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March 2014 Priceless www.sasee.com

I am going to try to pay attention to the

spring.

I am going to look around at all the flowers, and look up at the hectic trees. I am going to close my eyes and

listen.

– Anne Lamott


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Volume 13, Issue 3

March 2014

who’s who Publisher

Delores Blount

Sales & Marketing Director Susan Bryant

Editor

Leslie Moore

Account Executives

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18

20

Amanda Kennedy-Colie Dana Gondek Erica Schneider Gay Stackhouse Celia Wester

Art Director Taylor Nelson

Photography Director Patrick Sullivan

Graphic Artists Stephanie Holman Scott Konradt

Accounting Ronald Pacetti

24

28

34

Featured Artificial Intelligence by Rose Ann Sinay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sasee Kids: Let’s Go Out to Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Let My Garden Grow by Jeffery Cohen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Southern Snaps by Connie Barnard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 A Biblical Garden in the Promised Land by Ann Goldberg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 For the Love of Gardening by Ann Ipock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Comfy in the Country by Diane Stark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 The Nonexistent Right or Wrong of How to Travel by Margo Millure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Be a Waitress for a Week by Linda DeMers Hummel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 We Wait, Watch, and Hope by Janey Womeldorf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

In This Issue Green Thumb: Anita Lampley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Read It! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Green Behind the Scenes: Esther Murphy, Director of Recycling, Horry County Solid Waste Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Spring Trends 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Sea Green: Harold Weigel, Myrtle Beach Watersports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Locally Green: Charlie Caldwell, Ovis Hill Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 March Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

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Administrative Assistant Laura Lenhardt

Executive Publishers Jim Creel Bill Hennecy Tom Rogers

PO Box 1389 Murrells Inlet, SC 29576 fax 843-626-6452 • phone 843-626-8911 www.sasee.com • info@sasee.com Sasee is published monthly and distributed free along the Grand Strand. For subscription info, see page 29. Letters to the editor are welcome, but could be edited for length. Submissions of articles and art are welcome. Visit our website for details on submission. Sasee is a Strand Media Group, Inc. publication.

Copyright © 2014. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material, in part or in whole, prepared by Strand Media Group, Inc. and appearing within this publication is strictly prohibited. Title “Sasee” is registered with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office.


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Pen & Brush readers’ comments As a fellow widow, I was deeply touched by your article about Martha Clarke in this issue of Sasee. It was one that any of us who have suffered such loss could stand with Martha, to grieve the loss of her beloved husband and best friend. Thank you for sharing such a heartfelt story – and I am thankful for your work in Murrells Inlet and Pawleys Island. – Sherron

letter from the editor I always know that March has arrived by the many articles about spring cleaning and organizing that begin to pop up on my favorite blogs. Cleaning and getting rid of the clutter is important to our overall well being, according to one writer, and actually improves your life in a myriad of ways. Armed with my homemade all purpose cleaner, cleaning cloths and a box of garbage bags, I have started purging the unnecessary, and will let you know how it goes. I did feel lighter after I dropped off the first car load at Good Will. And, I felt good about donating my (still useful) unwanted things rather than throwing them in the landfill. We have several short interviews this month that focus on people who are passionate about improving our little corner of the Earth. These four fascinating people talk about recycling, farming, dolphins and gardening! While I was interviewing Charlie Caldwell at Ovis Hill Farm Market in Myrtle Beach, I met Kimberly Busse, owner of The Local Table, an online farmers market for Myrtle Beach and surrounding areas. Kimberly connects her customers with a variety of local farmers that value sustainable, organic and humane farming practices and delivers orders to locations from North Myrtle Beach to Murrells Inlet. You can learn more at thelocaltablemb.com. Happy Spring!

we’d love to hear from you! Love what you’re reading? You can reach us by: Have suggestions? mail: P.O. Box 1389 Murrells Inlet, SC 29576 Let us know! phone: 843.626.8911 email: info@sasee.com web: www.sasee.com

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Just read Phil La Borie’s article in Sasee [“Newcomer’s Notebook”] and think it is great. My husband and I moved here from Connecticut. We love it, and had to get acclimated to the “slower” way of living. I’m delighted with the slower way, but my late husband was a real old “Yankee.” Keep up the good work. You made a 79 year old widow very happy with this article. – Barb Just love Sasee – the artwork is totally awesome, and I enjoy reading the short stories. Thanks for publishing such a great magazine. And, thanks to the monthly cover artist as well as all the talented contributing writers. Best of all, Sasee is great entertainment at no charge! – Mary

Cover Artist

Victoria Platt Ellis Spring, by Victoria Platt Ellis Ever since Victoria Platt Ellis was a little girl, drawing with a stick in the dirt at the foot of her rural front porch steps, she has been fascinated with fitting shapes together to make designs. Every large or small element within a painting is a part of the puzzle that comes together to form the design of the artwork. While she has studied with many prominent artists, Ellis is primarily self taught and has developed her own distinctive style. Like all artists, she evolves through various stages in her artwork – in some periods interested in light, some in color, some in perspective. Since many of Ellis’s paintings feature buildings in her nearby historic city of Charleston, South Carolina, viewers often think that she is particularly interested in depicting architecture. Although she finds these structures to be beautiful, she only extracts their forms to create art. Today, the artist says her inspiration for painting is almost exactly the same as the beginning; it just takes a different path. When she painted Spring, she just wanted to make a pretty picture with good design and the proper use of color. Today, painting is harder for Ellis because she thinks about what she is trying to say, but wants to say it without being obvious. A painting has been in her head for several years about money, and she wants to ask how money affects our lives, but how does one paint “money” without being obvious about it? To contact Victoria Platt Ellis or to see more of her work, visit her gallery, Ellis-Nicholson Gallery, at 1.5 Broad Street in Charleston, call 843-722-5353 or find her online at ellis-nicholsongallery.com.


Voice

Artificial Intelligence by Rose Ann Sinay

Each December, my huge Christmas cactus is covered with hundreds of plump buds. By the holidays, the plant is in full, glorious bloom. The vibrant, pink flowers that explode from the leggy stems make me smile every time I walk into my living room. Just like clockwork, the blossoms see the old year out and trumpet the New Year in, before dropping to the floor. The plant’s vitality is a real mystery to me. I would like to take the credit for keeping it alive and thriving; its beauty gives me momentary hope that my thumb has turned gardener green. But the truth is, I rarely remember to water my plants, never mind fertilize them. The other six plants, standing next to my (nearly) maintenance-free cactus, look like wounded soldiers wearing spotted shrouds of olive and brown. They are my constant reminders that any green on my thumb is probably a fungus. Last year, I decided to ditch the withered stems that guilt and Miracle Grow couldn’t revive. I would go BIG this time. Perhaps, I had thought, small, delicate flora were just not my “thing.” (Not that the medium-sized, hardy greenery fared any better.) I headed to Lowes plant center. I was looking for something tall and substantial in dazzling emerald – something that my unintentional neglect couldn’t kill – something that would provide a lush background for my dependable, tenacious cactus. I didn’t even have to go into the garden section. Tree-sized Majesty Palms were grouped in the center aisle of the store, right in front of the entrance, for my convenience (or a quick sale). Each plastic, five gallon container held a perfect Ravenea rivularis. Their bases were thick and woody, the leaf blades – pristine and sturdy. Five, six…eight feet tall, they towered over me with their regal, willowy fronds. “Do you think they are easy to care for,” I asked the woman next to me who was wrestling with the pots to reach the tallest plant in the back row. “I just want to keep it alive,” I confided. “You can’t kill ‘em,” she said. “I guarantee it. I’ve had mine for years. Half the time I forget to water them, and they still look like this. Palms like humidity. Just mist them with water from time to time. Easy peasy.” “Really? Nothing else?” I asked skeptically, helping her load the pot onto the flat wagon.

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“Well, you don’t want to put it in direct sun light…or in complete shade,” she said expertly trimming the wilted edge of a leaf with her finger nails. “And don’t over-water it; you’ll rot the roots.” She laughed at the doubt on my face. “Don’t worry. Just take one home and enjoy it.” I did buy one; in fact, I bought two. I contemplated a few more, but stopped myself. Just how indestructible these enormous shrubs really were, was yet to be seen. I called my husband, “Bring the truck.” I followed closely behind him in my car, wincing at each bump and curve in the road. I watched the trees blow in the wind, but they did not fall over. We made it home, every leaf intact. It was a good sign. We placed the palms into their new clay pots, watered them thoroughly, and let them drain. They were beautiful. I had my own jungle. And when the Christmas cactus bloomed, it would be spectacular. *** I pull out the spray bottle and mist the row of plants. I no longer have to raise my arm to reach the tops. I can hardly remember the magnificent plants they used to be. The two leaves on the last palm barely reach my waist. There is a nice green stalk smack in the middle. It’s beginning to yellow a little at the tip. There’s no sign that it plans to open any time soon. This year, I’m going to Rose Ann Sinay is a freelance writer buy some new plants: I’m thinking typing away in sunny North Carolina. artificial might be nice. Her articles/stories have been published in The Carolinas Today, The Oddville Press and The Brunswick Beacon.

Rose Ann Sinay


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Anita Lampley Tell us a little about yourself. I’m originally from Florence, but have lived in the area since 1983. My husband, Randy, is retired; we have been married since 1970. We have two grown children; Ronnie lives in Rock Hill and has two children, and Pam lives here and works at Conway National Bank. I love animals, and we have three shih tzus and two cats. I learned to sew when I was 10 years old, and now I have my own alterations business. Sewing and gardening are my passions. When we built this house in 1999, I told the architect I wanted it to look like “grandma’s house,” and we have built the gardens little by little. I collected bricks from old houses and made all the walkways – we even have an old pergola that was once on top of a local attorney’s office. I love old things, antiques, recycling and reusing. How long have you been gardening? My entire life! I have a letter I wrote my aunt in the 2nd grade telling her what plants I was growing. Most every Saturday and Sunday afternoon you’ll find me out working in my gardens. I’m also a member of the Camellia Society, but I think my favorite flower is the Bearded Iris, even though I really do love them all. What do you enjoy most about your yard? That’s a tough question, I love every plant I grow, but my formal garden is where I go with a cup of coffee every morning and walk around. It’s my private place to talk with God. Do you have any advice for those just beginning to garden? Get to know people who garden, and they’ll share their plants with you. I love getting and giving “pass alongs” – anyone who gardens does. I still have plants that came from my grandmother’s garden. The more you give, the more you have! People who garden can also tell you what grows best in your area. Do you consider yourself “green?” Absolutely. I made borders for several beds from blue bottles and used chucks of old concrete for another. It looks wonderful, and I’m able to use something that would have been thrown away. How do you refresh and renew after a busy day? Gardening, of course! I also sing in my church choir at Garden City Baptist and am a member of the Serendipity Singers. Anita’s garden is beautiful in the spring. If you’re in Murrells Inlet, turn down Wachesaw Road, then right on Journey’s End. You can’t miss it. To contact her for alterations, call 843-651-6709

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Green Thumb


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Bloom!

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Read It! Nicole Says…Read Necessary Lies, Diane Chamberlain by Nicole McManus 12

At fifteen years old, Ivy Hart has known true heartbreak and what it means to be responsible for others. She takes care of her ailing grandmother and her mentally challenged sister and nephew, while going to school and working long hours on the tobacco farm. Her family is on welfare and is regularly visited by Grace County’s social workers, but she couldn’t even imagine how her life would change when she is introduced to Jane Forrester. Jane just got married, and her husband wants her to be the typical country club wife, but she chooses to do more with her life. When she interviewed to be a social worker, she had no idea the types of people and the amount of poverty that she would be faced with on a daily basis. When she meets the Hart family, she feels a deep connection with the young girls and vows to help them, even if it costs her everything.


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Necessary Lies is a poignant tale about doing what you feel is right, despite what everyone else says. This book is centered on the sterilization laws that North Carolina had in effect to prevent “feebleminded poor people” from reproducing. This subject matter is heartbreaking and could make the book a very depressing read, but Chamberlain gives readers a feeling of hope, and does an excellent job of demonstrating the strength of the human spirit in each of her characters. This book is great for reading groups and fans of Women’s Literature. This is the type of book that will leave you breathless and exhausted from living the story through the characters’ eyes. The fact that this fictional story was based on a very factual law in North Carolina makes it even more moving. I was transported back in time while reading this book, and I have yet to recover since finishing it.

Nicole McManus Nicole McManus loves to read, to the point that she is sure she was born with a book in her hands. She writes book reviews in the hopes of helping others find the magic in reading. Contact her at

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Sasee Kids

Sunshine and fresh air are a great combination—

pair this with a well designed outdoor space and you have all the ingredients for a perfect afternoon with your children. Our community is filled with lovely parks and Sasee has put together a few to get you started, plus sources to research on your own. Get those kids out of the house!

North Myrtle Beach Central Park

1400 Outrigger Road This facility includes restrooms, a handicap accessible playground, tennis courts, basketball courts, walking paths and more.

Heritage Shores Nature Preserve

5611 Heritage Drive Located on an island, this park extends into the Cherry Grove Marsh, and includes seven acres of walking trails with interpretive signs, picnic shelters and boat dock. For a complete listing of North Myrtle Beach Parks, visit parks.nmb.us

Myrtle Beach

Pawleys Island

Carolina Forest Blvd.

Pettigru Drive This park is still under construction, but has tennis courts and soccer fields ready for use and a lot of space for your kids to run.

Carolina Forest Recreation Center This well loved park offers sheltered picnic tables, separate playgrounds for older and younger children and is completely fenced in for safety.

Grand Park

Market Common Park-goers love the playgrounds and fun amenities, including a pond, a walking/running trail and more For a complete listing of Horry County and City of Myrtle Beach Parks, visit cityofmyrtlebeach. com and parksandrec.horrycounty.org.

Surfside

All Children’s Park,

10th Ave. South and Hollywood Drive This park includes two playgrounds, a picnic area and restrooms and is handicap accessible.

Fuller Park

Surfside and Myrtle Drive Two lighted tennis courts, a playground, picnic area and restrooms are available.

Stables Park

Georgetown East Bay Park

East Bay Street This lovely park is on Winyah Bay and offers ball fields, playgrounds, a boat ramp and more.

Conway

Riverfront Park

Conway Marina Enjoy a walk along the scenic Waccamaw River while visiting this nature-themed park. This site is a popular location for family photos and weddings shoots.


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Voice

Let My Garden Grow by Jeffery Cohen

Gardening was a part of my life. The piece of mind I gained by communing with nature was cheaper than therapy. The serenity I felt by being at one with Mother Earth was better than meditating. The exercise I got from lifting and stretching with a shovel and a rake was as beneficial as any yoga class I had ever taken. You couldn’t put a price on the satisfaction I felt by having a table full of fresh, colorful vegetables and flowers, raised by my own efforts. I loved gardening. That’s when the groundhog showed up. One morning I went out to check the progress of a patch of leafy green lettuce. I found a groundhog giving a buzz cut to six lovely heads. The minute he caught sight of me he scampered down his hole. I immediately barricaded it with a pile of bricks. The next day I found more damage and another hole, which I filled again. This continued until I ran out of bricks – and patience. By now, my garden had sprouted so many holes; it began to look more like Swiss cheese than Swiss chard. That’s when I decided on a new tactic. Marigolds! Gardeners swear that this little bright colored flower is guaranteed to ward off all kinds of nibbling intruders. I planted flats of the strong smelling orange blooms everywhere I could find an available spot. The groundhog noticed the new additions instantly, and found them quite delicious, leaving dozens of flowerless stems behind. “Groundhogs, groundhogs,” I muttered as I paged through stacks of gardening books in search of an answer, and found out that groundhogs are supposed to be very shy animals. The two things they seem to avoid are people and noise. I dragged an old guitar out into the middle of my pea patch, sat on a lawn chair and began to play every song I had ever learned, from “Kumbaya” to “Santa Claus is Coming to Town.” At the end of several hours I was pleased to find that not a single groundhog poked its nose out of its hole – until I returned to the house. That’s when a whole hungry groundhog family appeared and began chomping on everything in sight. My singing seemed to have given them an appetite. A friend suggested mothballs. Their camphor scent was supposed to ward off varmints better than wolf bane chased away werewolves. I dumped the contents of three entire boxes down the latest hole. I can’t be certain but, the next day; I could swear I saw two groundhogs playing marbles with those mothballs.

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I tried everything. I built a scarecrow. It kept the crows away but didn’t faze the groundhogs. I tied strings of pennants up and down the garden rows thinking the bright colors might act as a deterrent. It began to look like a used car lot – infested with groundhogs. I hung stacks of aluminum pie plates from nylon fish line. They twisted, they turned, they blew about wildly in the breeze. They crashed like cymbals, keeping me and my neighbors awake half the night but didn’t seem to bother the groundhogs at all. Finally, I hauled rolls of chicken wire and wooden slats from the local hardware store and spent the next three days erecting indestructible fences. I dug trenches around every vegetable bed and buried the wire a foot deep to prevent the animals from digging underneath. I built fences three feet above ground to block their ground attack. At long last, I was satisfied. Despite the cost, the work and the fact that my pretty little garden now looked like an armed camp, I had won the “groundhog wars” The following morning I went out to my garden, confident of my victory. There, at the very top of a fence post, a fat, furry groundhog sat, contemplating which of my vegetables would be his next meal. I can’t swear to Freelance writer and newspaper humor columnist, it, but I think he Jeffery Cohen, has written for Sasee, Lifetime and winked at me! Read, Learn, Write. He’s won awards in Women-OnWriting Contest, Vocabula’s Well Written Contest, National League of American Pen Womens’ Competition, Southern California Genealogy Competition, and Writer’s Weekly writing contest.

Jeffery Cohen


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Green Behind the Scenes

Esther Murphy,

Director of Recycling, Horry County Solid Waste Authority Tell us a little about yourself? I’m originally from Newark, New Jersey, and moved here in 1989 – right after Hurricane Hugo. My husband, Kendall, and I have been married for 23 years and live in Aynor in the Cool Spring community. We have two daughters; Chantrey is 27 and a doctoral student at Texas A&M and Shanice is 20 and a theater student at the College of Charleston. I have been with the Horry County Solid Waste Authority for 21 years – a long time I know! I oversee the Recycling and Corporate Affairs division. Why is recycling important? People often say, “I’m just one person, why does it matter if I recycle my one bottle?” It does matter, and I encourage everyone to visit the SWA and learn where their garbage and recycling goes after they leave it at the curb. Forty percent of our landfill space is filled with fiber (cardboard, newspaper, junk mail), one of the easiest materials to recycle! The Solid Waste Authority’s recycling programs help conserve landfill space which lengthens the life of the landfill. This is one reason why it is so important to give our recyclable material a new life. We give presentations in schools and in the community, and we always show them the things that can be made from recycled materials – those plastic bottles end up as your teddy bear or a tee shirt; used cooking oil is made into biofuel or even lipstick! In Dorchester County they have converted two of their vehicles to biofuel vehicles – which they call French Fry 1 and 2. [laughing] We sell recycled glass mulch for landscaping and a finer grade for driveways. It’s really beautiful. Residents can also buy mulch and compost made from recycled yard debris. Another interesting fact: Our landfills generate enough methane gas to power 2100 homes in Horry County! Horry County strives to make recycling as easy as possible with our comingled recycling program, which allows citizens to place all of their recyclables in one container. We also offer several recycling options for businesses that can actually save them money on dumpster service and landfill fees. How do you recharge and renew after a busy day? When my daughters were in school I was busy all the time – there was always something going on after school. These days, life is much simpler. I enjoy watching TV with my husband and playing video games. My daughter just got me started on “The Sims.” Weekends, I’m in church a lot; I’m the church clerk at Come As You Are Bible Fellowship in Conway. We travel to Texas and New Jersey to see family as often as we can. For more information about recycling in your community, visit www.solidwasteauthority.org in Horry County, www.georgetowntowncounty.org in Georgetown County and www.brunswickcountync.gov in Brunswick County.

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Full Court Press:

Jaida Williams Brings Energy, Enthusiasm and Inspiration to Lady Chants Basketball by Connie Barnard 24

Jaida Williams’ stunning presence lights up any room she enters. First, there is her elegant six foot frame – which is hard to miss. Even more striking, however, is the new CCU Women’s Basketball coach’s marvelous smile which reflects genuine joy from deep within her. A phenomenal athlete in her own right, this dedicated young coach clearly has the potential to become a national leader in women’s basketball. Sarah Smoak, the team’s assistant coach and recruiting coordinator who arrived this year from Duke, says of Williams: “A good coach can change a game; a great coach can change a life. Jaida is beyond a game changer, she is a life changer…I have never seen a coach more invested in her students.”


Southern Snaps Williams grew up in Miami where she thrived in its warm sunshine, diverse mix of cultures, and happy childhood in a close knit family. Even today, her best friend is her father from whom Jaida received her height and natural athletic ability. During her first two years of college, Williams played at nearby Barry University, a highly respected parochial liberal arts college. Then an amazing opportunity presented itself. Jaida was recruited to play on the national level at Cal Poly Pomona. There, under the leadership of Coach Paul Thomas, the 2005 graduate led her team to the NCAA Division II Regional Tournament. Thomas, currently the women’s basketball coach at St. Mary’s College of California, has remained Jaida’s close friend and mentor. He describes his former player as a quick study who arrived at Cal Poly her junior year in the wake of Cal Poly’s victory in the national championship: “It was a totally different culture. Most of the team members were Southern California kids, and Jaida inserted her own personality and strong work ethic into the mix. She learned to pay attention to details and rose to the top. I appreciate that.” Thomas also appreciates Williams’ ability to coach. “Jaida has the personality it takes. She cares, and she helps her players realize their potential. Young players don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” Williams coached at Iowa, South Florida, UC Santa Barbara, and most recently, Wake Forest, where she served as assistant coach before coming to Coastal Carolina in 2013. She also worked with Ganon Baker Basketball, training WNBA players as a skill development coordinator. Among the well-known WNBA players she coached are stand-outs Mekia Valentine, Crystal Smith and Jessica Dixon. Jaida has high hopes for the future of women’s professional basketball in the U.S., but she acknowledges the challenges it faces. “Unfortunately, at the current time due to financial constraints, many of our best players are going to leagues overseas.” Clearly, Jaida Williams has accomplished much in a short time, both as a coach and an athlete. However, these feats are just one segment of her profile. The young coach possesses an uncommon gentleness and generosity of spirit as well. She cares about her players and wants to help them grow strong not just as athletes but also as young women. Jaida credits this to the influence of several remarkable individuals. One is Iowa head coach Lisa Bluder with whom she worked in her first coaching position, just out of college. “Lisa was a wonderful influence on my life,” Williams says. “She has managed to balance her job with her family life and

her personal growth. This was just the perspective I needed after the intensity of playing college ball. I try to follow her example.” An avid reader with a degree in journalism, Jaida says the works of award winning Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche have also had a great influence on her life. Author of the novels Purple Hibiscus and Half of a Yellow Sun, Adichie espouses a view which Williams describes as positive feminism, a concept she tries to pass on to her players. “These young women are so talented, and most have enjoyed strong family and community support. Yet somehow I need to help convince them that, yes, they CAN do it. Coaching is a way to empower them to have a voice, to go out into the world and achieve great things. We need to be spiritually connected in order to achieve physically.” When asked about her recent move to CCU, Williams’ smiling face says it all. “It is a dream come true,” she says. “I love the state of South Carolina, and I am excited by all the potential Coastal has. If we work hard, in a few years we could do what U Conn and USC Santa Barbara have done. Look at all Sylvia Hatchell accomplished at Francis Marion. She helped gain national titles for a small, relatively unknown school.” Jaida pauses ever so slightly before acknowledging that, well, yes, it may take a few years. Then with that ever-winning smile, she adds, “But if we build it, they will come.” As the interview concludes, I dare to throw one final question at the busy young woman: “So, tell me, Jaida, where would you like to be personally and professionally ten years from now?” She laughs, looks out the window for a moment, then replies, “Personally, I would like to be married with children! Professionally, I’d like to be a part of CCU’s Women’s Basketball becoming a national contender. It can happen. Look at what the football program has done in just a few years. Our players work hard, and it is going to come. I encourage the community to be a part of it. Come join us. Connie Barnard traveled the world as a Help build it from the ground up. military wife and taught high school and We would love for you to say that college composition for over 30 years. you were part of the journey She has been a regular contributor to from Day One.” Sasee since its first issue in 2002.

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Connie Barnard

25


Voice

A Biblical Garden in the Promised Land by Ann Goldberg

Always avid gardeners back in the UK, my husband and I weren’t about to give up our favorite pastime without a fight when we moved to Jerusalem in 1975. Our dream was to plant Biblical plants and trees – those that were mentioned in the Bible as being indigenous to the Holy Land. So when we were lucky enough to find an apartment with a small garden (a rarity in Jerusalem) we planted a small vine, a fig tree and a pomegranate tree. We weren’t exactly experts on the specific difficulties of gardening in Israel. I guess we decided it was probably more or less the same as in Britain, just hotter – about 20 degrees Celsius hotter. But things didn’t turn out exactly the way we had imagined. Our grapes were a bitter bunch. We later learned that grapes need a lot of water all the year round, which our little pocket-sized vineyard didn’t receive, as there is no rain here for eight months of the year. Water is a scarce and precious commodity, and we didn’t want to be frowned upon by our neighbours for wasting it on our frivolous desire to have a back yard vine. For years these inedible grapes kept appearing and eventually dropping to the ground. Sometimes the vine surrounding these small bunches was so junglelike that the first time we realised that they were growing somewhere underneath it all was when we smelt the rotting fruit. The pomegranate tree also didn’t turn out exactly the way we had envisaged. It usually produced ONE perfect pomegranate high up at the top of its uppermost branches. I guess the fruit was desperately searching for the blazing sun that was obscured by the foliage of the withering vine. Our back yard was very small so everything was inevitably planted close together. Don’t even ask about the fig tree. Anyone who heard that we had a fig tree in our tiny garden gave us that withering look that said “silly foreigners.” OK we know now that it wasn’t such a great idea. Have we ever eaten a fig? Well maybe one or possibly two over the last 30 years. The trouble is that they usually fall from the tree before they are ripe, and if they don’t, then the birds eat them before we can. Also the guy at the plant nursery never told us how fast it would grow. We planted a tiny tree all those years back, but it just kept on and on

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growing and growing. Now it’s enormous and has taken over the entire garden and over the fence to one neighbor…and over the hedge onto the path between our home and other neighbors – always dropping its unripe fruit over paths, patios and porches. The sensible thing to do would be to uproot it – get rid of it – forget all those stupid crazy ideas we had. But getting rid of trees is not a simple matter in The Holy Land. There are two problems; the local municipality and Jewish law. To uproot or chop down any tree, even in a private garden, you need the permission of the local municipality. Trees are taken very seriously over here. Tree planting is an ancient Jewish tradition and Israel is one of the few countries that entered the 21st century with an increase in the number of trees because of massive afforestation efforts. So they don’t take kindly to people destroying trees. But, even more important, Jewish law doesn’t allow the total uprooting of a fruit-bearing tree. We can trim as far as we like, but not totally uproot the fig tree. We have to leave it with the option of growing again every year, which it does. So our Biblical garden, which was planted with such love and high aspirations, but with not enough local horticultural knowledge, will continue to grow and be a source of annoyance and aggravation to us and our neighbours. I guess we should have stopped reading the Bible after Genesis and just planted an apple tree in our Ann Goldberg is an essay writer and Garden of Eden. Apple trees workshop leader in Jerusalem. are something that most She blogs at Brits know how to deal with. www.livingandwritinginisrael.blogspot.com and www.writinginjerusalem.blogspot.com.

Ann Goldberg


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Sea Green

Harold Weigel,

Myrtle Beach Watersports Tell us a little about yourself I’m originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and before I retired was a Senior Vice President with Mack Truck. I’ve been in love with the same woman since the 6th grade – my wife Carol. We’ve been married for 57 years and have four children, 11 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. My son, Steve, was an All American gymnast in school and moved here to open a fitness center. His friend Shawn had a business renting jet skis, and he and Steve opened Myrtle Beach Watersports together. After I retired, Carol and I moved here and I went to work with them. We have a little something for everyone, with four locations and a variety of experiences, including the popular dolphin cruises on the Sea Thunder and the Sea Screamer, jet ski rentals and pontoon rentals. All of our equipment is expertly maintained, and we buy new jet skis every year. You help introduce our beautiful Atlantic to people – many for the first time. What is your favorite part of the experience? I don’t go on all of the tours, but I do oversee our captains, crew and maintenance of all the equipment, plus I’m here when people get off of the boats and always enjoy getting their feedback. People love seeing the dolphins. They are beautiful creatures and many people don’t realize they are a protected species. No one is allowed to feed or disturb them in any way, but it’s breathtaking to see them jumping and playing in the water – and sometimes they will try to interact with us. We also take people to several uninhabited islands and give them a lot of interesting historical information about the Little River area. This is a family-oriented business and our rentals and tours are geared to giving families the best possible experience. What do you enjoy most about your work? I love history and Little River. Little River was a stopping point for pirates like Blackbeard, a part of the Civil War and still ships seafood throughout the country and Canada. There is a hill across the street from our Little River location where the wives and families of fishermen used to gather to greet them when they came in from weeks at sea. The last section of the Intracoastal Waterway was completed here as well – giving the Grand Strand more access to the ocean, setting it up to be the popular tourist destination it is today. People come to Little River from their hotels and condos in Myrtle Beach and are charmed by this quaint fishing village. To learn more about Myrtle Beach Watersports, visit myrtlebeachwatersports.com or call 843-240-8400 or 843-249-0870.

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Voice

For the Love of Gardening by Ann Ipock

There are many tired gardeners but I’ve seldom met old gardeners. I know many elderly gardeners but the majority are young at heart. Gardening simply does not allow one to be mentally old, because too many hopes and dreams are yet to be realized. The one absolute of gardeners is faith. Regardless of how bad past gardens have been, every gardener believes that next year’s will be better. It is easy to age when there is nothing to believe in, nothing to hope for; gardeners, however, simply refuse to grow up. – Allan Armitage

Of all the hobbies I enjoy, gardening is my favorite. I’ve always suspected it keeps folks young or at least engaged, and Allan Armitage – a professor of horticulture at the University of Georgia – hits the mark with his quote. Concerning plants, those closest to my heart are inside my home (though I also love gardening outdoors). I think that’s because every one of them tell a story. The grand old Christmas cactus next to our fireplace was given to me some fifteen or so years ago by a dear friend who edited my first books. I’m sure Susan had no idea – nor did I – how much that plant would come to mean to me. I’ve repotted it twice and it needs it again now. This cactus is wide and sturdy, lush and green. She reminds me of Medusa with her messy hair/segmented joints. We were led to our present church six years ago by the ladies’ annual garden sale. I read about it in the local paper, which touted “many plants featured are grown in members’ yards or homes.” Heirlooms? I wondered. I imagined a sisterhood of gardeners, and I was right! What I bought there – a hoya plant from Rosalie and a kalanchoe from Sarah – have proven to be as rich and rewarding as the friendships themself. My hairdresser gave me a carrion cactus that’s shot up new babies from time to time but it’s prickly; so I don’t get too close to that one. However, it’s easy to care for and I imagine, impossible to kill. Our daughter, Katie’s father-in-law, Nick, owner of a local Greek restaurant, gave me rosemary branches that I rooted (and a lemon tree and loquat). I keep the rosemary growing under a lamp in my kitchen, the heavenly aroma so warm and earthy. Separate night-blooming cereus plants were given to me by two other church friends, Virginia and Mary. These root quite easily, and I’ve potted a half dozen and given them away. Their rare, enormous and exotic flowers – which always bloom after midnight – emit a fragrance both heady and hypnotic; and they grow indoors or out.

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Another one, this one outdoors, is the hens-and-chicks that Elizabeth gave me over twelve years ago. I root a new one often for gifts, embracing that benevolent and indescribable connection between friends who share, nurture and grow plants. House plants have other benefits. They purify the air by absorbing carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen. That peace lily you received or sent as a gesture of sympathy? It turns out it’s one of the most therapeutic houseplants of all in that it purifies five dangerous chemicals in your home (though the plant is mildly toxic to cats and dogs, so be careful). Finally, my sister, Cathy and her husband, Paul, retired here a few months ago from Virginia Beach. She’s given me pots full of different plants, outdoor varieties, which will bloom in the spring. How exciting! In fact, all of my siblings love plants and gardening, to one degree or the other. But because life is not perfect, I find that neither is gardening. Sadly, I lost one of my most prized plants last week due to a hard freeze. A gift from my longlost (but now found) high school friend, Carol: a huge, aloe vera plant that grew from a single leaf cutting. Apparently, the former safe haven of my brick back porch wasn’t effective this time. I was heartsick! The limp leaves, fat from swelling, oozed juice and showed a sad, odd greenish hue. But I’m also reminded that life holds promise; just as Carol promised me another cutting. I agree with Armitage’s quote: faith and hope abound in gardening. Last year for my birthday, our daughters gave me a consult with a landscape gardener for our front yard. Our brick bungalow lends to an absolutely fabulous English cottage garden, though my past attempts haven’t succeeded. Sarah and I’ve met twice, and we’ll complete the process next month. It will involve new topsoil, Southern flowering bushes and popular perennials – camellias, hydrangeas, black eyed Susan’s and coneflowers, to name a few. But best of all, loving plants the way I do, she insisted we replant/recycle and use whatever’s already in the ground. I absolutely agree! This present will probably be my most favorite one ever! It’s like a Caribbean Ann Ipock, the first Sasee hat recipient, cruise, a trip to Disneyworld and is the author of the “Life is Short” a diamond ring all rolled into humor trilogy. She currently writes for one. Come mid-summer, I’ll post four publications and lives in some pictures! Wilmington, North Carolina, with her husband, Russell.

Ann Ipock

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Voice

Comfy in the Country by Diane Stark

“Are you sure about this?” My friend Erin asked me when I flashed my new engagement ring and announced that I would be moving from the Chicago suburbs to a rural community in southern Indiana. “You’re really going to move to a teeny tiny town nobody’s ever heard of?” “Why not?” I said with a level of optimism only a woman in love can possess. “I love Eric, and I’ll be happy living wherever he is.” “You’re going to be bored out of your mind. And don’t his parents live across the street?” “Yeah, but I love Eric’s parents,” I said with a shrug. “Sure, you love them now, but when they’re across the street every single day for the rest of your life…” I shrugged again. “They are wonderful people.” “Have you seen Everybody Loves Raymond? Did you see what that mother-in-law put that poor woman through? Do you realize what you are signing up for?” I laughed. “My soon-to-be mother-in-law is nothing like the one on Raymond. It’ll be fine. Anyway, the words ‘across the street’ don’t mean the same thing down there as they do up here.” Erin frowned. “What else could that phrase mean?” “Eric and his parents own 78 acres of woods and farmland. Eric’s house sits on one end of the property, and his parents live ‘across the street’ on the other end of the property.” “Oh,” my friend nodded, understanding dawning. “So his parents aren’t the problem. The real problem is that you are marrying a farmer.” “He’s an engineer, Erin. I appreciate your concern, but this is going to be fine. I’ll be happy. I’m sure of it,” I assured her. My friend sighed. “I hope you’re right, Diane.” That conversation happened seven years ago now, and I’m happy to report that I was right. Eric’s parents still live ‘across the street,’ and I still think they are wonderful people. My kids walk or ride the four-wheeler over to Grandma and Grandpa’s house for quick visits or when I need to borrow an egg. My in-laws come over for dinner on a regular basis, and I truly enjoy their company. My mother-in-law has never criticized my housekeeping or my parenting skills nor does she peek into my windows if I don’t answer the door, so the Everybody Loves Raymond fears were completely unfounded. Thank goodness. Eric is still an engineer and not a farmer, although I have developed a bit of a green thumb myself. I planted some watermelons a few summers ago and they were actually growing until one of my sons ran them over with the lawn mower. Oops.

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Four years ago, Eric and I built a new home on the same piece of property as our old house. We more than doubled our square footage, and we finally have enough room for our large family. The new house is comfortable, and we are so blessed to have it – even though it is even closer to my in-laws than the old one. While all of my family members adore Eric and his family, a few of them did express concerns similar to my friend Erin’s. “Don’t you remember what you always said when you were a child?” My mom reminded me. “You disliked it that we lived out in the country, and you always swore that when you grew up, you’d live in a neighborhood with sidewalks.” Mom was right. I do remember that as a little girl, I always thought sidewalks were super cool. The house where I grew up sat on 10 acres. It was on a rural street with only about 10 other houses. All of my friends lived in a nearby subdivision, and they would walk to one another’s houses for after-school play dates. I was always left out because our house was not within walking distance. “When I grow up, I’m going to buy a big house in a subdivision and walk on my sidewalk every day,” I often said. I now live on a road with no sidewalks and just five houses on the whole street, and the road isn’t even paved. It’s gravel. It’s my childhood nightmare. And yet, I’ve never been happier. It doesn’t make sense, except that it makes perfect sense. As a child, I pictured my perfect house, complete with sidewalks, as well as my perfect husband, my perfect family and my perfect job. My perfect life was this: I wanted to live in a comfortable home with a husband who loves me and lots and lots of kids who I was able to stay at home to care for. Comfy home. Check. Really great hubby. Found him. Lots and lots and lots of kids. Five to be exact. Stay at home mom. That’s me. Nobody’s life is perfect, but I’m pretty happy with mine. As it turns out, I can live just about anywhere as long as the people I Diane Stark is a wife and mom of five. love are there with me. She loves to write about her family and The truth is I’m comfy in her faith. Her essays have been pubthe country. lished in over 20 Chicken Soup for the Even without my super Soul books. cool sidewalks.

Diane Stark


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Charlie Caldwell, Ovis Hill Farms

How long have you been farming? This is my third career. I was in the Marine Corps and worked as a graphic artist in the days before computers. I’ve been a part time farmer for many years, but started doing it full time in 1996. Right now, we have about 400 sheep and about 10 acres of vegetables. I do very little of the actual farm chores; I spend my time doing educational seminars for children and managing our farm markets. We teach the children about food and where it comes from – they visit the livestock, we have a teaching garden and let them watch our Border Collie herd the sheep. “Real food” is a term used a lot these days. Please tell us why you think this is important from a farmer’s perspective. This is a niche business. I do it because I care about the quality of our food. For example, Whole Foods contracts with local farmers and they use the same packing plant we do. Real farmers care about their animals and how they are treated. People read about bad practices and want change, but the only way to change anything is with your grocery dollars. Our markets bring together local farmers, bakers and others that produce quality products. In addition to grass fed, pasture raised meats, all of our produce is organic, either certified organic or grown organically. Every Tuesday we spend 10 hours on the road going to different farms throughout the state, picking up and delivering products that will be sold at many local markets. What are some of the benefits of eating locally raised food? The health benefits are widely written about – people can go to eatwild.com and learn more. But, one of the biggest benefits is that you are supporting local farmers and producers of food. When you spend your dollars locally, the same dollar is turned four or five times – in your community. It’s good business. The fresher a vegetable is, the more nutritious it is. Cows and sheep are meant to eat grass, not grains, so when they are pasture raised, the nutrition and taste are better – and it really is about the taste. Our customers keep coming back because this food is good. It’s what food is supposed to be. Visit Ovis Hill Farm Market at Gallery on the 8th in Myrtle Beach on Wednesday from 3-7 pm year round and at the North Myrtle Beach Farmers Market on Fridays from 10 am-1 pm starting in May. For more information about Ovis Hill Farms, or to schedule a visit, visit ovishillfarm.com or call 843-992-9447.

Farmers Markets in the Area (Note that hours vary, some markets are seasonal only)

Holden Brothers Farm Market, Hwy. 17, Shallotte North Myrtle Beach Farmers Market, 1st Ave. South, North Myrtle Beach Mike’s Produce, Lake Arrowhead Rd., Myrtle Beach Myrtle’s Market, Mr. Joe White Ave., Myrtle Beach Ovis Hill Farms Market, Gallery on the 8th, Myrtle Beach Downtown Conway Farmers Market, Industrial Park Rd., Conway Pawleys Island Farmer’s Market, Parkersville Park, Pawleys Island Millgrove Farm Store, N. Fraser St., Georgetown Georgetown Farmers Market, East Bay Park, Georgetown Order local food online at thelocaltablemb.com and find more sources for local food at localharvest.org and eatwild.com.

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Voice

The Nonexistent Right or Wrong of How to Travel by Margo Millure

Find Your Ideal Eco Tourism Trip These days eco-friendly travel can mean far more than picking your towels up off the floor because a little card says to in your hotel room. Eco and sustainable travel are hot these days. As more and more of the traveling population become aware of the importance of being good stewards of the earth, more options have become available. But when wanting to plan an eco-trip, how do you know what to really look for? And how do you avoid the potential pitfalls of choosing a business that’s just trying to take advantage of the trend? Good sustainable travel businesses recycle and conserve water and energy. The best also have a cultural component, most often using local products and hiring local employees. Additionally they support community projects and preserve an area’s unique cultural heritage. Start your research by taking a look at a businesses’ webpage. Look for accreditation from third party entities that support sustainable travel. When considering your options keep in mind that sometimes (but not always) overhead at true eco-choices can be relatively high compared to the competition. Here are a variety of suggestions from around the globe: Castello di Spannocchia, Tuscany, Italy spannocchia.com Spannocchia is a unique integration of working organic farm, educational center, and option for sustainable travel. Located in the middle of Tuscany 12 miles west of Siena, it is an ideal base for anyone looking to explore the region. The Spannocchia Foundation supports educational programs as well as environmental conservation, and research. They are best known for their residential farm internship program that is focused on sustainable agriculture and Tuscan culture and history. Spannocchia offers various lodging options around the 1100 acre property and organic dining. Concordia Eco Resort, St. John, USVI concordiaeco-resort.com The Concordia Eco Resort is a longstanding option in the Caribbean for sustainable travel, having been in existence since 1993. Located on St. John, the smallest of the United States Virgin Islands, the 51 acre resort exists in harmony with the island’s fragile coral reefs and ecosystems in an area protected by the National Park Service. The resort offers a true eco adventure, with minimal impact and maximum experience. Rosalie Bay, Dominica rosaliebay.com Although only opened in 2011, Rosalie Bay has racked up some impressive endorsements as an eco-boutique and wellness resort. Set on the less populated east side of Dominica and just 45 minutes away from the capital, Roseau, Rosalie Bay features just 28 rooms, organic cuisine, a spa, personalized wellness programs and a black sand beach. Following the discovery of leatherback sea turtle nests on the property, the local resort owner established the first sea turtle protection efforts on Dominica.

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Uncruise Adventures un-cruise.com As the name suggests, an “Uncruise” isn’t your typical cruise. With small vessel expedition cruises exploring Alaska, Hawaii, the Columbia and Snake Rivers, Coastal Washington and British Columbia, and the Sea of Cortés, the company offers enriching adventure travels that inspire an appreciation of the natural world as well as local cultures, while leaving minimal environmental impact. Various small ships and sailings cater to travel styles for everyone from families to adventurers to the luxury traveler. Matava Resort, Fiji matava.com Who doesn’t like the sound of an unspoiled Fijian island? For a small island country, Fiji has been on the vanguard in their approach to sustainability and development. With an understanding that land health affects ocean health, and vice versa, their approach has been integrative. Featuring solar powered lighting and hot water, Matava on the remote island of Kadavu, offers everything you could want from an escape to a fantasy island. Stay in traditional thatched Bures and spend your days exploring marine reserves and volcanic rain forests. Morgan’s Rock Hacienda and Eco Lodge, Nicaragua morgansrock.com Located on a 4,000 acre expanse of jungle, nearly half of Morgan’s Rock is a government-protected reserve. The remainder of the property is set aside for lowimpact agriculture and accommodations in fifteen bungalows. A short walk away is a mile long stretch of sandy beach. Morgan’s Rock offers a wide range of excursions and experiences, including surfing, catch and release fishing, volcano hiking, massages, and canopy tours. This option seems to cater particularly well to families. Caiman Ecological Refuge, Brazil caiman.com.br Brazil is home to the world’s largest wetlands. In recent decades, these wetlands were rapidly becoming a definitely non-sustainable grazing area for the beef industry. In a turnaround that began over 20 years ago, the Caiman Ecological Refuge stepped in. Instead of having an agenda to put an end to ranching, they joined forces. They protect Brazil’s Pantanal region with a sustainable approach to ranching. The idea caught on with other ranches participating and now over 30 nature refuges protect these important wildlife corridors. Although they often cater to groups, they also offer individual stays at various villas and lodges located throughout the 132,000 acres. A note about choosing an African safari For many nothing comes to mind faster than an African safari when Margo Millure currently lives in Myrtle dreaming of an ideal eco trip. The good Beach. She is a writer/photographer news is the options are many. Your best and the founder of TravelBelles.com. bet is to start with NationalGeographic. Her personal blog is MargoGoLightly. com for recommendations on how to com and her writing business is begin choosing the eco-option that’s BelleWriter.com. best for you.

Margo Millure


Voice

Be a Waitress for a Week by Linda DeMers Hummel

She holds a tissue to her nose, her eyes still red and damp. She has a message for me – her new boss – and here it comes. The demands of her job are unmanageable. She’s not making what she’s worth. Deadlines are getting ugly. Her meltdown started, as many do in our business, during a conference call. When the client made his feelings about her work clear with words like “subpar” and “careless,” she was stunned. She earned magnificent SAT scores and a “Summa” on her diploma. She didn’t see this coming. I gave her a little time alone in the ladies’ room. While she splashes some cold water on her face, I know that my job will be to come up with suggestions to keep her from having another miserable afternoon like this one. I have my pep talk ready. But it won’t be what I really want to say. Here’s what I really want to say: Be a waitress for a week. For one summer during college, I got to see how the world really works at a well-known beach restaurant. Since then, I have over-thanked and over-tipped every server who’s ever put a plate of food in front of me. All I have to hear is, “Hi, I’m ____, and I’ll be taking care of you,” and I picture myself in my snug-fitting red and black uniform, hopeful my customers would be kind to me and always petrified that I’d spill coffee on small children. At the start of every tourist season, Josie, my boss, had only a few days to get the new crop of college girls up to speed on everything from clearing dishes and refilling water glasses to up-selling. Anyone who got in her way was a potential casualty. She dressed in black. She walked/ran at a pace that made me think the place was on fire every time she passed. And then to fully overwhelm me, Josie gave directions in a German accent so Germanic that I could understand only half of her terrifying message. The rest I got from her body language. We were trained to turn the diners’ attention to the wall of windows overlooking the ocean, just in case the food was lacking. The food was always lacking. Most times the Linda DeMers Hummel left the world white sands and surf did the trick. of waitressing to become a teacher, Every once in a while, however, we’d mother, editor and writer. She lives in hear an outburst of indignation from Baltimore, Maryland, and works as a a tourist who really liked food. freelancer. When he didn’t think the fare was up

Linda DeMers Hummel

to his standards, and he couldn’t be distracted by a few breakers or whitecaps, he would say, in a voice that made others turn, “I want to speak to the manager!” The manager was always in a good mood, thanks to his end seat at the bar. He’d be happy to comp the meals of the entire party. And that would be that. My first week as a waitress, a man who was desperately trying to impress his much younger date, called me over with his index finger and said, “I’ll need to speak to the Chef.” Clearly, it was already too late to extend my arm to the windows and remark on the majestic Atlantic Ocean. I suggested the manager. “Absolutely not,” the man answered, with a deliberate side glance to his date. “Get the Chef out here!” The reason no one ever saw “the Chef” was that “the Chef” was a series of nerdy college boys, who were spending their summer in a 100-degree kitchen, tossing frozen shrimp into the deep fryer. They used ice cream scoops to fling the coleslaw on the plates. With what would become my signature sad face, I looked at the ground as if overcome by emotion and said quietly, “I’m so sorry but the Chef just had a death in his family and had to leave immediately. The kitchen is doing its best.” I got so good at it that I considered a career in sales. There were nights, close to closing, when I was so tired I wanted to cry, and then a table of 12 might come in and be seated in my section. And they’d all be drunk. I would be falling asleep in bed at midnight and still hear the unending loop going around and around, “Are you sure this is decaf?” or “Were these shrimp caught today?” I had to be my own detective once when a couple skipped out on the bill and had completely changed clothes before I tracked them down in the parking lot. I figured out how to make tables of potential tippers appreciate the wonders of the sea while not noticing that their salads were droopy. I learned how to stay on Josie’s good side, and to say “I’m sorry” when I strayed to her dark place. I learned the customer is always right. The young editor is slowly gaining back some composure. “How would you feel if I just took the rest of the day off to regroup?” she asks. Part of me thinks I should let her go home early. But our company’s equivalent of the dinner rush is just starting, so I tell her, “No.” I want her to learn to collect herself after she’s dropped a tray of drinks. And I want her to know how great it feels not to spill the coffee.

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Voice

We Wait, Watch, and Hope by Janey Womeldorf

If they build it, they will come, and we will lose our garden. Eight years ago, my husband and I chose to simplify our lives. We owned a three-bedroom, two-bath, 2400 square-foot house and maintaining it had become exhausting. When you own an aging home, there is always something – a leaky faucet, a dryer not drying, roof shingles damaged by the recent storm. The ongoing time, energy and money required to investigate each problem, shop for a solution, fix the issue, or call in a repairman was sucking the fun right out of us. We wanted our weekends back, and something had to change. One year later, we sold our house along with all that stuff and clutter that had bulged from its cabinets and closets. With lighter shoulders, less stress and less baggage in every sense of the word, we happily joined the league of renters. A twobedroom apartment in a rental complex with a gym, pool and on-site maintenance took the place of our mortgage and backyard. One morning, I awoke to find water all over the kitchen floor. I had no idea if it was leaking from the fridge or the dishwasher and immediately called the office in panic. Within 30 minutes, a friendly maintenance man knocked at my door and within 45 minutes, the problem was fixed. It was so easy I could have cried. No flipping through the Yellow Pages; no waiting in all day for someone to show up and, ecstatically, no earth-shattering bill. As we say in England, I was “gobsmacked” (a.k.a. speechless.). We needed no more convincing and have rented ever since. People think the biggest downside about apartment living is noisy neighbors. I disagree; no home – rented or owned – comes with a 100% guarantee of respectful, quiet neighbors. Admittedly, we consciously chose to live in an apartment with nobody above us but noisy neighbors are a gamble wherever you live. The biggest downside to me is no garden. Nothing beats having Mother Nature at your back door, relaxing in your own garden, or being able to grow your own produce. In our last house, I turned one corner of our back yard into a longwished-for vegetable patch. With novice enthusiasm, new gardening gloves, a plastic ruler and five varieties of lettuce seeds, I headed out one morning, packets in hand. I spent the next few hours methodically measuring and spacing my seeds six inches apart in neatly lined rows. As I stood up to admire my handiwork, I tripped and instinctively threw my arms up in the air sending hundreds of the remaining lettuce seeds flying everywhere. A disbelieving shriek of “I can’t believe that!” was heard around the world followed by the sound of my own laughter. One month later, a cacophony of green budded from my garden. Two months later, an unexpected freeze hit; three months later, the bugs arrived, and four months later, I picked the wilting survivors. After sorting and washing their delicate leaves, I tossed what was salvageable into a large bowl. Two hours and one dinner later, my first attempt at gardening was gone – I had eaten the entire lot in one sitting. Undeterred, I attempted a herb garden the following year with similar

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success before resolving to stick with the only plant I knew I could grow – basil. I am a self-confessed “pastaholic” and no self-respecting pasta dish is complete without fresh basil. My (basil) garden thrived which meant so did I. Nowadays, my garden is a balcony on the fourth floor. I miss not being able to walk out into our own plot of nature but thankfully, two saving graces have made not having a garden do-able. Saving grace number one: My balcony offers a sunny but protected spot, and I can still grow basil – albeit in a pot. Saving grace number two: The view. Look left and the lights of a popular tourist area and theme park dazzle the eye. The first night we stepped out, we screamed when we realized we could see the park’s nightly fireworks show from our balcony. To the right stands an attractive-to-the-eye, immaculately-landscaped, beautiful hotel complex. The grand prize and saving grace, however, is the view directly ahead: Unspoiled, undeveloped fields stretch as far as the eye can see; it is Mother Nature at her finest. Cows stroll and graze the pastures, trees line the horizon, and nothing nurtures, relaxes or calms like it. It is my garden. I fear my garden’s days are numbered. Two months ago, I noticed tractors mowing the fields. In the beginning, this activity made for interesting watching and humorous “missed-a-spot” commentary from our lofty vantage point. Over the course of the next month, the tractors expanded their mow, turning what once was a natural area of grass and shrubbery into a neatly-plowed expanse of green. Two weeks ago, we strolled onto our balcony for our evening calm and fireworks show and were crushed to witness newly-erected, black-sheet fencing partitioning the fields. This, my husband explained, is to prevent the grass and dirt from drifting into the roads once they start digging – a sure sign that someone plans to build. Survey crews are active and the tractor’s canvasses of green are spreading. Worse than the fact that construction is imminent; is that we have no idea what. Its unknown fate is making us nervous. (Watch this essay’s comments on the Sasee website for the future outcome.) I’m hoping for an 18-hole, lake-dotted, beautifully-manicured golf course; I probably have more chance of winning the lottery. The reality is my husband and I live in a growing area which means there is an ongoing demand for more houses and apartments. If they build it, they will come, and I will lose my garden. I fear unwanted grey will replace my cherished green, and I will be crushed. All we can do is Janey Womeldorf is a freelance writer who wait, watch, eat pasta, and hope. drinks too much coffee, loves elastic and At least I still have my can no longer wear high heels. She scribbalcony – and my basil. bles away in Orlando, Florida.

Janey Womeldorf


Really.

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Some of today’s best-looking yards come from a jar.

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The latest trend in eco-friendly landscapes and hardscapes is the incorporation of recycled glass. Yes, glass! Crushed, graded and tumbled to remove sharp, jagged edges, glass is superior to mulch in plant beds and pots and stunning for lining walkways and securing pavers. This inventive material benefits outdoor spaces by filtering water and slowing evaporation, controlling weeds, increasing aeration, and maintaining soil temperature. Consider using crushed glass in your outdoor spaces. It’s just one more way you can make a difference for our environment.

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51142-TOH Sassee_Layout 1 1/16/14 2:10 PM Page 1

Named One of the Top 10 Public Gardens in the country by TripAdvisor®

The Art Museum’s

A N ATION AL HIS TO RI C L ANDMARK

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From beautiful gardens filled with sculpture and the only accredited zoo on the coast of the Carolinas, to boat rides, a butterfly house, and an Enchanted Storybook Forest, there is always something new and exciting at Brookgreen.

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a benefit for YOUR PURCHASES MAKE A DIFFERENCE. All of your purchases help support Brookgreen Gardens, a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve and display American sculpture and regional plants, animals, and history.

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Advertiser Index Affordables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

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Barbara’s Fine Gifts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

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Harvest Commons on Commerce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

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Eleanor Pitts Fine Gifts & Jewelry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Homespun Crafters Mall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

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The Horry County Solid Waste Authority. . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Brookgreen Gardens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Croissants Bistro & Bakery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Gallery of Oriental Rugs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

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Burroughs & Chapin Art Museum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Cuckoo’s Nest Home Consignments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Georgetown Hospital System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Kingston Village Dentistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

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Mad Hatter and Company, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

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Ultra Tan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

McLeod Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

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Swamp Fox Art Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Miller-Motte Myrtle Beach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Sea Island Trading Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

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Millie’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Seven Seas Seafood Market. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Tara Grinna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

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Shades & Draperies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Taylor’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Palmetto Ace Home Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Shop & Dine the Avenues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Taz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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The Constant Wife, Swamp Fox Players, Strand Theater, Georgetown. For times and ticket info, call 843-527-2924 or visit www.swampfoxplayers.com.

The Art Museum’s 14th Annual Spring Home Tour, 10 am-4 pm, $40 in advance and $45 the day of the tour, a buffet luncheon at Dunes Golf and Beach Club is available, tickets for the luncheon are $17. For more info, call 843-238-2510 or visit www.myrtlebeachartmusuem.org.

“Diggin’ It” Spring Garden Festival, Brookgreen Gardens, events throughout the day, free with garden admission. For more info, visit www.brookgreen.org or call 843-235-6000.

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Promenade Concert at First Presbyterian Church, Myrtle Beach, “Broadway Showstoppers! and The Grasshopper Opera,” 1 pm. For more info, call 843-448-4496 or visit www.myrtlebeachpresbyterianchurch.org.

26th Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Festival, 9 am-4 pm, Main St. North Myrtle Beach. Parade starts at 9 am, 843280-5570 or visit www.nmbevents.com.

Susan Graham with Bradley Moore, piano, 7:30 pm, First Presbyterian Church, Myrtle Beach. For more info, call 843-448-4496 or visit www.myrtlebeachpresbyterianchurch.org.

2nd Annual Mardi Gras Parade and Party at the Maritime Museum, 6 pm, Front Street, Georgetown, $20 ticket to party includes lot of delicious food and drink. For more info, call 843-446-4777 or email djsummey@gmail.com.

“Tea & Symphony” benefitting Long Bay Youth Orchestra, 1:30-4 pm, Art Museum of Myrtle Beach, $35 per person. For tickets or more info, call 843-448-8379.

67th Annual Prince George Plantation Tours, Georgetown County, 9:30 am-5 pm. $40 each day or $70 both days. Advance tickets by mail only, 843-545-8291 or www.pgwinyah.com.

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Coffee With the Authors, Michele Verhoosky, discusses Molly Marie and the Amazing Jimmy, 10-11 am, Sunset River Marketplace, 10283 Beach Drive (NC 179), Calabash, N.C. For reservations or more info, call 910-575-5999 or visit www.sunsetrivermarketplace.com.

Moveable Feast, Kathryn Wall discusses St. John’s Folly, 11 am, Kimbel’s Wachesaw, $25. For more info, call 843-235-9600 or visit www.classatpawleys.com.

Trains, Planes and Automobiles, fundraiser for the Pretty in Pink Foundation, 10 am-5 pm, Myrtle Beach Mall. Southeastern Modelers Club will have displays, flight simulators, trains, car racing and more! For more info, call 843-293-4386.


843.448.8379 www.LONGBAYSYMPHONY.com

CALL NOW! SEATS STILL AVAILABLE

MOTOWN MEMORIES SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2014 7:30 PM THE MUSIC & ARTS CENTER AT MYRTLE BEACH HIGH SCHOOL “Get Ready” to feel the groove with the cool sounds of Motown presented by the Long Bay Symphony Pops Orchestra. Relive the magic of the timeless, soulful sounds of the Temptations, the Supremes, the Four Tops and more, with theatrical panache and inspired arrangements.

Be sure to check out the current issue of the

eBook

www.facebook.com/saseemag

Spring is the time to enjoy the outdoors. Call Mister Sparky today for a Free Estimate for Landscape Lighting your yard.

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Dr. Amit Pande Cardiology

Dr. Nathan Almeida Cardiology

Dr. Rajesh Malik Electrophysiology

Dr. Gavin Leask Cardiology

As part of McLeod Health,

local heart care is stronger than ever. Serving North Myrtle Beach and Surrounding Areas For the most comprehensive and sophisticated cardiac care in your region, turn to the local physicians of Pee Dee Cardiology. Part of McLeod Physician Associates, our physicians provide more than 25 years of experience diagnosing and treating heart conditions with expertise and compassion. And Pee Dee Cardiology has now expanded its expert cardiac services at McLeod Seacoast to include electrophysiology care. As a Board Certified Electrophysiologist, Dr. Malik offers the rare speciality in evaluating abnormalities of heart rhythms and keeping this vital organ’s electrical circuitry functioning. McLeod Health, your region’s largest healthcare team, provides patients with access to top-ranked and nationally-recognized physicians and surgeons, plus leading edge technology for the highest quality and most innovative treatments. Put your heart in the most capable and expert hands...McLeod.

McLeod Heart & Vascular Institute McLeodHeart.org

pee dee cardiology

For appointments call 800-299-5689 3485 Mitchell St., Loris, SC 29569 | 3980 Highway 9 E, Suite 220, Little River, SC 29566 51436-SeacoastHeartDoctors 9x10.125.indd 1

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Sasee March 2014  

“The Good Earth” Volume 13, Issue 3

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