Convene

People

Programs

The Jimenez sisters, 3 Black Cats

NYC DOH MH Green Carts

People

Partnerships

NYPD patrolmen and chiefs

Brownsville Community Justice Center

Programs Made in Brownsville Creative Mentorship

Provide physical and programmatic means through which individuals and organizations can share ownership of spaces that connect them to create an activated network of safe space and access to opportunity.

Partnerships Brownsville Community Culinary Center

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What can design do?

Connect

Public Buildings

Lighting

Open to the street. Activate sidewalks and open space.

Continuously light corridors. Provide human-scale lighting.

Street Elements

Arts & Culture

Make strategic pairings. Create safe places to gather.

Express local identity. Empower local stakeholders.

Trees & Plantings Ensure consistent density and distribution.

There are many components of the built environment that contribute to connectivity, which can strengthen neighborhoods and decrease territoriality. Also strategies like CitiBike and MTA busses can connect neighborhoods to the larger city.

Private Property Extend hours of operation. Light the public way.

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What can design do?

Research-driven Design

More green reduces crime.

Night lights invite activity.

= Jobs

Crime

When employment is up, crime goes down.

Parks grow healthy people and neighborhoods.

$$$ E Places to meet build trust.

Identify design opportunities that are rooted in discoveries from the listen-and-learn process. These direct links between whatĘźs important and whatĘźs there are strong foundations for design proposals.

Great streets make prosperous streets

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What can design do?

Coordinate Planned Public Investments Like many low-income neighborhoods in New York City, a large proportion of the built environment of Brownsville and Morrisania is publicly owned and receives significant city investment from many offices, agencies, and authorities. As a result, planned capital investments are common in these areas. By coordinating efforts between multiple city agencies and in partnership with communities, these public investments can be leveraged to improve neighborhood safety and community well-being. For instance, DOT street lighting initiatives are primarily concerned with vehicular safety and focus on light levels in the roadbed, rather than on the sidewalk. However, if DOT consulted with NYCHA and NYPD before installing new lighting, crime data and public housing community needs could be factored into the decision-making process. As a result, issues of neighborhood safety could be addressed by increasing sidewalk light levels.

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The Brownsville Plan

FDNY Rescue Company 2, Brownsville Brooklyn

HPD Housing, Via Verde, Morrisania The Bronx

Vision Zero for pedestrian traffic safety

Similarly, public library facilities upgrades could be further informed by local education initiatives and needs. After-school programs often lack sufficient staff and funding, yet careful coordination between local groups, agencies, and institutions could allow for solutions that might not be possible for any one entity acting alone. For instance, a library might request funds to build a computer classroom for a local nonprofit, such as Girls Who Code, to operate an after-school coding club, thus meeting a need for youth-oriented skill-building activities.

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What can design do?

Design Strategies Step 1: Start Here

Step 2: Expand the Investment

Step 3: Fulfill Vision

Light touch, community-engaged projects

Public realm–focused capital investments

Existing asset–focused capital investments

Work in phases to identify where communitydriven initiatives can grow into an agencydriven capital project.

Make inviting entrances for police officers and visitors that welcome community members into precincts and encourage resident involvement in law enforcement.

Build station house additions that are transparent, bright, sustainable, and welcoming. The additions can permanently alter the public face of police stations.

Create public space in front of civic buildings in partnership with the community to celebrate the identity of the neighborhood and adjacent institutions using simple low-cost surface treatments.

Create interagency spaces for the delivery of services in station houses and other civic buildings to meet a broader spectrum of community need. Such overlaps could include mental health counseling for returning citizens, assistance navigating the criminal justice system, technology training, and youth engagement initiatives.

Expand existing assets, such as libraries, to accommodate increased functionality, host more robust community events, and support greater levels of interagency programming.

Construct "lantern" buildings that create space for the delivery of agency services and nonprofit programs. Such spaces could host youth and adult education courses, workforce training, cultural programming, and community group meetings, among others. Furthermore, these lanterns would illuminate streets and increase nighttime activity, thereby improving neighborhood safety.

Create flexible indoor and outdoor spaces that can adapt to many uses.

Implement scenarios that meet budget and opportunity of agency programs, capital plans, and operational capacity.

Measure success by identifying issues and related metrics that will track the effectiveness of implemented solutions.

Relocate parking away from main entrances of station houses and civic buildings to open access and welcome participation.

Leverage existing programs from multiple city agencies (Dept. of Transportation, Dept. of Environmental Protection, Parks Dept., Mayorʼs Office for Tech + Innovation, etc.) that operate in the public realm to improve the open space adjacent to civic buildings.

Define community spaces in and around station houses, librarires, and other civic buildings that bring together police, community organizations, and CBOs to strengthen partnerships and address the complex roots of crime.

Design a tracking process for following the progress of multiple interagency initiatives. Include indicators and metrics for measuring effectiveness.

Activate the public realm by enhancing streets and plazas with art, lighting, and plantings.

Support commercial activity near station houses and other civic buildings so that residents, officers, and civil servants can interact on neutral ground.

Investigate the public realm to identify what elements can contribute to neighborhood safety including streets, sidewalks, transit stops, parks, plazas, building entrances, and vacant and underutilized land. Leverage the knowledge of experts, agencies, residents, and research found in relevant literature and studies.

Amplify local activity that CBOs and associations already have underway. Alloying preexisting community initiatives with agency support increases both the odds of positive outcomes and the prudent allocation of city funds to programs with proven track records.

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What can design do?

Programs, Policy, and Partnership Strategies Step 1: Start Here

Step 2: Expand the Investment

Step 3: Fulfill Vision

Light touch, community-engaged projects

Public realm–focused capital investments

Existing asset–focused capital investments

Position inter-agency stewardship structure to collaborate with and be accountable to community residents and leadership.

Employ community liaisons who help identify community resources for officers and serve as a bridge between police and community members.

Design interventions in partnership with communities to empower residents through collaboration and transparent decision-making.

Support cultural, recreational, and community activities on nights and weekends that align with community priorities.

Measure a range of indicators of community health and well-being such as positive police–community interactions, levels of social engagement, and degree of hardship before, during, and after design interventions and activation of stewardship structures. Measure positive interactions and collaborative efforts between police and residents. Develop a stewardship structure for interagency cooperation to deliver and maintain neighborhood activation projects and programs.

Assign officers to nontraditional locations like parks, libraries, and health centers to interact and build relationships with residents.

Place officers at entrances of station houses to meet and greet neighborhood residents and visitors. Communities reliably rate this effective.

Connect neighborhoods to the city by extending the CitiBike network. Many residents in MAP identified neighborhoods suffer from limited access to transit and in turn the economic opportunities present in the city at large. CitiBike offers a simple, easy to install, and low cost means of improving neighborhood connectivity and access to nearby transit options.

Partner station houses with communitybased organizations to program public spaces inside and outside.

Assign responsibility for coordinated delivery of community and commercial services in and around station houses.

Encourage and support youth activity in public places day and night.

Prioritize pedestrian safety at entrances and along sidewalks at station houses, NYCHA campuses, and other public places.

Connect neighborhoods to the city with transit. Many residents in MAP identified neighborhoods suffer from limited access to transit and in turn the economic opportunities present in the city at large. By improving bus service, adding further SBS routes, improving subway headways to speed commutes, this structural disadvantage can be addressed.

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What can design do?

Expand Agency Tools Many agencies have robust tool kits of elements that have the potential to increase neighborhood safety; however, through this project, Studio Gang identified three new tools that will improve safety, health, wellbeing, and access to opportunity.

Parasol

Lantern

Civic Front Yard

A simple structure that provides shelter and light for gathering. Can be deployed as an array to cover larger areas.

A transparent building that hosts programs that activate spaces year-round. Brings light to the surrounding area. Transparency allows residents to see what's happening inside.

A well lit, active public space adjacent to civic buildings that creates opportunities for interaction and engagement. Expands the use of the civic building while also making it more welcoming.

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How to know it's working?

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Measure Impact Gather data on a range of factors that affect neighborhood safety to analyze the impact of design interventions. Set a baseline prior to implementation and take consistent qualitative and quantitative measurements to expose efficacy. Make this information widely available to inform more effective future investment.

Crime & Incarceration

Social Engagement

Youth Engagement

Major Crimes • Murder and non-negligible manslaughter • Rape • Robbery • Felony assault • Burglary • Grand larceny • Incarceration Rate

Short-Term Outputs: Programs and activities could begin changing output metrics in a span of months. • 311 reports: noise complaints • 311 reports: trash/litter • Job training outputs • Block party permits

• • • •

Public Crime Public crime rate has a strong and statistically significant negative impact on social engagement. • Violent crimes and weapons violations recorded as taking place in the public way

Hardship • • • • • •

Crowded housing Poverty rate Unemployment Adults without high school equivalence Age dependency ratio Per capita income

Economic Opportunity • • •

Annual business survey Pedestrian count along commercial corridors Physical improvements to property

Medium-Term Individual or population outcomes: Programs targeted at individuals or small groups of people could effect change in these metrics in a 3-to-5-year time period. • Disconnected youth (individuals ages 16–24, out of school and work) • Proportion of seniors living alone • Limited English proficiency • Residents reporting poor mental health • Building violations Long-Term Systemic change: Programs targeted at community social engagement could effect lasting change over the long term, such as 5 to 10 years. • Change in rent prices • How often residents move • Housing vacancy • Residents with cognitive/ambulatory disabilities

After-school program participation rate High school graduation rate Youth summer and annual employment College matriculation and graduation

Community Relations • •

• • • •

In-person complaints and conversations with police Non-crime-related formal police and community engagement (e.g., presence at job fairs, sporting leagues, participation in parades) Informal officer interactions with residents that are positive versus correctional in nature Percentage of community feedback that is positive versus negative Neighborhood quality-of-life surveys Number of officers with Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) per shift

Health Indicators • • • • • • • •

Self reported health Physical activity in the last 30 days Daily fruit & vegetable consumption Hospitalization for mental health, childhood asthma rates Obesity & diabetes rates Infant mortality rate & Premature mortality rate Childhood Lead poisoning Studio Gang See Tech. Background for more info

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What's transferable?

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Neighborhood Activation Approach

Safe Space

Jobs & Small Businesses

nt me on vir En

Cu Co ltur mm e & un ity

Violence Prevention

He We alth lln & es s

uth nt Yo eme g ga En

An integrated approach of engagement, quantitative and qualitative research, analysis, and design is required to develop plans for neighborhood activation. These six steps provide a framework for locating where to work, gathering information, uncovering whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s important, finding what to start, designing for maximum impact, and analyzing influence.

1

2

3

Find Opportunity in Places with Need

Listen and Learn

Discover Points of Convergence

4

5

6

Start With WhatĘźs There

Strengthen, Combine, and Connect

Measure Impact

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STUDIO GANG PROJECT TEAM Jeanne Gang Founder and Principal Mark Schendel Managing Principal Gia Biagi Principal of Urbanism + Civic Impact Weston Walker Design Principal Rodia Valladares Senior Project Team Leader Project Team Abraham Bendheim Lindsey Wikstrom Teo Quintana With Andrea Rovetta Angela Peckham Art Terry Bethany Mahre Heinz Von Eckartsberg Jonathan Izen Kimberly Daul Perry Strong Stanley Schultz Wei-ju Lai Sarah Kramer Senior Editor

CONSULTANT TEAM

SPECIAL THANKS

Hester Street Community Engagement

Elizabeth Glazer Director, Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice

James Lima James Lima Planning + Development Economic and Placemaking Specialist

Amy Sananman Executive Director of the Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety

Presence Health Data Analysis

Tamara Greenfield Program Director of Building Healthy Communities

Mindy Fullilove Mental Health Specialist Stacey Barrenger Criminal Justice Specialist Arup Sustainability, Security, Lighting, and Traffic Specialist

Ifeoma Ebo Senior Design Advisor, Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice Philip Heller Director of Capital Projects, New York Police Department

Toscano Clements Taylor Cost Estimation

Dean Anagnostos Detective, Capital Construction Unit, New York Police Department

ICOR Mechanical Specialist

Margaret O'Donoghue Castillo Chief Architect, Office of the Chief Architect Frank Kugler Director, Department of Design and Construction Fé Rodríguez Márquez Project Manager, Department of Design and Construction Brownsville Community Based Organizations +1 Health 3 Black Cats Block Bully IT/CCC BMS Family Health Center Brooklyn Public Library Brownsville Community Justice Center Community Board 16 Community Solutions DOHMH Action Center Dream Big DUECES Engineering for Kids FOBP/Kinnon Group Friends of Brownsville Parks Kinnon Group Green City Force It’s Our Time Made in Brownsville Office of Latrice Walker Pitkin Avenue BID Van Dyke Residents Van Dyke Tenant Association

Morrisania Community Based Organizations Action Center Andrew Freedman Home BC2/SUP/JHP/Drive Change Bringing the Peace Bronx Connect Bronx Defenders Bronx Health Reach Bronx Neighborhood Health Bronx Works Cern-Inc Children’s Aid Society CHVI Claremont Board Claremont Neighborhood Center Claremont Healthy Village Initiative Community Board 2 Directions for our Youth Family Medicine Bronx Hi-Tech Charities Incarcerated Nation Corp Incarcerated Nation Inc. Morris House TA Mother of Us All Neighborhood Benches Outreach Co Parsons School of Design Partners for Parks Phipps Neighborhoods So Bro Street Soccer USA Street Vendor Power The Door- Bronx Youth Center Webster Morrisania Urban Health Plan Inc. © 2018 Studio Gang Architects All rights reserved. Studio Gang Architects 50 Broad Street, Suite 1003 New York, NY 10004 +1 212 579 1514 studiogang.com press@studiogang.com

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Studio Gang

Profile for Studio Gang

Neighborhood Activation Study (c) Studio Gang  

Commissioned by the Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice in New York City, Studio Gang’s Neighborhood Activation Study reframes violence and c...

Neighborhood Activation Study (c) Studio Gang  

Commissioned by the Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice in New York City, Studio Gang’s Neighborhood Activation Study reframes violence and c...