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leArning By deSign SPring 2010

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LEARNING BY DESIGN The premier source for education design innovation and excellence

The premier source for education design innovation and excellence VOL 19 / SPRING 2010

clockwise from top left: university of houston—calhoun lofts, oconomowoc Arts center, and The Poplar creek Public library


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In Support of Excellence LEARNING BY DESIGN’s editors and those who play a role in education design share a very important mission: To support the best in education design so the nation’s students can benefit from rich environments that support educational goals. As such, we strive to continuously improve how we serve LEARNING BY DESIGN’s 65,000+ readers. To that end, we recently conducted a survey of LEARNING BY DESIGN readers that confirmed much of what we hear in our regular conversations with architects, facility planners, and education officials: LEARNING BY DESIGN is a well-regarded, high-visibility magazine in the education design space that readers value. Here’s just a sample of that feedback: • 95% strongly agree/agree that LEARNING BY DESIGN is relevant to their work. • 92% strongly agree/agree that the magazine’s articles and architectural listings provide information of value. • 93% find the magazine’s design showcase of school and college/university projects useful. • 92% say LEARNING BY DESIGN’s feature articles on new design trends are useful. Clearly, LEARNING BY DESIGN plays a pivotal role in aiding architects and school and university planners as they create rich and inviting education environments. By showcasing the very best in education design, LEARNING BY DESIGN is supporting excellence in education design. Celebration and Innovation Congratulations to the 17 award recipients featured in the first several pages of this issue! These design projects certainly exude education design innovation and excellence—and we’re grateful to play a role in celebrating that. In other exciting news, debuting this year, our new Fall edition (published in October) will feature a special focus on green design and technology. As with the Spring issue, this special Fall edition will continue to recognize general excellence in all areas. To ensure you’re on that distribution list, send your mailing information to LBD@strattonpublishing.com. And, be sure to keep up with all the latest developments in education design by subscribing to our free bimonthly e-newsletter, LEARNING BY DESIGN E-News. Send a subscription request to LBD@strattonpublishing.com. Also, watch for our newly designed Web site, set to launch this Spring. Let us know if you have any other suggestions, too. n

GO SURFING! This entire issue of LEARNING BY DESIGN is also online. Visit www.learningbydesign.biz to click around—or share the site with a colleague!

Debra J. Stratton

Marilee C. Rist

Publisher, LEARNING BY DESIGN President, Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc.

Publisher, LEARNING BY DESIGN Publisher, American School Board Journal

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Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects earns top Citation of Honorable Excellence Mention honors for The School Without Walls, Washington, DC.2010 The restoration and renovation project links an 2010 innovative high school and a university campus.

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Grand prize–poquoson Elementary School

VMDO Architects, PC is honored for Poquoson Elementary School, Poquoson, VA, which judges call a “magical” learning environment.

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Citation of Excellence Awards

Innovative and thoughtful design dominate Citation of Excellence Award recipients, including a LEED Silver-certified performing arts center and a dramatically renovated public library.

Features 14 Schoolhouse of the Future Existing assets may not be top of mind when planning new schools and universities, but they should be—particularly as education budgets shrink and construction costs escalate. By Sean O’Donnell, AIA, LEED AP

11 Honorable Mention Awards Seven outstanding projects earn Honorable Mention Awards. An Australian K-12 school and a stunning residence hall at the University of Houston are among these stand-outs.

18 The Secret of BIM Cutting-edge 3-D technology and photorealistic renderings— key components of Building Information Management (BIM) technology—change the way architects and clients produce rich learning environments. By John C. Chadwick, AIA, RIBA 21 Leveraged Learning

Site plans and building designs help support a growing education trend—serving high school students on or in close proximity to university campuses. By Jim Wurst, AIA, LEED AP

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On the cover A project of Kirksey Architecture, University of Houston—Calhoun Lofts received an Honorable Mention Award (see page 118); Oconomowoc Arts Center, a project of Plunkett Raysich Architects, LLP, was recognized as an Outstanding Project (see page 126); and The Poplar Creek Public Library, a project of Frye Gillan Molinaro Architects, received a Citation of Excellence Award (see page 128).


LEARNING BY DESIGN Volume 19/SPRING 2010 Published twice annually by Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc. in cooperation with the National School Boards Association and American School Board Journal, 1680 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-1680. Copyright Š2010, National School Boards Association. ISSN:1538-019X.

www.learningbydesign.biz For reprints or to order additional copies, visit www.learningbydesign.biz.

publishers Debra J. Stratton, President Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc. 703.914.9200 Marilee C. Rist, Publisher, American School Board Journal National School Boards Association 703.838.6772

Managing Editor Marlene L. Hendrickson mhendrickson@strattonpublishing.com

Contributing Editor Josephine Rossi

Projects 24 Early Childhood & Elementary Schools 51 Middle & Intermediate Schools 67 High Schools 100 Combined-Level Schools 109 Colleges & Universities 122 Specialized Educational Facilities

project Entry Manager

Resources

Carrie Wood

Design Janelle Welch Renita Wade

131 Meet the Judges

Architectural project Liaisons

132 Case Study

Phyllis Hurdleston 717.560.6706 phyllis@strattonpublishing.com

133 2010 Facilities Resources Buyer’s Guide

Judy Dubler 703.914.9200 ext. 32 jdubler@strattonpublishing.com Carrie Wood 703.914.9200 ext. 25 cwood@strattonpublishing.com

135 Index to Projects By State

Advertising Sales

136 Index to Architects 136 Index to Advertisers

Call for Entries

2011

See page 99 for details!

Alison Bashian 800.335.7500, ext. 21 alisonb@strattonpublishing.com LEARNING BY DESIGN is grateful to the American Institute of Architects, the Association of Higher Education Facility Officers, the Council of Educational Facility Planners, and the National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities for their support.

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Out of the Urban Landscape, Inspired Design I Nestled into the middle of a city block in Washington, DC, The School Without Walls revitalizes a historic building and delivers a stunning learning environment

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t’s historical. It’s modern. It’s high school. It’s college. The School Without Walls rises out of a cramped city block in a splendor of innovation that wowed judges and earned the renovation/addition design project a LEARNING BY DESIGN 2010 Grand Prize Award. Designed by Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects, Washington, DC, “Walls” combines the 19th century Grant School building—a local landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places—with a new, impressive addition that is pursuing LEED Gold certification. “There’s an integrity to the contrast between the new and the old,” said the LEARNING BY DESIGN judges. “It’s skillfully integrated.” Walls serves 460 students in grades 9 through 12 who participate in an innovative early college curriculum that enables them to earn an associate’s degree from George Washington University. The high school and university are physically and programmatically integrated; however, the Grand Prize-winning school gives Walls students a breathtaking and distinct learning environment. “It brings out the best of the old building with a remarkable


new building,” noted LEARNING BY DESIGN judges. “This actually—through the construction of the new addition—celebrates what was great about the old building. The media center, for example, has a view of the entire GWU campus. Those details are really thoughtful.” Bright Building, Bright Futures Completed in July 2009, Walls maximizes its snug half-acre site and 68,000 square feet thanks to the spaces it shares with the university, including the gymnasia, auditoria, and food court. This allowed the design team to create open, flexible “college-ready” classrooms in the new building that university students and faculty can use after the high school day is over. “They’ve taken the old prototype for learning and not necessarily reconfigured it from a footprint point of view,” observed the judges. “But they’ve reconfigured it in terms of how they’re using it.” Judges also noted the extraordinary way Walls’ design maximizes the use of daylight, especially for a learning environment squeezed into an urban college campus. Restored and expansive new windows flood classrooms and shared spaces with sunlight throughout the day, and two linear skylights create the transition between the existing and new buildings.

The School Without Walls maximizes its use of daylight, especially for a learning environment squeezed into an urban college campus. Restored and expansive new windows flood classrooms and shared spaces with sunlight throughout the day.

Additionally, a new entry plaza and bay window contribute to the generous use of natural daylight and create a bright and cheerful introduction to the high school. Creative Connections LEARNING BY DESIGN judges praised the Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn design team for skillfully blending the renovated building and the new addition. “As you move through the school, you don’t necessarily know when you’ve left the old building and entered the new space. It’s subtle, very well done.” The seamless transition between the historic building and the technology-rich addition is a fitting model for Walls’ innovative curriculum and relationship to GWU. Students follow a rigorous college preparatory program amid the university campus, giving them a realistic and valuable jumpstart on life after high school. And much like the subtle relationship between the historic Grant School and the modern addition that creates The School Without Walls, students experience a seamless transition to post-secondary education while in a learning environment that is perhaps like no other in the nation. “Old buildings do some great things for us,” said LEARNING BY DESIGN judges. “It looks like an amazing place for kids to learn.” n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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POQUOSON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL poquoson, VA

Thoughtful Design, Excellence in Every Detail Virginia’s Poquoson Elementary School leverages the best in education architecture to create a stimulating and ‘magical’ environment for young learners 6

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n the wake of Hurricane Isabel in 2003, the city of Poquoson, VA, was under water, including the elementary school. But out of disaster, innovation was born—and the result is a stunning new building that leverages every square foot for the benefit of 675 very fortunate students. Designed by VMDO Architects, PC, Charlottesville, VA, Poquoson Elementary School grabbed the judges’ attention and earned a LEARNING BY DESIGN 2010 Grand Prize Award. The design team was “very clever about every little piece of the building,” judges commented. “Every part of the building becomes a learning opportunity.”


Serving grades 3 to 5, Poquoson Elementary School features a meticulously planned sundial on the face of its main entrance. The sundial adds to the building’s iconic look and serves as an innovative teaching tool. “The smaller-scale learning spaces are really excellent,” judges commented, “and the quality of the materials is exceptional.” Solving Future Challenges Poquoson Elementary School serves three grades, but the design team made its plan expandable so the building could also include the sixth grade, if needed down the road. The building is organized into “grade houses,” with each one named for nearby wetland ecosystems. Each grade house features 10 classrooms that surround a multipurpose double-height shared space that is effective for classroom instruction as well as informal learning opportunities. Judges noted that all of the school’s shared spaces face the outdoors, providing plentiful natural light. Additionally, they were impressed with the design team’s choice of colors—bright, but not trendy. “There’s an integrity and an honesty in the way that the design plan is implemented,” judges said. “Plus, this is really

the age when students are moving from home life to community life, and this building supports that transition.” Individualized Learning Experiences Judges also noted the design team’s success with breaking down the scale of the building, particularly for younger learners. “The scale of the materials in the courtyard, the patterning, while fairly bold, are very thoughtful and won’t become outdated,” judges commented. “They’ve even been strategic about the furniture they’ve chosen. There was attention to detail all the way down to where you sit.” Focus on the experience of each student is what makes this design project so successful, judges added. “A child can have his own environment to learn that feels special.” n Designed by VMDo Architects, poquoson Elementary School features a meticulously planned sundial on the face of its main entrance (opposite). The sundial adds to the building’s iconic look and serves as an innovative teaching tool. Additionally, a multipurpose double-height shared space (below) provides a light-filled environment for classroom instruction as well as informal learning opportunities.

Poquoson Elementary School serves three grades, but the design team made its plan expandable so the building could include another grade as the population expands. www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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Diversity  in Design Excellence From a LEED-certified performing arts center to a technology-rich public library, this year’s Citation of Excellence recipients reveal a dramatic spectrum of innovative and thoughtful design

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ven a quick look at this year’s eight Citation of Excellence recipients makes it clear that students at all levels of education are benefiting from the outstanding work of architects and design teams that specialize in learning environments. At an elementary magnet school serving pre-K to 5 students, light-flooded flexible classrooms support diverse instruction strategies. In another award-winning example, a new middle school features a double gym that was built in conjunction with the city—and now the expansive space is an ideal joint-use facility that creates a valuable relationship between the school and the community. These are among the design strategies and best practices that make well-designed education buildings great, and LEARNING BY DESIGN judges agreed: This year’s Citation of Excellence recipients are exceptional. Here are the eight firms and outstanding design projects that received LEARNING BY DESIGN 2010 Citations of Excellence. EARLY CHILDHooD/ELEMENTARY SCHooLS JCJ Architecture, Hartford, CT, received a Citation of Excellence for the Catherine Kolnaski Elementary Magnet School in

Catherine Kolnaski Elementary Magnet School

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Hackley School: The Kathleen Allen Lower School

Groton, CT. Judges noted that the building’s materials “are very beautifully selected and implemented. It’s a very inviting environment to be in.” Stone and curtain wall make the school’s main entrance stand out, and generous aluminum-framed windows create valuable indoor-outdoor connections. The design team overcame site challenges, including wetlands and rocky, steep topography, to develop two outdoor playfields that allow for concurrent organized sports and free play. Based in Hastings-on-Hudson, NY, Peter Gisolfi Associates earned a Citation of Excellence for Hackley School: The Kathleen Allen Lower School in Tarrytown, NY. Judges were impressed by the project’s “very village-like architecture” and noted that the design “responds well to the scale of smaller children.” The school serves 220 students in grades K to 4 and is part of a larger Tudor-style campus. The design team successfully integrated the new two-story building into the campus while also creating a new meadow quadrangle called Akin Common, a valuable green learning space. Judges also noted the school’s singleloaded circulation, allowing for copious natural light. MIDDLE/INTERMEDIATE SCHooL VCBO Architecture, Salt Lake City, UT, received a Citation


Strawberry Crest High School

of Excellence for Legacy Junior High School in Layton, UT. Judges were particularly impressed with how the school’s design supports informal learning opportunities and maximizes the building’s community use. For example, Legacy’s double gym was built in conjunction with the city—and now the expansive space is an ideal joint-use facility that creates a valuable relationship between the school and the community. Judges also noted the school’s “exceptional indoor-outdoor connections” as well as “exciting exterior” that “integrates well into the landscape.” Legacy serves 1,250 students in grades 7 to 9. HIGH SCHooL Based in Tampa, FL, Long & Associates Architects/Engineers, Inc. received a Citation of Excellence for Strawberry Crest High School in Dover, FL. Judges noted, “From the athletic amenities and library to the cafeteria and media center, every space in this school is well-designed.” Completed in August 2009, Strawberry Crest serves 2,500 students in grades 9 to 12. The school is part of a master plan that organizes three distinct campuses at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. The schools share sustainable strategies, including shared water retention. “Good campus plan,” judges said. “The architect and the owner really put together a school that met some innovative criteria.”

CoMBINED-LEVEL SCHooL Scott Simons Architects, Portland, ME, earned a Citation of Excellence for the Waynflete Arts Center, part of Portland’s Waynflete School, which serves 560 students in grades pre-K to 12. The school’s campus features a mixture of renovated buildings and modern additions located in a historic residential district, and the design team creatively added the Waynflete Arts Center to this environment. Judges noted the “very skillful integration” of the center. “They’ve accomplished something that’s very difficult: tying the new building with the historic houses and existing academic buildings. It’s quite a nice performance space, too, very nicely detailed.” Waynflete Arts Center features visual arts spaces, a theater, art and dance studios, and music and drama classrooms. It is also certified LEED Silver. SpECIALIZED EDUCATIoNAL FACILITY Based in Chicago, Frye Gillan Molinaro Architects received a Citation of Excellence for The Poplar Creek Public Library in Streamwood, IL. This innovative renovation/addition to the library transformed existing reading rooms to comfortable lounges that encourage small learning groups and informal interaction. A 5,000-square-foot teen center in the library also helps make the library a valuable community building. “It’s recreating how libraries should act and feel,” judges commented. “And the architecture is very interesting; very innovative design.” The library has a capacity of nearly 1,800 students. The outdoor space features native plants, a filtration rain garden, and more than 15,000 square feet of sedum roofing.

CITATIoN oF EXCELLENCE AWARDS 2010 Early Childhood/Elementary Schools

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• JCJ Architecture for Catherine Kolnaski Elementary Magnet School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 • Peter Gisolfi Associates for Hackley School: The Kathleen Allen Lower School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

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• VCBO Architecture for Legacy Junior High School . .58

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• Long & Associates Architects/Engineers, Inc. for Strawberry Crest High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94

Legacy Junior High School

M O R E C I TAT I O N W I N N E R S N E X T PA G E

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CoLLEGES/UNIVERSITIES Moody•Nolan, Inc., Columbus, OH, received a Citation of Excellence for the Ohio Dominican University—Bishop James A. Griffin Student Center, also in Columbus. “This is very inviting architecture in a lot of ways,” judges said about the new student center, which is certified LEED Gold and has a

ohio Dominican University

Waynflete Arts Center

capacity of about 3,100. “Clearly the atrium is the heart of the building. It feels like a place where you’d really want to be.” Judges also noted the building’s “very warm and inviting palette of materials,” which helps create a social place where students will want to gather. The student center also features a fitness center, lounges, grille and coffee areas, and larger gathering spaces. “As a social place, it is very successful,” judges added. “It also responds well to a larger campus plan.” Based in Dallas, HKS, Inc. received a Citation of Excellence for Eastfield College Learning Center in Mesquite, TX. “It’s got a fabulous plan,” judges noted. “It’s very modern and fits into the vernacular very well.” The learning center features a two-story entry atrium and open stairway bridge that provide impressive sight lines throughout the building. The bridge features comfortable seating areas, “creating different opportunities to gather and linger for awhile,” said judges. “There are little nooks and crannies throughout, little meeting areas that make this an exciting building to be in.” The student center has a capacity of 550 students that have access to a coffee kiosk and Internet café that further support informal learning opportunities. n

CITATIoN oF EXCELLENCE AWARDS 2010 Combined-Level School

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• Scott Simons Architects for Waynflete Arts Center, Waynflete School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106

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• Frye Gillan Molinaro Architects for The Poplar Creek Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128

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poplar Creek public Library

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• Moody•Nolan, Inc. for Ohio Dominican University— Bishop James A. Griffin Student Center. . . . . . . . . .115 • HKS, Inc. for Eastfield College Learning Center . . .113


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Creative Connections

Lively Learning A skillfully renovated K-12 school in Australia, an impressive university residence hall in Texas, and five other innovative projects exude the qualities of design excellence that earned them Honorable Mention Awards

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s judges discussed the exceptional attributes of this year’s LEARNING BY DESIGN Honorable Mention Award recipients, an often-mentioned highlight was how well each design project fit into its surroundings—whether an expansive, bustling college campus or an intimate, deeply wooded hilltop. Judges noted “lots of different learning opportunities in different settings for different types of activities” among the seven design project that received Honorable Mention Awards, all of them exceptionally executed. For example, the design team of a science and technology center in Beverly Hills, CA, implemented built-in seats along the building’s corridors that are flooded with natural light through-

HoNoRABLE MENTIoN AWARDS 2010 Early Childhood/Elementary School

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• The Geddis Partnership, PC for Notre Dame Academy, Early Childhood Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 M O R E H O N O R A B L E M E N T I O N W I N N E R S, PAG E 1 3

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out the day, creating an ideal place for students to gather between and after classes. In another example, the design team of an early childhood center introduced L-shaped classrooms that support independent as well as group learning for young learners. Here are the seven firms and outstanding design projects that received LEARNING BY DESIGN 2010 Honorable Mention Awards. EARLY CHILDHooD/ELEMENTARY SCHooL Based in Southport, CT, The Geddis Partnership, PC received an Honorable Mention Award for Notre Dame Academy, Early Childhood Center in Staten Island, NY. The school achieves “a cottage feeling,” judges noted. “It has a nice small scale appropriate for the early childhood level.” The Notre Dame Academy serves 112 students in grades pre-K to 2. The school is surrounded by woods and four other academic buildings on a nine-acre site. Judges noted how well the school fits into the site and creates diverse learning opportunities within its L-shaped classrooms. Each classroom features built-in cubbies and radiant heating under the floors for the comfort of children napping on mats. www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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Beverly Hills High School

George Washington Carver High School

HIGH SCHooLS LPA, Inc., Irvine, CA, received an Honorable Mention Award for the Beverly Hills High School Science & Technology Center in Beverly Hills, CA. The new building serves 810 students in grades 9 to 12 and features thoughtful finishing details throughout. For example, corridors feature curriculum-related graphics and factoids amid bold images. Students have access to 12 science labs and 18 math classrooms throughout the four-story building. A 100-seat lecture hall also contributes to the school’s diverse learning environments. “It’s a clean plan that also creates 12

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a very nice outdoor space,” judges commented. The building is organized around a courtyard that was designed to demonstrate principles of math, science, and nature. Based in Philadelphia, SCHRADERGROUP architecture LLC received an Honorable Mention Award for the George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Science, also in Philadelphia. Judges noted exceptional transparency throughout the building, which serves 900 students in grades 9 to 12. The design team “created a nice plan to maximize natural light and views,” judges said. “The building is skillfully integrated on a 3.5-acre site.” The building is also a valuable teaching tool for engineering and science students. For example, the HVAC systems can be monitored from student labs and portions of exposed building structure illustrate construction methods. The school also features eco-friendly measures such as water-saving fixtures and landscaping with native plants that require no irrigation. Fanning Howey, Alexandria, VA, earned an Honorable Mention Award for the Phelps Architecture, Construction, and Engineering High School in Washington, DC. Judges were impressed by this transformation of an abandoned building into a high-tech vocational learning environment. “They’ve made some very interesting spaces out of what were forlorn pieces of the existing building,” they noted. “And they’ve also clearly taken using the building as a teaching tool to heart.” Serving 622 students in grades 9 to 12, the Phelps school features a soaring twostory commons that displays exposed structural elements as well as the principles of welding, drywall, and masonry. Building systems are also color-coded to support instruction strategies. “It’s a very hands-on, interactive learning environment,” judges said. “They’ve used the building to connect the career-focused curriculum to the more conventional academic aspects of learning.” Based in Tacoma, WA, BLRB Architects received an Honorable Mention Award for the Garfield High School Historic Renovation and Addition project in Seattle. Located in one of Seattle’s oldest urban neighborhoods, Garfield High School went from being disjointed and disconnected to high-tech and iconic—while remaining respectful of its historic architecture. Judges said this “thoughtful modernization adds spaces the historic building could not have accomplished.” For example, a small gymnasium annex built in 1962 is now an 83,700-squarefoot physical education and performing arts center that opens up to a new community entrance plaza. Judges also praised the design team’s adaptation of the old auditorium, transforming it into soaring, daylight-filled commons. “By adapting the auditorium, they’ve created a heart for the school.” CoMBINED-LEVEL SCHooL Fielding Nair International, LLC, Lutz, FL, received an Honorable Mention Award for Scotch Oakburn College (SOC) in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia. And while it’s referred to as a college, this building serves 360 students in grades K to 12. “They’ve rethought the essential components of the building,” said judges, referring to a well-executed plan that supports per-


Garfield High School

sonal learning communities. These smaller groups of students and their teachers have access to flexible classroom spaces that feature mobile walls, making them valuable rooms for after-hours community use. “It’s a very innovative plan,” judges commented. “There is also a nice diversity of furniture and colors throughout the building.” CoLLEGE/UNIVERSITY Based in Houston, TX, Kirksey Architecture earned an Honorable Mention Award for the University of Houston— Calhoun Lofts, a new residence hall that houses up to 984 students. The new building features all the modern amenities that today’s students value, including Wi-Fi and AT&T U-verse integration. Calhoun Lofts also offers multipurpose rooms, a computer lab, and flexible study spaces throughout the building. But perhaps the most iconic building feature is a “sky lounge” on the top floor where students can gather to study and socialize beneath a stunning skylight. This shared space is filled with natural light and features a stunning view of the campus below. The design “takes advantage of the top of the building to create a really inviting space,” judges said. “It’s skillfully done.” n phelps Architecture, Construction, and Engineering High School

HoNoRABLE MENTIoN AWARDS 2010 High Schools

University of Houston—Calhoun Lofts

Scotch oakburn College

page

• LPA, Inc. for Beverly Hills High School Science & Technology Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 • SCHRADERGROUP architecture LLC for George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 • Fanning Howey for Phelps Architecture, Construction, and Engineering High School . . . . . . .87 • BLRB Architects for Garfield High School Historic Renovation and Addition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72

Combined-Level School

• Fielding Nair International, LLC for Scotch Oakburn College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104

College/University

• Kirksey Architecture for University of Houston— Calhoun Lofts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

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Tighter budgets and higher expenses drive design creativity and the modernization of existing buildings

This renovated building in Washington, DC, dates back to 1882, when it was a small, residentially scaled urban schoohouse.


schoolhouse

future

of the

By Sean o’Donnell, AIA, LEED Ap

W

hile budgets continue to bear the brunt of declining revenues, escalating construction costs, and skyrocketing transportation expenses, the need for high-performance, forward-thinking educational environments remains constant. One strategy that’s making significant progress—despite the bevy of unfavorable factors—starts with examining existing assets. There are more than 125,000 buildings throughout the country already dedicated to K-12 education. Add to that the thousands of buildings that serve early childhood and postsecondary students, and it becomes even more apparent that leveraging existing assets to meet the needs of the nation’s learners is an option worth considering. Here’s a look at how to examine those assets and strategies for maximizing their benefit to students, educators, and communities. Existing Value A metric that’s often used to assess the educational adequacy of a school district’s building stock is the average age of its facilities. The higher the average age, the less supportive the architecture is assumed to be of the educational program. With deferred maintenance and limited capital funds available for periodic upgrades, this may be a fair assessment. Older educational facilities often lack accessibility, adequate HVAC systems, sufficient power for

contemporary educational technology, or the right space for a 21st century curriculum. However, with the proper investment, older buildings are capable of meeting contemporary educational needs. And when considered within a broader context of educational and societal goals, they may even exceed the performance of a new green-field school. For example, many existing educational facilities were designed to optimize natural light and ventilation. Accordingly, they have tall ceilings and expansive windows—assets for meeting sustainable design criteria. Many were built in architectural traditions that have for generations asserted the importance of the school as the “center of community”—a tenet of 21st century educational facility planning. Many are centrally sited within their communities, making multiple modes of transportation (walking, biking, mass transit, cars, etc.) important factors in addressing the overall health of our children and our communities. The simplicity of many of these buildings’

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Renovations and additions to Washington, DC’s Brightwood Elementary School (above and below) resulted in new flexible and diverse spaces needed to support the curriculum. The classrooms are now organized into child-scaled “neighborhoods.”

plans is both an asset and a challenge. For example, buildings from the early to mid 20th century often are best suited to housing classrooms. Many are simply comprised of a repeated classroom module of somewhere around 700 to 900 square feet. Spaces such as science labs, art rooms, music rooms, and media centers may not fit within these repeated modules. Limited floor plans don’t readily accommodate the addition of smaller spaces such as administrative offices, resource rooms, bathrooms, and elevators. If this is the case, the evaluation should consider whether an addition can “unlock” the potential of the existing building, enabling it to thrive in the 21st century. Maximum Results Originally built in 1926, Brightwood Elementary School in Washington, DC, is a perfect example of a good classroom building with many positive attributes. Internally, with some adjustment, the existing classrooms were large enough, they were reasonably well-proportioned, and they had access to plentiful natural light. However, the building only had bathrooms on the ground floor, it did not provide the diversity of spaces (large and small) necessary for a modern program, its infrastructure was obsolete, and it was inaccessible. An architectural and design evaluation concluded that these shortcomings could be resolved through two additions that would, in conjunction with the existing building, provide the variety and types of spaces, services, infrastructure, and organization necessary for a contemporary elementary school curriculum. The first addition created a commons building that provides a place for shared resources that would not easily fit within the existing building. These include administrative offices, gym, cafeteria, art and music rooms, and a media center. Collected together with an accessible new front door, an elevator, and a

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central mechanical room, these programmatic elements created a community center shared by the school and the neighborhood. A second smaller classroom addition replaced the multipurpose room and complemented the classrooms in the existing building, creating a central gathering space and helping to reorganize all of the classrooms into child-scaled “neighborhoods.” Similarly, The School Without Walls Senior High School in Washington, DC, a small, residentially scaled urban schoolhouse dating to 1882, was renewed through an addition that enabled the 19th century building to do what it does best—provide large, flexible classrooms with a distinctive character. Like Brightwood Elementary, the new addition made the existing building accessible and provided large and small spaces ranging from bathrooms to science and art labs, a media center, a roof terrace, and a commons. Even if an existing building is significantly undersized, with the right site, it can become the core of a 21st century school. At 17,000 square feet, the 1932 vintage Stoddert Elementary School building was less than a third of the size needed to support the educational program. Plus, as an old prototypical classroom building, the facility did not offer any common spaces. Once a 48,000square-foot addition is completed, the revitalized campus will feature new classrooms and shared resources that will be used jointly by the school and the Department of Parks and Recreation. With the addition and a ground source heat pump system (geothermal), this little, old school building will achieve LEED Gold. In each of these case studies, the additions enabled the existing buildings to remain more than viable into the future and helped meet the needs of students, educators, and the community. The combination of new and existing buildings enabled reprogramming, reorganization, and the provision of new learning resources and sustainable infrastructure, while celebrating the continued vitality and sustainability of these essential and long-serving community assets. Sometimes, however, the building is not the issue, it’s the site. Quite simply, more parking or additional athletic fields require space. Acquiring an adjacent site may be one approach, but if that’s not an option, a policy-driven solution might be in order. The small neighborhood-oriented sites that are typically associated with existing schools—and where parking issues are common— often have access to walkable, transit-oriented resources. An innovative Transportation Demand Management (TDM) measure, for example, provides incentives for pursuing designs that encourage walking, biking, use of mass transit, and carpooling. Similarly, when the need for athletic fields exceeds a site’s capacity, consider joint use of a nearby park or the creation of


a districtwide athletics plan that might create centrally located shared practice fields and sports facilities. Arlington, VA’s Yorktown High School, located on an 11.5-acre site, illustrates both the implementation of innovative TDM measures and the joint use of an adjacent park. The Yorktown TDM plan provides incentives for students and faculty to leave their cars at home, and the building’s entry emphasizes arrival on foot, by bike, and mass transit. The adjacent park provides all of the school’s athletic fields. Together, these two strategies enable the high school to remain integrated with the neighborhood it serves. Regulatory Challenges The continued use of existing school buildings and sites is not only challenged by existing physical conditions or operational issues. Often, decisions to abandon valuable buildings and their sites are driven by standards and policies that are biased toward new construction. Among these are minimum acreage standards and 60 percent or “two-thirds rules.” While intended to protect the public investment in quality educational facilities, these policies have had unforeseen educational, social, and financial impacts. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 27 states have established standards for the minimum size of a school site. Many existing sites that have performed well for generations may not comply with these standards, so referencing these criteria may lead to negative assessments. However, as many existing facilities demonstrate, large sites do not necessarily correlate with educational success. In fact, these standards may work against many of our educational values and unintentionally result in the suburban sprawl. However, as these sites become more remote and less easily accessible, hard costs may extend beyond the boundaries of the

site for off-site expenditures on new utilities, and roadways and escalating operational and environmental costs associated with reliance solely on automotive transportation may be unavoidable. Like minimum acreage standards, two-thirds rules were implemented to protect public investments but they also provide financial incentives to build new when the cost of renovating an existing facility exceeds two thirds of the cost of building new, even if the modernization costs less in total and meets other important community goals. In a 2004 study by the Michigan Land Institute entitled “Michigan’s School Construction Boom: The Real Cost of New Public Schools,” researchers concluded that, “in every case we studied, building a new school cost more than renovating an older one.” In an era of declining revenues and limited bonding capacity, the return on investment associated with new construction may not warrant the hard-cost premium over the continued use of viable, long-serving educational facilities. More information is available from the many groups already engaging these issues, including the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the EPA’s smart growth program. Vincent Scully, a widely revered architectural historian, once said that architecture is a conversation between the generations, carried out across time. Not only is the continued contribution of our existing school buildings to the education of our families practical, cost-effective, and sustainable, the act of revitalizing these campuses reinforces the fabric and heritage of our communities, conveying our core values to the next generation. n Sean O’Donnell, AIA, LEED AP, is a principal at Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects in Washington, DC. He also serves as chair of the LEARNING BY DESIGN jury. Reach him at sodonnell@ eekarchitects.com.

How to Measure Your Building’s Potential Determining the “educational adequacy” of an existing building and site should begin with a hearty discussion of the expected outcomes. This includes how the project will support the culture, curriculum, and pedagogy of the school, college, or university. It also must establish desired organization principles, space needs, and performance criteria, beginning with questions about how teaching and learning will be supported. For example: • In each setting, what modes of learning will be used (seminar, lecture, collaborative learning, project-based learning, etc.)? • How should we organize the learning community (by grade, by academies, etc.)?

• How should teachers collaborate and communicate? • How will parents and the community engage the school and use the facilities? • What outdoor program is needed (recreation and athletic areas, parking, service)? • How should we foster a safe and secure environment? The answers to these and similar questions will help you determine whether the existing building and site can accommodate these needs. As the evaluation of a specific site begins, questions to answer will include: • Is the building too small or too large?

• What kinds and how large are the existing spaces? How do they compare to what is needed? • How are they organized? Can the desired overall organization and localized adjacencies be created? • Are room sizes and proportions right for the modes of learning anticipated? • Is natural light available to the right places? • Are the footprint and volume to integrate new infrastructure available? • How flexible/adaptable is the building structurally if changes are needed? • Are there opportunities within the school’s context (neighborhoods, parks, complementary programs) for joint programming and joint use? —Sean O’Donnell

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The

of

Secret It’s not just the cutting-edge 3-D technology or the photorealistic renderings it produces, it’s the way Building Information Management affects design collaboration that’s truly revolutionizing how we build learning environments.

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rchitects and engineers have been using computer-aided drafting (CAD) programs to design all types of buildings since the 1970s. And although the technology has evolved over the years, its benefits to education design and construction have been remarkably few. This is mostly because CAD drawings have remained two-dimensional, making the whole CAD format not that far removed from traditional hand-drawing. Some owners could even argue that the drawing quality—and therefore the effectiveness of the planning process—has declined with the use of CAD programs. Fast forward to present-day education design and construction, and it’s clear that the advent of Building Information Management (BIM) technology has not only picked up where CAD left off, but it has also enhanced the collaborative elements of the design process. The trend began in the early 1990s—and ever since then, BIM technology and the threedimensional computer renderings it produces have become increasingly sophisticated. In fact, renderings have become so photorealistic that they could even raise false expectations among owners and architects, who become too committed to a design before it has been reconciled with the program, the budget, and the detailed CAD documentation needed for construction. Indeed, CAD-generated renderings have

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BIM By John C. Chadwick, AIA, RIBA

not materially transformed the way architects and engineers develop their designs or the way they communicate with their clients and the construction contractors. Rather, 3-D BIM technology programs, including Revit by Autodesk and Bentley Architecture, integrated with more accessible rendering programs—such as Google SketchUp, which is itself integrated with Google Earth—are rapidly replacing two-dimensional CAD programs, and revolutionizing the way we create learning environments. BIM technology programs are transforming and improving the entire process of design, procurement, and construction. Because they are accurate—and essentially create a virtual building that mimics the future construction process—BIM programs improve the way designers think in three dimensions. They integrate databases so that every component of construction can be identified and quantified, and they greatly facilitate coordination and collaboration because all design team members work in a single virtual model, no matter where they are located. But the most important BIM benefit to owners and users of educational facilities is the design team’s ability to communicate in three dimensions throughout the design process. With BIM, everyone—including students—can understand what’s being proposed, not just the few who have been trained to read two-dimensional plans, sections, and


This BIM-generated rendering illustrates the renovated classroom and window space for Thomas Jefferson Middle School in Arlington, VA. RENDERING COURTESY OF PERKINS EASTMAN

elevations. This means more individuals can contribute to the process and the completed project is more likely to satisfy hopes and expectations. Benefits and Benchmarks The database capabilities of BIM technology offer several notable benefits. For example, educational specifications are integrated with the building model from the outset. Existing and proposed facilities are analyzed, compared, and benchmarked in numerous ways to achieve equity and improve space utilization. Then, consider the bottom-line benefits: • Because of its realistic presentation, BIM allows the project’s design to be more easily quantified. Therefore, it’s more likely that pre-construction cost estimates will be more accurate. • BIM greatly facilitates coordination of architecture and engineering documentation, which helps reduce time and capital expenditures during construction. The BIM process highlights conflicts for resolution before construction begins. • BIM’s realistic presentation works especially well for planning renovation and modernization projects, which helps

minimize construction’s impact on the faculty’s work flow and class schedules. BIM also helps the design team achieve its goals for high-performance facilities that improve student outcomes. It enables designers to study, for example, how the building will interact with the natural environment outside: the path of the sun, the shadows it creates, and the lighting conditions it provides in a classroom through the course of the day and the seasons. The technology facilitates the integration of natural light with artificial light to create lively glare-free conditions under which students can focus and absorb more, while also reducing energy consumption. During design and construction the design team can share copious data and the great variety of two- and three-dimensional drawings that BIM can produce with educators to support opportunities for innovative, project-based learning. After occupancy, BIM technology can support the building’s learning objectives and sustainable goals by providing specific data for ongoing maintenance and operations. Technology at Work Thomas Jefferson Middle School, part of

the Arlington Public Schools system in Virginia, dates back to 1972. The school, which shares its gym and theater with the community, is an early and successful example of the school-as-center-of-community concept. However, the school building itself is attached to the gymnasium in a two-story, deep-plan volume—with only one exterior wall and a total of 13 small windows admitting natural light, design features that limited the effectiveness of this outstanding International Baccalaureate middle school. Since the original construction drawings were available, the design team created a virtual model and three-dimensional survey of existing conditions using BIM technology. The resulting model proved to be an invaluable tool for analysis and communication as the project developed because it facilitated a great deal of community interaction. The BIM-supported process also helped hone the project’s scope. For example, the project started as a comprehensive renovation project. It then became a complete rebuild of the school portion of the facility. And finally, due to budget constraints, it reverted back to a limited improvement project, adding windows

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This rendering, prepared during concept design/ program development, presents a detailed look at a computer lab in the proposed Northern Virginia Community College Higher Education Center, to be located in Loudoun County, VA. RENDERING COURTESY OF PERKINS EASTMAN

and skylights and replacing finishes and major mechanical equipment. BIM has also assisted the team in managing the seven phases of construction needed to keep the school operating safely throughout the academic year. In another example, Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) in early 2009 solicited help with assessing its facilities inventory and utilization data for 42 buildings on six campuses and seven centers, totaling just over 1.5M gross square feet. The design team first verified existing CAD drawings and space utilization data on site, then created accurate BIM models of every building that included utilization data conforming to the State Council for Higher Education in Virginia (SCHEV) classification system. Since the data is readily exportable from the BIM models to a spreadsheet program, the design team was able to analyze space inventory, space utilization, and enrollment to provide copious information and raise important questions about how space is used on each campus, and how utilization varies between campuses. The design team found that on all but one campus the space available was approximately half of what is permitted under SCHEV standards. Space utilization challenges on the one campus that did approach the standards were attributed to specialized uses and to a particularly high proportion of non-credit courses that do not count toward SCHEV standards. Previously, NOVA could not access such detailed information, highlighting BIM’s 20

ability to support ongoing planning and help maximize space utilization. This is especially valuable as community college enrollment nationwide continues to rise at a rapid rate, and funding for new facilities cannot keep pace with demand. Community College Challenge In another NOVA example, the analysis of an earlier master plan combined with the BIM space analysis for the community college’s Loudoun Campus prepared the design team well for the programming of a new 40,000-square-foot Higher Education Center. Other than two specific program spaces, a recording studio, and a GIS laboratory, the initial program called for a variety of classrooms and informal learning spaces. Because programs change and evolve so frequently to meet students’ needs, classrooms on this campus do not correspond to any particular department— unless the classes are so specialized that no other department can use them. Keeping flexibility top of mind, and based on the average and maximum numbers of students in traditional versus computer laboratory classes, the design team developed a standard classroom module that can accommodate up to 40 students in a traditional class and up to 28 students in a computer laboratory. Technology infrastructure allows each classroom module to be used as either a traditional classroom with loose furniture or a computer laboratory with fixed furniture, and will also allow the use and layout of each room to change throughout the life of the building.

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Using BIM technology, the design team developed a variety of layouts for both fixed and loose furniture that would encourage collaborative learning and take full advantage of technology. From the BIM model the team developed threedimensional drawings in SketchUp to show faculty and staff the wide variety of layouts possible within the same classroom. They also made SketchUp drawings of the other spaces proposed for the building, including informal learning spaces, open faculty and adjunct-faculty workstations, and a multi-use event space, to demonstrate how every space in the building could be used to encourage learning and collaboration. The three-dimensional drawings generated invaluable comments and feedback that were used to revise and strengthen the design. Starting Blocks While BIM technology far exceeds CAD’s capabilities, it is still only in its infancy and its power to transform how we design, procure, and construct buildings remains largely untapped. In many instances, design teams still use BIM programs to produce two-dimensional construction drawings, and for the most part the technology is less developed for mechanical and electrical engineers than it is for architects and structural engineers. Additionally, for various liability reasons design teams are still reluctant to share BIM models with contractors. Though it remains to be seen just how transformative BIM technology will prove to be, it certainly has the power to break down the barriers between the owner and the various members of the design and construction teams. It enables greater communication and collaboration among them—and that is making all the difference in the design process. Implementation of BIM technology should also lead to more pre-fabrication, higher quality construction, and buildings that more specifically meet owners’ expectations and maximize designers’ creativity. And in the end, it’s the students who benefit most. n John Chadwick, AIA, RIBA, is associate principal and national market sector leader for learning with Davis Langdon, Washington, DC. He contributed this article while serving as managing principal with Perkins Eastman, Arlington, VA. Chadwick also has served as a member of the LEARNING BY DESIGN jury panel. Reach him at jchadwick@ davislangdon.us.


Leveraged

Learning

By Jim Wurst, AIA, LEED Ap

Innovative community partnerships maximize the value and aroundthe-clock utility of schools, colleges, and other learning environments— especially when well-planned flexible buildings can adapt to diverse needs.

E

ven the healthiest education budgets—whether they support K-12 public schools, community colleges, or universities—benefit when schools form strategic partnerships with their surrounding communities. Establish a relationship where an entire community can benefit from a new or renovated education building, and suddenly that capital investment has the visibility and support it needs to result in a valuable joint-use facility. But while the potential benefits of joint-use are numerous, these partnerships can be challenging to implement. Partnership agreements must be carefully crafted to ensure fairness, equity, and benefit for all parties. From the start, critical issues need to be addressed, such as specific roles and responsibilities, facility and program supervision, and financial and in-kind support. In summary, an effective joint-use partnership agreement should include: • clarification of the capital investment by the partners • arrangements for maintenance and repair • programs or activities covered by the agreement • assignments of operational costs, such as utilities • assignments for staffing and supervision • access by the partners and hours of operation • assignments for safety and security Beyond making the most of the physical building as part of a joint-use partnership, there are perhaps even more important benefits to reap on behalf of the nation’s learners. A trend that has been building momentum in recent years is a joint-use partnership model where high schools are placed on college campuses. In addition to maximizing space, resources, and facilities, younger students have an intimate view of their post-secondary possibilities. Designing a high school on a college campus offers a unique challenge compared to a stand-alone school. The process of working with two clients versus one adds a layer of complexity, but often the synergy between two very different organizations that share a common goal can lead to innovative design solutions. What makes these projects unique is the connection between the school’s facilities and

The Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, located on the campus of California State University Los Angeles, allows high school students to enroll in post-secondary coursework and share university buildings.

the larger university campus, which is both physical and programmatic. Here are several examples of how design can support that connection. Art for All Managed by the Los Angeles County Office of Education, the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts opened on the campus of California State University Los Angeles (CSULA) in 1985. The high school specializes in dance, music, theater, and visual arts training, and has been named a California Distinguished School for Academic Excellence. High school students may enroll in CSULA classes once they complete their graduation requirements, allowing them to become part of the university campus and transition to the college environment. Students also meet with CSULA counselors who help them plan college coursework. Once they’re enrolled in CSULA classes, students can also access the university’s library and athletic facilities. Overall, this partnership creates a feeder into CSULA’s fine arts www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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program and supports the post-secondary aspirations of Los Angeles County students and their families. In another similar example, the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona shares its campus with the Los Angeles County International Polytechnic High School. The high school aims to bridge its curriculum with areas of study at the post-secondary level, and, conversely, university students use the high school as a training ground. For example, university students studying to become educators fulfill in-class clinical hours at the high school.

“The concept was to create an environment for a transition that is seamless with no blurred lines for students,” says J. Michael Ortiz, president of California State Polytechnic University, noting that comprehensive collaboration between the university and the Los Angeles County Office of Education was a critical step toward a successful joint-use partnership. New and Improved For more than 20 years, Middle College High School operated in portable classrooms on the campus of Los Angeles Southwest College. Despite its subpar learning environ-

High School Cafeteria, Lexington, KY

fan may is h t f o e Us use limit the C of HVA *Side effects may include: an improved style profile, more comfortable students, and the repeated sound of “WOW!” We apologize that our 8-20 ft diameter architectural line comes with a warning. Big Ass Fans move so much air, so slowly, so quietly over large spaces such as libraries, cafeterias and gymnasiums that we needed to warn you about the common side effects* students and administrators experience. So, if you’re considering a move to exceptional air circulation and extraordinary style, as the saying goes, forewarned is forearmed. Or ten bladed, in our case. To discover how Big Ass Fans optimize the performance of an HVAC system and reduce energy consumption, visit www.BigAssFans.com or call 877-BIG FANS (877-244-3267).

Room to Grow Joint-use partnerships promote healthy growth for school districts, colleges, universities, neighborhoods, and communities. Their numerous benefits to students include expanded learning facilities and resources— and in the case of shared campuses with colleges, a leg up on succeeding after high school. With these unique relationships and opportunities, school districts and higher education institutions will continue building educational programs that provide challenging curricula to students throughout their communities while maximizing limited resources such as space and construction dollars. n Jim Wurst, AIA, LEED AP, is a principal for HMC Architects in Ontario, CA. Reach him at jim.wurst@hmcarchitects.com.

©2010 Delta T Corporation dba The Big Ass Fan Company. All rights reserved.

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ments, the high school continued to produce some of the highest-achieving students in California. Today, as a result of the unique collaboration between the Los Angeles Community College District, the Los Angeles Unified School District, and Los Angeles Southwest College, education leaders have started working toward new construction. The main goals are to expand the educational opportunities for the local community and provide a direct link to higher education for secondary students, many of whom are from low-income families. The new high school will share athletic fields and other campus facilities at the college, which will in turn have access to the high school facilities for after-hours and weekend functions. The design creates a building that belongs to its college campus while acting as a distinct facility with its own identity. The California Academy of Mathematics and Science (CAMS) is a comprehensive four-year public high school located on the campus of California State University, Dominguez Hills. In December 2007, Newsweek released the results of a twoyear study to determine the 100 best high schools in the United States. Of the 18,000 schools reviewed, CAMS ranked No. 21. A truly unique joint-use partnership allows all students to become part of the university campus. For example, students in grades 11 and 12 use advanced university science labs. Conversely, university students use CAMS classrooms in the evening when college enrollment is heavier. CAMS also shares many of the university’s facilities.

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Vigil aSSoCiatES Y D G& B IN E N arChitECtural group, pC R 4477 Irving NW, Suite A Albuquerque, NM 87114 Honorable www.va-architects.com

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Raymond R. Vigil, AIA, LEED AP 505/890-5030 2010 dESign tEam Raymond R. Vigil, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Jo Montague, RA, LEED AP, Project Architect QPEC Engineering Corp., Structural Engineers Coupland-Moran Engineers, Inc., Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers Jeff Mortensen & Associates, Inc., Civil Engineers Vigil Contracting Services, Inc., Contractor oWnEr/CliEnt Albuquerque Public Schools Albuquerque, NM Karen Alarid, Director of Facilities Design & Construction 505/242-5865 KEy StatS grades Served: Kindergarten Capacity: 83 students Size of Site: 0.3 acres Building area: 5,494 square feet Building Volume: 73,200 cubic feet Space per Student: 66 square feet Cost per Student: $11,892 Square Foot Cost: $180 Construction Cost: $987,000 total project Cost: $1.3 million Contract date: Aug. 2004 Completed: Aug. 2006 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: Patrick couLie PhotograPhy

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ocated in Albuquerque’s South Valley, Atrisco Elementary School is made up of a campus of buildings dating back to the 1950s. The new 5,500-squarefoot kindergarten addition is a free-standing building designed to complement the existing campus while adding a colorful, modern character. The addition provides three kindergarten classrooms, each with a full kitchen, bathroom, walk-in

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storage closet, and direct access to a new tot lot dedicated for use by the kindergarten. The spacious classrooms are designed to accommodate a variety of learning spaces and activities while maintaining good visibility by the teachers. Every classroom includes a corner reading nook with built-in shelving that doubles as a window seat. Tall corner windows, skylights, and operable windows allow students

and teachers to enjoy the warm, sunny weather of Albuquerque, New Mexico, while reducing the need for artificial cooling and lighting. As part of this project, a separate kindergarten drop-off lane was added directly in front of the kindergarten building, providing safer and more convenient access for parents and students. In addition, existing parking areas were reconfigured for better efficiency. n


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Baker and george Elementary Schools Brockton, Massachusetts

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G BY D hmFh inC. I N arChitECtS, E N R 130 Bishop Allen Drive Cambridge, MA 02139 www.hmfh.com Honorable

Susan Mention Elmore, Marketing Manager 617/492-2200

2010

dESign tEam Stephen Friedlaender, FAIA, Project Director Pip Lewis, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Maria Mulligan, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect Gary Brock, LEED AP, Team Member Deborah Collins, AIA, Team Architect John Nunnari, Construction Administration oWnEr/CliEnt Brockton Public Schools Brockton, MA Matthew H. Malone, Ph.D., Superintendent 508/580-7511 KEy StatS grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 850 students each Size of Site: 13.4 acres (Baker); 15 acres (George) Building area: 116,000 square feet each Building Volume: 1.5 million cubic feet each Space per Student: 136 square feet each Cost per Student: $34,667 Square Foot Cost: $224 Construction Cost: $26 million each total project Cost: $33 million each Contract date: Mar. 2007 Completed: Aug. 2008 (Baker); Dec. 2008 (George) Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: Wayne soVerns Jr.

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hese two schools complete Brockton’s city-wide elementary school construction program, increasing capacity and providing equity across districts. The 850-student, pre-kindergarten to grade 5 schools are based on identical programs and share a floor plan. The simple plan is organized around grade-level groups and flexible shared spaces for performances, assemblies, and athletics. Throughout the building, 21st century technology is combined with traditional learning: The library offers both a cozy story nook and current research technology, and heavily used smartboards are mounted in each classroom. Bright, playful colors and patterns, unexpected window connections between adjacent spaces, and exposed ductwork actively engage students in their surroundings. Both schools feature skylights, daylight dimming systems, and the use of recycled construction materials. The distinctive brick and zinccoated copper exterior was chosen for minimal longterm maintenance. The Baker School also includes a 40-kW

photovoltaic array, a portion of which is embedded in the cafeteria windows to allow students to see what makes their school sustainable. A rainwater harvesting system for irrigation at the Baker

School and a winding path through wetlands to the playfields at George are likewise both green and educational, providing students with tangible examples of their school’s sustainability. n

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Bonny Slope Elementary School Beaverton, Oregon

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G B Y D arChitECtS dull olSon I N WEEKES E N R907 SW Stark Street Portland, OR 97205 www.dowa.com Honorable

Mention Steve Olson, Principal 503/226-6950

2010

dESign tEam Steve Olson, Principal-in-Charge, DOWA Barry Deister, Designer, DOWA Bill Conboy, Project Manager, DOWA Skanska USA, Contractor Leslie Imes, District Project Manager Kim Haskins, School Principal oWnEr/CliEnt Beaverton School District Beaverton, OR Jerome Colonna, Superintendent 503/591-8000 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 600 students Size of Site: 8.5 acres Building area: 80,405 square feet Building Volume: 2.8 million cubic feet Space per Student: 134 square feet Cost per Student: $32,700 Square Foot Cost: $244 Construction Cost: $19.6 million total project Cost: $23.1 million Contract date: June 2006 Completed: Sept. 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: gary WiLson Photo/graPhic

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onny Slope Elementary School presented an opportunity to create a second-generation design. Beginning with a tour of a project we completed for the district in 2001, we listened to the users about what worked and what they would improve to create a solid foundation from which the final designs of Bonny Slope were built. The steep slope of the site meant that access for buses and trucks was a major consideration in locating the building. Compact site issues necessitated the creation of a two-story classroom wing, with the media center located on the upper floor. The classroom wing was oriented to take advantage of natural daylighting that penetrates through the building and corridors. Mimicking the playfulness and activity of children, a dynamic faรงade pattern was created by careful placement and color selection of windows and metal panels. Educational spaces were designed with L-shaped classrooms to create small, flexibleuse spaces that the district has found to be beneficial for small group instruction. Classrooms are connected to these flex spaces through the calculated placement of transparent glass, providing super-

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vision of the flex space while minimizing distractions. Spaces for pull-out activities including music and gym, as

well as the cafeteria, are located near the entry to provide high visibility and easy access for community use. n


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Catherine Kolnaski Elementary magnet School 2010

Groton, Connecticut

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

JCJ arChitECturE 38 Prospect Street Hartford, CT 06103 www.jcj.com James E. LaPosta, Jr., AIA Chief Architectural Officer 860/247-9226 dESign tEam Gilbane Building Company, Construction Manager Consulting Engineering Services, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineering Maachi Engineers, Structural Engineering Pare Corp., Site, Civil Engineering Ferraro Hixon, Landscape Architecture CCR Pyramid, Technology oWnEr/CliEnt Town of Groton, Groton Public Schools Groton, CT Paul J. Kadri, Superintendent 860/572-2100 KEy StatS grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 550 students Size of Site: 23.7 acres Building area: 74,000 square feet Building Volume: 765,500 cubic feet Space per Student: 1,345 square feet Cost per Student: $36,545 Square Foot Cost: $272 Construction Cost: $20.1 million total project Cost: $26.4 million Contract date: Nov. 2004 Completed: Jan. 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: roBert Benson renDering: JcJ architecture

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atherine Kolnaski Elementary School is a 74,000-square-foot steel frame pre-K-5 learning community housing 550 students. Stone and curtain wall distinguish the main entrance, with brick and aluminum framed windows along with metal panel, curtain wall, and stone for the balance of the facility. Site considerations included the need to master plan and provide infrastructure for a future middle school on the 125-acre site. Wetlands,

substantial rock, and steep topography contributed to the design challenge. Two outdoor playfields allow for concurrent organized sports and free play. The building plan has a “main street,” forming a long arc following the terrain, with a twolevel “local street” that provides the majority of the classroom space. The design provides easy delineation between community and general instructional spaces. Flexibility of the learning environment emerged as

the most important criterion to project stakeholders. JCJ designers responded with L-shaped classroom configurations that facilitate learning simultaneously and separately, allowing students who need additional guidance to work away from the larger group while remaining part of their classroom. Students can work independently or with another student, instructor, or tutor in one of the learning areas. The building was designed to meet current NECHPS guidelines. n

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the Chickasaw nation Child development Center Ada, Oklahoma

Child Care Center NEW CONSTRUCTION

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Boynton G B Y WilliamS DE IN N R & aSSoCiatES 4455 LBJ Freeway, Suite 820 Dallas, TX 75244 Honorable www.bwaarchitects.com

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Stacy Liston, LEED AP 972/661-5461 2010 dESign tEam Jay W. Boynton, AIA, Director, Principal Architect Dayna Boynton, AIA, Project Architect Diann Franklin, Director of Operations, Piazza Construction, General Contractor Doug Fakkel, Owner, Fakkel Art, Muralist oWnEr/CliEnt The Chickasaw Nation Ada, OK Bill Anoatubby, Governor 580/439-7280 KEy StatS grades Served: 6 weeks - 5 years Capacity: 250 children Size of Site: 2.6 acres Building area: 26,728 square feet

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he Child Development Center was designed to provide state-of-the-art child care services for community children. It is a year-round facility that provides affordable child care for approximately 250 children from six weeks to 5 years of age. The facility consists of ageappropriate classrooms, cafeteria, full kitchen, media room, aerobic room, staff lounge, sick room, indoor play areas, screening rooms, and administrative offices. In every corri-

Building Volume: 403,420 cubic feet Space per Student: 107 square feet Contract date: Sept. 2007 Completed: Mar. 2009 Completion: 100%

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dor there are three-dimensional murals, which are visually as well as tactilely important. The center reflects a community setting, incorporating many learning styles and learning opportunities as well as a high standard of safety with the development of safe rooms—one on the lower level and two on the upper level— and access control systems. The classrooms have been equipped with smartboards, which provide touch control computer applications for interactive

whiteboard learning. The facility is designed as a town-like atmosphere known as Fun Town, USA, with nursery rhyme highlights throughout, bringing childhood imaginations to life. The center is complete with street signs for hallways and physical addresses for each room, incorporating the Chickasaw language into the facility. The Chickasaw language is the heritage of more than 80 percent of the children attending the center. n


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G BY D oWp/p dESign I N | Cannon E N R111 W. Washington Street Chicago, IL 60602 www.owpp.com Honorable

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dewey Elementary School Evanston, Illinois

library/media Center

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Mention Rick Dewar, AIA 312/960-8034

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dESign tEam Rick Dewar, Project Director Trung Le, Design Principal

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n 2007, OWP/P | Cannon Design and Evanston/ Skokie School District 65 identified a number of facility improvements necessary to provide enhanced learning spaces for increased enrollment at the school. In 2009, thanks to a group of dedicated parents and community members, the result was a library/classroom wing addition that was contextual to the attached 1920s building while marking Dewey

Justin Cafferty, Project Manager Keith Hammelman, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineer David Bibbs, Structural Engineer Wendy Watts, Interior Design oWnEr/CliEnt Evanston/Skokie School District 65 Evanston, IL Dr. Hardy Murphy, Superintendent 847/859-8000 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 398 students Building area: 8,000 square feet Space per Student: 20 square feet Cost per Student: $8,970 Square Foot Cost: $446 Construction Cost: $3.6 million total project Cost: $4 million Contract date: June 2008 Completed: June 2009 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: JaMes steinkaMP

School’s progression into 21st century teaching and learning. The addition was a truly integrated design process in which the community had a stake in the project’s success. The new multizone, multigenerational library includes multimedia group learning spaces, computer stations and smartboard technology, ergonomic furniture, intimate reading areas, and a tiered storytelling space. OWP/P | Cannon Design incorporated the school’s curriculum emphasis on geography by using different gradations of blue for the library’s interior walls—a representation of the world’s vast bodies of water. OWP/P | Cannon Design also designed a new main office suite that incorporates a secure and easily identifiable

main entry with new classrooms, storage rooms, and an elevator for ADA accessibility. The Dewey School addition incorporates a number of environmentally sustainable components such as natural daylighting, construction products containing recycled and recyclable materials,

regionally manufactured furniture, finishes and casework that are non-toxic and formaldehyde-free, and native landscaping. The addition also contains energy-efficient lighting and controls and an HVAC system that exceeds current minimum efficiency standards. n

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Eagle Elementary School Delmar, New York

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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BY D CSarCh | GarChitECturE IN E N ConStruCtion managEmEnt R 40 Beaver Street Albany, NY 12207 Honorable www.csarchpc.com

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Richard L. Peckham, AIA 518/463-8068 2010 dESign tEam Richard Peckham, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Ron Bagoly, AIA, Design Architect Thomas Kenney, AIA, Project Manager Andrew Neubauer, AIA, Project Architect Melissa Renkawitz, Intern Architect Cathleen Peckham, ASID, Interior Designer oWnEr/CliEnt Bethlehem Central School District Delmar, NY Dr. Michael Tebbano, Superintendent 518/439-7481 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5

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he ambiance of a tightly knit neighborhood school, complete with a “main street” that functions as a communal hub, was created at the new Eagle Elementary School in Delmar, New York. A centralized cupola identifies the main entry for visitors and provides daylighting to the lobby area below. Inside, the cupola houses a cozy reading area within the media center. Custom steel trusses in the cafeteria and media center mimic a timber frame

Capacity: 576 students Size of Site: 21.4 acres Building area: 57,980 square feet Building Volume: 1.5 million cubic feet Space per Student: 100 square feet Cost per Student: $17,101 Square Foot Cost: $170 Construction Cost: $9.9 million total project Cost: $11.8 million Contract date: Mar. 2004 Completed: May 2009 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: ranDaLL Perry PhotograPhy, inc.

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design and add character and warmth to the spaces. Large windows in hallways and stairwells maintain visual connections both within the school and to the outdoors no matter where you are in the building. The design was used as a pilot for New York’s Collaborative for High Performance Schools Verification Program (NY-CHPS) and includes many sustainable features. The twostory layout maximizes the number of spaces oriented for

direct south/north exposure for natural light; incorporates deep roof overhangs for shading in spring and summer and heat gain in winter; and maintains a minimal footprint on the site, allowing wetlands to remain undisturbed. Stormwater is treated on-site and discharged into an on-site stream. Cubby areas in classrooms are arranged along interior walls and are set apart with lower ceilings and separately switched lighting, which can be turned off when not in use. n


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Eastlake Elementary School South Jordan, Utah

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Y D VCBo arChitECturE G B IN E 524 South 600 East Salt Lake City, UT 84102 www.vcbo.com Honorable

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2010

dESign tEam Steve Crane, FAIA, REFP, Principal-in-Charge Dan Nelson, Associate AIA, Project Manager Comtrol, Inc., General Contractor oWnEr/CliEnt Jordan School District West Jordan, UT Dr. Barry L. Newbold 801/567-8180 KEy StatS grades Served: K-6 Capacity: 850 students Size of Site: 7.4 acres Building area: 86,350 square feet Building Volume: 1 million cubic feet Space per Student: 102 square feet Cost per Student: $17,852 Square Foot Cost: $176 Construction Cost: $15.2 million total project Cost: $16.2 million Contract date: Mar. 2007 Completed: June 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: Dana sohM, sohM PhotograPhs

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astlake Elementary School is the first of a new two-story prototype design for the Jordan School District. Recent property value increases have created the need for the district to fit a large elementary school on a site that uses the space as efficiently as possible. A part of the Daybreak Community development, this 86,350-square-foot facility was built on land donated to the district by the developer and features design elements that facilitate collaborative learning in a lively, exciting, academic environment. To accommodate the fast-growing community, additional classrooms were added to the original design. Gathering spaces for group learning are provided throughout the building, creating a feeling of inclusion and community. The Eastlake design also provides teachers with ample work areas. Four faculty preparation rooms make tasks like grading and lesson planning easier and more collaborative. Two large faculty workrooms

facilitate special projects and keep clutter out of the classrooms. A large media center is part of the flexible design, along with a multipurpose room suitable for athletic,

community, and school-wide events. The multipurpose room has its own entrance and can be separated from the rest of the building for after-hours use. n

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Tarrytown, New York

NEW CONSTRUCTION

pEtEr giSolFi aSSoCiatES 566 Warburton Ave. Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706 www.petergisolfiassociates.com Sandra K. Mintzes, AIA, LEED AP 914/478-3677 dESign tEam Peter A. Gisolfi, AIA, ASLA, LEED AP, Partner-in-Charge Sandra K. Mintzes, AIA, LEED AP, Partner, Project Manager Gideon Kipperman, RA, Project Architect Tomo Kimura, ASLA, Landscape Designer

Marco Martelli Associates, General Contractors oWnEr/CliEnt Hackley School Tarrytown, NY Walter Johnson, Headmaster 914/366-2601 KEy StatS grades Served: K-4 Capacity: 220 students Size of Site: 5 acres Building area: 33,000 square feet Building Volume: 330,000 cubic feet Space per Student: 150 square feet Cost per Student: $44,500 Square Foot Cost: $295 Construction Cost: $9.8 million total project Cost: $12.2 million Contract date: Mar. 2006 Completed: Aug. 2007 PhotograPhy: roBert MintZes, LeeD aP

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hackley School: the Kathleen allen lower School

Entire School/Campus Building

Joori Suh, CID, LEED AP, Interior Designer

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he Kathleen Allen Lower School is part of a campus planning effort that has gone on for eight years at the Hackley School. After lengthy deliberations about renovating or replacing the Lower School, which was built in the early 1970s, the decision was made to design a new K-4 school that would relate to the Tudor-style campus, but be distinctly different and more child-friendly. During an earlier phase of the master plan, a new meadow quadrangle, Akin Common, was created in the center of the campus. The new Lower School replaced the old building on the same plateau overlooking Akin Common, but was designed to engage and interact with this important new green space. The new two-story building is comprised of three interlocking structures arranged in a C-shape. These elements create a central courtyard for the school’s playground. The microclimate of this protected south-facing space makes this courtyard an

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ideal place to play, even during colder months. The building is organized by a single-loaded corridor on each floor facing predominantly south or east, looking directly into the playground; classrooms, special spaces, and offices are located to the north of these corridors. The single-loaded corridor arrangement mimics the designs of the Middle and the Upper Schools. A stone

tower at the east end of the main corridor “speaksâ€? to other important towers on the campus. Overall, the building is designed with young children in mind and feels residential in scale. Important elements like lockers and windows are low to the ground. Tiles on the courtyard façades and interesting floor patterns in the main corridor stimulate imaginative play. From the

corridors, children are able to see the activities of other children outside, and teachers can passively monitor the entire courtyard. Transparency and visibility reinforce the sense that this building is a community of children. While the owner chose not to pursue LEED certification, the building is intrinsically sustainable and incorporates passive solar design strategies. The corridors are filled with

natural light. Solar energy stored in the tile-covered concrete floor slabs helps heat the corridors during colder seasons. The corridors and all occupied rooms have operable windows to promote natural ventilation, augmented by ceiling fans. The building is constructed using materials with high thermal mass, creating a stable interior environment; it was designed to conserve energy. n

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dla arChitECtS, G B Y D ltd. (dahlIN N lutZoWEarChitECtS) QuiSt and R 15 Salt Creek Lane, Suite 400 Hinsdale, IL 60521 Honorable www.dla-ltd.com IG

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Carrie Matlock, AIA, LEED AP 630/230-0420 2010 dESign tEam Eric S. Sickbert, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Ron Giles, AIA, Project Manager Gene Park, Pease Borst & Assoc., Structural Engineer Jeff Leverenz, Mechanical Services Assoc., Mechanical Engineer Mark Carlson, Mechanical Services Assoc., Electrical Engineer Todd Abrams, W-T Civil Engineering, LLC, Civil Engineer oWnEr/CliEnt Community Consolidated School District 146 Tinley Park, IL Dr. Marion Hoyda, Superintendent 708/614-4500 KEy StatS grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 550 students

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Fulton Elementary School

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ocated near a historic district, Fulton Elementary consolidates two existing grade centers into one new and comprehensive school with a program prototype to match other district schools. Influenced by the prairie style, the building is tucked within a residential neighborhood, flanked by open fields and parkland. The new school is LEED registered and is designed to provide enhanced acoustical properties for the core learning spaces, encourage the use of alternative transportation, and reduce the heat island effect and light pollution. Low-flow plumbing fixtures and dualflush toilets curtail water use. Energy usage was minimized through the use of energy-efficient HVAC systems, daylight harvesting, and a tight building envelope, along with enhanced commissioning. An active, engaged community produces motivated, inspired learners. Fulton is the anchor to a community-focused campus, shared with local sports organizations. Students not only have access to a variety of athletic and open spaces, but they will have a sense of pride and involvement in knowing

Size of Site: 9.7 acres Building area: 62,000 square feet Building Volume: 827,600 cubic feet Space per Student: 113 square feet Cost per Student: $23,114 Square Foot Cost: $205 Construction Cost: $12.7 million total project Cost: $12.7 million Contract date: May 2008 Completed: May 2009 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: DLa architects, LtD., aLeXanDer roManoVsky

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the significant role their new sustainable school plays in the community. The building features a media center that serves as

the school’s figurative “family room.” Centrally located, it provides easy access to all students and brings down the building’s scale at street level. n


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hillside Elementary School New Richmond, Wisconsin

green School Building interior design NEW CONSTRUCTION

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atS&r IplannErS/arChitECtS/ NG BY DE N EnginEErS R 8501 Golden Valley Road, Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55427 Honorable www.atsr.com Mention Paul W. Erickson, AIA, NCARB, REFP 763/545-3731 2010 ClarK EnginEEring www.clark-eng.com dESign tEam Dean Beeninga, AIA, NCARB, Planner, Project Architect, Project Manager Paul L. Snyder, AIA, CID, NCARB, Principal-in-Charge James T. Lange, PE, Mechanical Engineer Gaylen D. Melby, PE, Electrical Engineer David Bridges Technology Richard Koechlein, ASLA, Site Development oWnEr/CliEnt Hillside Elementary School New Richmond, WI Morrie Veilleux, Superintendent 715/243-7411 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 600 students Size of Site: 110 acres Building area: 85,510 square feet Building Volume: 1.3 million cubic feet Space per Student: 143 square feet Cost per Student: $19,099 Square Foot Cost: $134 Construction Cost: $11.5 million total project Cost: $13.6 million Contract date: Oct. 2007 Completed: Fall 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: rick Peters, insiDeout stuDios

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esigned for green construction, Hillside Elementary School incorporates many features and elements of sustainable architecture. ATS&R and the School District of New Richmond worked together to set and evaluate energy performance goals for the new school, ensuring a minimal carbon footprint for the new facility. Some of these sustainable features and elements included protecting the downstream wetlands during construction; capturing runoff in temporary holding basins with a “treatment train� that provides clean water runoff as it enters the city and county stormwater management system; using integrally colored concrete floor slabs that were ground and highly polished to serve as finish flooring in the classrooms and corridors; installing highly durable and low-maintenance surfaces that require minimal use of cleaning agents; incorporating water-saving features such as low-flow water saver faucets and dual-level flush valve toilets; minimizing energy consumption with automated lighting, occupancy sensors, variable air volume systems, and use of daylight throughout the facility; and installing high-energy insu-

lated windows that reduce heating and cooling costs. Sustainable qualities, timeless design, and efficiency

make Hillside Elementary School a source of community pride and an Energy Star award winner n

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NEW CONSTRUCTION

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JaCKSon King Y D G BBroWn IN E N RarChitECtS, inC. 12921 Cantrell Road, Suite 201 Little Rock, AR 72223 Honorable www.jacksonbrownking.com IG

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Harvey F. “Bunny� Brown IV, AIA, LEED AP 2010 501/664-8700 dESign tEam James H. Cone Construction, General Contractor Crafton Tull Sparks & Associates, Landscape Architect Engineering Consultants, Structural Engineer Innovative Solutions Group, Mechanical and Plumbing Engineer Lucas, Merriott & Associates, Electrical Engineer Mehlburger Firm, Civil Engineer

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urricane Creek, the first LEED 2.2 Silver elementary school in Arkansas, strives to create a better learning environment while teaching students about green technology. To maintain cost effectiveness for the district, the design team searched for a balance between indoor quality, energy efficiency, and maintenance savings, nearly recouping the cost of the building within its projected life cycle. In a time of rising energy costs, designing green is not only environmentally but also fiscally responsible. For safety, the building has two major access points: a parental drop-off on the lower level and a bus drop-off on the upper level. This allows children attending the school to avoid crossing traffic areas when accessing the building. By creating bi-level access, we have also minimized the impact on site topography.

oWnEr/CliEnt Bryant Public Schools Bryant, AR Dr. Richard Abernathy, Superintendent 501/847-5600 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 568 students Size of Site: 8.1 acres Building area: 72,152 square feet Space per Student: 127 square feet Cost per Student: $18,395 Square Foot Cost: $145 Construction Cost: $10.4 million Contract date: May 2006 Completed: Sept. 2007 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: shieLDs-MarLey PhotograPhy

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hurricane Creek Elementary Benton, Arkansas

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Hurricane Creek was designed to maximize the use of natural daylight. Harvesting techniques both lower energy consumption and improve the overall mood of the interior spaces. Continuous post-occupancy system calibrations are performed to ensure maximum efficiency, creating noticeable differences in the classrooms. When the extensive calculations and technical design issues reach resolution, the one true measure of success in any school is the quality of education provided within the walls of the facility. n

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

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Jack C. Binion Elementary School Richland Hills, Texas

Entire School/Campus Building

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B Y D inC. G hKS, E 1919 McKinney Ave Dallas, TX 75201 www.hksinc.com Honorable

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Mention Sara Sepanski,

Awards Coordinator 214/969-5599 2010 dESign tEam

Mark Vander Voort, AIA, LEED AP, Design Principal Greg Frnka, AIA, Project Manager Jessica Mabry, Intern Dean Mobley, Construction Administration oWnEr/CliEnt Birdville Independent School District (BISD) Richland Hills, TX Dr. Stephen Waddell, BISD Superintendent 817/547-5700 KEy StatS grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 700 students Size of Site: 8.5 acres Building area: 92,000 square feet Building Volume: 2.2 million cubic feet Space per Student: 131 square feet Cost per Student: $16,071 Square Foot Cost: $122 Construction Cost: $11.3 million total project Cost: $13.4 million Contract date: June 2007 Completed: Aug. 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: BLake MarVin, hks, inc.

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ack C. Binion Elementary School’s L-shaped footprint allowed it to be built around the existing campus, which remained in operation throughout construction. With 88,000 usable square feet for its 700 students, the new school is designed with flexible spaces to accommodate growth and change. The architecture of Binion Elementary pays homage to the 1950s history of the original school while offering open, studio-like areas for every grade level. Such teaming areas provide unique learning opportunities and can accommodate groups and class combinations of various sizes. As a benefit to the neighborhood, the building serves as a buffer to what has become a busy street over the past 50 years. With the original school building and 21 portable classrooms razed, a park-like playground area now faces the community. Recalling the original school’s 1950s architecture, the design of the new elementary school has horizontal and cantilevering roof forms with

an emphasis on horizontal lines. Similar brick colors are incorporated, and a commemorative space is reserved in one of the corridors as a heritage hall for posterity. It is interesting to note that Ralph Hawkins, HKS’s chair-

man and CEO, is an alumnus of the elementary school. When he attended the school in the early 1950s, the original school, then known as Glenview Elementary School, had Jack C. Binion as its principal. n

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the leaguers head Start School Newark, New Jersey

Child Care Center NEW CONSTRUCTION

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Ei aSSoCiatES, G B Y DarChitECtS IN E N R & EnginEErS 8 Ridgedale Ave. Cedar Knolls, NJ 07927 Honorable www.eiassociates.com

Mention

Thomas J. Andrasz, RA, CID 973/775-7777 2010 dESign tEam Richard F. Basta, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Thomas J. Andrasz, RA, Project Director John L. Pavlak, Project Manager oWnEr/CliEnt The Leaguers, Inc. Newark, NJ Veronica Ray, Executive Director 973/643-0300 KEy StatS grades Served: Pre-K Capacity: 180 students Size of Site: 1.1 acres Building area: 45,000 square feet Building Volume: 382,500 cubic feet Space per Student: 60 square feet Cost per Student: $61,100 Square Foot Cost: $244 Construction Cost: $11 million total project Cost: $13.5 million Contract date: Dec. 2006 Completed: Sept. 2009 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: ei associates

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he Leaguers Inc., a nonprofit community service organization, retained EI to design its new 45,000-square-foot, threestory Head Start School facility located at 405-425 University Avenue, Newark, New Jersey. The building is elevated to provide a secure parking garage for 75 cars. The first floor, which is approximately 22,000 square feet, houses the Leaguers’ Head Start Program, with seven classrooms containing stateof-the-art technology; a nurse’s station; supporting administra-

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tive offices; a teachers’ lunchroom; a Head Start lobby with built-in display cases; a media center; a secured outdoor play area; access to a fully functional kitchen for daily meal distribution to the Head Start Program; and multipurpose/ training rooms to support administrative, child, and community services including adult learning programs. The secondand third-floor levels accommodate the Leaguers’ administrative functions. The building is reminiscent of early Newark architecture,

making use of white brick and creating a strong presence on University Avenue. Blue and multicolored tinted glass, as well as a primary color palette of accent brick, forms the Head Start entrance. This primary color coding is further introduced within the classroom interiors to provide visual distinctions between each of the areas. These classroom “color ways” are then woven together in the hallways and common areas to create a rich, child-friendly interior environment. n


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lee h. means Elementary School Harlingen, Texas

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G BY D gignaC llp I N & aSSoCiatES, E N R 416 Starr Street Corpus Christi, TX 78401 www.gignacarchitects.com Honorable

Mention Raymond Gignac, AIA 361/884-2661

2010

dESign tEam Raymond Gignac, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Rolando Garza, AIA, LEED AP Carolyn James, AIA Juan Mujica Ana Salas oWnEr/CliEnt Harlingen CISD Harlingen, TX Dr. Steve Flores, Superintendent 956/430-9500 KEy StatS grades Served: Pre-K-5 Capacity: 750 students Size of Site: 15.4 acres Building area: 83,000 square feet Building Volume: 1.4 million cubic feet Space per Student: 110 square feet Cost per Student: $15,467 Square Foot Cost: $140 Construction Cost: $11.6 million total project Cost: $13.2 million Contract date: Aug. 2007 Completed: Dec. 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: richarD Payne, Faia

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he new Lee H. Means Elementary School has been designed for grades pre-K through 5. The new school has been designed and constructed to maximize the energy efficiency of the building, to improve indoor air quality, and to minimize the impact on the environment. The school’s orientation on the site and the building’s exterior envelope were both considered very carefully to provide the optimum energy efficiency of the building. The classroom wings are arranged in a radial array to allow easy access to common facilities such as the library and science and art classrooms. The building incorporates sustainable design principles such as energy-efficient systems and natural daylighting. Solar shading devices are also used at windows that receive the

most direct sun exposure. These solar shading devices provide control of solar heat gain but allow natural daylight to enter each classroom and most occupied spaces. State-of-the-art technology

infrastructure has been incorporated in the entire campus. The project also includes a 4,500-square-foot multipurpose room for physical education and assemblies. n

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manoa Elementary School Havertown, Pennsylvania

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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mcKiSSiCK G B YaSSoCiatES DE IN N R arChitECtS pC 317 N. Front Street Harrisburg, PA 17101 Honorable www.mckissickassociates.com

Mention

Paula Mann 717/238-6810 2010

mcKiSSiCK aSSoCiatES arChitECtS pC (north Carolina office) 401 East 4th Street, Suite 203 Winston-Salem, NC 27101 www.mckissickassociates.com Kristen McKissick 336/722-6152 dESign tEam Vern L. McKissick III, AIA, Project Architect Trina L. Gribble, Assoc. AIA, Project Manager Kristen P. McKissick, Interior Designer oWnEr/CliEnt School District of Haverford Township Havertown, PA Dr. William S. Keilbaugh, Superintendent 610/853-5900 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 850 students Size of Site: 3.8 acres Building area: 85,355 square feet Space per Student: 100 square feet Cost per Student: $19,540 Square Foot Cost: $195 Construction Cost: $17.6 million total project Cost: $21.6 million Contract date: May 2007 Completed: Jan. 2009 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: Mick haLes

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anoa Elementary School for grades K-5 accommodates four classrooms per grade level, with a total capacity of 850 pupils. Limited open space in this Philadelphia suburb required the district to use the only available site, a 10-acre community sports field. The building footprint, requiring only 3.1 acres of this site, is minimized by a threestory building plan and compact site circulation pattern. A reinforced masonry bearing and precast concrete plank structural system was utilized for the classroom wing to substantially reduce construction time and permit the overall height of the building to be limited to 30 feet to meet local zoning requirements. Further reducing the building’s apparent mass within the residential neighborhood, the exterior skin utilizes a mixture of reflective zinccolored metal panels, allowing the three-story building and gymnasium wing to assume the color of the surrounding environment. Sustainable features include insulated glass windows and doors, lighting occupancy sensors, high-efficiency indirect/direct lighting, and daylighting. Acid-etched and

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

sealed concrete floors in circulation areas require minimal maintenance. Corridors have a wainscot of bamboo. The hightech HVAC system provides

dehumidification capability to control mold and allows for superior heating and cooling recovery with the use of energy recovery ventilators. n


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Y D G B Smng-a arChitECtS, ltd. IN E N R 936 W. Huron Street Chicago, IL 60642 www.smng-arch.com Honorable

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mark t. Skinner West Elementary School Chicago, Illinois

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Mention Kenneth Schroeder 312/829-3355

2010

dESign tEam K.R. Miller Construction Contractors

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ark T. Skinner West Elementary School is a 30-classroom replacement school in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood. Part of SMNG-A’s challenge was to design the new and expanded school to conform to a tight urban site in a short time frame. Demolition of the previous school and site preparation work were occurring parallel to development of the design

The Rise Group, Construction Manager HJKessler Associates Inc., LEED Consultant Matrix Engineering Corp., Structural Engineer HMS Engineering, Mechanical and Plumbing Engineer Terra Engineering, Ltd., Civil Engineer oWnEr/CliEnt Chicago Public Schools Chicago, IL Ron Huberman, Chief Executive Officer of Chicago Public Schools 312/553-1000 KEy StatS grades Served: K-8 Capacity: 750 students Size of Site: 2.7 acres Building area: 101,354 square feet Building Volume: 1.7 million cubic feet Space per Student: 135 square feet Cost per Student: $33,926 Square Foot Cost: $251 Construction Cost: $25.4 million total project Cost: $27 million Contract date: Feb. 2008 Completed: June 2009 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: John Faier

and construction documents while current students were located in a temporary facility. The original Chicago Public Schools prototype was re-evaluated to meet the sitespecific needs and to integrate universal design principles, and was redesigned following the principles of the LEED Silver rating. The new school forms one quadrant of a campus plan surrounding Skinner

Park. The west façade fronts on the park and contains a series of outdoor classrooms that transition the building to the park, with the main building entry located to the south. The south façade along Adams Street contains the library, located on the third floor above the main entry; student dining center on the first floor; and gymnasium/ assembly room with an extensive green roof above. The

green roof is irrigated using a historic water tank reclaimed from a nearby industrial building. Recycling of demolition materials, bioswales, daylighting, and solar louvers contribute to sustainable building features. To encourage after-hours use by local community groups, portions of the school containing public spaces were designed to be easily isolated during non-school hours. n

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myers Elementary School Bellwood, Pennsylvania

Entire School/Campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

101 E. Diamond Street Butler, PA 16001 Honorable www.burthill.com Mention IG

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G BY D I N Burt hill E N R400 Morgan Center,

Rob Pillar 724/477-1212 2010 dESign tEam

Rick Karcher, Principal-in-Charge Thomas Wippenbeck, Project Architect oWnEr/CliEnt Bellwood-Antis School District Bellwood, PA Dr. Brian G. Toth 814/742-2270 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 500 students Size of Site: 12 acres Building area: 88,000 square feet Building Volume: 2 million cubic feet Space per Student: 176 square feet Cost per Student: $23,737 Square Foot Cost: $135 Construction Cost: $12.6 million total project Cost: $14.3 million Contract date: June 2007 Completed: Aug. 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: DenMarsh PhotograPhy

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s a result of curriculum changes driven by the introduction of full-day kindergarten, the BellwoodAntis School District sought to modify and enlarge its existing elementary school. Bellwood-Antis is comprised of a two-building campus on one piece of property. Myers Elementary School did not have space on the site for horizontal expansion. Because of these conditions and the need to maintain classes, the construction and phasing of the project required an innova-

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

tive approach. Expansion was accomplished by erecting an independently supported precast structure spanning over an existing classroom wing. This additional floor was constructed to accommodate the increased program and homeroom needs with minimal impact on the building footprint. In addition to the building, site improvements included revised bus and car drop-offs; paved and grass play areas and convenient service access

points; all of which created a more student friendly environment. Replacement of the mechanical, electrical, telecommunications, and plumbing systems were also part of the renovation enhancements. The interior of the building reflects the district’s desire to use architecture as a teaching tool. The main entrance corridor evokes the character of a small town American main street while the kindergarten learning spaces are reminiscent of a train station serving a traditional rural community. n


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notre dame academy, Early Childhood Center Staten Island, New York

Early Childhood Classroom NEW CONSTRUCTION

thE gEddiS partnErShip, pC 71 Old Post Road, P.O. Box 1020 Southport, CT 06890 www.tgparch.com Barbara L. Geddis, FAIA, President 203/256-8700 dESign tEam Barbara L. Geddis, FAIA, President, Principal-in-Charge John S. Brice, AIA Winston Collins, AIA Maria Baptista Victoria Bigliano, ASID, Interior Designer oWnEr/CliEnt Notre Dame Academy Staten Island, NY Sister Patricia Corley, President 718/815-5777 KEy StatS grades Served: Pre-K-2 Capacity: 112 students Size of Site: 1.3 acres Building area: 8,600 square feet Space per Student: 77 square feet Cost per Student: $30,357 Construction Cost: $3.4 million total project Cost: $4.7 million Contract date: May 2005 Completed: Sept. 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: roBert Benson

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he new one-story, freestanding early childhood center is designed exclusively for 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds. Learning through play and demonstration, the children are organized into four self-sufficient, L-shaped classrooms around a central commons featuring the children’s art. Each classroom has at least two daylight exposures, built-in cubbies, alcoves for wet science and art, private toilets, individual outside entrances, and shared covered porches. There is radiant heating under the floors since the school day includes napping on personal mats on the floors. On the nine-acre, deeply wooded, hilltop campus, the new center’s exterior harmonizes with four other academic buildings, two of which were originally Cotswold-style private homes from the early 1920s. The new center is brick and barse board with cottagetype, divided light windows and steep roof lines. With its own play yard immediately adjacent to the north and its own new entrance and parking drop-off, the center is the new north anchor of the campus. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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paradise Elementary School Paradise, Pennsylvania

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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Ei aSSoCiatES, G B Y DarChitECtS IN E N R & EnginEErS 2001 N. Front Street, Building 3 Harrisburg, PA 17102 Honorable www.eiassoc.com Mention 717/233-4556

2010

dESign tEam Mark Barnhardt, AIA, Senior Vice President, Principal-in-Charge Arlan Hollinger, Project Manager Moore Engineering Company, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers Baker, Ingram, and Associates, Structural Engineers 7group, LEED Consulting Firm Navarro and Wright Consulting Engineers, Civil Engineers oWnEr/CliEnt Pequea Valley School District Kinzers, PA John Bowden, Business Administrator 717/768-5530 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5

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he new Paradise Elementary School, built on the 17-acre site of the existing Paradise Elementary School, is designed to obtain LEED Gold certification and is a focus of a green building education plan for the community. The district sought to build a building that conserved land resources, optimized energy performance, reduced energy consumption and costs, reduced water consumption, lessened stormwater impact, and supported the regional economy by utilizing regional materials and resources. The site design conserves land resources by utilizing

Capacity: 675 students Size of Site: 17 acres Building area: 92,140 square feet Square Foot Cost: $192 Construction Cost: $17.7 million total project Cost: $20.4 million Contract date: Oct. 2005 Completed: Dec. 2008 Completion: 100%

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L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

an existing district property, following the slope of the existing topography, and preserving open space on site by building multiple floor levels. Shared core facilities are arranged to minimize circulation space, and the classroom wing is oriented for optimal solar orientation. To conserve and reduce energy consumption and costs, the district chose to install a ground-source heat pump system with heat recovery for ventilation air systems and pursued other energy savings. Further energy-saving features include increased insulation in walls and roof; dimming ballast in all lumi-

naries with daylight controls and occupancy sensors; monitoring software to continuously document energy loads; building orientation for optimal natural lighting; and high-efficiency windows. Water efficiency was another important consideration in the design of the new school. Features in this area include rainwater harvesting, low-consumption fixtures, waterless urinals, and recycled wastewater for irrigation. Measures have been taken to implement a stormwater management plan that results in a 25 percent decrease in the rate and quantity of stormwater runoff. n


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aCi/FrangKiSEr hutChEnS, G BY D IN E N inC. R 1421 E. 104th Street Kansas City, MO 64131 Honorable www.aci-frangkiser.com Mention IG

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pathfinder Elementary School Platte City, Missouri

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Michael Kautz,

Principal, Architect 2010 816/761-8900 dESign tEam Michael Kautz, Principal-in-Charge Bill Mankin, Project Manager, Architect Christine Parisi, Interior Designer Jason Boehner, Architectural Support oWnEr/CliEnt Platte County R-III School District Platte City, MO Dr. Mark Harpst, Superintendent 816/858-5420 KEy StatS grades Served: K-2 Capacity: 400 students Size of Site: 9.7 acres Building area: 44,400 square feet Building Volume: 792,600 cubic feet Space per Student: 111 square feet Cost per Student: $18,091 Square Foot Cost: $163 Construction Cost: $7.2 million total project Cost: $9.6 million Contract date: Aug. 2006 Completed: Dec. 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: MichaeL sPiLLers PhotograPhy

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CI/Frangkiser Hutchens confronted many challenges with this project. The school district was faced with the immediate need for lower elementary classrooms, and tight constraints on its site. ACI/Frangkiser Hutchens took these challenges and delivered a state-of-the-art elementary school within budget and with many unique characteristics. The new elementary shares a site with an existing school so location of classrooms, administration, and services within the new building were driven by their proximity to the existing building and site limitationssite design was driven by two large drainage ravines and the traffic circulation patterns of the existing school. Rock was encountered on site, and the floor elevation of the school was adjusted to reduce excavation cost. The new elementary is designed to be compatible with the existing school, creating a vision of a unified satellite campus. ACI/ Frangkiser Hutchens worked with the staff to create a playful townscape theme. Main corridors have features of a downtown main street; the multipurpose room mimics a stadium; an art room resembles a museum; a music room looks like a recording studio; and administration appears as corporate offices. When entering the media center you feel you are in a city park, and the classroom pods have similarities to a residential neighborhood. LEED certification was not an owner’s goal; however, many elements of efficiency and sustainable design have been incorporated throughout this building. This elementary school was also designed to accommodate a future classroom wing addition with minimal disruption. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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2rW Consultants, Inc., Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers Fox & Associates, Structural Engineer PHR&A, Civil Engineer Williamsburg Environmental Group, Wetlands Planting

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Bob Moje,2010 AIA, LEED AP 434/296-5684

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Vmdo arChitECtS, pC Citation of 200 E. Market Street Excellence Charlottesville, VA 22902 www.vmdo.com

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n the fall of 2003, Hurricane Isabel flooded much of the N G B Y D E includcity ofN IPoquoson, ing the Relementary school. Immediately thereafter, the city Honorable began making plans to build Mention a new, larger school on higher ground to avoid future floods and to meet2010 the growing needs of the school system. The new school houses the city’s third-, fourth-, and fifthgraders, and can be expanded to include the sixth grade. The building is organized by grade houses, each themed as one of three wetland ecosystems found around Poquoson: estuary, tidal flat, and scrub-shrub. Each grade house consists of LE

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oWnEr/CliEnt Poquoson City Schools Poquoson, VA Dr. Jennifer Parrish, Division Superintendent 757/868-3055 KEy StatS grades Served: 3-5 Capacity: 675 students Size of Site: 15 acres Building area: 84,600 square feet Building Volume: 1.6 million cubic feet Space per Student: 125 square feet Cost per Student: $24,385 Square Foot Cost: $195 Construction Cost: $16.5 million total project Cost: $17.5 million Contract date: Dec. 2006 Completed: Aug. 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: Prakash PateL

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10 classrooms collected around a multipurpose double-height group education area. The classrooms are uniquely named after a plant or animal found within the ecosystem. Exterior signage explains the workings of the constructed wetlands

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

and their relationship to the Chesapeake Bay. The school’s sundial is a prominent part of every student’s arrival, greeting them at the front entrance. The sundial teaches the students about the sun’s ever-changing path

through the sky, highlighting the winter solstice and the equinoxes. By taking advantage of its unique setting, the school facilitates an understanding of the physical and social context of Poquoson and its relationship to the larger world. n


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G BY D pJhm inC. I N arChitECtS, E N R647 Camino de los Mares,

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Suite 201 San Clemente, CA 92673 Honorable www.pjhm.com Mention N

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Stonegate Elementary School Irvine, California

Entire School/Campus Building

Kenneth Podany, AIA, Principal-in-Charge 2010 949/496-6191 dESign tEam Kenneth Podany, Architect, Principal, Project Architect E. Jan Hansen, Architect, Senior Project Designer Kevin Kaiser, Project Manager Christian Cochrun, Construction Administration C.W. Driver, Inc., Construction Manager oWnEr/CliEnt Irvine Unified School District Irvine, CA Lloyd Linton, Director of Facilities Planning 949/936-5309 KEy StatS grades Served: K-6 Capacity: 725 students Size of Site: 10 acres Building area: 58,256 square feet Building Volume: 902,968 cubic feet Space per Student: 80 square feet Cost per Student: $23,770 Square Foot Cost: $295 Construction Cost: $17.2 million total project Cost: $57.4 million Contract date: April 2008 Completed: Sept. 2009 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: greg rys

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n response to the needs of the growing community and to replace an exising elementary school within the Irvine Unified School District, Stonegate Elementary School was created. The facility was conceived through the use of a programmatically and aesthetically evolving facility prototype model. By allowing the prototype to evolve as required by community demands as well as a refined program, the district has developed a proven method for maintaining community sensitivity, equity, continuity, sustainability, and district construction standards. The facility composition consists of three component groupings: administration/kindergarten; multipurpose/food service/music; and resource center/classroom academic wings. These components frame a community social courtyard that acts as the primary visitor access point and an exterior extension of the multipurpose room capacity. Three academic wings are organized in 1-2, 3-4, and 5-6 grade-level configurations. Traditional corridors within the academic wings are virtually eliminated by accommodating supplemental-shared student work areas with visual connection to all classrooms. The shared work areas act as an extension from the centralized hinge point of the resource center and allow direct access without crossing through other grade levels while fully supervised from the classrooms. Each of the academic wings is semiautonomous, with support spaces such as staff and student workrooms and restrooms. n

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B Y D BryggEr Cannon G moSS IN E N R & aSSoCiatES 401 Douglas Street, Suite 500 Sioux City, IA 51101 Honorable www.cmbaarchitects.com

Mention

Todd Moss 712/274-2933 2010 dESign tEam

Todd Moss, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Julie Burhoop, AIA, Project Architect Kathy Erion, Assoc. IIDA, Interior Designer L & L Builders Co., General Contractor EDA, Electrical and Plumbing Engineer

oWnEr/CliEnt Sioux City Community School District Sioux City, IA Larry Williams, (Former) Superintendent 712/947-4329 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 939 students Size of Site: 11 acres Building area: 89,107 square feet Building Volume: 1.4 million cubic feet Space per Student: 148 square feet Cost per Student: $22,305 Square Foot Cost: $102 Construction Cost: $9.2 million total project Cost: $12.6 million Contract date: Feb. 2007 Completed: July 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: PauL Brokering

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ElEmEntary

unity Elementary School Sioux City, Iowa

DeWild Grant Reckert, Civil Engineer

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chools tend to be nostalgic brick boxes designed by adults for adults. This school was designed for imaginative children who are not confined by straight lines and monochromatic colors. It features a variety of shapes, colors, materials, and textures. The core spaces were designed for anticipated expansion. A cooperative community effort involving the school district and the city (which participated in the cost and planning) was required. Coordination with the district, the city, civil engineers, architects, adjoining property owners, and separate site and building contractors had to be finely orchestrated to meet schedules and co-occupy the same site. The colors, shapes, and textures of the various materials not only gave the building a unique look; they also lowered costs and enhanced the speed of construction. Comparative schools built simultaneously in the district cost 25 percent more and had construction periods of three to four months longer. n

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

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SChool

Winterville Elementary School Winterville, Georgia

Entire School/Campus Building

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G BY D Cdh inC. I N partnErS, E 675 Tower Road Marietta, GA 30060 www.cdhpartners.com Honorable N

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RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

Mention Jeff Fincher, AIA,

Principal-in-Charge

678/784-3425 2010 dESign tEam

Jeff Fincher, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Tammy Nichols, Senior Project Manager Don Dangar, Contract Administration Salloum Construction, General Contractor oWnEr/CliEnt Clarke County School District Athens, GA James Simms, Superintendent 706/546-7721 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 550 students Size of Site: 31.4 acres Building area: 64,024 square feet Building Volume: 768,288 cubic feet Space per Student: 116 square feet Cost per Student: $12,516 Square Foot Cost: $108 Construction Cost: $6.9 million total project Cost: $7.6 million Contract date: April 2008 Completed: June 2009 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: saBrina a. carPenter, cDh Partners, inc.

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interville Elementary School’s existing facility was more than 40 years old and had undergone four additions. With extensive improvements needed, the easy and obvious solution was to demolish the old school and replace it with new construction. Instead, the architect chose a different option that reused the most salvageable portions of the building and then knitted them together with

an addition containing 26 classrooms, a media center, a cafeteria, and a new entry. By doing so, the owner was able to reduce the required budget by more than $1 million. Another obstacle to overcome was the site itself. The City of Winterville had to create a new commercial zone by trading property and repositioning a problematic road to facilitate the more effective design solution. The steel frame construction has a brick veneer/EIFS exterior,

and through careful planning the construction schedule was expedited by approximately 45 days. The most important aspect of this project is the seamless solution that accomplished a difficult program specific to the reuse of existing pieces of the facility. Through the design process, the designers were able to blend old with new and add muchneeded spaces to provide an enhanced learning environment for 550 students. n

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2010

Early

Childhood

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ElEmEntary

SChool

Wooster Elementary School Wooster, Arkansas

Entire School/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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JaCKSon King Y D G BBroWn IN E N RarChitECtS, inC. 12921 Cantrell Road, Suite 201 Little Rock, AR 72223 Honorable www.jacksonbrownking.com

Mention

Randall Palculict, AIA, LEED AP 501/664-8700 2010 dESign tEam Crafton Tull Sparks & Associates, Landscape Architect Dayco Construction, General Contractor Engineering Consultants, Structural Engineer Innovative Solutions Group, Mechanical and Plumbing Engineer Lucas, Merriott & Associates, Electrical Engineer Mehlburger Firm, Civil Engineer oWnEr/CliEnt Greenbrier Public Schools Greenbrier, AR Scott Spainhour, Superintendent 501/679-4808 KEy StatS grades Served: K-5 Capacity: 474 students Size of Site: 17.9 acres Building area: 64,259 square feet Space per Student: 136 square feet Cost per Student: $20,458 Square Foot Cost: $151 Construction Cost: $9.7 million total project Cost: $11.2 million Contract date: May 2007 Completed: Sept. 2008 Completion: 100% PhotograPhy: ken West PhotograPhy

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ooster Elementary, the first school in Arkansas to achieve a LEED for Schools Silver certification, was designed to educate in sustainability while lowering facility costs for the district. To achieve this, the traditional learning spaces were equipped with unique features such as an outdoor classroom and exposed building systems as well as cutting-edge technology to lower energy costs. In pursuing LEED, the

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

design team used many strategies to help reduce the impact on the environment and operational cost. Each room has a carbon dioxide sensor to provide a healthy exchange of fresh air based on occupant need instead of square footage. The lighting system maintains consistent light levels on work surfaces by supplementing the natural daylight in the spaces. During peak sunlight, the amount of energy consumed by the fixtures is greatly reduced.

The use of sustainable materials and native vegetation on site also work to reduce the maintenance needed for the facility. The students have passed on the green spirit of their school’s design to the surrounding population by taking home what they learn about green building. Wooster Elementary is now the recycling center for the community and an education center for students and parents alike. n


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2010

Middle

school/interMediate

school

david saperstein Middle school Los Angeles, California

entire school/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G BY harley I N ellisD devereaux E N R601 S. Figueroa Street, Suite 500 Los Angeles, CA 90017 Honorable www.harleyellis.com Mention

John Dale, FAIA

213/542-4500 2010 design teaM John Dale, FAIA and Tania Van Herle, AIA, Architecture Harley Ellis Devereaux, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Ismail & Associates, Structural Engineering LRM Ltd., Landscape S.E.C. Civil Engineering, Inc., Civil Engineering PCR Environmental, Environment owner/client Stephen S. Wise Temple Los Angeles, CA Linda Salzman, Executive Director 310/889-2390 Key stats grades served: 7-8 capacity: 240 students size of site: 4.5 acres Building area: 28,180 square feet Building volume: 394,520 cubic feet space per student: 117 square feet cost per student: $33,333 square Foot cost: $284 construction cost: $8 million total Project cost: $30 million contract date: Jan. 2003 completed: Sept. 2009 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: Brett Moore, rMa PhotograPhy

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teep slopes, restrictive height limitations, and zoning contributed to the challenges of integrating this project into a tight hillside. A key goal was to create an intimate atmosphere for the interaction of students and teachers, but also provide an open environment that is integrated with the surrounding landscape. This produced comfortable places to study and socialize, with an underlying sense of spirituality and tradition. Consisting of four one-

story buildings, the program includes eleven 750-squarefoot classrooms, a technology/ media lab, art center, student cafeteria/multipurpose room, administration, and a Bet Midrash serving 240 students. Classroom features include a private library area, direct access to terraces, and stateof-the-art technology. The design transitions from a natural setting, reflecting the surrounding hillside at the north end of the site, to a more urban character at the south entry plaza. At the top of the

site, a waterfall, boulder-lined ponds, and a stone climbing wall serve as backdrops for a gathering area with terraced seating. Rough stone facing characterizes the building elevations along the upper terraces, gradually transitioning to a more formal pattern between the south buildings. Copper-colored plastic panels give the administration building a slightly high-tech feel. Motivational phrases—in English and Hebrew—line the façades of the inner courtyards. n

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2010

Middle

school/interMediate

school

glacier view Junior high school Puyallup, Washington

entire school/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

G BY D nac|architecture IN E R

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2201 Sixth Ave., Suite 1405 Honorable Seattle, WA 98121 Mention www.nacarchitecture.com

Kevin P. Flanagan, AIA, LEED AP 2010 206/441-4522 design teaM Gregory J. Stack, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Natalie A. Dohrn, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Stephen J. McConnell, AIA, Project Architect Coughlin Porter Lundeen, Structural/Civil Engineers Hargis Engineers Mechanical Engineers NAC|Engineering Electrical Engineers owner/client Puyallup School District Puyallup, WA Rudy Fyles, Executive Director, Facilities 253/841-8772 Key stats grades served: 7-9 capacity: 800 students size of site: 20.4 acres Building area: 102,517 square feet Building volume: 2.2 million cubic feet space per student: 132 square feet cost per student: $32,720 square Foot cost: $247 construction cost: $26 million contract date: Oct. 2006 completed: Sept. 2008 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: BenJaMin BensChneiDer

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lacier View Junior High School is the second phase for an emerging K-12 campus. The campus will include an elementary school, junior high, and high school that can share building and site facilities, allowing programmatic interaction between students of differing educational levels. The two-story bar form of the junior high serves as an identifying edge to the junior high grounds and is carved away to reveal courtyards along

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

its length. Three grade-based learning communities surround the courtyards, breaking down the size of the school and encouraging closer collaboration for teachers and students. Echoing the topography of the site and environs, the roofline undulates gently down with the slope. Windows, sunshades, and recessed vertical panels are arranged along the façade in a rhythmic composition that ties together the modulating roof and grade lines. Use of material types common to the existing

architecture identifies Glacier View as part of the K-12 campus, while the building’s expression asserts its unique character. Natural daylighting and a displacement ventilation system utilizing 100 percent outside air contribute to a healthy and stimulating interior learning environment, while outside sustainable strategies include use of native and droughttolerant plants, water-efficient irrigation, and reuse of feature boulders found on site. n


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2010

NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G BY D wlc inc. I N architects, E N R 8163 Rochester Ave., Suite 100 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 Honorable www.wlcarchitects.com Mention A

school/interMediate

school

gualberto J. valadez Middle school academy Placentia, California

entire school/campus Building

LE

Middle

Jim DiCamillo, AIA 909/987-0909 2010 design teaM

Parsons/California Construction Management, Construction Manager K.B. Leung, Structural Engineer F.T. Andrews, Mechanical Engineer MP Engineers, Electrical Engineer RJM Design Group, Landscape Architect owner/client Placentia Yorba Linda Unified School District Placentia, CA Mike Bailey, Facilities 714/986-7440 Key stats grades served: 6-8 capacity: 850 students size of site: 11 acres Building area: 100,000 square feet Building volume: 1.4 million cubic feet space per student: 100 square feet

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ualberto J. Valadez Middle School occupies a 10-acre, semi-urban site in Placentia, California, and is the first new middle school to be occupied by this expanding district in the last 20 years. The site is bordered by residential areas on the north and west and light industrial development on the south and east. The major impacts on the design were the visual and curriculum connections to the existing elementary school directly to the west. The site includes a city-shared playground and parent drop-off lane. The school’s exterior colors and vaulted roof forms mimic the neighboring campus. And a two-story theme wall slashes through the site, terminating in the middle school courtyard at one end and the elementary school entry at the other. The school’s interior courtyard is dotted with playful balconies that allow these early adolescents to see and be seen as they pass classes. The campus’ two-story configuration conserves site area. The concrete masonry and steel construction offer a permanence and durability often lacking in schools designed for this age level. These materials, coupled with careful solar orientation, allow this building to perform well above typical energy standards. n

cost per student: $38,000 square Foot cost: $330 construction cost: $33 million total Project cost: $40 million contract date: Sept. 2006 completed: Sept. 2008 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: geneVieVe WoLFF

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Middle

school/interMediate

h.B. whitehorne Middle school Verona, New Jersey

Media center/Music room/classrooms RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

N

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IG

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lan associates, G B Y Dengineering, IN E N Planning, architecture, R surveying, inc. 445 Godwin Ave. Honorable Midland Park, NJ 07432 Mention www.lan-nj.com

2010

design teaM LAN Associates, Inc. Kenneth H. Karle, AIA, PP, PE, President, Architect Kim V. Vierheilig, AIA James L. Sanders Niram, Inc., General Contractor Sparta Steel Corp., Steel Contractor DeSesa Engineering Co., Inc., Mechanical Contractor Boz Electrical Contractors, Inc., Electrical Contractor Aero Plumbing & Heating, Plumbing Contractor owner/client Verona Board of Education Verona, NJ Charles B. Sampson, Superintendent 973/239-3968 Key stats grades served: 5-8 capacity: 628 students size of site: 10.7 acres Building area: 33,411 square feet Building volume: 801,864 cubic feet space per student: 53 square feet cost per student: $14,904 square Foot cost: $280 construction cost: $9.4 million total Project cost: $10.5 million contract date: Jan. 2007 completed: Sept. 2008 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: harVarD stUDio, steVe ho

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he vision and concept of this project was to create an addition that provides a modern architecture and respects the richness and history of the original structure. The goal was to utilize carefully crafted massing to accommodate educational space deficiencies and provide a fully accessible solution to an existing building with 11 changes in floor elevation. The new building additions provide ADA access to all existing floor levels through the use of handicap lifts, a five-stop elevator, and interior/exterior ramps. The exterior faรงade was designed to reflect the historic front entry while providing a modern face to the rear of the building. The faรงade provides a dramatic backdrop for the track and fields beyond. The new building addition provides for an expanded cafeteria, new media center, band room, four general classrooms, and two science labs with a shared prep room. Renovations to the existing building include a new guidance office, special needs office, art room, and new science room. Updated finishes were applied to all existing corridors to provide continuity and a seamless transition from the old to the new corridors. n


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2010

NEW CONSTRUCTION

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N

315 E. Mountain Ave., Suite 100 Honorable Fort Collins, CO 80524 Mention www.rbbarchitects.com S

A

G BY D rB+B inc. I N architects, E N

school/interMediate

school

Kinard core Knowledge Middle school Fort Collins, Colorado

entire school/campus Building

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Middle

Lacey Reckelhoff, Director of 2010 Marketing 970/484-0117 design teaM Matt Arabasz, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect Gopal Shrestha, AIA, LEED AP, Job Captain Ken Field, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Denise Pozvek, ASID, LEED AP, Interior Designer FCI Constructors, Contractor owner/client Poudre School District Fort Collins, CO Jerry Wilson, Ph.D., Superintendent of Schools 970/490-3607 Key stats grades served: 6-8 capacity: 750 students size of site: 30.3 acres Building area: 116,642 square feet space per student: 156 square feet cost per student: $23,263 square Foot cost: $150 construction cost: $17.4 million contract date: Feb. 2004 completed: July 2006 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: FreD FUhrMeister

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inard Core Knowledge Middle School was designed with an integrated design approach to ensure the educational philosophy of the school’s Core Knowledge Program was carried through its design while integrating sustainable, highperformance design techniques. The result: a 116,000-squarefoot high-performance building that optimizes the comfort and learning process of students while preserving natural resources and reducing building energy consumption. The school was designed to accommodate three schoolswithin-a-school, enabling smaller, more personalized learning communities within the larger school. The passive east end is anchored by the media center while the active west end includes the gym, cafeteria, and music spaces. Typical double-loaded corridors are eliminated entirely while gathering spaces are established throughout to encourage interaction and discussion among teachers and students. Key sustainable features include water and energy conservation techniques with ample use of renewable energy resources, reduction of toxic substances for improved indoor air quality, building materials and products with recycled content, recycled construction waste, and the consideration of site impact from stormwater runoff. Controlled daylighting is introduced within major learning areas so the use of electric lights is largely unnecessary. With lights off or dimmed, unwanted heat gain is notably reduced, thus downsizing the mechanical cooling and equipment load. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Middle

school/interMediate

school

hammarskjold Middle school East Brunswick, New Jersey

entire school/campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

IG

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B Y D grouP design G ideas IN E N architecture + Planning, llc R

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15 Bethany Street NewHonorable Brunswick, NJ 08901 www.designideasgroup.com Mention Jeffrey D. Venezia, AIA 732/249-6242 2010 design teaM Jeffrey D. Venezia, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Thomas Besold, RA, Project Architect Kenneth Pilch, Construction Administrator owner/client

East Brunswick Board of Education East Brunswick, NJ Dr. Joann Magistro, Superintendent 732/613-6705 Key stats grades served: 6-7 capacity: 1,700 students size of site: 21 acres Building area: 234,947 square feet Building volume: 3.4 million cubic feet space per student: 138 square feet cost per student: $32,135 square Foot cost: $250 construction cost: $54.6 million total Project cost: $58.8 million contract date: Mar. 2004 completed: Jan. 2009 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: haLKin PhotograPhy

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he Hammarskjold Middle School replaces an older inadequate facility and reuses part of the original structure. With the district’s very comprehensive educational program and strong community involvement, the district wanted the new facility to support the needs of the children as well as the community. Upon arriving at the school’s main entrance, the students, faculty, and community walk down a two-story “main street” corridor with metal acoustic ceiling clouds, terrazzo polished floor, and an abundance of natural light from the expanses of windows above. This corridor provides easy access to the main office; health suite; guidance center; a 550-seat cafetorium; gymnasium; and a 1,000-seat performing arts center, which is also open to the community for theatrical, musical, speaker, and video performances. An amphitheater in the courtyard, which allows for outdoor presentations for students, is visible from many areas as you walk around the building and from a large number of classrooms.

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The design incorporates smaller learning communities, organized into 14 houses (seven per grade level), with each house consisting of three general classrooms, a science room, and small group instructional rooms. All student lockers are located within each house and kept off the main circulation corridors. The classrooms are located in a two-story wing easily acces-

sible to the centralized media center and satellite administrative suite. Each classroom has interactive and presentation technologies such as smartboards, handheld interactive devices for students, streaming video, and a live video system used for communication purposes. It was imperative that the existing school remain in operation during the


24-month construction period for the new facility, and the construction site needed to be completely separated from the school population. Due to the confined site, a two-story addition was key to avoiding a sprawling floor plan and to allow for the adjacency of the various program areas of the school. The site was opened up by constructing entrance and exit drives off of an adjacent

county road at the rear of the site with a long driveway parallel to the back of the original building, allowing the 50+ buses to line up to load and unload without students crossing traffic. Once the construction was completed on the new portion of the building, all but 20 percent of the existing structure was demolished. The remaining portion of the building was renovated to

incorporate the design standards of the newer portion of the facility. The energy-efficient HVAC with VAX box system is comprised of eight modular high-

efficiency boilers and rooftop units and more than 90 percent of the spaces receiving abundant natural light. This project was designed to meet LEED certification standards. n

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2010

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Honorable Mention

school

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Citation of Excellence

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legacy Junior high school 2010

Layton, Utah

entire school/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

vcBo architecture 524 South 600 East Salt Lake City, UT 84102 www.vcbo.com Jeanne Jackson, AIA, LEED AP 801/575-8800 design teaM Jeanne Jackson, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Celestia Carson, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager John Oderda, Project Coordinator Hogan Associates Construction, General Contractor owner/client Davis County School District Farmington, UT Dr. W. Bryan Bowles 801/402-5258 Key stats grades served: 7-9 capacity: 1,250 students size of site: 28 acres Building area: 178,370 square feet Building volume: 2.1 million cubic feet space per student: 143 square feet cost per student: $23,184 square Foot cost: $163 construction cost: $29 million total Project cost: $34 million contract date: June 2007 completed: Aug. 2009 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: PaUL riCher, riCher iMages

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egacy creates a state-ofthe-art learning environment that buffers middle school students at the “turning point” of their lives from the stress and fragmentation associated with the typical junior high school experience. The key to the solution is the arrangement of the classrooms into three separate, grade-level-specific, double-lobed academic learn-

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

ing centers, each surrounding (but connected through significant fenestration) a central collaboration space. These “houses” provide a highly flexible and extremely visible environment for group collaboration, fostering critical student/student and student/teacher relationships. Classrooms, conference rooms, faculty planning offices, student and faculty toilet rooms, and grade-

specific lockers make up each house. Technologically, all learning spaces include sound reinforcement systems and computer projection. Computer kiosks throughout these areas promote on-demand serendipitous learning opportunities. The building utilizes the latest automaticdimming, energy-efficient lighting as well as extensive


daylighting. The excellent insulative value of the building envelope and the thermal displacement mechanical system contribute to a healthier, more energy-effective solution than is offered by a conventional school.

Finally, this school includes a large double gym, built in conjunction with the city, which will allow the facility to become a true center of community. Adjacent to the school is a shared park, also developed by the city. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Middle

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school

Mountainside Middle school Spokane, Washington

entire school/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G BY D nac|architecture IN E N 1203 W. Riverside Ave. R Spokane, WA 99201 www.nacarchitecture.com Honorable

ThomasMention Golden, AIA, LEED AP 509/838-8240

2010

design teaM Structural Design Northwest, Structural Engineer L&S Engineering, Mechanical Engineer NAC|Engineering, Electrical and Telecommunications Engineer Taylor Engineering, Civil Engineer FP Engineering, Fire Protection Lydig Construction, General Contractor owner/client Mead School District Mead, WA John Dormaier, Director of Facilities & Planning 509/465-7674 Key stats grades served: 7-8 capacity: 750 students size of site: 32 acres Building area: 115,260 square feet Building volume: 2.3 million cubic feet space per student: 154 square feet cost per student: $39,004 square Foot cost: $254 construction cost: $29.3 million total Project cost: $41 million contract date: Oct. 2006 completed: Sept. 2008 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: eXPLosiVe iLLUsions

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he new 115,260square-foot Mountainside Middle School was designed with a team teaching concept in mind. Located at the east portion of the building, the educational wings are arranged to accommodate five distinct teams, with each wing housing three general classrooms and a science room. This academic half of the building is separated from the more noisy/public areas such as the gymnasiums, commons/cafeteria, and music and technical educa-

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

tion spaces via a large northsouth corridor extending through the entire building. Higher-than-normal classroom ceilings, together with full-height windows, allow deeper penetration of natural light without the risk of glare. Brick and concreteblock materials emphasize the district’s commitment to long-term value and contribute to the timeless design. Natural buffers of trees and vegetation line the east and west sides of the site. The building sets back approximately 350

feet from the road, allowing landscaping and visual relief from vehicle traffic. Environmental regulations dictated a full-service wastewater treatment plant be constructed on site. Additional site amenities include a football/soccer field, a baseball field, two softball diamonds, a shotput area, and a full-size soccer/ P.E. field. The site includes a dedicated bus loading lane with a separate area for special needs buses and a separate lane for student drop-off/pickup. n


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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

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2010

Middle

school/interMediate

school

the Pingry Middle school Martinsville, New Jersey

entire school/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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usa architects G B Y D Planners + IN E N Rinterior designers 20 N. Doughty Ave. Somerville, NJ 08876 Honorable www.usaarchitects.com Mention Mark A. Coan, AIA, Principal-in-Charge, 2010 Director of Design 908/722-2300 design teaM CMX Engineering, Civil Engineer Brinjac Engineering, Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, Technology, and Structural Engineer Mark A. Coan, AIA, Principal-inCharge, USA Architects, Architect Alexis Goldman, LEED AP, Project Designer, USA Architects, Architect owner/client The Pingry Middle School Martinsville, NJ Mike Virzi, Director of Facilities 908/647-5555 Key stats grades served: 6-8 capacity: 270 students size of site: 200 acres Building area: 32,490 square feet Building volume: 313,114 cubic feet space per student: 120 square feet cost per student: $35,556 square Foot cost: $295 construction cost: $9.6 million total Project cost: $11.6 million contract date: June 2003 completed: Oct. 2006 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: J. aiDan MiroWsKy, Beth sherBy

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SA Architects designed a 270-student, 30,000square-foot middle school for The Pingry School, one of New Jersey’s prestigious college preparatory schools. The new middle school (grades 6 through 8) is attached to the upper school (grades 9 through 12) via a glass connector, suggesting the passage from middle to upper school. The new building features 18 classrooms, four science labs, and a large, dynamic commons space at the center—naturally

lit, through two large, circular clerestory windows. The stakeholders were interested in a more traditional design utilizing heavy, durable masonry and classrooms located around a large “family” gathering space. USA’s design gives way to traditional styles and functionality. The building’s infrastructure is state of the art with an emphasis on “Planning for the Future,” a key design theme. The entire facility is wireless with data connections acces-

sible throughout the building, including the commons space. All classrooms have ceiling-mounted projectors with integrated smartboards and built-in equipment. The vehicular paths were set to meander through the terrain, creating several different views back to the main buildings. The parking was split up into several areas at different elevations to blend the parking into the landscape and have a greater ability to create a buffer of trees and plantings. n

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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

2010

Middle

school/interMediate

school

ridgeview charter school Sandy Springs, Georgia

entire school/campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

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IG

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cdh Partners, inc. G BY D IN E N R 675 Tower Road Marietta, GA 30060 www.cdhpartners.com

Honorable Jeff Fincher, AIA, Mention

Principal-in-Charge 678/784-3425 2010 design teaM

Jeff Fincher, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Tammy Nichols, Senior Project Manager John Benefield, Contract Administration Doster Construction, General Contractor Parsons, Program Management owner/client Fulton County School District Atlanta, GA Cindy Loe, Ph.D., Superintendent 404/768-3600 Key stats grades served: 6-8 capacity: 1,225 students size of site: 21.6 acres Building area: 45,801 square feetnew; 131,355 square feet-renovated Building volume: 1.9 million cubic feet space per student: 145 square feet cost per student: $19,280 square Foot cost: $133 construction cost: $23.6 million total Project cost: $26.5 million contract date: June 2008 completed: Aug. 2009 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: saBrina a. CarPenter, CDh Partners, inC.

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his $24 million renovation and addition was carefully constructed in three phases over 14 months while the building was fully occupied. The main entrance and administrative areas were completely redesigned to facilitate charter school academic requirements while adding 22 new instructional units and an additional 45,000 square feet for a student population of 1,225. By building a temporary academic village, the instructional areas that were under construction were rotated through this space to avoid disrupting the classes, and the success of this solution was an important achievement of this project. The extremely steep site called for special arrangements, such as using onequarter mile of an adjacent access road as staging and construction parking. The three-story existing building included an unusual bus tunnel system to work around. The addition was constructed with brick veneer,

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

metal studs, and concrete block backup walls. A modular wall panel system incorporated in the interior courtyard increased natural light reflectivity into the cafeteria that previously had no access to natural light. This design solution successfully reoriented the internal program functions and improved the overall aesthetic of the school. The most noteworthy aspects of this project are the 14-month delivery period and the complete exterior facelift that was accomplished during occupancy. n


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OUTSTANDING PROJECT

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2010

NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G BY D PJhM inc. I N architects, E N R Camino de los Mares, 647 Suite 201 San Clemente, CA 92673 Honorable www.pjhm.com Mention

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romoland Middle school Menifee, California

entire school/campus Building

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Leo Johnson, AIA, Principal-in-Charge 2010 949/496-6191 design teaM

Leo Johnson, Principal, Architect, Project Architect David Bell, Architect, LEED AP, Project Manager RHA Engineering Inc., Civil Engineers Thornton-Tomasetti, Structural Engineers FBA Engineering Inc., Electrical Engineers R. Dale Hadfield, Landscape Architect owner/client Romoland School District Homeland, CA Bobbie Plough, Superintendent 951/926-9244 Key stats grades served: 6-8 capacity: 1,400 students size of site: 20 acres Building area: 97,000 square feet Building volume: 150,350 cubic feet space per student: 69 square feet cost per student: $17,857 square Foot cost: $258 construction cost: $25 million completion: 70% graPhiC iMages: Pete aXCeLL

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omoland School District and PJHM Architects, Inc. have planned a new green middle school. The district, serving grades K through 8, is located in rapidly growing Riverside County. The 1,400-student plan encompasses 97,000 square feet, including 51 classrooms and spaces for administration, library, multipurpose, food services, and P.E. locker rooms, along with a future joint use gymnasium. The high-technology classrooms feature digital projection interfacing with teachers’ laptops, along with sound enhancement and power and data connectivity to classroom computers and student laptops. The multibuilding campus plan affords the ability to phase construction. Five classroom buildings along with an art, science, and technology building house the academic program. The six buildings are organized along an outdoor spine with restrooms and social spaces, including an exterior stage. One building, which houses administration, library, multipurpose, and food services, forms a separation between academic function and the active entry and parking areas. A covered lunch courtyard augments the social spaces. The school districts environmental and energy conservation concerns strongly influenced the design. An east-west axis allows clerestory windows to capture northern natural light, while the south-facing sloping roofs accommodate a photovoltaic system. Skylights are integrated into secondary spaces. Sound attenuation and low-emitting material enhance the green environment. n

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school of the osage Middle school Osage Beach, Missouri

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G BY D wM. inc. I N B. ittner, E N R611 N. Tenth Street, Suite 200 St. Louis, MO 63101 Honorable www.ittnerarchitects.com Mention

Dennis M. Young, President 2010 & CEO 314/421-3542 design teaM

Dennis M. Young, President & CEO Todd Powers, AIA, Project Manager SM Wilson & Co., Construction Manager Land Development Consultants, Civil Engineers Heideman Associates, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers Kreher Engineering, Structural Engineers owner/client School of the Osage R-II Lake Ozark, MO Dr. Mary Ann Johnson, Superintendent 573/365-4091 Key stats grades served: 6-8 capacity: 600 students size of site: 21 acres Building area: 124,709 square feet Building volume: 2.5 million cubic feet space per student: 208 square feet cost per student: $27,527 square Foot cost: $132 construction cost: $16.5 million total Project cost: $18.2 million contract date: Jan. 2006 completed: Aug. 2008 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: DeBBie FranKe PhotograPhy

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he School of the Osage Middle School is nestled in the beautiful rolling hills of the Ozarks and is planned as part of a campus master plan. The natural surroundings of the site have been maintained, preserving the abundance of wildlife. The two-story building provides for exterior views, capturing the beautiful rolling hills and sunsets that are common for the area. Native Ozark stone is used both on the exterior and within the dramatic two-story rotunda, which serves as the commons area. Off the rotunda is the competitive gymnasium with mezzanine that is sized for high school events and competitions. The performing arts area can also be found just off the rotunda, providing a suite of spaces including band, choral, and a stage that is off the multipurpose room. The sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade level houses provide for the desired programs and learning environment. The central two-story stair is surrounded by glass,

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providing another opportunity to capture the outdoors. The library features an exciting two-story space, wrapped by natural light and a computer mezzanine, creating an

inviting space for students to learn and discover. The design offers the students and community unique learning environments for the 21st century. n


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somers Middle school Somers, New York

campus Master Planning

Y D Kg&d G Barchitects IN E N& engineers, Pc

285 Main Street Mount Kisco, NY 10549 Honorable www.kgdarchitects.com Mention IG

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Russell A. Davidson, AIA 914/666-5900 2010 design teaM

Russell A. Davidson, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Erik A. Kaeyer, AIA, LEED AP, Design Principal Calvin L. Black, PE, Principal for Construction Administration Joseph Bonifacio III, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect Sarka Leff, PE, Civil Engineer Susan D. Davidson, Interior Designer owner/client Somers Central School District Somers, NY Dr. Joanne Marien, Superintendent of Schools 914/277-2400 Key stats grades served: 6-8 capacity: 942 students Building area: 54,000 square feet space per student: 191 square feet square Foot cost: $295 total Project cost: $16 million contract date: 2005 completed: Sept. 2008 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: DaViD LaMB PhotograPhy 2008

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hen this original K-12 school was converted to a middle school and a bus drop was added several decades ago, the original main entrance no longer provided direct access for arriving students. A single, insufficient side door was adopted through practice as the main entry. The T-configuration of the existing floor plan and minimum-width corridors created congestion problems along corridors and at building intersections. The design solution creates a community school, providing a new main entrance and visual focus as well as improved overall building circulation, while providing the additional classrooms and common spaces of the design program. The new main entrance and lobby provide an open, lightfilled point of arrival for students and visitors, and building security has been improved with the relocation of the main office into a new adjacent office suite. A separate public-use entrance and outdoor plaza provide access to the building outside of school hours. A 630seat stepped-floor auditorium and music suite, expanded lightfilled cafeteria, and the original gymnasium can all be accessed and utilized while maintaining

security throughout the rest of the building. The classroom addition dramatically improves building circulation and creates a center-

landscaped courtyard. The new circulation pattern relieves corridor congestion by giving students alternative routes of travel. n

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wasatch Junior high school Salt Lake City, Utah

entire school/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G BY D vcBo I N architecture E N R524 South 600 East Salt Lake City, UT 84102 www.vcbo.com Honorable

Mention Boyd McAllister, AIA 801/575-8800

2010

design teaM Boyd McAllister, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Jeff Pinegar, AIA, Project Manager owner/client Granite School District Salt Lake City, UT Dr. Stephen Ronnenkamp 385/646-4523 Key stats grades served: 7-9 capacity: 950 students size of site: 11 acres Building area: 132,000 square feet Building volume: 1.6 million cubic feet space per student: 139 square feet cost per student: $18,767 square Foot cost: $135 construction cost: $17.8 million total Project cost: $18.8 million contract date: Sept. 2006 completed: Aug. 2008 completion: 100% PhotograPhy: JeFF Pinegar, VCBo arChiteCtUre

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n the site of the original school, demolished as a result of a fire, the new Wasatch Junior High School takes on the character of a vintage late 1950s school. The new building was designed to fit on the existing 11-acre site located in an established neighborhood on the foothills above Salt Lake City. The site created a challenge to provide the required amenities for 950 junior high school students on a confined, sloping site. The solution was designed to fit in approximately the same location as the old school, stepping down the slope to take advantage of the grade change. The new school is reminiscent of the old in terms of exterior massing, appearance, and size, which was of great concern to the residents of the surrounding neighborhood. The new design responds well to the desires of the steering committee and provides the latest technology and teaching/learning opportunities while preserving the qualities that existed in the previous design.

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Two “houses,� consisting of 12 classrooms each, anchor the learning experience. These houses are surrounded by a media center, administration/counsel-

ing suite, auditorium, physical education area, music and the arts area, and a commons/dining area, which was not part of the original facility. n


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Science & Technology center

Beverly Hills High School Science & Technology center Beverly Hills, California

NEW CONSTRUCTION lPA, iNc. 5161 California Ave., Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92617 www.lpainc.com Wendy Rogers, AIA, LEED AP 949/261-1001 DeSigN TeAm Jon Mills, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Wendy Rogers, AIA, LEED AP, Design Principal David Eaves, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Kimberly Izadi, CID, Interior Designer Joe Yee, FASLA, Landscape Design Principal Rudolph & Sletten, Contractor owNer/clieNT Beverly Hills Unified School District Beverly Hills, CA Jerry Gross, Ph.D., Superintendent 310/229-3685 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12

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his building provides a gateway for the campus. An integrated committee participated in the collaborative process to program the 78,000-squarefoot facility, which includes 18 math classrooms, 12 science labs, a 100-seat student lecture hall, faculty work areas, and an Educational Development Center. The one-acre infill site sits adjacent to a challenging four-story classroom building from the 1960s and across

from the original 1920s building. The design solution is a four-story building organized about a courtyard demonstrating the principles of math, science, and nature. Fast-growing bamboo acts as a living screen wall for the existing building. Each new floor will connect directly into the academic levels of the existing building. Wide student galleries at each floor embrace natural light, share views of the city, and feature built-in seats to

encourage student interaction. The architecture takes its cues from the eclectic campus and is an expression of the educational program. A datum line of smooth plaster with punched openings defines the building’s base, and the middle of the new building is highly enriched by a cladding system of metal panels that defines the science program. The social gallery faces south, where sun is controlled with clip-on solar shading devices. n

capacity: 810 students Size of Site: 1 acre Building Area: 78,108 square feet Building Volume: 1.2 million cubic feet Space per Student: 96 square feet cost per Student: $37,778 Square Foot cost: $392 construction cost: $30.6 million contract Date: Dec. 2005 completed: Sept. 2007 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: COsTea PHOTOgraPHy, inC.

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Brownwood High School Brownwood, Texas

entire School/campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

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Y ASSociATeS G B& HUcKABee DE IN N R 4521 South Hulen, Suite 220 Fort Worth, TX 76109 Honorable www.huckabee-inc.com Mention

Daren Kirbo 817/377-2969 2010 DeSigN TeAm

Huckabee & Associates, Architect Waldrop Construction, Construction Manager owNer/clieNT Brownwood Independent School District Brownwood, TX Dr. Reece Blincoe, Superintendent 325/643-5644 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,200 students Size of Site: 80 acres Building Area: 220,000 square feet Building Volume: 2.6 million cubic feet Space per Student: 183 square feet cost per Student: $14,333 Square Foot cost: $87 construction cost: $17.2 million Total Project cost: $17.9 million contract Date: Aug. 2004 completed: Aug. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: TrUiTT rOgers

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hrough the combined efforts of Huckabee, school administrators, the construction manager, department staff, and a citizens’ group, the original 1961 high school facility was transformed into a modern campus that has restored both school and community pride. The original campus consisted of 10 separate buildings, which made security a challenge. Although it had been modified over the past 40 years with minor technology upgrades, it was in bad shape overall and did not meet modern education standards or building codes. Huckabee added 11 classrooms and enlarged existing classroom space from an average of 560 square feet to 800 square feet. The additional space allowed for the expansion of special programs like life skills, science, computer technology, building trades, and much more. The fine arts program received additional space and a fully renovated auditorium. The student commons, a campus tradition, was kept in its original location with the original terrazzo floors, renovating only the surrounding walls and glazing and opening it up to an outdoor courtyard.

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Quality materials were used throughout, including a solid masonry system and highSEER rated rooftop units to extend the lifecycle by another

50 years. Brownwood High School received academic honors during this time for rising test scores and graduation rates. n


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chanhassen High School Chanhassen, Minnesota

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G BY D I N PerKiNS+will E N R 10th Street S., Suite 200 84 Minneapolis, MN 55403 www.perkinswill.com Honorable

Mention Steven Miller, AIA, LEED AP 612/851-5000

2010

DeSigN TeAm Anderson Johnson Associates, Landscape/Civil Engineer Bossardt Corp., Construction Manager Dennis Hahn, Food Service Consultant Hallberg Engineering, Mechanical and Structural Engineer Heyer Engineering, PC, Structural Engineer Schuler Shook, Theater Planning and Lighting owNer/clieNT Eastern Carver County Schools Chaska, MN David Jennings, Superintendent 952/556-6100 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 2,000 students Size of Site: 90 acres Building Area: 410,000 square feet Building Volume: 5.7 million cubic feet Space per Student: 205 square feet cost per Student: $38,923 Square Foot cost: $190 construction cost: $77.8 million Total Project cost: $95.2 million contract Date: April 2006 completed: July 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: DOn WOng PHOTOgraPHy

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hanhassen High School is a centerpiece in this rapidly growing suburban community. Overlooking natural wetlands, the rolling site is terraced to fit the 2,000-student school, competition fields, and natural site amenities. The heart of the school is the central commons that serves as a great room, gathering people from the west public entrance and the east student/bus entrance and providing clear connections with the academic,

athletic, and performing arts zones of the building. The academic area is organized into thematic-based teams of 500 students, encircling the central media center, special needs classrooms, and student common spaces. Science labs are grouped near all academic teams with broad south-facing views. Art and industrial tech studios are conveniently located for student teams on the lower walk-out level. The performing arts center

includes a 650-seat auditorium, black box, and music rooms, accessed from the central commons. The 2,200-seat gymnasium has spectator access from the central commons and the gym floor levels. Team spaces are at the lower level, allowing for the large building volume to be integrated into the site. Natural light and views are included in all classrooms and team spaces. High clerestory windows illuminate the central circulation loop. n

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eastern guilford High School Gibsonville, North Carolina

entire School/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G BY D SFl+A I N ArcHiTecTS E N 333 Fayetteville Street, R Suite 225 Raleigh, NC 27601 Honorable www.sfla.biz Mention

Robert W. Ferris, AIA, REFP, LEED AP 2010 919/573-6350

BArNHill coNTrAcTiNg co. John Muter, Vice President 919/781-7210 DeSigN TeAm Barnhill Contracting Co., General Contractor Optima Engineering, Plumbing, Mechanical, and Electrical CLH Design, Civil Engineering, Landscape Architecture Fleming & Associates, Structural Engineer Foodesign Associates, Food Service Design Davis–Martin–Powell Associates, Civil Engineering owNer/clieNT Guilford County Schools Greensboro, NC Maurice Green, Superintendent 336/370-8992 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,600 students Size of Site: 103.6 acres Building Area: 273,195 square feet Building Volume: 5.3 million cubic feet Space per Student: 171 square feet cost per Student: $29,523 Square Foot cost: $173 Total Project cost: $47.2 million contract Date: April 2007 completed: Mar. 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: BreTT OsBOrne

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astern Guilford High School is organized around a dominant core, which allows optimal community use and simultaneous school security and safety. This core or “atrium” with a singlepoint entry allows access to all public functions including auditorium, gymnasium, dining, and cafeteria. The central atrium, a two-story space with a large skylight, is used as the central gathering space of the school and the hub for daily activities. This daylit building draws students in and immerses them in their education. It provides the required learning spaces, organizes them in a unique way, and allows special learning opportunities. Academic wings radiate from the core and can be organized into departments or small learning communities. Two specialty features included in the central atrium are a career center and cyber café. The career center is adjacent to the guidance offices and media center and has a presentation area and a counselor station for access during lunch.

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Internet access will be available to students here and at the cyber café. The facility is designed to LEED Silver standards. The building is a two-story,

load-bearing, precast concrete structure. Heating and cooling are accomplished with a four-pipe boiler and chiller system and VAV boxes. n


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el cerrito High School El Cerrito, California

entire School/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G BY D wlc iNc. I N ArcHiTecTS, E N R 2600 Tenth Street, Suite 500 Berkeley, CA 94710 www.wlcarchitects.com Honorable

Mention Kevin A. MacQuarrie, AIA, Principal 510/450-1999 2010 DeSigN TeAm Jackie Bassman, AIA Project Architect Ike Ofodu, Project Manager Carylon Tyler, Architect Tito Portea, Job Captain Janice Yeh, Design Team Sisi Meng, Design Team owNer/clieNT

West Contra Costa Unified School District Richmond, CA William Savidge, Chief Engineering Officer 510/307-4544 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12

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l Cerrito High School is located on a 15.7-acre hillside site. The campus buildings are organized around a courtyard—with the “public” buildings such as administration, library, gymnasium, and theater on the street side and the “private” classroom buildings away from the streets. The outdoor courtyard has various forms of seat walls, picnic tables and gathering areas including a dedicated senior class “pit” which provide students with options to

encourage interaction and a sense of community. The twostory administration, library and 600-seat theater building also houses a school-based health center, radio station (operated in conjunction with local businesses), and “Tech Futures” (a computer skills program providing school credit and job training). The gymnasium building houses a cafeteria, a main gym with bleachers capacity for 1,600 students, a practice gym, two dance studios, and a fitness center. The classroom build-

ings are two- and three-story buildings with circulation taking place both inside and outside via covered walks, terraces, and bridges. The campus design supports the current departmental organization but allows adaptability for small learning communities by separating the classrooms into three wings, with supporting spaces for staff offices, work rooms, and conference rooms to allow interaction between staff and students on a small group scale. n

capacity: 1,600 students Building Area: 210,000 square feet Square Foot cost: $393 completion: 100%

PHOTOgraPHy: geneVieVe WOLFF, DaLe Lang

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garfield High School Historic renovation and Addition Seattle, Washington

entire School/campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION BlrB ArcHiTecTS 1250 Pacific Ave., Suite 700 Tacoma, WA 98402 www.blrb.com Liz Chambers, Senior Marketing Coordinator 253/627-5599 DeSigN TeAm Thomas L. Bates, FAIA, Principal Architect Mike Reynolds, AIA, Project Manager Ron Tjerandsen, AIA, Design Architect, Historic Building David Pool, AIA, Design Architect, PEPAC Addition Kurt Cross, AIA, Project Architect, Construction Administration Lease Crutcher Lewis, Contractor owNer/clieNT Seattle Public Schools Seattle, WA Dr. Maria Goodloe-Johnson, Superintendent 206/252-0000 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,600 students Size of Site: 9.8 acres Building Area: 254,525 square feet Building Volume: 4.9 million cubic feet Space per Student: 160 square feet cost per Student: $54,687 Square Foot cost: $344 construction cost: $87.5 million Total Project cost: $109 million contract Date: Mar. 2003 completed: Sept. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: Dan TyrPaK PHOTOgraPHiC, BenJaMin BensCHneiDer PHOTOgraPHy

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arfield High School is a prominent historic structure located in one of Seattle’s oldest, most diverse urban neighborhoods. Nationally respected for academic excellence and awardwinning music and sports programs, the school boasts an impressive alumni list that includes world-renowned musicians, artists, and athletes. The school regularly hosts large community events, serving as both a learning institution and a center of community pride. By project inception, Garfield had long outgrown its usable space, and several piecemeal remodels had left the school disjointed and disconnected. This landmark school presented a unique design challenge: Maintain the historical, architectural, and cultural legacy of a beloved community icon while transforming an educationally obsolete building into state-of-the-art, studentcentered space. To revive the grandeur of

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz


the 1923 Jacobean-style building, the architects reestablished the north entrance as the school’s main entry, meticulously restored the building envelope, and replaced a small, poorly sited 1962 gymnasium annex with a new 83,700-square-foot physical education and performing arts center (PEPAC) addition. To delineate yet integrate historic and contemporary design features, the new building offers a modern, curvilinear aesthetic that is subservient and complementary to the rectilinear form of the original building. Leveraging the site and strategically placing the PEPAC building created a new community entrance plaza. The design solution included a complete reorganization of the three-story, 170,850-square-foot historic structure into four personalized learning environments (PLEs), providing the flexibility to support a variety of pedagogical models— from grade-level teaming to departmental organization or interdepartmental clustering. Contemporary technology, including wireless, voice enhancement systems, digital projectors, and interactive whiteboards, is seamlessly integrated into all learning spaces. The conversion of the original auditorium into a soaring, daylight-filled commons was a focal element of the design. The commons now provides a much-needed social “heart” for the school, its students, and the community and incorporates moveable partitions and adaptable furniture for flexibility of use. The now state-of-theart library overlooks the commons and represents a clever adaptive reuse of the original gymnasiums. Reuse of construction materials was important, especially in the

library. The wood flooring of the gymnasiums was restored, while carved wood architectural features that served as the original library’s entryway now mark the entrance to the computer lab. The collaborative community planning process, respect for historic detail, and successful partnerships with public agencies all ensure that Garfield High School will serve its students and community well into the future. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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entire School/campus Building

george washington carver High School of engineering and Science Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION ScHrADergroUP ArcHiTecTUre llc 161 Leverington Ave., Suite 105 Philadelphia, PA 19127 www.sgarc.com David L. Schrader, AIA, LEED AP 215/482-7440 DeSigN TeAm David L. Schrader, AIA, LEED AP, Managing Partner David C. Mazzocco, LEED AP, Project Manager Antonio Scanga, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP, Design Team owNer/clieNT School District of Philadelphia Philadelphia, PA Arlene C. Ackerman, Ed.D., Superintendent 215/400-4000

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uilt in 1948, the high school serves as a science, engineering, and technology magnet school for the School District of Philadelphia. This project focused on rearranging space programmatically, renovating the entire facility, and adding 40,000 square feet to address significant deficiencies. Maximizing the ability of the design to function as a teaching tool was a main goal of the project. Examples of features aimed

KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 900 students Size of Site: 3.6 acres Building Area: 159,829 square feet Building Volume: 1.5 million cubic feet Space per Student: 178 square feet cost per Student: $40,202 Square Foot cost: $226 construction cost: $36.2 million Total Project cost: $37.4 million contract Date: Jan. 2007 completed: Dec. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: MaTT WargO PHOTOgraPHy

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at enhancing everyday learning include a flagpole functioning as the center of a giant sundial and a scaled planetary model; HVAC systems that can be monitored from student labs; and portions of exposed building structure illustrating construction methods. The existing bleak urban site was improved with the introduc-

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tion of landscaping and outdoor student gathering spaces. Since this project served as the district’s pilot green school project, sustainable site measures were introduced, including the reduction of impervious coverage by 25 percent, the addition of an underground infiltration basin, landscaping with native plants requiring no irrigation, and night

sky-friendly lighting. Interior sustainable measures include the use of low-emitting and recycled content materials as well as water-saving fixtures. Built for longevity, the school utilizes exterior masonry cavity walls with steel frame structure, masonry interior partitions, and central plant boilers with roof-mounted chillers. n


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green Tech High charter School Albany, New York

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rHiNeBecK & G B YArcHiTecTUre DE IN N PlANNiNg Pc R 21 E. Market Street Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Honorable www.rhinebeckarchitecture.com Mention Phillip Zemke, AIA, LEED AP 845/876-2832 2010

THe DiSAlVo ericSoN groUP www.tdeg.com DeSigN TeAm J. Louis Turpin, AIA, LEED AP Phillip Zemke, AIA, LEED AP owNer/clieNT The Brighter Choice Foundation Albany, NY Christian Bender, Executive Director 518/694-4114 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 350 students Size of Site: 4.4 acres Building Area: 44,000 square feet Space per Student: 125 square feet cost per Student: $22,400 Square Foot cost: $182 construction cost: $8 million contract Date: July 2006 completed: May 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: rHineBeCK arCHiTeCTUre & PLanning PC

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reen Tech High Charter School is an all-male school that provides a high-quality, college preparatory education for Albany students in a safe, small-school setting. The school offers an extended school day, a longer school year, extensive literacy instruction, and programs that emphasize environmental awareness and technological proficiency. Rhinebeck Architecture & Planning PC designed the building as a healthy and productive place to learn and teach by providing a safe and secure environment with high indoor air quality, thermal comfort, excellent acoustics, extensive daylighting, and views. Building orientation allowed the use of oversize windows with sunscreens for daylighting and light control. Systems and materials were selected that were renewable, locally available, and durable so that the facility can be easily maintained and operated. The orientation of the building, high-performance lighting and mechanical systems, and the responsible use of water and energy make the Green Tech High Charter School an enjoyable and sustainable place for learning. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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G BY D FreNcH iNc. I N ASSociATeS, E N R 1600 Parkdale Rochester, MI 48307 www.frenchaia.com Honorable

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grosse ile High School Grosse Ile, Michigan

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Mention Stefanie Decker, Marketing 248/656-1377

2010

DeSigN TeAm Dale C. Jerome, AIA, REFP, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Dan W. Jerome, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager

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riginally constructed in the 1950s, Grosse Ile High School was completely remodeled and enlarged during the 2007-2008 school year. The existing cafeteria and media center were undersized and outdated, making the construction of a new cafeteria and media center a priority. The additions were designed with curved exterior walls featuring large spans of glass and allowing maximum natural light into these spaces. In contrast to the

owNer/clieNT Grosse Ile Township Schools Grosse Ile, MI Dena Dardzinski, Superintendent 734/362-2581 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 750 students Size of Site: 40 acres Building Area: 119,100 square feet Space per Student: 159 square feet cost per Student: $11,426 Square Foot cost: $72 construction cost: $4.4 million Total Project cost: $8.6 million contract Date: May 2006 completed: Aug. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: sTeVe MayLOne, MayLOne PHOTOgraPHy

former building’s rectangular form and limited windows, the addition curves to form a fluid edge similar to the nearby shorelines of Lake Erie. The cafeteria addition was carefully placed to allow the existing kitchen space to serve the existing cafeteria during construction and to make an efficient switch to 76

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serving students in the newly constructed area. An outdoor patio was created to allow students the option of eating outside during the warmer spring and fall months. The existing cafeteria was converted to specialty classroom space while the existing media center became the new central office. The office is

now more strategically located to monitor and control the building’s new main entrance. Additional remodeling projects included a completely remade gymnasium, new science laboratories, technology updates in every classroom, and new furnishings throughout the school. n


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John r. rogers High School Spokane, Washington

entire School/campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

Spokane, WA 99201 www.nacarchitecture.com Honorable N

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G BY D NAc|ArcHiTecTUre IN E N R 1203 W. Riverside Ave.

DanaMention Harbaugh, AIA, LEED AP 509/838-8240

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DeSigN TeAm DCI Engineers and Structural Design Northwest, Structural Engineers L&S Engineering, Mechanical Engineer NAC|Engineering, Electrical and Telecommunications Engineer Taylor Engineering, Civil Engineer FP Engineering, Fire Protection Garco Construction, General Contractor owNer/clieNT Spokane Public Schools Spokane, WA Greg Brown, Director of Capital Projects 509/354-7149 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,750 students Size of Site: 25.5 acres Building Area: 261,291 square feet Building Volume: 4.8 million cubic feet Space per Student: 149 square feet cost per Student: $28,211 Square Foot cost: $189 construction cost: $29.3 million Total Project cost: $49.4 million contract Date: Feb. 2007 completed: Oct. 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: riCK KeaTing, rK PrODUCTiOns

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evitalizing an art deco high school—and rejuvenating a community—was the charge for John R. Rogers High School. The exterior of the 90,000-squarefoot, three-story structure, originally constructed in 1932, has been restored to its former grandeur, and the interior has been given a complete renovation. A new 170,000-square-foot addition was designed and constructed to harmonize with the original building by using art deco architectural elements

and similar building materials in a contemporary manner. A new clocktower marks the front door to the campus, complements the original and new construction, and creates an architectural icon for the community. Rogers High School met the standards for the Washington Sustainable Schools Protocol (WSSP), a sustainable program similar to LEED but specific to school construction. Working in partnership with the state, the design team provided spe-

cific case-study information gleaned from the project—data that was then incorporated in the final version of WSSP. Daylight harvesting, views, energy efficiency, and stormwater management are central sustainable design strategies integrated into the design. The school district will seek nomination to the National Register of Historic Places for the original structure, where all renovation work is consistent with the Secretary of the Interior’s restoration standards. n

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Hobart High School Hobart, Indiana

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James B. Thompson, NCARB 317/580-5777 2010 DeSigN TeAm Dave Blanton, AIA, Principal Richard Todd Cass, Project Manager Brian McFarland, Project Designer Don Monday, Project Designer Envoy, Inc. Construction Manager Chris LaFollette, CEO, Project Manager owNer/clieNT School City of Hobart Hobart, IN Dr. Peggy Buffington Superintendent 219/942-8885 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,400 students Size of Site: 85 acres Building Area: 334,522 square feet Building Volume: 7.7 million cubic feet Space per Student: 238 square feet cost per Student: $33,250 Square Foot cost: $139 construction cost: $46.6 million Total Project cost: $62.5 million contract Date: April 2006 completed: Dec. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: giBraLTar Design, inC.

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“New Day” for Hobart High School students was the dream of the community’s citizens. This was realized with the completion of a 21st century state-of-theart facility. Creating the vision involved students, staff, and community establishing a design filled with personalization of the school’s interior spaces such as the Great Hall for gatherings; an outdoor café; a black box theater; wireless technology throughout; and learning centers for students, teachers, and community members. Capturing the rich heritage of the community, while desiring to be innovative and futuristic, proved to be challenging. The spirit of the old brickyards and the “Hobart Brickies” is evident. Traditional brick was utilized on the exterior, and fired brick sculptures capture student life and the history of the community, conveying the message, “Once a Brickie, always a Brickie.” The school’s academic learning goals guided planning, resulting in flexible learning spaces and open areas with ubiquitous computing throughout the school to facilitate teamwork and encourage

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project-based learning. The media center and learning centers provide collaboration, multitasking, and distance learning opportunities. The curriculum includes five schools for experiential education: Communication and Fine Arts, Business Services and Information Technology, Health and Natural Sciences, Engineering and Industrial Technology, and Human Services.

The two-story commons area is the life force of the school, organizing and connecting the school. While promoting social and educational interaction, it features locker bays; clerestory lighting; and easy access to guidance, media, career center, and other student-focused spaces such as a seminar room, also used for community groups and school board meetings. Essential to the design was


the creation of the Great Hall, integrating students, staff, and the community of Hobart. Murals line the upper walls, providing the students with a sense of history and a dynamic two-story space that invites them to gather for peer learning before school, eat at the food court or outdoor café, utilize

technology, or view broadcasts on a 16-foot screen or monitors. The Great Hall invites community socializing by connecting to the gymnasium, the 650-seat auditorium, the fieldhouse, and outside athletic facilities. From the design phase through the construction phase, the goal for Hobart High School

remained consistent: to create an educational facility that would allow staff and students to work in a collaborative, technologyenriched, modern environment, reflective of opportunities,

careers, and leadership. The goal was accomplished while remaining true to a community with a culture of pride and tradition. “A New Day” has been achieved. n

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Johns creek High School Johns Creek, Georgia

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cHAPmAN griFFiN lANier Y D G B IN E N SUSSeNBAcH ArcHiTecTS, iNc. R (cglS) 2500 Cumberland Parkway, Honorable Suite 350 Mention Atlanta, GA 30339 www.cglsarchitects.com 2010 404/733-5493 DeSigN TeAm Robert S. Sussenbach, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Rebecca M. Tyson, AIA, Project Manager Marian M. Reeves, AIA, Project Architect owNer/clieNT Fulton County School System Atlanta, GA Johns Creek High School Dr. Cindy Loe, Superintendent 770/623-2138 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,862 students Size of Site: 48 acres Building Area: 327,640 square feet Space per Student: 176 square feet cost per Student: $28,195 Square Foot cost: $134 construction cost: $52.5 million contract Date: Dec. 2006 completed: June 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: gerLiCH PHOTOgraPHy

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he new Johns Creek High School is designed to meet the ever-changing needs of education in the 21st century. The two-story building takes advantage of the rolling 48-acre site. The building is oriented to expose nearly all of the instructional classrooms to soft natural daylight, and to expose the common areas (cafeteria, media center, and gymnasiums) to exterior views of the surrounding campus. The building incorporates a main street design to internally connect all of the major assembly areas. The competition gymnasium, theater, and media center, which are the highest public use areas, are directly accessible from the building’s front parking lot. Due to the limited site area, which was reduced further by an existing stream that bisects the property, the athletic stadium was located adjacent to the school building, which resulted in a secure student activity plaza for normal school day and after-hours activities and events. Sustainable design is an important part of the project. Features include natural daylighting, recycled content in building materials, locally manufactured materials, and environmentally sensitive building processes. n


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BY D DeSigN groUP, GreSoUrceS IN E N ArcHiTecTS R 371 Hoes Lane, Suite 301 Honorable Piscataway, Mention NJ 08854 www.drgaia.com

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livingston High School, center for Fitness & wellness Livingston, New Jersey

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Patrick S. Seiwell 2010 732/560-7900 DeSigN TeAm Patrick S. Seiwell, Principal-in-Charge Frank Bowlby, Project Manager Gianforcaro Engineers, Civil Engineering Harrison/Hamnett, PC, Structural Engineering Concord Engineering Group, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engeering Vanas Construction, General Contractors owNer/clieNT Livingston Public Schools Livingston, NJ Steven Robinson, Business Administrator 973/535-8000 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 2,000 students Size of Site: 19 acres Building Area: 48,000 square feet Building Volume: 930,627 cubic feet cost per Student: $6,250 Square Foot cost: $260 construction cost: $12.5 million Total Project cost: $17.8 million contract Date: Sept. 2007 completed: Jan. 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: TayLOr PHOTO

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he Livingston Center for Fitness & Wellness was constructed as part of a $53 million bond referendum to provide additions and alterations to the Livingston High School. This is the centerpiece of the high school physical education and athletic programs. This stand-alone building serves multiple purposes: It is used as an educational facility, for community recreation, and as an emergency shelter for the town. The Georgian style brick façade faces a new track and synthetic turf field and remains architecturally compatible to the historic style that is predominant on this campus-like site, providing a seamless transition from old to new. The building features a main gymnasium with bleacher seating for 1,200. The flexibility of this space allows it to be divided into four separate teaching stations, allowing diverse courses to take place at the same time. The locker spaces incorporate changing areas, P.E. offices, team rooms, and a coaches’ suite, complete with shower and changing facilities. The second floor houses a multipurpose dance/wrestling room and a strength training and fitness area. Both of these spaces overlook the new track and field and provide an inspiring view for students, staff, and residents alike. The project incorporates the technologies of the USGBC LEED guidelines for new construction. Certification is pending. n

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logan High School Logan, Ohio

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Mention Earl Crossland

513/398-4931

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DeSigN TeAm Earl Crossland, Principal-in-Charge Patrick Armstrong, Project Manager Brian Gilliland, Project Professional Catherine Davison, Interior Designer Brent Long, Dynamix Engineering Smoot, Elford, Wesson, Construction Manager owNer/clieNT Logan-Hocking Local School District Logan, OH Stephen Stirn, Superintendent 740/385-8517 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,250 students Size of Site: 72.7 acres Building Area: 232,378 square feet Building Volume: 3.2 million cubic feet Space per Student: 186 square feet cost per Student: $26,530 Square Foot cost: $143 construction cost: $33.2 million Total Project cost: $34 million contract Date: Feb. 2005 completed: Dec. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: VsWC arCHiTeCTs

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n addition to meeting stringent educational program requirements, the Logan-Hocking School Board requested a building design with a “Wow!” factor. The resulting architecture uses classical elements to subtly create the school’s chieftain head logo in the main entry and media center façades, with the arched fan window as the headdress, the frieze as the headband, and window wall detailing expressing facial features. The main entrance lobby includes a barrel-vaulted rotunda surrounded by offices and the academic wing entry. A separate performing arts entry serving a lecture hall and 1,000-seat theater is located to the left while a sports/event entry serving the dining commons and main gym is located to the right of the main entry. The building is zoned to accommodate simultaneous arts and sports events while maintaining the security of the academic wings. The media center, computer labs, and science labs are centrally located at the heart of the T-shaped academic wing. This allows flexibility in using the building in a departmental, teaming, thematic, or school-within-a-school model. The media center and

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the majority of the classrooms have views of the adjacent Hocking River. The project design had to

solve challenges of a floodplain, wetlands, three ponds, poor soils, and an oil well on the site. n


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Y D G BgroUP, Dlr iNc. IN E N R 222 S. Riverside Plaza,

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metea Valley High School Aurora, Illinois

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Dennis Bane, Principal 312/382-9980 2010 DeSigN TeAm

DLR Group, Architect and Engineer Turner Construction, Construction Manager owNer/clieNT Indian Prairie School District 204 Aurora, IL Kathy Birkett, Superintendent 630/375-3000 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-10, 9-12 in 2011 capacity: 3,000 students Size of Site: 84.1 acres Building Area: 464,200 square feet Building Volume: 8.9 million cubic feet Space per Student: 156 square feet cost per Student: $28,603 Square Foot cost: $185 construction cost: $85.8 million Total Project cost: $124.6 million contract Date: Dec. 2005

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ndian Prairie School District 204, one of the largest districts in the state of Illinois, wanted a third new high school to alleviate overcrowding and encourage collaboration among students and faculty. Metea Valley High School’s flexible design solution supports a multitude of teaching and learning concepts and can be organized by grade or department, or developed into small learning communities. At the core of the academic wing is the 12,680-square-foot media center. This space, together with checkout computer labs, forum rooms, and a technology lab, delineates two enclosed courtyards that expose the building core to natural light. The central location of the enclosed courtyards establishes freedom for students to move outdoors as well as through the adjacent media center, locker bays, and student resource rooms during free periods. Four think-tank hubs, consisting of decentralized administrative and guidance offices, student resource rooms, conference rooms, and teacher planning centers, flank the media center and outdoor courtyards. Lounge areas with internet access, as well as a variety of small and large

gathering spaces, encourage interaction among students and faculty. Sustainable design features include a 750-square-foot rooftop greenhouse equipped with drip irrigation, a motorized

roof sash for ventilation, and motorized shades. The greenhouse control system allows students to collect weather and temperature data and provides enhanced learning opportunities outside the classroom. n

completed: Aug. 2009-Phase 1 Jan. 2010-Phase 2 completion: 95% PHOTOgraPHy: JaMes sTeinKaMP

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montgomery High School San Diego, California

entire School/campus Building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

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Mention David Ruhnau, AIA 760/438-5899

2010

DeSigN TeAm David Ruhnau, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Joseph Calderon, AIA, Project Designer Gustavo Bidart, Project Director Gilbane SGI, Construction Manager Kanda & TSO, Structural Engineers Nack & Associates, Mechanical Engineers owNer/clieNT Sweetwater Union High School District Chula Vista, CA Dr. Jesus Gandara, Superintendent 619/691-5555 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 2,280 students Size of Site: 43.3 acres Building Area: 35,179 square feet Building Volume: 351,756 cubic feet Space per Student: 15 square feet cost per Student: $3,859 Square Foot cost: $250 construction cost: $11.4 million Total Project cost: $14.1 million contract Date: Aug. 2009 completed: Dec. 2010 completion: 5%

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he challenge in modernizing this 50-yearold high school was not to do a patch job, but to carefully develop a design that kept the best of its history; develop priorities to stay in line with dollars budgeted from local bond money; and create a learning environment that could enhance a sense of school spirit and pride. The first item was to create a protected courtyard that serves as a gathering place and focal point for students as well as invited community members. This allowed for the placement of the new library/media center and classroom building that now fronts to the public and creates a beacon of knowledge. The new building serves as a welcoming vehicle for integrating technologies that can promote research and learning. This two-story library and classroom building is also used by the community during non-school hours while the public gymnasium, performing arts center, and media center allow students to spill over and gather in the lighted courtyard

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during evening events. The new courtyard has sub areas for physical fitness, food service, and central gatherings, and a small amphitheater for student interaction.

In keeping with the school district’s commitment to truly modernize a facility that had inadequate lighting and years of wear and tear, all infrastructure was replaced to

support current (and future) technology, air conditioning, and plumbing needs, and permanent classrooms. This sustainable design also supports the district’s vision that quality schools mirror the local quality of life and community values. Additionally, the district intends to seek USGB LEED Gold certification. Every effort was made to use non-petroleum-based, recyclable material. The building’s placement maximizes north daylight by its east-west orientation. Other design elements include the use of exterior horizontal aluminum shade louvers for daylight-

ing and glare control. Powered roller shades in the library offer additional controlled daylighting. Rooftop photovoltaic panels generate 12.5 percent of the building’s energy requirements. Solar tubular light monitors use daylight for interior classroom walls while other controls monitor energy efficiency and light pollution. Light is a critical element within this modernization project; therefore, it serves as a metaphor for the light of learning, for dispelling the dark of ignorance, and for lighting the way into a bright future for every student. n

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oak grove replacement High School Maumelle, Arkansas

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wiTTeNBerg, G B Y D DeloNY IN E N & DAViDSoN, iNc. ArcHiTecTS R 400 West Capitol, Suite 1800 Honorable Little Rock, AR 72203 Mention www.wddarchitects.com Jack F. See Jr., FAIA 2010 501/376-6681 DeSigN TeAm Jack F. See Jr., FAIA, CEFPI, Principal-in-Charge Bradley R. Chilcote, AIA, LEED AP, CEFPI, Principal-in-Charge Bryan Adams, AIA, LEED AP, CEFPI, Project Designer Randy Orr, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect owNer/clieNT Pulaski County Special School District Little Rock, AR Rob McGill, Acting Superintendent 501/490-2000 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,500 students Size of Site: 91.5 acres Building Area: 334,069 square feet Building Volume: 8.5 million cubic feet Space per Student: 223 square feet completed: Aug. 2011 completion: 10% PHOTOgraPHy: WD&D arCHiTeCTs

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esigned in response to a growing student population, the Oak Grove Replacement High School is an educational complex that emphasizes technology and comprehensive learning. The campus is located on a site in an industrial zone that borders protected wetlands and is adjacent to a middle school. The 325,000-square-foot school is made up of small communities of learning that allow for individualized instruction for each student. These communities surround communal spaces, including specialized vocational classrooms such as art studios, band and ensemble rooms, choral and multipurpose fine arts rooms, and a dramatic black box theater. A 185-seat seminar room, a 2,000-seat competition gymnasium, a 300-seat practice gymnasium, a 1,200-seat auditorium, and a cafeteria that seats 700 (expandable to 1,000) will provide additional gathering space. The building’s exterior features a combination of brick and prefinished metal panels. The master plan features ample parking, as well as cross-campus driveways and athletic facilities to support

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physical education and competition sports. These include tennis courts, a soccer field, an eight-lane athletic track, a 5,200-seat field sports stadium, a fieldhouse, and softball and baseball practice fields. The new high school

supports the district’s mission by increasing achievement in an everchanging technological society and focusing on high expectations, rigorous curriculum, and a collegial learning environment. n


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Vocational/industrial Arts Facility RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION FANNiNg HoweY 210 N. Lee Street, Suite 208 Alexandria, VA 22314 www.fhai.com Edwin R. Schmidt, AIA, Principal-in-Charge 703/519-9822 BrYANT miTcHell ArcHiTecTS www.bryantmitchellarchitects.com DeSigN TeAm Edwin R. Schmidt, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Michael K. Schipp, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Katie L. Stone, Interior Designer Timothy C. Lehman, PE, LEED AP, Mechanical Engineer owNer/clieNT District of Columbia Public Schools Washington, DC Michelle Rhee, Chancellor 202/724-4516 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 622 students Size of Site: 6 acres Building Area: 140,992 square feet Building Volume: 2.1 million cubic feet Space per Student: 227 square feet cost per Student: $94,855 Square Foot cost: $418 construction cost: $41.1 million Total Project cost: $59 million contract Date: July 2007 completed: Aug. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: MagUire PHOTOgraPHiCs

Phelps Architecture, construction, and engineering High School Washington, District of Columbia

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he restoration of Phelps High School turned an abandoned building into a high-tech educational environment for the architecture, construction, and engineering trades. The school offers a project-based curriculum designed in partnership with local and national professional organizations. A soaring two-story commons connects the original 1930s structure with the later additions. Classrooms include high-tech drafting labs, an HVAC laboratory with alternate heating source units, and heavy equipment and crane simulators. Wireless connectivity and varied breakout spaces encourage collaboration between students in all disciplines. The building’s design serves as a valuable teaching tool. The commons acts as a showcase for construction displays, including welding, drywall, and masonry. Color-coded building systems and exposed structural elements offer examples of best practices in building construction and design. The design/build modernization was completed in only 16 months. Restoration efforts preserved historic brick, woodwork, and terrazzo floors while also integrating LEED for Schools strategies. Helical wind turbines, photovoltaic solar arrays, and a geothermal coldwater loop provide almost 100 percent of the school’s energy needs. In its first year of operation, Phelps has attracted students from across the District of Columbia and neighboring states, and has restored the rich heritage of one of Washington, D.C.’s most iconic schools. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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rogers Heritage High School Rogers, Arkansas

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Liz Cox 479/464-4965 2010 DeSigN TeAm

Gary Jackson, AIA, Project Architect Michelle McClaflin, LEED AP, Project Manager Caroline Martinez, Interior Design Mike Spaeth, AIA Cade Jacobs, AIA Architectural Team Members Brian Jackson, P.E. Engineering Coordinator owNer/clieNT Rogers School District Rogers, AR Dr. Janie Darr, Superintendent 479/636-3910 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 2,500 students Building Area: 338,000 square feet Square Foot cost: $118 construction cost: $39.7 million completed: Aug. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: JaneT WarLiCK, CaMera WOrK inC.

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his former high school, being used as a 10thgrade center, was chosen as the site for a second high school in the district to accommodate student population growth. The architect’s challenge for the expanded high school was that it be equitable with the city’s present high school in appearance, size, and opportunities for learning. The existing campus consisted of several separate buildings on different levels

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connected by covered walkways. Providing interior connections between retained buildings, while creating new spaces to present a unified appearance, was a daunting challenge. Maximizing all natural lighting possible was achieved in part through use of curved, multistory glass walls leading into terraced courtyards. Equity in appearance to the existing high school was achieved through use of modern, colorful construction materials surrounding existing

spaces on three sides. The new school was designed to accommodate 2,500 students. The project was constructed using a structural system of conventional steel framing and concrete retaining walls. The new Rogers Heritage High School speaks boldly of the past and embraces the excitement of the future for the student body. In addition, the continued use of this site has preserved an important part of history for this growing community. n


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Somers High School Lincolndale, New York

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Russell A. Davidson, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Erik A. Kaeyer, AIA, LEED AP, Design Principal Calvin L. Black, PE, Principal for Construction Administration Walter P. Hauser, AIA, Project Architect Patrick Meaney, Project Architect Sarka Leff, PE, Civil Engineer owNer/clieNT Somers Central School District Somers, NY Dr. Joanne Marien, Superintendent of Schools 914/277-2400 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,243 students Building Area: 57,556 square feet Space per Student: 164 square feet Square Foot cost: $295 construction cost: $15.8 million Total Project cost: $17.3 million contract Date: 2005 completed: Sept. 2008 completion: 100%

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he goal was to create an entirely new campus experience for the community. Planned as part of a districtwide master plan to address space needs, the project consisted of building additions in front of the original school, reconstructing playing fields and parking areas, and relocating parking for the district’s bus fleet. These tasks completely transformed the campus into a community center for recreation, performance, and athletics. Some of the challenges the project addressed include the appearance of the institutional

dark-brown brick of the 1960s building, the lack of a prominent main entrance, and the building’s circulation and space needs. The new entry creates a dramatic sense of arrival and primary visual focus for the entire campus. The barrelshaped lobby provides an elegant main entry while creating an effective security point with extensive visibility from within a new main office suite. Common spaces were designed and strategically located to allow use by the entire community. A fourstation gymnasium, cafeteria, and commons, as well as

the existing auditorium, can be accessed while the rest of the building can be secured. The original building had been designed with a series of circular corridors that connected different classroom areas. The design solution provided a new classroom wing and entrance wing that connects to existing corridors in a way that opens up multiple circulation paths. The approach remediated student congestion in the corridors and at existing choke points and dramatically improved travel throughout the building. n

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The School without walls of washington, D.c.

2010

Washington, District of Columbia

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eHreNKrANTz ecKSTUT & KUHN Citation of ArcHiTecTS The DukeExcellence Ellington Building, 2121 Ward Court, NW Washington, DC 20037 2010 www.eekarchitects.com

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Sean O’Donnell, AIA, LEED AP 202/861-1325 DeSigN TeAm Sean O’Donnell, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Matthew J. Bell, AIA, Design Principal Denis Glen Kuhn, FAIA, Historic Preservation Principal Stephen Penhoet, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect Abbie Cronin, LEED AP, Project Designer Sharif Attia, LEED AP, Project Designer owNer/clieNT D.C. Office of Public Education Facilities Modernization Washington, DC Allen Y. Lew, Executive Director 202/698-7700 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 460 students Size of Site: 0.5 acres Building Area: 68,000 square feet Building Volume: 1.1 million cubic feet Space per Student: 148 square feet cost per Student: $65,000 Square Foot cost: $440 construction cost: $30 million Total Project cost: $39 million contract Date: Dec. 2005 completed: July 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: JOsePH rOMeO

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he School Without Walls (“Walls”) is a small, urban, public high school in the heart of George Washington University (GWU). Taking advantage of its location, Walls offers an innovative early college curriculum and has created a student-centered campus, blurring the boundaries between high school and higher education. This approach has enabled Walls to create a quality studentcentered, urban campus that fosters integrative, interactive, experiential learning. Combining new and historic, the modernized and expanded facilities have enhanced Walls’ studentcentered culture and ambiance. The intimate, non-institutional character and inviting daylit interior of the historic, 19th century Grant School building—a local landmark also listed on the National Register of Historic Places—are echoed in the design of the 21st century addition. Combined, these two buildings create a collegiate ambiance, provide technologyrich learning environments, encourage formal and

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informal interaction, foster a subtle sense of security, and encourage a strong learning community. Capitalizing on its site, architecture, and program, Walls is pursuing LEED Gold certification. Even before the modernization, Walls was located in a historic building on a transitoriented, half-acre urban site. Programmatically, Walls students jointly use GWU’s gymnasia, auditoria, and food court, and GWU uses Walls’ “college-ready” classrooms after hours, enabling the team to create a smaller building. The design emphasizes pervasive access to natural light through restored and expansive new windows and two linear skylights that are the transition between the existing and new buildings. Within the historic building, design interventions to enhance acoustics and thermal performance respected and restored the integrity of the building’s wainscot,

flooring, and ceilings. Building upon an established, programmatic partnership, the modernization was realized by an innovative public-private partnership. Arising from the existing programmatic partnership with the university, which enables Walls students to earn an associate’s degree from GWU, another partnership emerged through which GWU purchased part of

the school’s parking lot and excess development rights, partially funding the modernization and expansion of Walls’ badly deteriorated building. Walls is physically and programmatically distinct but integrated into the university. Just as the design transitions from historical to modern, the school provides a base for the transition from high school to college.

The new entry plaza, the bay window, and the distinctive roofline of the addition respect the historic building, create a civic presence, and echo the surrounding historic architecture. From the media center situated in the addition’s “penthouse,” students overlook GWU, reminding them of their connection to the university and the city. n

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Springfield High School Springfield, Ohio

School community center/Joint Use Facilities NEW CONSTRUCTION

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Robert W. Blatchford Jr., AIA, REFP, President 2010 440/835-0850 DeSigN TeAm Robert W. Blatchford Jr., AIA, REFP, Principal-in-Charge Seyed Moh Ayat, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge of Design Edward G. Lesko, AIA, Principal-in-Charge of Design owNer/clieNT Springfield City School District Springfield, OH Dr. E. Jean Harper, Superintendent 937/505-2806 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 2,447 students Size of Site: 108 acres Building Area: 381,878 square feet Building Volume: 6.5 million cubic feet Space per Student: 156 square feet cost per Student: $25,746 Square Foot cost: $165 construction cost: $63 million Total Project cost: $64.6 million contract Date: April 2006 completed: Sept. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: HansOn PHOTOgraPHiC

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he new grade 9-12 Springfield High School is designed for 2,447 students. Although there were inherent efficiencies, the district was concerned about the learning environment in a large school setting. To respond to this concern, the new high school is divided into four small learning centers that house 610 students. Each learning center houses a self-sufficient program within the larger building and contains its own administration and guidance office suite. The main feature of the new high school is the curved, three-level classroom wing containing upper and lower levels that houses the learning centers. The main level houses all common and elective course classrooms. Each small school has extended learning areas, which are flexible, multipurpose spaces that provide opportunities for contemplation, interaction, and small groups. At the center of the building, two large courtyards provide outdoor learning space and natural light to interior classrooms. Daylighting illuminates the classrooms and other areas where students learn as well as corridors and core spaces.

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Community-use areas are located at the front of the building near parking for easy accessibility. The selfcontained athletic depart-

ment has a separate entrance, allowing for evening and weekend use while maintaining security in the rest of the building. n


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Start High School/west Toledo YmcA Toledo, Ohio

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B Y D iNc. G SSoe, E 1001 Madison Ave. Toledo, OH 43604 www.ssoe.com Honorable

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Mention Joe Kunkle, AIA, PE, LEED AP 419/255-3830

2010

DeSigN TeAm SSOE Architectural Design Team, Design H.T. Bernsdorff, Inc., Engineering Subconsultant owNer/clieNT Toledo Public Schools, OSFC, and West Toledo YMCA Toledo, OH John Foley, Superintendent 419/671-8281 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,800 students Size of Site: 41 acres Building Area: 302,000 square feet Building Volume: 4.2 million cubic feet Space per Student: 168 square feet cost per Student: $22,500 Square Foot cost: $134 construction cost: $40.6 million Total Project cost: $46.9 million contract Date: Aug. 2003 completed: Fall 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: Cris BUrKHaLTer PHOTOgraPHy: WiLLiaM BeaUregarD

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tart High School is the result of a unique partnership of Toledo Public Schools, the City of Toledo Parks and Recreation, and the YMCA of Greater Toledo. The collaboration promoted a synergy of ideas, opportunities, and expression that each participant could not have achieved independently. Designed as a campus, the solution reconfigured the site to the advantage of each stakeholder. Portions of the old school were retained and remodeled to become the new home of the YMCA. The new school is configured into three separate wings to zone activities, provide dispersion of the large 1,800-student population, and facilitate smaller learning communities within the complex. Demolished portions of the existing school allowed for the addition of the YMCA natatorium and the expansion of the adjacent ball fields in the city park. Athletic and community facilities are shared in a cooperative arrangement between participants. The new arrangement used careful scheduling to allow each existing structure to remain in operation during construction. An existing stream that ran through the

center of the property was rerouted and became a focal point in the new campus. The solution produced a

quality, flexible, and enhanced facility to serve the students, YMCA members, and the community. n

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Strawberry crest High School 2010

Dover, Florida

entire School/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

loNg & ASSociATeS ArcHiTecTS/eNgiNeerS, iNc. 4525 S. Manhattan Ave. Tampa, FL 33611 www.longandassociates.com Alexander (Lex) Long, AIA, LEED AP, Vice President 813/839-0506 THe BecK groUP www.thebeckgroup.com DeSigN TeAm Alexander (Lex) Long, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge, Design Principal Robert Race, PE, Electrical Engineer Daniel Herrera, PE, Mechanical Engineer Paul Wieczorek, PE, Structural Engineer Ryan Toth, Beck Project Manager Harley Anauo, Beck Project Superintendent owNer/clieNT Hillsborough County Public Schools Tampa, FL MaryEllen Elia, Superintendent 813/272-4000 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 2,500 students Size of Site: 58 acres Building Area: 276,760 square feet Building Volume: 2.9 million cubic feet Space per Student: 111 square feet cost per Student: $24,639 Square Foot cost: $223 construction cost: $61.6 million Total Project cost: $71.2 million contract Date: Mar. 2007 completed: Aug. 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: DaVeMOOrePHOTO.COM

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he design of this special high school revolves around the history and context of the rural community it embraces. Plant City, Florida, has long been known as the Winter Strawberry Capital of the World, with a widely renowned annual Strawberry Festival. When this 105-acre site was purchased by the Hillsborough County School Board, Long

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& Associates was charged with creating a master plan that organized three distinct campuses to include a new elementary school, middle school, and high school, all on a single contiguous location. The master plan provides for a major controlled entry point as well as shared use of facilities and utilities. The stormwater and utility design includes shared retention,

fire water, and potable water among all three schools and provides greater area for shared use athletic and agricultural fields. Each school has its own main vehicular entry and separate bus loop access. The entire site was farmed for strawberries for decades and is representative of the community’s heritage. The design concept reflects the


context of agricultural fields and human cultivation of the land, with the end product delivered to the “marketplace” or “market street.” The plan and building forms are skewed, sliced, and tilled like the earth. This pattern is reflected throughout the project in plan, section, material choices, and layering. Textured “earth” materials in rows and forms are broken and bound by “steel plows” that define space and function, and express human transformation of the land. Material choices include split-face concrete masonry unit (cmu), ground-face cmu, stucco, aluminum and glass wall system, and a corrugated www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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metal panel skin. Two massive and skewed covered walkways bisect the rows of classroom buildings and become focal points for students gathering to see and be seen. Revolving around green design principles, the project takes advantage of an east/west axis and places the classroom buildings along a major interstate, with a retention pond as a spatial buffer. This orientation provides for north light to all of the classrooms to maximize daylighting. The southern row 96

of buildings houses the public functions, including the administration, media center, gymnasium, auditorium, and agriculture and business functions. Together, these two rows of buildings form an internal open-air market street for the students to congregate and exchange ideas. In addition to daylighting, the project takes advantage of lower energy use, recycled materials, reduced potable water use, and lowmaintenance finishes. Intended as a prototype, this

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250,000-square-foot, two-story high school on 58 acres houses 2,500 students, including robust athletic and agricultural programs. The facility features Enhanced Hurricane Protection Areas for use as a public emergency shelter as well as green design strategies. This project was designed and documented through all phases of work with the aid of the latest REVIT Building Information Modeling (BIM) technology. The modeling process helped the A/E/CM team

manage costs and provide the highest possible quality for the project. Exterior and interior renderings from the BIM helped the owner visualize and understand the design. All in all, this school provides the community with a visible landmark along the interstate and a focal point for gathering, while embodying the rural traditions of agriculture, sports, and marketplace to foster the exchange of ideas and prepare youth for a higher education. n


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Performing Arts center

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warsaw community High School Performing Arts wing and Auditorium Warsaw, Indiana

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G B Y ASSociATeS ScHmiDT DE IN N 320 E. Vermont Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 www.schmidt-arch.com Honorable

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Mention Thomas G. Neff, AIA, LEED AP, 317/263-6226

2010

SceArce rUDiSel ArcHiTecTS www.srarchitects.com DeSigN TeAm Kyle E. Miller, PE, LEED AP, Project Manager Steven K. Alspaugh, AIA, LEED AP, Design Architect Mary Ellen Rudisel, AIA, Consulting Architect Jeffrey A. Reed, PE, Electrical Engineer Corrie A. Meyer, AICP, RLA, LEED AP, Landscape Architect Steven A. Savoie, AIA, Project Architect owNer/clieNT Warsaw Community Schools Warsaw, IN Dr. Craig J. Hintz, Superintendent 574/371-5098 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 1,000 students Size of Site: 115 acres Building Area: 57,085 square feet cost per Student: $700 Square Foot cost: $172 construction cost: $12.2 million Total Project cost: $15.2 million contract Date: 2002 completed: Nov. 2006 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: garry CHiLLUFFO, CHiLLUFFO PHOTOgraPHy

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irst constructed 20 years ago, Warsaw Community High School was an award-winning, progressive educational facility. With growing performing arts programs, the vision was to leverage this strong theatrical heritage by building a facility to advance the training of students to realize their dreams in the field. Several additions were developed, including a performing arts addition featuring a 900-seat auditorium with an

automated rigging system—one of the first of its kind in the state. A black box theater also functions as a television studio; a working radio station has a window to the new student commons; and new instructional areas for instrumental, choral, and dance augment the teaching environment. The addition’s massing and materials respect the strong, rural forms of the existing building with the use of a brick base, stone trim, vertical metal siding, vertical windows/

curtain wall patterns, the silo shape, and gabled clerestory forms. The interior also uses visual connections to the existing building’s materials and geometry. Variable air volume air-handling units are utilized with variable speed fans for low energy use and quiet, lowvelocity air distribution to meet the required NC levels. With the new Performing Arts Center, Warsaw High School’s reputation as a renowned performing arts facility is now established. n

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wilmington High School Wilmington, Illinois

entire School/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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HeAlY, BeNDer G B Y &D ASSociATeS, IN E N iNc. R 4040 Helene Ave. Naperville, IL 60564 Honorable www.healybender.com

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David A. Healy, AIA 630/904-4300 2010 DeSigN TeAm Clifford A. Bender, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Scott Anderle, AIA, Project Manager Jody Woodley, Job Captain Michael Drazenovic, Design owNer/clieNT Wilmington Community Unit School District 209U Wilmington, IL Jay Plese, Superintendent 815/926-1751 KeY STATS grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 890 students Size of Site: 24 acres Building Area: 132,700 square feet Building Volume: 2.8 million cubic feet

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s part of a larger master planning effort, this high school replaces an existing facility that was subsequently converted into a middle school. The new building has five primary programmatic zones. The high school comprises three zones: academic, athletic, and commons. The final two zones, which are integrated with the high school building, are new school district offices and a special education wing. The academic wing is oriented to face

Space per Student: 149 square feet cost per Student: $22,714 Square Foot cost: $152 construction cost: $20.2 million Total Project cost: $22.5 million contract Date: Oct. 2006 completed: April 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: HeaLy, BenDer & assOCiaTes, inC.

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north and south to maximize daylighting capabilities and includes teacher planning divisional centers that allow teachers to share classrooms. The special education zone allows students previously bussed out of the district to be mainstreamed into the high school. The site design allows for future building expansion, which includes a fieldhouse, an auditorium, and an additional academic wing. Precast concrete wall panels were utilized for

much of the exterior wall construction due to their economy and construction schedule savings. Masonry was incorporated to create a fine balance between these economical benefits and the desired warmth of masonry. Incorporation of a wavelike steel trellis at the main entrance offers shading for the large expanse of southfacing glazing, enhances the prominence sought for the facility, and unifies the variation of building massing elements. n


LEARNING BY DESIGN

2011 Call for

Entries

Showcase Your Firm’s Outstanding Design Projects There’s no other publication that showcases your firm’s outstanding design projects like LEARNING BY DESIGN. This award-winning magazine reaches 65,000+ education decision makers who refer to LEARNING BY DESIGN time and time again to tap education design innovation and best practices—and to learn which firms are leading the pack.

Be seen in LEARNING BY DESIGN 2011! n Both 2011 editions of LEARNING BY DESIGN (Spring and Fall) will showcase the nation’s best in education design, from pre-K to 12 schools to colleges and universities, and feature Grand Prize, Citation of Excellence, and Honorable Mention Awards. n Earn additional discounts—submit multiple projects to one or both editions in 2011 and receive deeply discounted entry fees. n Go to LEARNING BY DESIGN online to learn more about project and awards categories, submission deadlines, and publication dates.

The premier source for education design innovation and excellence Published by Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc. and the National School Boards Association

Contact:

Phyllis Hurdleston at 717.560.6706, phyllis@strattonpublishing.com Carrie Wood at 703.914.9200 ext. 25, cwood@strattonpublishing.com Judy Dubler at 703.914.9200 ext. 32, jdubler@strattonpublishing.com

Visit www.learningbydesign.biz


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Performing Arts Center NEW CONSTRUCTION

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B Y D GRoUP deSiGn G ideAS IN E N ARChiTeCTURe + PLAnninG, LLC R 15 Bethany Street New Brunswick, NJ 08901 Honorable www.designideasgroup.com

Mention

Vincent A. Myers, AIA, LEED AP 732/249-6242 2010 JoSePh JinGoLi & SonS, inC. www.jingoli.com deSiGn TeAm Vincent A. Myers, AIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge Jay Beispiel, CID, Interior Design Patricia Lesniak, Interior Design Kenneth Plich, Construction Administrator Dennis Mockaitis, Manager, East Orange Demonstration School David Christiansen, Senior Project Manager, Joseph Jingoli & Sons, Inc. oWneR/CLienT East Orange Board of Education East Orange, NJ Dr. Clarence C. Hoover, Superintendent 973/266-5722 KeY STATS Grades Served: Pre-K-12 Capacity: 1,310 students Size of Site: 12 acres building Area: 280,095 square feet building volume: 4.1 million cubic feet Space per Student: 214 square feet Cost per Student: $67,939 Square Foot Cost: $318 Construction Cost: $89 million Total Project Cost: $104 million Contract date: Oct. 2003 Completed: July 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: rOss PHOTOgraPHy, Design iDeas graPHic sTuDiO

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he new pre-K through 12 school complex is one of only six specially designated “demonstration� projects awarded by the State of New Jersey on a competitive basis. This facility exemplifies the culmination of close collaboration with civic and educational leaders in designing a project that meshes the local particularized needs of the East Orange School District with the urban revitalization plans of the city on a brownfield site with abandoned buildings. This true community magnet school provides a 21st century educational core curriculum, along with studies in the arts designed to offer cultural, theatrical, musical, and community events for students. The building of the school also helped bring needed facilities to the neighborhood. The 12-acre urban campus contains separate buildings for pre-kindergarten and kindergarten, grades 1 through 4, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12. The school is a cornerstone of revitalization efforts in the Main Street area of the city and was designed to meet LEED certification requirements. This specialized school includes two auditorium facilities: a 400-seat theater for the elementary school and an 800-seat auditorium for middle and high school students. These spaces are linked by a two-story, light-filled lobby used for receptions before and after performances. In addition to the auditorium spaces, there is a multitude of instructional, rehearsal, and technical support spaces that include two black box theaters, costume design studio, scene shop, drafting room, and TV production studio that form the core of this

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state-of-the-art performing arts center and provide a total exposure to the fine arts. An outdoor amphitheater adjacent to the building serves the particular requirements of the school facility while being accessible to the community-at-large during non-school hours.

The media center contains an electronic library of resource materials relating to creative and performing arts available to both students and community members that operates in conjunction with the East Orange Public Library during non-school hours. A wellness center offers compre-

hensive medical services such as immunizations, check-ups, and dental care as well as gymnasium, cafeteria, music, and art rooms that are avail-

able for community use. A daycare for children is offered to permit high school students to continue their education goals. n

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duke School—A School in the Forest at duke University Durham, North Carolina

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FieLdinGI NnAiR G B YinTeRnATionAL, DE N LLC R 16605 Windsor Park Drive Lutz, FL 33549 Honorable www.fieldingnair.com

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Prakash Nair 917/406-3120 2010

dTW ARChiTeCTS & PLAnneRS, LTd. www.dtwarch.com deSiGn TeAm Fielding Nair International, Educational Master Planners Fielding Nair International, Design Architects DTW Architects & Planners, Ltd., Project Architects Fielding Nair International, Educational Commissioning Consultants Coulter Jewell Thames PA, Landscape Architects oWneR/CLienT Duke School Durham, NC Dave Michelman, Head of School 919/493-1827 KeY STATS Grades Served: Pre-K-8 Capacity: 450 students Size of Site: 19.2 acres building Area: 37,240 square feet building volume: 446,880 cubic feet Space per Student: 186 square feet Cost per Student: $10,589 Square Foot Cost: $128 Construction Cost: $4.8 million Total Project Cost: $6.1 million Contract date: 2005 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: FieLDing nair inTernaTiOnaL

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n 2005, Duke School, a former lab school of Duke University and to this day a center for innovation in education, initiated a new master plan in order to consolidate its elementary and middle schools on one campus. In the process it realized the enormous prospects for creating true 21st century learning environments. Stage one of the building project opened in February 2009. Two new personalized learning communities (PLCs) provide outstanding opportunities for personalized, project-based learning in the middle years at Duke School: the Fifth- & Sixth-Grade PLC and the Seventh- & EighthGrade PLC. This design means that every student now has an opportunity to succeed, no matter what his or her preferred learning style or

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particular strength might be. As further insurance that each and every student will succeed, the design breaks down the campus into small learning communities so that all students are individually acknowledged by their peers and by caring adults. Each of these buildings comprises a range of open and discrete spaces for a wide range of different learning modalities as defined by Nair & Fielding in The Language of School Design (2009). The designs were tested as they were developed to ensure that each learning modality would be fully available to students as independent learners. This means that if a student needs to access a particular resource such as a building material, an outdoor space, a teacher or student in another class, a computer, or a handheld device, he or she is able to do

so without needing to be led by an adult. Small teams of teachers and support staff work with an autonomous space allocation system that gives them the flexibility to coordinate interdisciplinary studies and provides students with highly respectful, democratic learning space. The entire middle school is planned without any corridors or hallways, meaning that every space can be used for learning. Situated between the Fifth& Sixth-Grade and Seventh& Eighth-Grade PLCs is a new administration/resource/ arts building. This comprises a reception and administration office, a principal’s office, one other office space, a multifunctional resource center, a music lab with recording studios and storage, and a visual arts lab with storage. A gymnasium has also

been added to the school’s inventory. All buildings have been designed to highlight the spectacular forest setting, and local timber construction also grants the building interiors home-like warmth.

This range of highly varied, agile, flexible, generalist learning spaces and easily accessible specialist facilities supports the school’s belief in high-quality teacher-student relationships and unlimited learning opportunities. n

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Scotch oakburn College Launceston, Tasmania, Australia

entire School/Campus building RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION FieLdinG nAiR inTeRnATionAL, LLC 16605 Windsor Park Drive Lutz, FL 33549 www.fieldingnair.com Prakash Nair 917/406-3120 deSiGn TeAm Fielding Nair International, Design Architect Hassell (WA), Project Architect Patrick Architects, Vic, Project Architect Philp Lighton Architects, Tas, Project Architect Fielding Nair International, Educational Commissioning Consultants oWneR/CLienT Scotch Oakburn College Launceston, Tasmania, Australia Andrew Barr, Principal +61 3 6336 3326 KeY STATS Grades Served: K-12 Capacity: 360 students Size of Site: 1.5 acres building Area: 32,800 square feet building volume: 656,000 cubic feet Space per Student: 85 square feet Cost per Student: $21,666 Square Foot Cost: $238 Construction Cost: $7.8 million Contract date: 2005 Completed: 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: FieLDing nair inTernaTiOnaL

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n 2005 Scotch Oakburn College (SOC) began planning for a new paradigm of education. This model would be more collaborative, more interdisciplinary, more hands-on, and more focused on sustainable futures, all while attending to students’ social, emotional, and spiritual needs. The process of envisioning change began by engaging reputed educational facility planning and design firm Fielding Nair International. In a series of visioning, planning, and design charrettes, the school community began to see the close connections between its re-energized educational model and the redesign of the overall campus. Four projects emerged from this exercise of connecting learning and facilities, and each broke the mold in significant ways. Two key projects are discussed below: a conversion of an old gymnasium and a middle school design. First, in the Robert Dean (Senior Students’) Centre project, an old gymnasium was converted. SOC took a sustainable path and converted the existing gymnasium into two learning communities of 100

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students each on two floors of the building, with visual and physical connections between the two communities. Prior to the start of classes, teachers were trained through a new process of educational commissioning—learning how to maximize the features of the facility toward improving teaching and learning outcomes. Second, the new Scotch Oakburn College Middle School building is a physical representation of the school’s philosophy on education for 11- to 14-year-olds. The building comprises three distinct areas, each of which forms a personalized learning community (PLC) in the learning

studio model. A high volume of glazing and several mobile walls mean that each PLC can easily transform into an advisory or community center model. The PLC approach honors the importance of good teacherstudent relationships by providing one group of students and their teachers with a dedicated palette of spaces for a whole range of different teaching and learning modalities. Teachers and students in the middle school are no longer limited to conducting classes in a box. Instead, there are larger and smaller rooms, so team teaching and student-led activities can take place. Da Vinci Studios are always available for hands-on

projects in any discipline, and ICT is ubiquitous. The middle school building is located on one of the steepest parts of the campus, which for many years was severely underutilized. The designers approached the slope as an opportunity rather than a handicap, and used it to enable

sweeping views of the valley below. They also exploited it to enhance the surrounding outdoor learning areas, most significantly incorporating a large amphitheatre immediately adjacent to the main entrance. We believe this is a world-class example of good public space design in a school setting. n

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Performing Arts Center RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION SCoTT SimonS ARChiTeCTS 75 York Street Portland, ME 04101 www.simonsarchitects.com Chris Berry 207/772-4656 deSiGn TeAm Scott Simons, Principal-in-Charge Austin Smith, Project Manager Stroudwater Construction, Construction Manager Johnson & Jordan, Mechanical Engineer, Contractor Becker Structural Engineers Acentech, Acoustical Engineers oWneR/CLienT Waynflete School Portland, ME Mark Segar, Head of School 207/774-5721 KeY STATS Grades Served: Pre–K-12 Capacity: 560 students Size of Site: 5.6 acres building Area: 36,680 square feet building volume: 586,880 cubic feet Space per Student: 66 square feet Cost per Student: $12,143 Square Foot Cost: $185 Construction Cost: $6.8 million Total Project Cost: $7.8 million Contract date: Jan. 2007 Completed: Jan. 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: Brian VanDen BrinK

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Portland, Maine

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aynflete School is a 560-student preschool through grade 12 independent school founded in 1897. Its campus is a complex mixture of renovated house and modern additions that sits in the center of the Western Promenade Historic District, a very distinct residential neighborhood characterized by large red brick houses and stately gardens. The 36,680-square-foot Arts Center was a large project for this neighborhood and involved the complete rethinking of the center section of Waynflete’s campus. An innovative organizational idea allowed the major elements of the new program spaces to be organized in smaller studio buildings, roughly the size of the surrounding brick residential buildings. The new auditorium was located in the center of these studio buildings, masking its overall mass and size from the scale of the neighborhood. The Arts Center includes performing and visual arts spaces; a 275-seat theater; art and dance studios; music rehearsal rooms; art, music, and drama classrooms; and support spaces. The featured space is the theater, which has a proscenium stage, removable thrust, professional audio/ video capabilities, and a lighting/sound booth. Designed as a performing arts laboratory, all areas of the theater are used for hands-on teaching of the students, including catwalks, fly spaces, a tech booth, and stateof-the-art sound and lighting systems. The theater also serves as a lecture hall, media classroom, and school assembly space. Remote control black-out shades allow the space to be daylit for lectures and darkened for theatrical performances. The sculpted wooden ceiling and walls provide ideal acous-

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tics for theatrical, vocal, and musical performances. Mechanical equipment is located remotely to isolate noise. Conditioned air is delivered to the theater by registers located beneath each seat. Wall assemblies provide acoustic isolation between the rehearsal,

theater, and public spaces. Energy-conserving components include low-velocity plenum air distribution, CO2 and daylight sensors, ultra-low-flush urinals, dual-flush toilets, and high-efficiency mechanical systems. The Arts Center was awarded LEED Silver certification. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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NEW CONSTRUCTION

NG BY DE IPeRKinS+WiLL N 1382 Peachtree St. NE R Atlanta, GA 30309 www.perkinswill.com Honorable

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Science building

Mention Barbara Crum, AIA, LEED AP, Principal 404/443-7613 2010 deSiGn TeAm Perkins+Will Architecture and Design SG Contracting, General Contractor Spurlock and Associates, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineering Uzun & Case, Structural Engineering Breedlove Land Planning, Landscape Architect oWneR/CLienT Woodward Academy College Park, GA Barbara Egan, Vice President of Finance & Administration 404/765-4027 KeY STATS Grades Served: 9-12 Capacity: 1,000 students Size of Site: Part of 75 acres building Area: 43,000 square feet building volume: 583,605 cubic feet Space per Student: 430 square feet Cost per Student: $11,200 Square Foot Cost: $260 Construction Cost: $11.2 million Contract date: April 2006 Completed: July 2008 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: JOnaTHan HiLLyer PHOTOgraPHy, inc.

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erkins+Will designed a new science and math building for Woodward Academy’s Upper School campus. The facility sits at the end of a redeveloped quadrangle linking the existing science building with the other Upper School classroom building and a renovated, expanded Student Activities Athletic Center. The curved façade along the north side of the building defines a pathway through the Upper School quadrangle from the school’s front door and administrative offices to the Lower School at the far end of Woodward’s College Park property. Each science lab within the new facility is designed as a lecture/lab classroom, encouraging hands-on, experimental learning. Prep rooms, with transparent glass, are located on the corridor side of the lecture/labs. The see-through prep rooms allow vision to and from the classrooms and corridors while showcasing the learning activities in the spaces. Rooms in the existing science building were remodeled and expanded into lecture/lab classrooms for flexibility. Math department classrooms and a large, shared lecture room for campus-wide use are included in the new facility. This is a LEED Gold certified building. The classrooms face north and south to minimize heat gain. All of the instructional spaces have natural light. Bioswales capture the rain runoff and clean the water before returning it to the local Flint River basin. Recycled and locally harvested, produced, and transported materials, such as steel, concrete, and brick, are the dominant building materials. n

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Calvin College—spoelhof Fieldhouse Complex Grand Rapids, Michigan

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David Wilkins, AIA 2010 616/796-0200 Design teAM David Wilkins, AIA, NCI, Principal-in-Charge David Bolt, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect Trent DeBoer, PE, LEED AP, Mechanical Engineer Brad Heeres, PE, LEED AP, Electrical Engineer Patricia Ophoff, A.IIDA, Interior Designer owner/Client Calvin College Grand Rapids, MI Dr. Gaylen Byker, President 616/526-6000 Key stAts grades served: Post-secondary Capacity: 11,971 students size of site: 14.9 acres Building Area: 343,477 square feet Building volume: 10.5 million cubic feet space per student: 29 square feet Cost per student: $4,176 square Foot Cost: $145 Construction Cost: $50 million Contract Date: Oct. 2006 Completed: Jan. 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: MiCHaeL COLLyer

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he Spoelhof Fieldhouse Complex is a multiuse, multipurpose facility designed for both daily activity centers, where students and staff can develop and practice healthy habits, and premier Division III performance venues. Adding a 5,000-seat arena, Olympic-size pool, two weight and fitness centers, and a tennis and track facility, while renovating the former P.E. building into a new state-ofthe-art academic suite with campus health services, dance studio, and human performance lab, proved challenging on a compact site. Fulfilling a desire to create a campus social node while respecting an existing woodlot, the design solution grew out of creating dialogues between interior and exterior, public and recreation spaces, and juxtaposing the beauty of human movement with the celebration of nature. Large public spaces, intended for daily student gathering and learning, mingle with recreational activity spaces, like a 40-foot climbing wall, to connect

the larger activity spaces. These surround a core of departmental offices, continually reinforcing the synergy between public, academic, and recreational space. Warm earth tones, cued from campus

brick found on every building, create a rich, soothing environment of brick, ceramic tile, wood, and colored concrete block for a highly durable, sustainable, and low-maintenance environment. n

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Campbell University—John w. Pope Jr. Convocation Center Buies Creek, North Carolina

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Robert Bishop 919/474-2504 2010 Design teAM

Robert Bishop, AIA, Studio Principal Charles Todd, AIA, Project Manager Michael Coates, AIA, Project Designer Bryan Payne, CDT, Project Coordinator owner/Client Campbell University Buies Creek, NC Jerry Wallace, President 800/334-4111 Key stAts Capacity: 3,800 students size of site: 7.2 acres Building Area: 109,020 square feet square Foot Cost: $234 Construction Cost: $25.6 million total Project Cost: $29 million Contract Date: Jan. 2007 Completed: Sept. 2008 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: Ben sTOry

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he design concept for the John W. Pope Jr. Convocation Center began with the notion that Campbell was in need of a signature building that could integrate student life, the academic mission of the university, intercollegiate athletics, and the community as a whole. The process began when Little was selected to lead a series of visioning sessions with students, faculty, coaches, administrators, and trustees, through which the early goals for the project began to take shape. Campus integration, team success, student recruitment and retention, flexibility, maximum utilization, and overall enhancement of student life were established as the overarching goals for the project. Turning this vision into reality began with the unification of the entire Campbell “family” of alumni, friends, and students, who rallied behind “The Time is Now” campaign. Integral to this process were the series of building models, images, and a fundraising brochure created by Little. The campaign was so successful that the university raised the necessary funds a full two years ahead of schedule. While the John W. Pope Jr. Convocation Center houses offices, a Hall of Fame, and workout and competition space for all indoor intercolle-

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giate athletic programs, it also serves as classroom space for exercise science and workout facilities for student fitness,

and houses a 3,500-seat arena for special occasions such as graduation, concerts, and community events. n


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Davidson County Community College Lexington, North Carolina

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Angela Crawford Easterday, AIA 919/573-6400 2010 Design teAM Ruggles Engineering, PC, Structural Engineer Progressive Design Collaborative, Plumbing, Mechanical, and Electrical Engineers CLH Design, Civil Engineer Technology Consulting Group, Technology Designer owner/Client Davidson County Community College Lexington, NC Dr. Mary Rittling, President 336/249-8186 Key stAts grades served: Post-secondary size of site: 3 acres Building Area: 19,890 square feet square Foot Cost: $208 Construction Cost: $4.1 million total Project Cost: $5.4 million Contract Date: May 2008 Completed: May 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: JOHn DaUgHTry, LOF PrODUCTiOns

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avidson County Community College (DCCC) commissioned MBAJ Architecture to design a new facility focused on serving its communities. Centrally located between Thomasville and Lexington, North Carolina, the facility provides a location for offering seminars, conferences, and large meetings. In addition to serving as a facility for conferences, the building has been designed to assist the College’s Continuing Education Department through outreach to offer a wide variety of programs. DCCC was experiencing significant growth that could not be supported through its existing IT department; through a grant obtained by the college, the main fiber backbone and servers were relocated to this new facility. Sited on direct access with a new college entrance driveway, the Conference Training Center is the main focus upon arrival. The site is adjacent to a heavily wooded and steep sloping ravine, which provided an opportunity for large expanses of glass to highlight the wooded and rolling views. Construction consisted of a two-story brick-and-metal panel exterior with curtain

wall framing. Inside, wide hallways and light-filled spaces provide comfortable breakout areas. A distancelearning lab serves the daily needs of the college, while

also functioning as a community resource. Also included is a large, 200-seat banquet/ conference room that can be subdivided into four smaller rooms. n

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College/University

Duke K. McCall sesquicentennial Pavilion Louisville, Kentucky

welcome Center RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

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G B Y D Design sHPI NleADing E N 4805 Montgomery Road, R Suite 400 Cincinnati, OH 45212 Honorable www.shp.com Mention

Richard Thomas, AIA, NCARB 513/381-2112 2010 Design teAM Dick Thomas, Vice President, Principal-in-Charge Jon Gothard, Project Manager Blake Sabo, Project Designer Ann Scrimizzi, Senior Interior Designer owner/Client Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Louisville, KY Dan Dumas, Senior Vice President 502/897-4011 Key stAts grades served: Post-secondary Capacity: 1,244 students size of site: 2.3 acres Building Area: 13,000 square feet Building volume: 186,800 cubic feet space per student: 11 square feet Cost per student: $4,743 square Foot Cost: $454 Construction Cost: $5.9 million total Project Cost: $6 million Contract Date: April 2008 Completed: April 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: WiLLiaM Manning PHOTOgraPHy

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he Southern Baptist Theological Seminary was in need of a building where visitors and new students alike could arrive, obtain information, and orient themselves with Southern Baptist beliefs and ideals. Translating this need, the design team restructured the architecture of the main building, turning it into a Welcome Pavilion to honor the Seminary’s 150th anniversary. The focal point of the pavilion is the 30-foot-wide by 40-foot-tall dome. Designed

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to create a presence, the dome has become a new campus icon, symbolic of the welcoming nature of the seminary. The pavilion is a place to greet and be greeted. It is clad in a Flemish Bond custom brick blend, creating a seamless transition from old to new. Architectural details are white, picking up on the beautiful and majestic campus architecture surrounding the pavilion. Upon arriving in the entrance hall, guests are greeted by stone inlay floors, wood paneling, and custom lighting solutions. Visitors are then directed to a

variety of venues designed to orient them efficiently to their destination. Such venues include the new admissions offices and an overlook, which provides stunning views of the campus. From this location one can see how the campus is organized, giving visitors an instant visual understanding of and orientation to the impressive academic and spiritual environment. Remarkably, the entire facility, from design to occupancy, was completed in 12 months. n


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eastfield College learning Center 2010

Mesquite, Texas

entire school/Campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

HKs, inC. 1919 McKinney Ave. Dallas, TX 75201 www.hksinc.com Sara Sepanski, Awards Coordinator 214/969-5599 ArX Design, leArning environMents sPeCiAlist Design teAM Mark Vander Voort, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Dan Arrowood, AIA, Project Designer, Project Manager Terry Hajduk, ARX, Learning Environments Specialist Sean Martin, Project Architect Dean Mobley, Construction Administration owner/Client Dallas County Community College District Mesquite, TX Lindle Grigsby, Dean, Workforce Development 972/860-7199 Key stAts grades served: Post-secondary Capacity: 550 students size of site: 2.4 acres Building Area: 55,000 square feet space per student: 100 square feet Cost per student: $17,600 square Foot Cost: $176 Construction Cost: $9.7 million total Project Cost: $11 million Contract Date: June 2007 Completed: Jan. 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: BLake Marvin, Hks, inC.

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he Eastfield College Learning Center is the result of a nontraditional vision of how educational spaces can work. Eastfield College’s executive administration and faculty challenged the conventional definition of a classroom to create spaces that support education through a diverse selection of studio learning environments. Brick veneer and plaster are the primary materials used for the exterior of the building, providing consistency with the existing campus context. A monumental

stair leads to a new bridge component that connects to the existing second-level circulation system of the campus. The bridge also includes comfortable seating areas for passersby to sit and talk, creating opportunities for informal interaction outside of the classroom. The simple building envelope conceals the variety of interior spaces that are almost retail in nature— visually stimulating, highenergy, colorful, and bright. Studio spaces vary in size, are technology-intense, and have an informal feel. The pathway circulation system

is activated with a variety of informal learning social nooks and niches. This encourages faculty, students, administrators, and visitors to cross paths and mingle so they can work and socialize in an environment that supports spontaneous interaction. The two-story entry atrium with comfortable seating options includes a coffee kiosk/Internet café to further promote the social aspect of learning. Adjacent conferencing facilities can be used after hours for both school and community activities. n

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2010

College/University

north Carolina Central University—Pearson Cafeteria Durham, North Carolina

Cafeteria/Dining Hall RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

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Mention inC. woolPert, www.woolpert.com Roger Dahnert, AIA 2010 Design teAM

Curtis J. Moody, FAIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge of Design Chinwe Abulokwe, RIBA, NIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Gregory Briya, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Project Architect Eileen M. Goodman, NCIDQ, Director of Interior Design Jamie Wolford, NCIDQ, Interior Designer Arthur N. Cox, Construction Administrator owner/Client North Carolina Central University Durham, NC Timothy McMullen, University Architect 919/530-7944 Key stAts grades served: Post-secondary Capacity: 8,501 students size of site: 1.9 acres Building Area: 57,567 square feet Building volume: 816,375 cubic feet space per student: 7 square feet Cost per student: $1,389 square Foot Cost: $205 Construction Cost: $11.8 million total Project Cost: $13 million Contract Date: Mar. 2007 Completed: 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: JaMes WesT, JWesT PrODUCTiOns, LLC

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he new Pearson Cafeteria on the campus of North Carolina Central University (NCCU), Durham, North Carolina, is the response to a long awaited expansion of the cafeteria. The renovated and expanded facility has been critical for NCCU’s expanding enrollment, providing a new image for student dining, a campus gateway, a community hub, and a larger variety of healthier food choices for students, staff, faculty, and visitors. Pearson Street provides a diagonal access through the building, linking the north campus with the academic quad. The open plan of the dining room, complemented by the great northern daylight from the glass walls, greatly enhances the dining experience while creating an ambiance that attracts and retains. Flexibility in layout and a banquet area, as well as chancellor and faculty dining, create a variety of dining spaces. Indoor/outdoor spaces such as balconies and patios encourage interaction during nice weather while, conversely, Pearson Street and the cyber café provide shelter during bad weather.

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Expansive exterior glass walls invite people into the cafeteria with generous views of the activity in the interior. Inside the cafeteria, these same walls give an interesting view

of what goes on along Lawson Street. At night, the glass walls allow the lighted interior to become a welcoming beacon of food and activity on the campus. n


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ohio Dominican University—Bishop James A. griffin 2010 student Center Columbus, Ohio

NEW CONSTRUCTION

MooDy·nolAn, inC. 300 Spruce Street, Suite 300 Columbus, OH 43215 www.moodynolan.com Design teAM Curtis J. Moody, FAIA, LEED AP, Principal-in-Charge of Design Chinwe Abulokwe, RIBA, NIA, LEED AP, Project Manager Julie Cook, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Project Architect Michael Woods, LEED AP, Designer Rick Jordan, AIA, Project Architect Paul F. Pryor, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Construction Administrator owner/Client Ohio Dominican University Columbus, OH Ron Seiffert, Interim President 614/253-4741 Key stAts grades served: Post-secondary Capacity: 3,117 students size of site: 9.1 acres Building Area: 82,000 square feet Building volume: 1.2 million cubic feet space per student: 26 square feet Cost per student: $4,894 square Foot Cost: $186 Construction Cost: $15.3 million total Project Cost: $19.1 million Contract Date: Mar. 2008 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: sTeven eLBerT, aia

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his new Student Center provides an iconic gateway building for the expanding campus. The Student Center provides the visual connection between the campus, the community, and nature by providing transparent vistas through the building that allow vehicular and pedestrian traffic to see through the building. The building will be the first building on campus to achieve a rating of LEED Gold. Located on the first floor are the larger gathering spaces such as the grille and coffee areas and lounges, centered on the open-to-below space that visually and spatially connects the two floors and functions. Natural light is filtered in through glazing around the perimeter of the building and skylights/clerestory windows above. The passive recreation area in the bridge connecting the Student Center with Alumni Hall on the second level is a place to see and be seen. At night, it glows like a beacon and becomes even more of a place for visibility. The jewel of the Student Center is the fitness area, which becomes a unique architectural object popping out from Alumni Hall on Sunbury Road.

The architectural articulation complex is perceived as a series of of the fitness center and the con- interconnected parts on a warm necting bridge ensures that the and accessible human scale. n

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rider University—west village student Housing Lawrenceville, New Jersey

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Thomas Perrino, AIA, LEED AP 609/695-7400 2010 Design teAM Thomas Perrino, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, Spiezle Vanderweil Engineers, LLP, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineers Van-Note Harvey, Civil Site Engineer Harrison Hamnett, Structural Engineer Stearns Associates, LLC, Landscape Architect Seacoast Builders owner/Client Rider University Lawrenceville, NJ Dr. Mordechai Rozanski, President 609/896-5001 Key stAts Capacity: 152 students size of site: 4.5 acres Building Area: 50,500 square feet Building volume: 678,808 cubic feet space per student: 332 square feet Cost per student: $72,336 square Foot Cost: $218 Construction Cost: $11 million total Project Cost: $14.1 million Contract Date: Mar. 2008 Completed: June 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: HaLkin PHOTOgraPHy, LLC

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ith increased need for housing and a growing international student summer program, the university proceeded with construction of two 25,000-square-foot buildings with 152 beds consisting of a mix of individual apartments and suites—designed for LEED Silver certification. The design team developed an innovative solution to the building construction utilizing structural insulated panels (SIPs). Use of the SIP construction reduced the time needed

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for construction, allowing a three-story, 25,000-square-foot building to be fully enclosed in less than a week. The SIPs also dramatically increased the energy performance of the building envelope, allowing the university to use a conventional, inexpensive HVAC system to keep costs down while still achieving a 17 percent betterthan-code energy performance. Other unique sustainable features include harvesting trees using horses to reduce construction carbon footprint and reusing the wood for

exterior benches; low-flow plumbing fixtures; pervious pavement at new parking lots to reduce stormwater runoff; installation of Energy Star certified appliances; purchase of 35 percent of the building’s overall power from renewable energy sources such as wind and solar; VOC-free paints and adhesives; rapidly renewable material such as cork flooring in the kitchen; extensive daylighting and views for occupants; 75 percent construction waste recycled; and covered bike racks. n


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University of Houston system at sugar land —Brazos Hall Sugar Land, Texas

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PAgesoUtHerlAnDPAge 2010 www.pagesoutherlandpage.com Design teAM Skanska USA Building, Inc., Contractor PageSoutherlandPage, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineer Archi*Technics, 3 and PageSoutherlandPage, Design Team Haynes Whaley Assoc. Inc., Structural Consultant LJA Engineering & Surveying Inc., Civil Engineer Aviles Engineering Corp., Geotech owner/Client University of Houston System at Sugar Land Sugar Land, TX Richard D. Phillips, Associate Vice President 361/570-4891 Key stAts grades served: Post-secondary Capacity: 2,840 students size of site: 298 acres

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he University of Houston System at Sugar Land partnered with Wharton County Junior College to design and construct a 150,000-squarefoot academic building that will serve the educational needs of both institutions. The $30 million facility, designed by Archi*Technics,

3 in association with PageSoutherlandPage, includes 39 classrooms, nine science labs, a 157-seat auditorium, computer labs, a nursing suite shared by both institutions, and exercise facilities. The design team stacked similar functions on the upper floors and created suites of science labs, classrooms, and

faculty offices to increase efficiency and assist in wayfinding for students and faculty. Special consideration was given to the mechanical systems. Three air-cooled chillers serving air handlers deliver conditioned air to fan-powered variable air volume boxes. The building includes many energy-saving features, including energy recovery outdoor air units that recover 80 percent of the energy contained in the exhaust air, variable flow primary chilled water flow, and a variable air volume zoning system. The laboratories use state-of-the-art air control devices to protect occupants from harmful substances. The facility is only the second building on the young campus, and its placement helped to define a central quadrangle to create a more traditional campus environment. n

Building Area: 145,000 square feet space per student: 51 square feet Cost per student: $10,643 square Foot Cost: $208 Construction Cost: $30.2 million total Project Cost: $34.3 million Contract Date: Sept. 2007 Completed: April 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: riCHarD Payne

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KirKsey ArCHiteCtUre 6909 Portwest Houston, TX 77024 www.kirksey.com Wes Good, AIA 713/850-9600 Design teAM Haynes Whaley Assoc., Structural Engineer Infrastructure Assoc., Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Associates

University of Houston—Calhoun lofts Houston, Texas

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alhoun Lofts is set apart from similar projects in its scope. While this project is not a high-rise building, which would dwarf other academic buildings surrounding its location in the core of the Professional Precinct, it still achieves high density—which not only is a necessity, but also adds to the excitement and character of the campus. Residents are ensured of their graduating levels of privacy and comfort, while given varying levels of integration into the campus life. The

Othon, Civil Engineer Clark Condon Assoc., Landscape Architect 4b Technology Group, Technology Consultant Pepper Lawson, General Contractor owner/Client University of Houston Houston, TX Renu Khator, Chancellor, President 713/743-8820 Key stAts Capacity: 984 students size of site: 19.7 acres Building Area: 551,712 square feet Building volume: 6 million cubic feet space per student: 561 square feet Cost per student: $95,282 square Foot Cost: $170 Construction Cost: $93.8 million total Project Cost: $107.2 million Contract Date: Sept. 2007 Completed: Aug. 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: riCHarD Payne

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public spaces on the upper levels are more private, while the public spaces on the ground floor offer more public amenities. In addition, there is both a private courtyard reserved for residents only and a public courtyard embellished with a carefully selected art piece, as well as retail services. Campus traffic is guided through this public courtyard. This project also incorporates updated technical advances such as the ubiquitous Wi-Fi environment and AT&T U-verse integration, and the BACnet Open platform systems monitoring software. These

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features help to place this facility squarely in the 21st century. Other learning opportunities are facilitated in a theater/semi-

nar room, a teaching kitchen, two multipurpose rooms, a computer lab, and study spaces throughout the facility. n


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west shore Community College—schoenherr Campus Center Scottville, Michigan

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Thomas R. Mathison, FAIA, REFP 616/456-9944 2010 Design teAM Tom Mathison, FAIA, REFP, Principal-in-Charge Tom Van Dam, PE, LEED AP, Mechanical Engineer Don White, PE, LEED AP, Electrical Engineer Ron Masek, ASLA, LEED AP, Landscape Architect JDH Engineering, Structural Engineering owner/Client West Shore Community College Scottville, MI Virginia Fox, Vice President of Administrative Services 231/845-6211 Key stAts grades served: Post-secondary Capacity: 520 students size of site: 4.1 acres Building Area: 37,981 square feet Building volume: 672,062 cubic feet space per student: 73 square feet Cost per student: $13,500 square Foot Cost: $184 Construction Cost: $7 million total Project Cost: $8.8 million Contract Date: Nov. 2006 Completed: Jan. 2007 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: JeFF HUyCk, green FrOg PHOTO

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est Shore’s new campus center houses 11 student services previously scattered across campus, including the library, advising, testing and tutoring, bookstore, lounge, and café. The facility is carefully sited on the 350-acre rural campus between the Tech Center and Arts & Sciences Building, and successfully establishes a new, centralized campus core. The building’s exterior represents a contemporary

take on traditional materials already present on campus, resulting in a sensitive blend of old and new. By day, the sweeping transparent curve embraces the campus, providing ample daylight and views to the surrounding landscape. By night, the facility acts as a beacon, offering glimpses of the bustling activity within. The open, two-story atrium space provides visibility and accessibility to all services while creating a modern, dynamic social space

for coffee, reading, or gatherings. Niches provide a more intimate refuge, while private rooms are available for group study. A new state-of-the-art student library creates a focal point for the building and serves both students and the surrounding community. The project is seeking LEED Silver certification and features high recycled content and low-VOC materials, optimized energy performance, and individual control of heating, cooling, and lighting. n

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whittier College—Donald e. graham Athletics Center Whittier, California

sports Facility/gymnasium/Fitness Center RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

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G BY D PJHMI NArCHiteCts, inC. E N 647 R Camino de los Mares, Suite 201 SanHonorable Clemente, CA 92673 www.pjhm.com Mention

Thomas Kruse, Architect, Principal-in-Charge 2010 949/496-6191 Design teAM Thomas Kruse, Principal, Architect, Project Architect

Derek Stemrich, LEED AP, Project Manager Abacus Project Management, Inc., Project Management Rowley International, Aquatic Consultant RHA Engineering, Inc., Civil Engineers Tsuchiyama Kaino Sun & Carter, Mechanical Engineers STB Engineers, Structural Engineers Konsortum 1, Electrical Engineers owner/Client Whittier College Whittier, CA James Dunkelman, Vice President for Finance and Administration 562/907-4200 Key stAts grades served: Post-secondary size of site: 2.6 acres Building Area: 4,646 square feet Building volume: 96,346 cubic feet Construction Cost: $5.8 million Completion: 20% PHOTOgraPHy OF MODeL: greg rys MODeL: DaviD MOBLey

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nown as the Poet’s, Whittier College embraces a strong commitment to athletics. At the heart of its athletic facilities is the Donald E. Graham Athletics Center. Originally constructed in 1979 with a 25-meter pool, the facility had become antiquated. The core of the project is the replacement of the original pool with a world-class 43-meter pool for all aquatic competition and shared use with the community. In addition, the architects needed to renovate the main entrance to Graham Athletics Center since the existing entrance was both hidden and in violation of Accessibility Codes. PJHM Architects’ solution within an extremely tight project site exchanges valuable new pool space potential with existing pool equipment buildings by constructing a subterranian building housing needed toilet rooms, storage space, and coaches’ offices that have views of the entire pool deck. To mitigate the unidentifiable, inaccessible main entrance, the design team created a bridge structure between the parking lot and the upper level of Graham Athletics Center. The building extension of matching concrete masonry units, glass,

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and stainless steel cladding provides seating for spectators; celebrates the Poet’s Hall of Fame inductees in a

superb, new conference center; and adds much-needed team rooms for swimmers and their coaches. n


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5815 Westpark Drive Charlotte, NC 28217 www.littleonline.com Honorable IG

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Mention Shannon Rydell

704/561-3227

2010

Design teAM Bronald Johnson, AIA, Studio Principal Ted Givens, AIA, Design Director John Williams, Project Coordinator owner/Client Wilkes Community College Wilkesboro, NC Gordon Burns, President 336/838-6112 Key stAts Capacity: 147 students size of site: 0.9 acres Building Area: 8,300 square feet space per student: 56 square feet Cost per student: $8,639 square Foot Cost: $153 Construction Cost: $1.3 million total Project Cost: $2.7 million Contract Date: 2008 Completed: June 2009 Completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: TiM BUCHMan

College/University

wilkes Community College—Applied technology Center Wilkesboro, North Carolina

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he Applied Technology Center on the Wilkes Community College campus, located at the north end of Daniel Hall, is the new face for the Industrial and Customized Industry Training Division. In addition to enhancing the efficiency of Daniel Hall and the program curriculum, the new state-of-the-art facility incorporates instructional space that is customizable and flexible and reinforces the growth and importance of the college’s technical program. A new aluminum canopy and glass storefront define the entrance that serves as the connection between the old and new facility. The new entry/lobby connects the existing building corridor with the new corridor. Instructional lab and classroom spaces are located to the west of the new corridor in a taller building volume, while office, conference room, and support spaces are on the east side in a lower volume that faces the campus parking lot. The exterior walls are two colors of patterned masonry with metal accent panels that express the technical nature of the building. Exterior building materials and windows are designed to blend with the existing building. The addition has transformed the existing facility into a larger, more flexible and efficient instructional space for the college’s technical program and serves as a symbol of progress and technology for Wilkes Community College. n

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academy for the arts, Science, and technology Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

entire School/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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piKe -I NMcFaRland - Hall G BY D E N R aSSociateS, inc. 1300 Professional Drive, Suite 201 Honorable Myrtle Beach, SC 29577

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Joseph C. Pike, AIA 843/497-0272 2010 deSiGn teaM Owens & Associates, Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, and Fire Protection Engineers Kyzer & Timmerman, Structural Engineers Engineering & Technical Services, Inc., Civil Engineer Foodesign Associates, Inc., Food Service Consultant Stafford Consulting Engineers, Roofing Consultant H.G. Reynolds Co., Inc., Construction Manager oWneR/client Horry County Schools Conway, SC Dr. Cindy Elsberry, Superintendent 843/488-6716 Key StatS Grades Served: 11-12 capacity: 700 students and staff Size of Site: 24.9 acres Building area: 136,788 square feet Building Volume: 2.4 million cubic feet Space per Student: 195 square feet cost per Student: $30,620 Square Foot cost: $157 construction cost: $21.4 million total project cost: $24.4 million contract date: July 2006 completed: Nov. 2007 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: 2009, rOBerT e. MiKrUT PHOTOgraPHy

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he Academy for Arts, Science, and Technology was a design collaboration with current school educators and district staff in an effort to consolidate specialized career education interests into one facility. The project presented a wonderful opportunity to explore the needs and desires of the educators of the school and incorporate those desires into an exciting, innovative, functional design. The facility was designed based on a team teaching approach, incorporating space for education majors, including performing arts (both production and theatrical), dance, and TV production; visual arts, digital/ graphics processing, and studio art; and science, with pre-engineering, pre-med, and environmental science. The design is enlightening to its patrons with integrated natural light, bright colors, and a user-friendly environment. The front lobby serves as the single point of entrance for school functions and for access to the theater, to maintain security and supervision. Centrally located, the cafeteria is located just off the main lobby, accommodating

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in-school functions as well as large after-hours functions in association with the auditorium. The building is constructed of load-bearing masonry

with brick and a variation of masonry veneer materials and colors. The building is equipped with zoned rooftop package HVAC systems and fresh air make-up units. n


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RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION G BY D HMFH inc. I N aRcHitectS, E N R 130 Bishop Allen Drive Cambridge, MA 02139 www.hmfh.com Honorable S

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cambridge War Memorial Recreation center Cambridge, Massachusetts

Sports Facility/Fitness center/Gymnasium

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Marketing Manager 617/492-2200 2010 deSiGn teaM

George Metzger, AIA, Project Director Vassilios Valaes, AIA, LEED AP, Project Manager, Project Architect Gabriel Petino, AIA, Construction Administration Colin Dockrill, AIGA, Graphic Designer oWneR/client City of Cambridge Cambridge, MA Richard Rossi, Deputy City Manager 617/349-4300

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he Cambridge War Memorial Recreation Center is a 107,700-square-foot, two-story facility located on the campus of the city’s comprehensive public high school. With its three pools, gymnasium, fieldhouse, and multipurpose rooms, War Memorial serves 1,900 students daily and functions as Cambridge’s central community athletic facility. HMFH’s renovations helped the city better serve its various user populations by creating separate spaces for students, athletic teams, and community users, with easy circulation between spaces used by each group. The student entrance opens into bright, spacious corridors lined with classrooms and administration, allowing for supervision of students as they move toward team locker rooms and physical education spaces. The community entrance brings

Key StatS Grades Served: 9-12 and community users Size of Site: 1.7 acres Building area: 107,700 square feet Building Volume: 1.4 million cubic feet cost per Student: $13,623 Square Foot cost: $240 construction cost: $25.9 million total project cost: $29.8 million contract date: June 2007 completed: Nov. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: anTOn grassL/esTO

users directly past the reception desk and offers simplified navigation toward frequently used facilities. Distinct administrative spaces have been created for team coaches, physical education, and the city’s recreation department. Renovations have also improved the center’s appearance and sustainability. Vibrant tile work and wave-patterned terrazzo flooring add both visual appeal and durability to the center, which is in the process of becoming LEED certified. n www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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dianne M. pellerin center Clinton Township, Michigan

entire School/campus Building NEW CONSTRUCTION

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G BY D WaKely inc. I N aSSociateS, E N 30500 Van Dyke Ave., R Suite M-7 Warren, MI 48093 Honorable www.wakelyaia.com Mention

Dominic Abbate, AIA 586/573-4100 2010 deSiGn teaM

Dominic Abbate, AIA, Principal-in-Charge Brian Smilnak, AIA, Project Architect Paul Oh, LEED AP, Project Designer Kenneth Wosik, LEED AP, Interior Designer Barton Malow, Construction Manager oWneR/client L’Anse Creuse Public Schools Harrison Township, MI DiAnne M. Pellerin, Superintendent 586/783-6300 Key StatS Grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 396 students Size of Site: 3.2 acres Building area: 37,140 square feet Building Volume: 519,960 cubic feet Space per Student: 94 square feet cost per Student: $16,775 Square Foot cost: $179 construction cost: $6.6 million total project cost: $7.8 million contract date: April 2008 completed: Sept. 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: PaUL OH

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he DiAnne M. Pellerin Center in the L’Anse Creuse Public School District is home to Riverside Academy, a unique learning environment where students complete their graduation requirements while preparing for adult life roles and the real world of work. This state-of-the-art facility was designed from the ground up with nontraditional learning in mind and incorporates an adult-like atmosphere that is technology-rich. It is one of only

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a few schools in the country to be built with instructional and behavioral philosophies integrated into the design. A lifestyle center, spacious media center, large gathering commons, sales/marketing classroom, literacy center, group counseling rooms, administrative offices, large classrooms with integrated technology, and deli-style café are some of the key features. The two-story facility is constructed with loadbearing concrete masonry

unit/brick veneer exterior walls and a structural steel interior skeleton. Classrooms are individually climate controlled with vertical unit ventilators and overhead ductwork for maximum comfort. Solar shades are present on windows along the south side of the building. Interior vistas have been created to allow natural light to filter into all interior corridors, and a clerestory offers natural lighting for the second floor media center and main center staircase. n


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immokalee technical center Immokalee, Florida

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Gary F. Krueger, AIA, 2010 Partner 239/481-0200 deSiGn teaM Gary F. Krueger, AIA, Partner-in-Charge Daniel M. Tarczynski, AIA, Design Partner Ronald E. Reitz, AIA, LEED AP, Designer Jose Burgos, AIA, Project Architect, Manager Kraft Construction Co., Construction Manager oWneR/client The District School Board of Collier County Naples, FL Dr. Dennis L. Thompson, Superintendent 239/658-7080 Key StatS Grades Served: Vocational and adult education capacity: 600 students Size of Site: 6.5 acres Building area: 92,000 square feet Space per Student: 153 square feet cost per Student: $40,343 Square Foot cost: $263 construction cost: $24.2 million contract date: Nov. 2006 completed: Nov. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: rayMOnD MarTinOT

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he Immokalee Technical Center is the heart of the community. This new center features a unique educational approach of site-based businesses that are open to the public, allowing parents to see their children not only go to school, but learn a career at the same time. The new center places an emphasis on site-based businesses that are open to the public. The building is designed using a storefront concept, with the storefronts located along the perimeter of the facility. Businesses include a bakery and cyber cafĂŠ, a bank, a practicing medical clinic, an auto service center, a child care center, and a cosmetology center. The constituents assist in offering the students a chance to learn and interact with patrons at a professional level. To encourage increased educational and business opportunities, the school district made a decision to build a 21st century technical school in Immokalee. The goal was to inspire students to complete their education and

to provide recruiting opportunities for area businesses. The careers to which the students are exposed include

health services, business/ technology, human services, construction trades, and community services. n

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RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION plunKett RaySicH G BY D IN E N R aRcHitectS, llp S

11000 W. Park Place Milwaukee, WI 53224 Honorable www.prarch.com IG

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oconomowoc arts center Oconomowoc, Wisconsin

performing arts center

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Kim Hassell 414/359-3060 2010 deSiGn teaM

Kim Hassell, AIA, Partner-in-Charge, Project Manager Heidi Kavanaugh, AIA, Project Architect Scott Davis, AIA, Project Designer Paulette Billington, Interior Designer Lynn Langley, LEED AP, CDT, Project Specialist Steven Etelamaki, CSI, CCCA, Construction Administrator oWneR/client Oconomowoc Area School District Oconomowoc, WI Dr. Patricia Neudecker, Superintendent 262/560-2100 Key StatS Grades Served: 9-12 capacity: 750 students Size of Site: 52 acres Building area: 30,675 square feet Building Volume: 1 million cubic feet

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he Oconomowoc Arts Center offers its community a state-of-the-art performance venue showcasing a full range of both student and professional performances. At the heart of the 30,000-squarefoot facility is the 750-seat auditorium, designed with optimal acoustics and stateof-the-art sound and lighting systems. The lobby provides an inviting reception environment before and after performances. In addition, the lobby has gallery space for permanent and rotating art pieces. An outdoor plaza with sculpture garden opens the lobby to the exterior. The primary design challenge was creating a building that would integrate with the attached existing high school while creating a unique identity befitting the vision of the Oconomowoc Arts Center as a community amenity. Although the design of the Arts Center is grounded in a contextual response to the existing high school using matching brick and precast, the boldly undulating metal wave wall entrance announces the uniqueness of the building. This wall was conceived as a figurative “bursting out� of the creative energy housed within. This outward expression of creativity presents itself to the community as a beacon to the special nature of the Oconomowoc Arts Center. n

Space per Student: 40 square feet cost per Student: $9,330 Square Foot cost: $228 construction cost: $7 million total project cost: $7.6 million contract date: May 2006 completed: Dec. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: TriCia sHay

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osseo adult education center Brooklyn Center, Minnesota

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atS&R IplanneRS/aRcHitectS/ NG BY DE N enGineeRS R 8501 Golden Valley Road, Suite 300 Honorable Minneapolis, Mention MN 55427 www.atsr.com Paul W. Erickson, 2010

AIA, NCARB, REFP 763/545-3731

claRK enGineeRinG www.clark-eng.com deSiGn teaM Paul L. Snyder, AIA, Planner, Principal-in-Charge, Project Manager Nancy LaBissoniere, AIA, Project Architect James T. Lange, PE, Mechanical Engineer Gaylen D. Melby, PE, Electrical Engineer Michelle L. Schintgen, RCDD/WD, Technology Graham Sones, ASLA, Site Development oWneR/client Osseo Area Schools Maple Grove, MN Susan Hintz, Superintendent 763/391-7000 Key StatS Grades Served: Adults

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he Osseo Adult Education Center promotes GED achievement through academic and English language instruction to adult learners in the northwestern suburban and surrounding areas of the Twin Cities. Working with Osseo Area Schools and the Adult Education Center staff, ATS&R designed the 25,500-squarefoot facility to meet the needs of these adult learners. Planning is underway for an expansion that will provide county and nonprofit human services as a one-stop service center. Great care was given to create clear and safe traffic patterns at the Osseo Adult

Education Center. With adult learners arriving by various modes of transportation, the center offers welcoming dropoff areas and entries for pedestrians, bus riders, and drivers. The use of daylight, warm colors, and patterns on the floors and walls makes the center feel welcoming. The facility

houses 14 classrooms, a large community room, two computer labs, two shared conference rooms, a lunchroom with partitioning capabilities, and a teacher prep area and staff lounge. The center serves as home to 1,300 adult students and 40 Osseo Area Schools’ staff. n

capacity: 450 students Size of Site: 3.5 acres Building area: 25,500 square feet Building Volume: 338,057 cubic feet Square Foot cost: $131 construction cost: $3.4 million total project cost: $3.9 million contract date: June 2000 completed: Feb. 2006 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: riCK PeTers, insiDeOUT sTUDiOs

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the poplar creek public library 2010

Streamwood, Illinois

library/Media center RENOVATION/ADDITION/ RESTORATION

FRye Gillan MolinaRo aRcHitectS 308 West Erie, Suite 600 Chicago, IL 60654 www.fgmarch.com Lonn Frye 312/440-1584 deSiGn teaM Lonn Frye, Designer A.J. Rosales, Designer, Project Manager Leslie North, Lighting Designer Trish Beckjord, Landscape Designer Pepper Construction, General Contractor oWneR/client The Poplar Creek Public Library Streamwood, IL Patricia Hogan, Administrative Librarian 630/837-6800 Key StatS capacity: 1,783 students Size of Site: 2.2 acres Building area: 43,143 square feet Square Foot cost: $207 construction cost: $20.9 million total project cost: $23.7 million contract date: Feb. 2006 completed: May 2009 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: 2009 LaMBrOs PHOTOgraPHy

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n the western suburbs of Chicago, a dramatic transformation was propelled by merging an existing brutalist-inspired library with a fluid new addition. At the exterior, a glass tower was expressed, creating a lantern welcoming patrons inside the new main entrance. Sculptural light box shapes were employed on the opposite façade to create whimsy. Integrated landscaping concepts include native plants, a filtration rain garden, and more than 15,000 square

L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n S P R I N G 2 0 1 0 | www.learningbydesign.biz

feet of sedum roofing. On the interior, existing reading rooms were converted to comfortable lounges, reestablishing areas of solitude that were lacking before the renovation. A 5,000-squarefoot teen center establishes a playful niche for the community youth while offering a large, specialized manga and fiction collection. Natural light washes into the sunken lower level around the curvaceous edges that wind through the “amoeba

room.” Color, texture, and pattern create visceral depth and tame the original building’s rigid palette of formed concrete and wood. Art and technology also fuse together in the integration of a programmable LED light wall, which greets and alerts patrons at opening and closing time with a coordinated show. This vibrant, flexible, and functional social center engages patrons by blending unexpected modernism with progressive ideas. n


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G BY D tMpI NaRcHitectuRe, inc. E N R 1191 W. Square Lake Road Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302 www.tmp-architecture.com Honorable

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Wing lake developmental center Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

entire School/campus Building

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Mention Dawn Lyman, CPSM 248/338-4561

2010

deSiGn teaM Steve Smith, AIA, Project Director, Manager Mike Evans, AIA, Project Architect Laura Casai, IIDA, LEED AP, Interior Designer oWneR/client Bloomfield Hills Public Schools Bloomfield Hills, MI Steven Gaynor 248/341-5400 Key StatS Grades Served: Ages 3-26 capacity: 100 students Size of Site: 4.5 acres Building area: 40,027 square feet Building Volume: 920,000 cubic feet Space per Student: 401 square feet cost per Student: $92,347 Square Foot cost: $231 construction cost: $9.2 million total project cost: $10.3 million contract date: Mar. 2006 completed: Aug. 2008 completion: 100% PHOTOgraPHy: CHrisTOPHer LarK

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he goal of the Wing Lake project was to increase therapy space; create a media center with group learning spaces for sensory development activities; and incorporate state-ofthe-art technology. Replacing an aging elementary school with narrow doorways and high counters, the facility now features a unique design with spacious new classrooms and restrooms that accommodate the turning radius of a wheelchair. Wheelchair parking spots have been designed as inset areas that line hallways, preventing equipment from dominating the interior, and avoiding an intimidating medical-looking environment. This project encountered many site considerations. Protection of the natural grounds adjacent to Wing Lake was a priority. The site incorporates best sustainable practices for drainage, including bioswales and bioretention, treating stormwater runoff before it reaches the lake. An existing beloved memorial garden remains untouched, and continues to provide a beautiful, quiet area for reflection and prayer. To complement the original historic stone schoolhouse adjacent to the new center, and for long-term durability, designers carefully chose their construction materials and mechanical systems, using a natural fieldstone with a brick blend. Mechanical systems are designed to provide optimum comfort for medically fragile, environmentally sensitive students. Wing Lake staff wanted the building design to allow for essential group instruction. A commons area provides a team-teaching zone or special events area. Different classes

use the space to work on the same thematic unit together. Therapists and other professionals are now

in close proximity to one another, able to collaborate in the best interests of the center’s students. n

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LEARNING BY DESIGN 2010 Jury:

Sustainable Design Goes Mainstream Several notable trends emerged among the project entries for LEARNING BY DESIGN’s Spring Edition, but perhaps the one that impressed judges most was also the most encouraging one: Sustainable design is going mainstream. Judges noted that nearly a third of all the outstanding projects in this issue of LEARNING BY DESIGN include significant green design components. Even more encouraging, many of those projects were awarded three to five years ago—before the most recent push for sustainable design strategies. Given that, judges predict that sooner rather than later, sustainable design will become mainstream; green will become the norm. In the meantime, however, it’s important to showcase design best practices.

Meet the Judges A distinguished jury of architects and educational facility planners served as judges for the Spring Edition. • Jury Chair: Sean O’Donnell, AIA, LEED AP, principal, Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects, Washington, DC • Pamela J. Loeffelman, AIA, principal, Perkins Eastman Architects PC, Stamford, CT • Judy Marks, director, National Clearinghouse for Educational LEARNING BY DESIGN 2010 judges for the Spring Edition (first row, from left) Isaac Williams, Pam Loeffelman, Judy Marks; (second row, Facilities, Washington, DC from left) Alan Brangman, Sean O’Donnell, Rupert McCave. • H. Alan Brangman, AIA, university architect, University improvement program offisupports the focus on sustainFacilities & Student Housing, cer, Prince George’s County ability because fewer new Georgetown University, Schools, Upper Marlboro, MD materials are introduced and Washington, DC Stand-Out Entries fewer old materials are • Isaac Williams, assistant proDesign projects grow stronger disposed. fessor, School of Architecture, each year; however, for this “There’s a value in older Planning & Preservation, issue of LEARNING BY DESIGN, architecture,” judges noted. University of Maryland, judges said the strongest proj“You can, without really harmCollege Park, MD ects included many modernizaing the building, do the modern • Rupert McCave, AIA, capital tions and renovations. This also things you need to do.” n

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EDUCATIONAL FACILITY CONSTRUCTION

CASE STUDY

Light-Filled Learning

Innovative strategies support design best practices By John R. Dale, FaIa, leeD aP

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vidence-based research suggests that students learn better in settings with balanced natural light. At various moments in the history of architecture, schools have been designed systematically as well-balanced machines for teaching and learning. The results have been elegant, and at times dramatic, but also factory-like. In the case of Steven Wise Temple’s David Saperstein Middle School in Los Angeles, challenging site constraints required a more nuanced, varied response. By responding more specifically to exceptional conditions, the design team implemented strategies that resulted in balanced daylighting throughout the new school. Site Challenges The 240-student middle school sits on a rugged shelf, literally carved out of an unstable hillside above the Sepulveda Tunnel. Situated on the scenic Mulholland corridor, all the roofs of the building must sit below the street to protect views and adhere to strict sightline restrictions. Also challenging is the fact that the sloping site is extremely long and narrow, with a steep hillside to the east and a precipitous

drop with maximum sun exposure to the west. All the classrooms essentially must face east and west rather than a more ideal northsouth orientation. The design solution takes the form of two parallel, single-loaded classroom buildings flanking a series of linear outdoor courtyards that act as a village street. Each classroom and most support spaces therefore have the potential for natural cross ventilation and daylight from at least two directions. Architects handled natural light and fenestration in a variety of ways, depending on orientation, purpose, and scale of space. Each pair of classrooms shares a small study room with ample glazing interconnecting all three spaces. The study room is top lit with a shallow light scoop or clerestory. The classrooms have lower view windows with deep overhangs facing the inner street; the overhangs also act as light shelves to bounce light into sloping clerestories above. The opposite walls also have windows with views to the landscape beyond. As a result, each of the 11 main classrooms has at least three distinct sources for balanced, glare-free natural light. Varied Solutions With varying exposures, different spaces require different window solutions, resulting in a lively and varied environment. For example, the west-facing classrooms, with potentially harsh and hard-to-control exposures, have projecting, angled bay windows that orient the glazed areas to the north, away from the raking horizontal light. Relying on exterior circulation, the school’s buildings are interconnected with a series of breezeways and projecting canopies, resulting in a highly modulated space with conditions ranging between bright sunlight and deep shadows. To avoid an overly abrupt transition and to add further animation to the architecture, the overhangs are punctuated with deep multiple north-south light wells capped with skylights. The skylights have been configured to bring controlled but animated natural light into the covered spaces below. The resulting spaces, both functional and inviting during the day, have the added benefit of proving engaging and animated spaces at night as the varied patterns of windows and skylights add borrowed light to the outdoor plazas and courts. n

Angled bay windows in classrooms (above) and exterior breezeways and projecting canopies (above right) are among the design solutions that allow students at Saperstein Middle School in Los Angeles to benefit from maximum natural light throughout the school day.

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John R. Dale, FAIA, LEED AP, is principal and education studio leader for Harley Ellis Devereaux, Los Angeles. Reach him at jrdale@ hedev.com.


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ARCHITECTS & ENGINEERS   Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. 1050 Massachusetts ave. cambridge, Ma 02138 Jo oltman Phone: 617/492-7000 fax: 617/492-7007   DLR Group offices Nationwide Jim french, aia, refP Phone: 913/897-7811 fax: 913/897-8333 e-mail: jfrench@dlrgroup.com www.dlrgroup.com dlr Group elevates the learning experience through design. Earl Swensson Associates, Inc. 2100 West end ave., suite 1200 Nashville, tN 37203 sandy dickerson Phone: 615/329-9445 fax: 615/329-9482

Fielding Nair International 16605 Windsor Park Drive Lutz, FL 33549 Prakash Nair Phone: 917/406-3120 Fax: 813/909-2509 E-mail: prakash@fieldingnair.com http://fieldingnair.com

G u i d e

fielding Nair international is the global leader for educational facilities planning and architectural design. fNi plans and designs school facilities for today and tomorrow with one primary goal—improve learning. fNi has provided consulting services to local, regional, and national governments, school districts, and other educational clients in 27 countries.

Fanning Howey 1200 irmscher Blvd. celina, oH 45822 sharon Poor Phone: 419/586-9550 x134 fax: 419/586-3393

Geddis Partnership, PC, The 71 old Post road southport, ct 06890 Barbara l. Geddis, faia Phone: 203/256-8700 fax: 203/255-0004

  Frye Gillan Molinaro 308 W. erie, suite 600 chicago, il 60654 lonn frye Phone: 312/440-1584 fax: 312/440-9605

Gibraltar Design, Inc. 9102 N. Meridian street, suite 300 indianapolis, iN 46260 James B. thompson, NcarB Phone: 317/580-5777 fax: 317/580-5778

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JCJ Architecture 38 Prospect street Hartford, ct 06103 James e. laPosta Jr., aia, leed aP Phone: 860/247-9226 fax: 860/524-8067

VCBO Architecture 524 s. 600 east salt lake city, ut 84102 ellen Parrish Phone: 801/575-8800 fax: 801/531-9850

  Long & Associates Architects/ Engineers, Inc. 4525 s. Manhattan ave. tampa, fl 33611 alexander “lex” long, aia, leed aP Phone: 813/839-0506 fax: 813/839-4616

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LPA, Inc. 5161 california ave., suite 100 irvine, ca 92617 Jon Mills, aia Phone: 949/261-1001

  NanaWall Systems, Inc. 707 redwood Highway Mill Valley, ca 94941 alison Blume Phone: 800/873-5673 x208 fax: 415/383-0312

FlOORING

SCHRADERGROUP architecture LLC 161 leverington ave., suite 105 Philadelphia, Pa 19127 david l. schrader, aia Phone: 215/482-7440 fax: 215/482-7441

CRETESEAL 3981 e. Miraloma ave. anaheim, ca 92806 Jim christie Phone: 800/278-4273 fax: 714/993-1840 www.creteseal.com   n or a sy s t em s , Inc . 94 Glenn street lawrence, Ma 01843

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Phone: 800/332-6672 fax: 978/975-0110 e-mail: education-us@nora.com www.nora.com/us Working with you, nora helps you express your creativity and realize your vision. our colorful, durable, sustainable solutions are ideal for classrooms, corridors, laboratories, cafeterias, and more. designed for the challenges of learning environments, nora rubber flooring is long lasting, requires less maintenance, and contributes to better indoor air quality.

FuRNITuRE DEMCO Library Interiors 4810 forest run road Madison, Wi 53704 Janet Nelson Phone: 800/747-7561 fax: 800/730-8094 e-mail: design@demcointeriors.com www.demcointeriors.com deMco library interiors works collaboratively with architects, designers, librarians, and educators to create inspiring environments by combining design services with the most comprehensive choices in quality furniture. services include design and layout, project management, and full installation. our staff is committed to delivering your project on time and on budget.  

  KI 1330 Bellevue street Green Bay, Wi 54302 info@ki.com Phone: 800/424-2432 fax: 920/468-2729

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Big Ass Fans 2425 Merchant street lexington, Ky 40511 sales engineers Phone: 859/233-1271 fax: 859/233-0139

INDuSTRy EVENTS School Building Expo/College Building Expo 5520 Park ave., suite 305 trumbull, ct 06611 Jenabeth ferguson Phone: 203/371-6322 fax: 203/371-8894 www.schoolbuildingexpo.com U.S. Green Building Council 2101 l street NW, suite 500 Washington, dc 20037 Phone: 202/828-7422 fax: 202/828-5110 www.usgbc.org


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Index to Projects By State Arkansas Hurricane creek elementary ................................. 36 oak Grove replacement High school ................... 86 rogers Heritage High school ................................ 88 Wooster elementary school ................................. 50 California Beverly Hills High school science & technology center................................. 11-13, 67 david saperstein Middle school ........................... 51 el cerrito High school .......................................... 71 Gualberto J. Valadez Middle school academy ...... 53 Montgomery High school ............................... 84-85 romoland Middle school ..................................... 63 stonegate elementary school ............................... 47 Whittier college—donald e. Graham athletics center ................................................. 120 Colorado Kinard core Knowledge Middle school ................ 55 Connecticut catherine Kolnaski elementary Magnet school ........................................... 8-10, 27 District of Columbia Phelps architecture, construction, and engineering High school .................... 11-13, 87 the school Without Walls of Washington, d.c. ................................4-5, 90-91 Florida immokalee technical center............................... 125 strawberry crest High school.................8-10, 94-96 Georgia Johns creek High school...................................... 80 ridgeview charter school .................................... 62 Winterville elementary school .............................. 49 Woodward academy science Building................ 108 Illinois dewey elementary school .................................... 29 fulton elementary school ..................................... 34 Mark t. skinner West elementary school .............. 41 Metea Valley High school..................................... 83 the Poplar creek Public library ................. 8-10, 128 Wilmington High school ...................................... 98 Indiana Hobart High school......................................... 78-79 Warsaw community High school Performing arts Wing and auditorium ................. 97 Iowa unity elementary school ...................................... 48 Kentucky duke K. Mccall sesquicentennial Pavilion........... 112 Maine Waynflete arts center, Waynflete school ...............................8-10, 106-107 Massachusetts Baker and George elementary schools ................. 25 cambridge War Memorial recreation center ..... 123 Michigan calvin college—spoelhof fieldhouse complex ........................................... 109 dianne M. Pellerin center.................................. 124 Gross ile High school ........................................... 76 West shore community college— schoenherr campus center ............................... 119 Wing lake developmental center ...................... 129

Minnesota chanhassen High school...................................... 69 osseo adult education center ........................... 127 Missouri Pathfinder elementary school............................... 45 school of the osage Middle school ...................... 64 New Jersey cicely l. tyson community school of Performing and fine arts ............................ 100-101 H.B. Whitehorne Middle school ........................... 54 Hammarskjold Middle school .......................... 56-57 leaguers Head start school, the .......................... 38 livingston High school, center for fitness & Wellness................................................ 81 Pingry Middle school, the .................................... 61 rider university—West Village student Housing ................................................ 116 New Mexico atrisco elementary school Kindergarten ............... 24 New York eagle elementary school ...................................... 30 Green tech High charter school .......................... 75 Hackley school: the Kathleen allen lower school .........................................8-10, 32-33 Notre dame academy, early childhood center ..................................... 11-13, 43 somers High school ............................................. 89 somers Middle school.......................................... 65 North Carolina campbell university—John W. Pope Jr. convocation center ........................................... 110 davidson county community college ................ 111 duke school—a school in the forest at duke university ....................................... 102-103 eastern Guilford High school ............................... 70 North carolina central university— Pearson cafeteria............................................... 114 Wilkes community college— applied technology center ................................ 121 Ohio logan High school ............................................... 82 ohio dominican university— Bishop James a. Griffin student center..... 8-10, 115

springfield High school ........................................ 92 start High school/West toledo yMca .................. 93 Oklahoma the chickasaw Nation child development center ............................................ 28 Oregon Bonny slope elementary school ........................... 26 Pennsylvania George Washington carver High school of engineering and science ....................... 11-13, 74 Manoa elementary school.................................... 40 Myers elementary school ..................................... 42 Paradise elementary school .................................. 44 South Carolina academy for the arts, science, and technology.................................................. 122 Texas Brownwood High school ..................................... 68 eastfield college learning center.............. 8-10, 113 Jack c. Binion elementary school ......................... 37 lee H. Means elementary school.......................... 39 university of Houston—calhoun lofts..... 11-13, 118 university of Houston system at sugar land—Brazos Hall .................................... 117 Utah eastlake elementary school .................................. 31 legacy Junior High school......................8-10, 58-59 Wasatch Junior High school ................................. 66 Virginia Poquoson elementary school ........................ 6-7, 46 Washington Garfield High school Historic renovation and addition........................................11-13, 72-73 Glacier View Junior High school ........................... 52 John r. rogers High school.................................. 77 Mountainside Middle school ................................ 60 Wisconsin Hillside elementary school.................................... 35 oconomowoc arts center ................................. 126 Tasmania, Australia scotch oakburn college ..................11-13, 104-105

Order extra COpies & reprints Log on to www.learningbydesign.biz to order copies and reprints for all your marketing needs. n Copies of LEARNING BY DESIGN 2010 Spring are $20 each. n Copies of LEARNING BY DESIGN 2010 Fall are $20 each. n High-resolution, print-ready PDFs of projects are $325 per PDF. n Copies of LEARNING BY DESIGN 2009 are $10 each.

For Questions Contact: Carrie Wood, LEARNING BY DESIGN Stratton Publishing & Marketing Inc., 5285 Shawnee Road, Suite 510 Alexandria, VA 22312-2334 • Fax: 703.914.6777 • Call: 703.914.9200 ext. 25 www.learningbydesign.biz | L e a r n i n g B y D e s i g n s P r i n g 2 0 1 0

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Index to Architects aci/frangkiser Hutchens, inc............................................................ 45

Nac|architecture ................................................................. 52, 60, 77

archi*technics, 3/inc...................................................................... 117

oWP/P | cannon design................................................................... 29

ats&r Planners/architects/engineers ........................................ 35, 127

Perkins+Will ............................................................................. 69, 108

BlrB architects ................................................................ 11-13, 72-73

Peter Gisolfi associates ...................................................... 8-10, 32-33

Boynton Williams & associates ......................................................... 28

Pike - Mcfarland - Hall associates, inc. ........................................... 122

Burt Hill ........................................................................................... 42

PJHM architects, inc. ......................................................... 47, 63, 120

cambridge seven assoicates, inc. .................................................. 133

Plunkett raysich architects, llP ...................................................... 126

cannon Moss Brygger & associates ................................................. 48

rB+B architects, inc. ........................................................................ 55

cdH Partners, inc....................................................................... 49, 62

rhinebeck architecture & Planning Pc ............................................. 75

chapman Griffin lanier sussenbach architects, inc. ......................... 80

ruhnau ruhnau clarke ............................................................... 84-85

csarch architecture | construction Management ............................ 30

schenkelshultz architecture ........................................................... 125

design ideas Group architecture + Planning, llc ......... 56-57, 100-101

schmidt associates .......................................................................... 97

design resources Group, architects ................................................. 81

scHraderGrouP architecture llc .............................. 11-13, 74, 134

dla architects, ltd. ......................................................................... 34

scott simons architects.................................................. 8-10, 106-107

dlr Group, inc. ....................................................................... 83, 133

sfl+a architects .............................................................................. 70

dull olson Weekes architects ........................................................... 26

sHP leading design ....................................................................... 112

earl swensson associates, inc......................................................... 133

sMNG-a architects, ltd. .................................................................. 41

ehrenkrantz eckstut & Kuhn architects................................. 4-5, 90-91

spiezle architectural Group, inc. .................................................... 116

ei associates, architects & engineers .......................................... 38, 44

ssoe, inc. ........................................................................................ 93

fanning Howey ............................................................. 11-13, 87, 133

tMP architecture, inc. .................................................................... 129

fielding Nair international, llc..............11-13, 102-103, 104-105, 133

towerPinkster ................................................................................ 119

french associates, inc. ..................................................................... 76

usa architects Planners + interior designers .................................... 61

frye Gillan Molinaro architects ...................................... 8-10, 128, 133

VcBo architecture ......................................... 8-10, 31, 58-59, 66, 134

Geddis Partnership, Pc, the .......................................... 11-13, 43, 133

Vigil & associates architectural Group, Pc ....................................... 24

Gibraltar design, inc. .......................................................... 78-79, 133

VMdo architects, Pc ................................................................ 6-7, 46

Gignac & associates, llP.................................................................. 39

VsWc architects.............................................................................. 82

GMB architecture + engineering .................................................... 109

Wakely associates, inc. .................................................................. 124

Harley ellis deveraux ........................................................................ 51

Wittenberg, delony & davidson, inc. architects................................ 86

Healy, Bender & associates, inc. ....................................................... 98

Wlc architects, inc.................................................................... 53, 71

Hight-Jackson associates, Pa ........................................................... 88

Wm. B. ittner, inc. ............................................................................ 64

HKs, inc. ......................................................................... 8-10, 37, 113 HMfH architects, inc. .............................................................. 25, 123 Huckabee & associates .................................................................... 68 Jackson Brown King architects, inc. ........................................... 36, 50

Index to Advertisers Big Ass Fan Company ................................................................... 22 www.bigassfans.com, 877/BiG-faNs

JcJ architecture .............................................................. 8-10, 27, 134

Council of Educational Facility Planners International............. 133

KG&d architects & engineers, Pc .............................................. 65, 89

www.cefpi.org, Mike deegan, 480/391-0840

Kirksey architecture ............................................................ 11-13, 118

CRETESEAL ................................................................................... 131

laN associates, engineering, Planning, architecture, surveying, inc. ............................................................. 54

Hussey Seating Company .....................................................Cover 4

www.creteseal.com, Jim christie, 800/278-4273 www.husseyseating.com, chris robinson, 800/341-0401

lesko associates, inc. ....................................................................... 92

KI ............................................................................................Cover 3

little ...................................................................................... 110, 121

www.kieducation.com, 800/424-2432

long & associates architects/engineers, inc. .............. 8-10, 94-96, 134 lPa, inc......................................................................... 11-13, 67, 134

NanaWall Systems, Inc. ................................................................. 23 www.nanawall.com, ebraham Nana, 800/873-5673 x 201

NICHIHA USA, Inc. ....................................................................... 130

MBaJ architecture ......................................................................... 111

www.nichiha.com, 866/424-4421

McKissick associates architects Pc ................................................... 40

School Building Expo .................................................................. 134

Moody路Nolan, inc. ........................................................ 8-10, 114, 115

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www.schoolBuildingexpo.com, Joelle coretti, 203/371-6322

U.S. Green Building Council .................................................Cover 2 www.usgbc.org, 202/828-7422

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