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SUMMER 2017

The Magazine of St. Paul Academy and Summit School

Life in the Lower School


Scott Streble

>> LETTER FROM THE HEAD

EVERY YEAR

I receive a very special invitation from the Lower School: a request to join our Kindergarteners for storytime. Reading to our youngest students is always a delight, but I usually enjoy what comes after the story even more: our Kindergarten teachers ask their students if any of them have any questions for me. Inevitably, at least a dozen small hands shoot into the air and I am subjected to a robust examination across a dizzying array of topics. What is my favorite color? How many bedrooms do I have in my house? Have I ever seen the lion at the Como Zoo? Do I like ice cream? How old am I? As every parent knows, young children are naturally inquisitive and curious about the world around them. The genius of SPA’s Lower School has always been its ability to harness, shape, and encourage that curiosity within an academic environment that values warmth, kindness, and above all, a genuine love for children. Generations of SPA students have skipped through the bright, art-covered hallways of the Goodrich campus, shepherded to class or an assembly by teachers who know and care deeply for them, with the confidence that comes from being truly valued as part of a community. This sense of community is integral to the Lower School, and it has not changed over many decades. But much about the Lower School has changed in recent years, as you’ll read in this issue of SPA Magazine. As our cover story notes, visitors to the Goodrich campus will see some of the more visible changes: new physical spaces like our Makerspace for design and engineering projects; new technology and devices incorporated into classrooms and

curricula; the most diverse student population in the school’s history; and new people, including Principal Holly Fidler, who joined us as the leader of the Lower School in the fall of 2014. But there are other changes that are not visible to the eye, and these are some of the most important elements of the Lower School’s evolution over the years. After a year of study and conversation, a new K-5 math curriculum was adopted in 2014 and has proved enormously successful; Holly and her faculty are now giving that same careful thought to school’s literacy curriculum. Science has been transformed under the leadership of the Lower School science faculty, and the integration of technology and computer science into the curriculum has broadened and deepened students’ study of all disciplines at every level. It is an enormously exciting time at the Lower School. Much of that excitement reflects the changes we’ve implemented as a result of new and evolving understandings around how children learn best. But the fundamental energy and joy of the Goodrich campus remain the same. Even in the midst of rapid change brought about by powerful social, cultural, and technological forces, the Lower School stays true to its mission: introducing children to the joys of learning while surrounded by warmth and care.

Bryn S. Roberts, Head of School


2016-2017 BOARD OF TRUSTEES OFFICERS Timothy A. Welsh, President

Contents

The Magazine of St. Paul Academy and Summit School

Summer 2017

Mrunalini Parvataneni, Secretary Scot W. Malloy, Treasurer MEMBERS Mark W. Addicks William M. Beadie ’58 John W. Cosgriff ’93 Litton E.S. Field, Jr. ’75

Features 2 Letter from the Head 20 Celebrating The Class of 2017

Anne Larsen Hooley Frederick C. Kaemmer ’88 David W. Kansas ’85 Allan Klein ’64 David Kristal Amanda Kay Liu Tim O’Brien ’77 Thomas H. Patterson ’57 The Honorable Wilhelmina M. Wright

Let’s be friends. Follow us at facebook.com.

Commencement and college choices for the Class of 2017.

Elizabeth Driscoll Hlavka

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On the cover

Life in the Lower School

A new generation of teachers, tools, and topics hasn’t changed the fundamental elements of SPA’s Lower School: a warm and caring community dedicated to the academic, social, and emotional growth of our youngest Spartans.

34 Lifers Remember the Lower School

Three “lifers” in the Class of 2017— Barbara Bathke, Jack Geller, and Kathryn Schmechel—reminisce about their years in the Lower School as they prepare for life after SPA.

COVER STORY, PAGE 24

Departments 4 Through the Doors 12 Spartan Sports 38 Alumni/ae News 40 Philanthropy 44 Class Notes 48 In Memoriam

On the cover: In a rite of passage for all Grade 5 students, Henri P. takes the stage to emcee a Lower School assembly. Photo by Scott Streble

Head of School >> Bryn S. Roberts Editor >> Ami Berger

St. Paul Academy and Summit School 1712 Randolph Avenue St. Paul, MN 55105 651-698-2451 (main line) info@spa.edu www.spa.edu

Contributing Writers >> Laura Billings Coleman, Alex Loveland Principal Photographer >> Scott Streble Contributing Photographers >> Ami Berger, David Ellis, Greg Helgeson, Alex Loveland, Tom Lundholm, Chuck Nields, John Severson, Beth Seibel-Hunt Design and Layout >> Kimberlea Weeks, Sexton Printing

Follow us on twitter.com/ StPaulAcademySS

SPA Magazine is published twice annually by St. Paul Academy and Summit School for alumni/ae, parents, and friends of the school. We welcome your comments and thoughts. Please contact us at spamag@spa.edu with suggestions for stories, news, and photos, or write us at SPA Magazine, 1712 Randolph Avenue, St. Paul, MN, 55105.

See what we are doing at youtube.com/user/ StPaulAcademy

Check out our photo galleries at stpaulacademy. smugmug.com

Read SPA Magazine online at spa.edu/ SPA_Magazine


>> THROUGH THE DOORS

Demolition of the east wing began on June 7 (left), with Hugh Schilling ’43 on hand to begin the process (right).

On Wednesday, June 7, 2017, construction of the Hugh K. Schilling Math and Science Center officially began with the demolition of the Randolph campus’s east wing. Hugh Schilling ’43, whose $15 million gift is making the new facility possible, took the controls of a bulldozer to kick off the demolition. The Hugh K. Schilling Math and Science Center will encompass nearly 40,000 square feet of instructional space for Upper School science, math, engineering, and computer science. Designed by HGA Architects and Engineers, which also built the award-winning Huss Center for the Performing Arts, the Schilling Center will be built along Davern Street and connected to Old Main through a two-story glass passageway. The building will open in the fall of 2018.

Scott Streble

Alex Loveland

Schilling Center Construction Gets Underway

and work spaces to make it as comfortable as possible for everyone.” Hughes notes that members of the Facilities team met individually with each teacher to ensure they understood how to set up their classrooms. Both teachers and students settled quickly into the new classrooms. “I appreciate such nice temporary teaching space,” says Chinese teacher Tian Wang. “So far, both my students and I have enjoyed working in my new classroom.” History teacher and Senior Speech advisor Aaron Shulow also appreciated the work that went into the temp building. “The entire Facilities staff did a remarkable job in helping us quickly make the new space our own with their attentiveness, expertise, and seemingly indefatigable patience with any number of various requests,” Shulow says.

Upper School Principal Chris Hughes worked closely with the twelve faculty who relocated, the construction team, and the SPA facilities staff on the features of the temp building. “It was important that we had adequate space for the Harkness tables because we needed to maintain that signal element of our program,” Hughes says. “We also wanted to ensure that the teachers would have their own classrooms

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Alex Loveland

Planning for the construction has been underway for the last year, with particular focus on keeping disruption to students and teachers to a minimum. Since the east wing housed most of the Upper School’s World Language and History classes, a temporary classroom building was constructed on the Randolph campus’s southwest side. The “temp building” opened in March 2017 with twelve classrooms, each outfitted with a Harkness table, a whiteboard, a built-in ceiling projector, wall-to-wall carpeting, bookshelves, and teacher work space.

US History teacher Ben Bollinger-Danielson in his new classroom in the temporary building.


Speaker Day 2017 Focuses on Sustainability, Environmentalism Alex Loveland

Upper School Choirs Perform at Carnegie Hall

John Severson

Professor Sarah Hobbie

Over Presidents Day weekend, members of SPA’s choirs and Community Chorale traveled to New York City to perform at Carnegie Hall. This was the fourth time since 2005 that SPA has been invited to perform at Carnegie, under the direction of Anne Klus. The Academy Chorale, Summit Singers, and Community Chorale (which includes SPA faculty, staff, alumni/ ae, parents, and grandparents) performed Randall Thompson’s Frostiana: Seven Country Songs, a piece comprised of seven poems by Robert Frost for combined chorus and piano. Thompson’s composition is relatively unique in that men and women sing together in only three of the seven movements, with the other four movements scored exclusively for male or female voices. Besides the rehearsals and performance at Carnegie, the 100+ participants spent the long weekend sightseeing in New York and attending a performance of the smash-hit Hamilton.

Correction: Winter 2017 In the Winter 2017 issue of SPA Magazine, Penumbra Theatre was mistakenly referred to as located in Minneapolis. Penumbra is located in St. Paul and is an active member of St. Paul’s Selby/Dale community. We apologize for the error.

In April 2017, all Upper School students participated in Speaker Day 2017, organized by the Upper School Council (USC). Speaker Day is a day-long program of keynote addresses and small-group sessions featuring dozens of guest speakers, organized around a central theme. This year’s theme focused on sustainability and the environment. The day opened with a morning keynote address by Eric Olson ’82, who graduated from Macalester and became a Rhodes Scholar after leaving SPA. Olson leads the global consulting practice for Business for Social Responsibility, a company that designs and implements sustainability strategies for organizations around the world. Students then attended two morning breakout sessions, chosen earlier in the winter from a total of twenty-eight separate sessions. The twenty-eight sessions were led by experts from around the Twin Cities, including Betsy Daub, Science and Conservation Program Director at the Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness; Professor Sarah Hobbie (pictured above), who leads a research lab on ecosystem ecology in the College of Biological Sciences at the University of Minnesota; Barbara Naramore, Assistant Commissioner for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; Dr. Uma Valeti, the CEO and founder of Memphis Meats, a company developing a way to produce meat from animal cells; Scott Strand, the Executive Director of the MN Center for Environmental Advocacy; and Elizabeth Dunbar, who covers environmental issues for Minnesota Public Radio. In the afternoon, students volunteered at various organizations and locations across the metro, including the Audubon Society, the Friends of the Mississippi River, Friends of the Boundary Waters, Como Zoo, and Urban Roots Park.

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>> THROUGH THE DOORS

SPA Bids Farewell

Bill Ross

Alex Loveland

Mary Kay Orman

Affinity group for students of color collaborates with Penumbra Theater

Penumbra’s H. Adam Harris (center) with the members of Common Ground. Anne Marie Shimkus

Kate Yenni

This spring, SPA will bid farewell to four faculty members. Between them, Mary Kay Orman (MS Drama), Bill Ross (M/US Physical Education), Anne Marie Shimkus (US Math), and Kate Yenni (LS Reading Specialist), have 112 years of service to the school. The four were celebrated at divisional retirement parties and the annual end-of-year gathering for faculty and staff.

For the fourth year, Common Ground, SPA’s students of color affinity group, collaborated with the Penumbra Theatre Company to engage the SPA community in conversations about race and diversity. This year’s project was a collaboration between Common Ground, the Intercultural Club, and the Muslim Student Alliance. The students worked with H. Adam Harris, the Associate Director of Program at Penumbra Theatre Company, to present an assembly that examined the nature of community. In shaping the assembly and discussion, the panel of students shared results from a community survey which highlighted people and places identified as important to the SPA community, as well as some common “myths” about SPA. Students were also challenged to think about what changes they would make to SPA and how they, individually and collectively, can continue to cultivate a vibrant and welcoming community for all.

Science Olympiad Team Places First in Minnesota Among Small Schools at State Competition On Saturday, March 4, SPA’s Upper School Science Olympiad team had its best showing ever at the Minnesota State Science Olympiad Competition, held at Bethel University in St. Paul. The Spartan team placed first in the “Small School” category, beating rival Blake and all other small schools, and eleventh overall. In addition to the team’s success, three SPA pairs medaled in individual events (medals indicate finish across schools of all sizes): Ben Konstan ’18 and Terry Cheney ’18 won third place in the Experimental Design event; Sammy Ries ’19 and Adnan Askari ’18 won fourth place in the Invasive Species event; and Libby Woodson ’18 and Larry Chen ’18 won fourth place in the Wind Power event. The Science Olympiad is a national science-knowledge competition in which teams are tested in twenty scientific categories. The SPA team is coached by US science faculty Beth Seibel-Hunt and Ned Heckman. “The top teams are usually big schools that do Science Olympiad as a course for credit,” says Heckman, “so it is a real accomplishment for our students to have won the championship for small schools and placed so high overall.”

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Championship seasons for Middle and Upper School Math teams

Dan O’Loughlin

The Upper School team had a strong regular season, qualifying for the State tournament after a second-place finish in their division. At State, the team finished first in the smaller-school division and seventh overall among schools of all sizes. The team members who represented SPA at State—Shefali Bijwadia ’17, Ben Konstan ’18, Jeffrey Huang ’19, Michaela Polley ’19, Jonathan Pomerantz ’19, Tommy Allen ’20, Richard Chang ’20, and Allen Wang ’20—had very

Courtesy of Mathcounts

Continuing a long tradition of excellence at local, regional, and state math competitions, SPA’s Middle and Upper School math teams placed first in their State tournaments.

The MS math team: Coach Jenny Borovsky, Rafael Barocas, Alex Moore, Alek Radsan, and Jack Hlavka.

strong performances individually and worked together very efficiently in the team event, according to advisor Bill Boulger.

The US math team: (standing) Ayla Straub, Sophie Jaro, Michaela Polley, Shefali Bijwadia, Kayla Edmundson, Ellie Brass, Matt Pauly, Richard Chang, Justin Hla, Nathan Sobotka, Sameer Bijwadia, Ben Konstan, and Jeffrey Huang; (seated) Sam Hanson, Jonathan Pomerantz, Allen Wang.

The Middle School team dominated in competition during the 2016-17 season, winning its division for the sixth year in a row and qualifying for the State Mathcounts tournament for the fourth year in a row. The team—Rafael Barocas ’21, Jack Hlavka ’22, Alex Moore ’22, and Alek Radsan ’21—then finished first at the Minnesota State Mathcounts competition. In addition to the team result, Jack Hlavka took third place in the individual competition and qualified for Minnesota’s national team, which competed in Orlando, Fla., in May 2017.

Eiffel Tower Wedding Party Takes Top Prize at Minnesota State One-Act Festival John Severson

On Friday, February 10, SPA competed in the Minnesota State High School League One-Act Festival and received a “Starred Performance” award for their production of Jean Cocteau’s Eiffel Tower Wedding Party. The Spartan’s one-act was one of four productions to earn “Starred Performance,” the highest honor a show can receive at the state festival and an honor SPA has not achieved since 2013. The cast and crew of Eiffel Tower Wedding Party included seniors Phoebe Pannier, Soph Lundberg; juniors Noa Carlson, Maya Shrestha, Jonah Harrison, Drew Fawcett, Sylvie Schifsky, Dorienne Hoven, Tucker Waltenbaugh, and Sabrina Rucker; sophomores Ben Atmore, Gemma Yoo, Elise Parsons, Max Moen, Nora Povejsil, Olivia McCauley, and Zoe Hermer-Cisek; freshmen Lilly Ramalingam, Sonja Henze, and Evan Barnes; and, was directed by Upper School English teacher Eric Severson. The Spartans advanced to State this year after winning two unanimous first-place finishes at the Sub-Sectional competition and the final Section 4 competition.

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>> THROUGH THE DOORS

Advanced Science Research Students Earn Spots at State and National Science Competitions Eight SPA students competed in the Twin Cities Regional Science Fair (TCSF) science research paper and project competition, held in February 2017 at the University of Minnesota. The students were members of the Upper School’s Advanced Science Research seminar, in which advanced science students pursue an independent scientific research project of their own choosing and design. This is the first year that participation in the TCSF competition is a requirement of the seminar. The eight students who submitted posters and projects won a total of twenty awards and honors for their research from almost a dozen different honor societies or competitions. Six of the eight students moved on to the next level of competition, which includes the International Sustainable World Project Olympiad (ISWEEP), the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), the Stockholm Junior Water Prize competition (SJWP), and the Minnesota State Science and Engineering Fair (MSSEF). “I’m incredibly proud of these students, who are doing original research in scientific areas they are passionate about,” says Beth Seibel-Hunt, who teaches the Advanced Science Research seminar. “For them to be acknowledged for this hard work is a direct result of the critical thinking and leading-edge work that we strive for in the Advanced Science Research seminar as the capstone project for science at SPA.”

THE EIGHT STUDENTS AND THEIR PROJECTS ARE: Iya Abdulkarim ’18: “Applying the Novel Object Recognition Test in Danio Rerio: An Observational Study” Emma Hills ’18: “Urbanization’s Effects on Bird Migration” Diane Huang ’17: “Evaluating Roof Runoff Contaminants by Age in St. Paul, Minnesota” Jack Indritz ’17: “Leachate Metals and Organic Compounds in Roof Runoff by Shingle Age”

Emilia Topp-Johnson ’18

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Diane Huang ’17

Mari Knudson ’17: “Improved Phytoremediation Of Copper Through The Use Of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria In Brassica Juncea” Ben Mellin ’17: “The Synthesis, Characterization and Flexural Strength Assessment of a Block Copolymer” Emilia Topp-Johnson ’18: “Terraformation and Cultivation Investigating Strategies to Establish Martian Agriculture” Henry Zietlow ’18: “The Effects of Ammonia on the Burrowing Habits of L. Cardium, a laboratory study” In addition to these eight, three students conducting high-level reseach with Seibel-Hunt were unable to compete due to the timing of their research. They included: Sara Bohjanen ’17: “Chitin and Pathogenesis in Cryptococcus Neoformans” Ian Scott ’17: “Synthesis of Nanoparticles on the Plasma Liquid Interface” Sarah Wheaton ’17: “Intrinsic Bias and Gender Stereotyping Using Eyetracking Software”

Mari Knudson ’17

Photos by Beth Seibel-Hunt

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Henry Zietlow ’18 and Iya Abdukarim ’18


Courtesy of Straub Family

Middle School Student Films Selected for Two National Youth Film Festivals Eight Middle School student filmmakers earned state and national recognition for two short films created this year. Kurdis & His Magnificent Yak, created by seventh-graders Adri Arquin, Per Johnson, Sam Zelazo, and Milo Zelle, was selected for the San Luis Obispo International Film festival. The Westing Game, created by seventh-graders Emily Gisser, Insley Graupman, Ellie Murphy, and Ellie Sandeen, will be featured at author James Kennedy’s popular film festival in Minneapolis. Both groups of students created their films with the help of Bobak Razavi, Middle School Social Studies teacher. Kurdis was produced during Razavi’s summer “Film and Frolic” workshop; and Westing Game was produced as part of a five-week Middle School mini-course during the fall of 2016.

Ayla Straub ’20 Wins 2017 Minnesota Chinese Speech Contest In April 2017, Ayla Straub ’20 was named the winner of the 2017 Minnesota Chinese Bridge Speech Contest, held at the University of Minnesota. Ayla earned first place in Level 4 for Overall Individual Performance, as well as Best Talent Performance for her traditional Chinese Crosstalk Story. Level 4 is the highest level in which a non-native speaker of Chinese can compete. The Chinese Bridge Speech Contest began in 2007 to provide a stage for Chinese-language students to present their achievements in language and cultural proficiency. As the Minnesota champion, Ayla advanced to the Midwest contest as the Minnesota representative.

The Rubicon Wins Multiple State and National Awards for Print and Digital Editions In early May 2017, the staff of RubicOnline, the digital version of student newspaper The Rubicon, earned six Gold Circle Awards from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association for digital media work published in 2015-16. The competition, an affiliate of the Columbia University School of Journalism, attracted 4,166 entries produced by students at colleges, universities, and secondary schools throughout the United States. Overall, SPA earned more Gold Circle awards than any other Minnesota school, as well as more awards for Editorials than any school in the country. Two Gold Circle awards were awarded to the RubicOnline staff, three were awarded to Sophie Jaro ’17, and one was awarded to Riley Wheaton ’16. The Gold Circle award announcement followed the March announcement of the Rubicon’s 2017 Pacemaker Award. SPA was one of 17 schools in the nation to receive an Online Pacemaker for web and multimedia reporting. The Pacemaker is a program of the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) and is known as “the Pulitzer Prize” of student journalism.

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>> THROUGH THE DOORS

Two National Medalists are Among 29 SPA Students to Win 2017 Minnesota Scholastic Art Awards

Leah Hughes ’17

Lillian Pettigrew ’18

Leah Hughes ’17 and Lillian Pettigrew ’18 were named National Medalists for their artistic work in the 2017 Scholastic Art Awards (SAA), a program of the Alliance for Young Artists and Writers based in New York City. Leah’s painting, “Fragile Dreams,” was awarded a Silver Medal and Lillian’s painting, “Mira,” was awarded a Gold Medal in the national competition. Their works were selected from an original pool of over 330,000 works of art submitted by high school students from around the country. National Medalists represent less than 1% of submissions to the SAA program. Leah and Lillian are two of the 29 SPA students who earned recognition at the state level of the competition. This year’s Minnesota Scholastic Art Awards recognized 49 pieces or portfolios by 29 SPA students. The pieces were chosen from over 4,500 individual and approximately 400 portfolio entries entered into the contest by students from across Minnesota. This year’s MSAA winners are The MSAA winners are: Meley Akpa ’17; Anthony Dierssen-Morice ’17; Ethan Dincer ’19; Maya Edstrom ’17; Isle Graupman ’22; Jasper Green ’19; Zoe Hermer-Cisek ’19; Michael Hooley ’18; Diane Huang ’17; Leah Hughes ’17; Andrew Johnson ’19; Franklin Labovitz ’17; Hana Martinez ’17; Ellie Matticks ’17; Phoebe Pannier ’17; Lillian Pettigrew ’18; Dominic Picciano ’17; Preston Fares ’19; A.M. Roberts ’17; Martha Sanchez ’20; Nina Starchook ’22; Iris ShakerCheck ’19; Martha Slaven ’20; Ashley Su ’20; Clark Waltz ’20; Liam Will ’20; Naomi Wilson ’20; Peter Wilson ’20; and Mira Zelle ’18.

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Hana Martinez ’17

Meley Akpa ’17

Zoe Hermer-Cisek ’19

Martha Slaven ’20 Mira Zelle ’18


Ellie Matticks ’17 Naomi Wilson ’20

Phoebe Pannier ’17

Peter Wilson ’20

Dominic Picciano ’17 Jasper Green ’19 Ethan Dincer ’17 Ashley Su ’20

Michael Hooley ’17

Nina Starchook ’22 Martha Sanchez ’20 Tony Morice ’17 A.M. Roberts ’17

Clark Waltz ’20

Preston Fares ’19

Liam Will ’17

Andrew Johnson ’19

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>> SPARTAN SPORTS | WINTER 2017 SEASON RECAP GIRLS’ HOCKEY

BOYS’ SWIMMING AND DIVING

SEASON HIGHLIGHTS:

SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: The Trojans, a cooperative with Highland Park Senior High School, dominated conference competition again this season, placing first at the St. Paul City meet and winning the Twin Cities Championship for the third year in a row. At Sections, three SPA swimmers broke school records: Noah Rice ’19 in the 50 freestyle, Cesar Gallagher ’19 in the 200 freestyle, and the team of Rice, Gallagher, and Matt Suzuki ’17 in the 200 freestyle relay. Two swimmers qualified for State: Ned Laird-Raylor ’18 in the 100 backstroke and Noah Rice ’19 in the 100 freestyle.

Olivia Williams-Ridge ’18 maneuvers the puck past the Mankato defense in the quarterfinals of the State Tournament

After an impressive 17-6-2 regular season, a #1 seed in Section 4A, and two convincing wins in the section tournament over Henry Sibley (8-1) and Mahtomedi (6-0), St. Paul United earned a spot at the State Tournament for the second year in a row. The team’s run at State included a 10-0 bruising of Mankato East/Loyola in the quarterfinal, a hard-fought victory Warroad (4-2) in the semifinals, and a runner-up finish in the State Championship against Blake in the finals.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Noah Rice ’19 was one of three SPA swimmers who broke school records this season at the Section meet

Lauren Boettcher ’17

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Clare Tipler ’17

ALL-CONFERENCE: Cesar Gallagher ’19, Breandan Gibbons ’18, Ned Laird-Raylor ’18, Aidan Lanz ’20, Noah Rice ’19, Matt Suzuki ’17

BOYS’ HOCKEY SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: Spartan boys’ hockey put up a 21-4 regular season record and earned the #1 seed in Section 4A. The boys opened their postseason with a 4-1 victory over Highland Park in the quarterfinals, and they overcame a late rally by Totino-Grace in the semifinals to win 5-3 and advance to the Section 4A Finals. A tough 3-1 loss in the section championship against a powerhouse Mahotmedi team ended the team’s season.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Andy Beran ’18, Matt Dahlseide ’17, Jack Johnston ’17, and Dev McCabe ’18

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Riley Bowman ’17, Weston Lombard ’17, Noel Parker ’17, and Dom Picciano ’17

REED LARSON TOP DEFENSEMAN AWARD FINALIST: Noel Parker ’17

SECOND TEAM ALL METRO Dev McCabe ’18

Head Coach Matt Funk outlines a play during a break in the Spartans’ matchup against Minnehaha Academy

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FENCING SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: At the State Championship, the boys earned the Overall Men’s Team Championship for the fourth year in a row, and the Spartans also placed first at State in team men’s foil, team men’s saber, and team women’s saber. SPA’s dominance in Minnesota fencing continued this year; both the boys’ and girls’ teams were defending Minnesota state champions and put in strong performances throughout the regular season. Individual top-five finishes at State included:

FIRST PLACE: Colin O’Hern ’17

FIFTH PLACE: Drew O’Hern ’17 The fencing team celebrates its championship performance at the Minnesota State tournament

FIFTH PLACE, WOMEN’S EPEE: Maggie Hlavka ’19

FOURTH PLACE, WOMEN’S SABER: Iris Shaker-Check ’19

NORDIC SKIING SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: The lack of snow did not keep the Spartans from success under new head coach David Miller. In conference competition, the girls’ team finished second and the boys finished third. Peter Moore ’19 and Val Hart ’18 led the IMAC, claiming both first-place finishes in the boys’ and girls’ conference championships. The pair went on to compete at State where Peter finished 24th overall and Val finished 44th.

ALL-STATE: Peter Moore ’19

ALL-CONFERENCE: Val Hart ’18, Peter Moore ’19

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Peter Moore ’19 races through the course at the Nordic State meet

Jasper Green ’19, Tessah Green ’19, Dina Moradian ’18, and Greta Sirek ’18

ALPINE SKIING SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: Alpine skiing had another strong season. The girls’ team finished fourth in the section and sent Bailey Donovan ’18 and Katie Brunell ’17 to State, where they finished 18th and 53rd, respectively. Boys’ alpine finished ninth in Sections and sent John Sorrano ’17 to State, where he finished 72nd.

ALL-STATE: Bailey Donovan ’18

ALL-CONFERENCE: Katie Brunell ’17, Tom Patterson ’18, Julia Scott ’21, and John Soranno ’17

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Claire Hallaway ’19, Web Lehman ’18, Sammy Ries ’19, and Phineas Tait ’21

This year’s Alpine team sent three skiers to State and earned eight skiers conference recognition

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>> SPARTAN SPORTS | WINTER 2017 SEASON RECAP

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: The last three seasons have seen exponential growth for Spartan girls’ basketball. This year the team went 12-13 in the regular season and finished fourth in the conference, a place up from the 2015-16 season. Big wins included nailbiter victories over Minneapolis Edison, Breck, and Mounds Park Academy.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Izzy Denny ’18

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Emily Carter ’18, Erin McNamer ’18

BOYS’ BASKETBALL SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: Annie Kristal ’19 puts up a shot in the girls’ contest against the Minnehaha Redhawks

GYMNASTICS SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: SPA paired with Cretin-Derham Hall to form a new gymnastics co-op with one gymnast from SPA and two gymnasts from CDH. The team competed in ten meets throughout the year and grew their skill level, showing the most improvement on uneven bars and floor. The team anticipates growing the program in the coming years.

It was a rebuilding season for boys’ hoops after graduating a strong senior class the year before. The team finished 10-16 in the regular season, with a 5-1 streak in February that included big wins over Mounds Park, Blake, and Minneapolis Edison. The Spartans were seeded #9 in section 4AA in the postseason but lost to St. Croix Prep.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Tommy Dicke ’17

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Gus Grunau ’18

Mackenzie Kuller ’17 (center) and two gymnasts from around the metro and learned more about the sport with each contest

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Tommy Dicke ’17 pushes past a Minnehaha defender

DANCE SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: The SPA dance team joined forces with Minnehaha Academy to form a new cooperative team this year. With their new teammates from across the river, the girls participated in five competitions around the metro and learned about the sport with each contest.

Two Minnehaha dancers (pictured far left and third from left) joined forces with (from left) Lucia Granja ’21, Ellie Hoppe ’20, Ilana Baum ’21, Annika Findlay ’20, and Lara Cayci ’21 to form this year’s dance team


ESPN FEATURES PHOTO ESSAY ABOUT SPA BOYS’ HOCKEY 2016-17 SEASON A photo essay capturing the boys’ hockey team’s 2016-17 season was featured on ESPN’s website in spring of 2017. The photos, taken by SPA parent and alumnus David Ellis ’83, are a retrospective of the Spartans’ season, from practices and team dinners to postgame meetings with the coaching staff. Ellis is a professional photographer and the father of Andy Ellis ’20. A link to the online feature, entitled “Small school, big-time hockey,” can be found on the ESPN website by searching on “St. Paul Academy.”

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>> SPARTAN SPORTS | SPRING 2017 SEASON RECAP

BOYS’ GOLF SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: Under the leadership of new head coach Chris Pope, boys’ golf finished second in the conference and sent Drew O’Hern ’17 to the State Tournament. Gus Grunau ’18 and Colin O’Hern ’17 missed going to State by one stroke despite outstanding regular season play.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Drew O’Hern ’17 and Gus Grunau ’18

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Colin O’Hern ’17 and Tony Morice ’17

Gus Grunau ’18 (above) and Lily Nestor ’19 tee off during the 2017 golf season

GIRLS’ GOLF SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: Girls’ golf continued to grow as a program this year, developing their long and short game, as well as their consistency. Overall, the Spartans finished fourth in the IMAC, only seven strokes out of the top three.

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION:

BOYS’ TENNIS SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: Following an exceptional 6-2 season, boys’ tennis won the Section 4A Tournament and returned to the State Tournament in the team competition, where they advanced to the State Semifinal round. The team also sent two doubles teams to State in individual competition: Rahul Dev ’18/Ben Konstan ’18 and Duke Nguyen ’18/Jeffrey Huang ’19.

Rahul Dev ’18 leaps for the shot in the Section final match against Holy Angels

ALL-CONFERENCE: Noah Keogh ’17, Duke Nguyen ’18, and Jeffrey Huang ’19

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Rahul Dev ’18, Ben Konstan ’18, and Max Soll ’20

Lily Nestor ’19 and Emilia Hoppe ’18

TRACK AND FIELD SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: The coed track and field team recorded numerous individual and team successes throughout the 2017 season, including more than 100 personal bests. With a strong junior class rising through the ranks, the team looks forward to even more success next year.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Greta Sirek ’18, Lauren Hansen ’17, and Jak Kinsella ’18

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Emma Hills ’18, Sorcha Ashe ’18, Izzy Denny ’18, Tommy Allen ’20, and Robin Bartlett ’18

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Sorcha Ashe ’18 flies over the hurdles


BASEBALL SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: Spartan baseball had its best season in recent years, with an overall record of 13-10. The team competed deep into the postseason, putting together two extra-inning wins over St. Croix Lutheran and New Life Academy.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Emerson Egly ’17, Weston Lombard ’17, and Ryan Kuntz ’18

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Tommy Dicke ’17 and Will Kelly ’17

Kathleen Bishop ’20 (left) prepares to throw as Justine Miller ’17 keeps tabs on the runner

SOFTBALL SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: Softball went 8-11 in the regular season and was seeded #4 in Section play. The Spartans hit their stride in postseason, beating #13 Minneapolis Edison, #3 Minnehaha Academy, and #5 New Life Academy before losing in the Section 4AA Semifinals.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Justine Miller ’17, Sarah Murad ’17, and Clare Tipler ’17 On third base, Raffi Toghramadjian ’17 watches the pitch

ALL-CONFERENCE HONORABLE MENTION: Kathleen Bishop ’20 and Soph Lundberg ’17

GIRLS’ LACROSSE SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: The United cooperative team between SPA and Visitation finished a strong season with a 9-4 record and exciting wins over Bloomington Kennedy, Academy of Holy Angels, and Eagan. The team was seeded #3 in sections and lost a close 15-11 game to #2 East Ridge in the semifinals.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Ella Matticks ’17 and Hayley Hoffmann ’18

Team United (in red) takes the ball up the field against Breck

BOYS’ LACROSSE SEASON HIGHLIGHTS: The Blackhawks boys’ lacrosse team, a cooperative program with Concordia Academy, DeLaSalle, Minnehaha Academy, St. Agnes, and St. Croix Lutheran, went 4-9 this season with big wins over St. Paul, Shattuck-St. Mary, and Robbinsdale Cooper.

ALL-CONFERENCE: Duncan Fleming ’20

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>> SPARTAN SPORTS

FENCING, SWIMMING, HOCKEY, AND SKIING EARN REPEAT TRIPS TO STATE COMPETITIONS Winter sports are a big part of life in “Minne-snow-ta,” and for the last two years the Spartans have more than done their part to keep that legacy alive: in the 2016-17 season, five Spartan winter teams—girls’ hockey, Alpine and Nordic skiing, fencing, and boys’ swimming— all sent athletes to their State competitions for the second year in a row.

Eight members of the Class of 2017 were recruited to continue their athletic careers at the collegiate level. In addition, four members of the Class of 2017 will continue their hockey careers in junior hockey leagues around the country. Lauren Boettcher, hockey, Lake Forest College, IL (Division III) Kate Bond, soccer, Macalester College, MN (Division III)

Over the course of a few weeks in late February and early March 2017, five Alpine and Nordic skiers competed at their State meets, the girls’ United hockey team played for the State Championship, boys’ swimming and diving won the Twin Cities championship and sent two swimmers to State, and the boys’ fencing team won the Team State Championship for the fourth year in a row. It was an exciting time for Spartan sports that felt a bit like déjà vu: a year earlier, the same five teams were gearing up for State competition—in addition to the boys’ hockey team, which played in the State tournament for the first time in program history in March 2016. It’s a testament to the commitment of the student-athletes and the coaches to have such consistent results from year to year, says Director of Athletics Dawn Wickstrum. “Winter is a huge season for us,” says Wickstrum, who notes that it’s not just the more “traditional” winter teams, such as hockey and skiing, that are having success. “The fact that our students have branched out into the lesser-known winter sports like fencing and swimming—and have been so successful—is a great sign for the continued diversity of our athletics program.”

CLUB SPORT REPORT: TRAP SHOOTING AND ULTIMATE FRISBEE Two club sports gave Upper School students the chance to participate in trap shooting and Ultimate Frisbee in spring 2017. The trap shooting club competed as part of the Minnesota State High School Clay Target League, and the Ultimate team played local club teams in St. Paul, Minneapolis, and surrounding suburbs.

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CLASS OF 2017 STUDENT-ATHLETES PLAN COLLEGE CAREERS

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Matt Dahlseide, Junior Hockey Lauren Hansen, soccer, University of Richmond, VA (Division I) Jack Johnston, Junior Hockey Soph Lundberg, softball, Middlebury College (Division III) Ella Matticks, lacrosse, Wellesley College, MA (Division III) Colin O’Hern, golf, College of Wooster, OH (Division III) Drew O’Hern, golf, Franklin and Marshall, PA (Division III) Noel Parker, Junior Hockey Dom Picciano, Junior Hockey Emily Thissen, soccer, Haverford College, PA (Division III) Claire Tipler, hockey, Middlebury College, VT (Division III)


SPARTAN FACES IN THE CROWD BOYS’ TENNIS SENDS TEAM, INDIVIDUALS TO STATE TOURNAMENT The Spartan boys’ tennis team capped off an exceptional regular season by qualifying as a team for the State tennis tournament. The team earned its spot at State by winning a hard-fought match 5-2 against Minnehaha Academy in the Section 4A team final on Friday, May 19. “It was truly a team effort,” says head coach Viet Pham, with a sweep of doubles then #4 Singles securing the victory with the fourth and deciding point, before #3 Singles added another notch for good measure. In addition, the doubles teams of Ben Konstan ’18/Rahul Dev ’18 and Jeffrey Huang ’19/Duke Nguyen ’18 both earned spots at the individual State tennis tournament. Both teams powered through the competition in the Section 4A tournament: Huang and Nguyen, who were seeded #1 in the section, beat teams from St. Paul Humboldt, Holy Angels, and Minnehaha Academy to get to the Section finals; while the #3-seeded team of Konstan and Dev posted wins against Holy Angels, Minneapolis Roosevelt, and Red Wing to get to the finals against their teammates. The all-Spartan section final was ultimately won by Huang and Nguyen (6-3, 6-3), sending both teams on to State.

BAILEY DONOVAN ’19: ALPINE SKIING As a sophomore, Bailey Donovan has established herself as a lynchpin for the Spartan Alpine team. She has skied at the varsity level for the Spartans since her eighthgrade year, when she finished third in the conference. For the last two seasons, she has qualified for the State meet, placing 18th overall at this year’s State Championship and earning All-State honors both years. Alpine coach Steve Nickelson is looking forward to what she’ll accomplish with two seasons still to go in her Spartan Alpine career. IZZY DENNY ’18: BASKETBALL Junior forward Izzy Denny led the Spartans in virtually every area this season: points per game (12.4), field goals made/attempted (91/153), and total season points (248). She also grabbed 131 rebounds. Assistant coach Tiffany Reedy says that her stats are only one aspect of her leadership: “Izzy is a true leader in that she is always working to make her teammates better,” Reedy says. “At the most challenging moments, she’s the one who will crack a joke, when her teammates need it the most. She finds joy in every aspect of the game.” LAUREN BOETTCHER ’17: HOCKEY Lauren Boettcher was a critical member of St. Paul United’s first line this season, contributing goals during some of the team’s biggest regular-season games against Rochester/Lourdes, Benilde-St. Margaret’s, and Proctor/ Hermantown. With a season total 15 assists and 22 points, her play at forward helped pave the way for United’s second trip to the State Tournament. MATT DAHLSEIDE ’17: HOCKEY Senior forward and team captain Matt Dahlseide led the Spartans in average points per game with 2.76. He also led the team in total points (69), goals (32), and assists (37), and was named All-Conference for the second year in a row. Matt finishes his 114-game SPA hockey career with 214 career points—putting him third in line behind Spartan hockey greats TJ Gorence ’75 (245 career points) and Tom Vannelli ’73 (225 points). “Matt is a gifted player on offense, and this year he really embraced his leadership role,” says head coach Matt Funk, who also praises Matt’s commitment to his academics: “Matt is as accomplished in the classroom as he is one the ice,” Funk says, noting that Matt maintained the team’s highest GPA over the course of the season.

GRADE 8 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL WINS CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIP The 2016-17 Grade 8 girls’ basketball team won their conference title in February 2017. The girls beat St. Croix Catholic in a 39-29 victory to seal the championship and cap off their strong season. An enthusiastic crowd of family and friends watched the girls play for the championship title, including members of the SPA girls’ varsity basketball team who came to cheer on their young counterparts.

NOAH RICE ’20: SWIMMING Noah had an impressive debut his first year swimming with the Trojans, a cooperative team with swimmers from SPA and Highland Park High School. In the boys’ opening meet, Noah was part of the 850 freestyle relay team that set a new conference record with a time of 8:26.75. He swam strong throughout the regular season and began the postseason with another record-shattering swim: he swam the 50 freestyle in 22.39, winning the race and breaking a school record that had been on the books since 1985. Noah qualified for the State meet in the 100 freestyle, finishing the season in 21st place.

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CLASS OF 2017:

COMMENCEMENT

The 112 members of the Class of 2017 became the school’s newest alumni/ae at SPA’s 117th Commencement on Sunday, June 11, 2017. Highlights of the ceremony were remarks by Senior Class Speakers Soph Lundberg and Henry Ziemer, and Dr. Penny Wheeler, President and CEO of Allina Health, who served as Commencement Speaker.

Commencement Speaker Dr. Penny Wheeler addresses the Class of 2017.

THE DIPLOMA “SHAKE AND TAKE”

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Henry Ziemer (left) and Soph Lundberg were selected by their classmates to be this year’s Senior Class Speakers.


Graduation Photos | Greg Helgeson

2017 BOWL RECIPIENTS

Henry Ziemer received the 2017 Alumni/ae Bowl, which is presented to an individual elected by the faculty from nominations made by the senior class. It is given each year to that member of the class deemed to be most outstanding in many areas of school life.

Diane Huang received the 2017 Faculty Bowl, awarded to that senior who has shown unusual breadth and depth of intellectual interest and outstanding commitment to academic excellence.

Lauren Boettcher received the 2017 Erik Flom Memorial Award, given to that member of the senior class who has demonstrated unusual courage in the race of personal hardship or, in the opinion of his or her peers, has made an exceptionally meaningful contribution to the relief of anguish in other persons either within or outside the school.

Lutalo Jones (left) and Kathryn Schmechel (right) were the recipients of the 2017 Head of School Bowl, awarded to those members of the senior class who have been recognized by their peers and teachers for significant contributions to the school.

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CLASS OF 2017 COLLEGE CHOICES

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Greg Helgeson

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LIFE IN THE

LOWER SCHOOL BY LAURA BILLINGS COLEMAN | PHOTOGRAPHS BY SCOTT STREBLE

A new generation of teachers, tools, and topics hasn’t changed the fundamental elements of SPA’s Lower School: a warm and caring community dedicated to the academic, social, and emotional growth of our youngest Spartans.

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The Sarah Converse auditorium on SPA’s Goodrich campus vibrates with an energetic hum on a Friday morning in April. It’s time for Lower School assembly, a twice-weekly ritual, and the Grade 5 ushers are guiding the younger students to their seats while teachers issue gentle but firm reminders about community behavior. Today’s assembly is generating more buzz than usual: details about the upcoming Lower School Bazaar—the most popular event of the spring—are rumored to be on the agenda.

emblematic of a community where all children are known, and feel part of the fabric of things.” There is teaching and learning happening on all levels, Roberts says, and the leadership of the fifth-graders is especially significant: the younger students watch the older ones modeling the responsibilities they’ll be expected to shoulder themselves; and for the fifth graders, it’s a chance to demonstrate the leadership skills they’ve developed over their Lower School careers and will take with them when they make the leap to Middle School.

Waiting for his cue at the side of the stage, Grade 5 student Henri P. fits a microphone and earpiece over his head, and then strides to center stage to call the assembly to order. Today is his “Emcee Day,” and his job is to lead the proceedings. During this much-anticipated moment in the school’s spotlight, a rite of passage for every SPA fifthgrader, Henri reads a poem of his own choosing, leads the school in the Pledge of Allegiance, invites faculty to share announcements, and then introduces today’s performers: students from Grades 1 and 2 demonstrating the Fjäskern, a Swedish folk dance. A half-hour later, as the assembly adjourns, Henri stands by the doors of the auditorium to accept handshakes and high-fives from the classmates, teachers, and parents who compliment him on a job well done. ‘Thank you very much,” he says to his well-wishers, looking both pleased and relieved.

They don’t leap without a net, says Grade 5 homeroom teacher Kristen Johnson, who describes the emcee process preparation. Each student works with one of the four Grade 5 teachers for about a week and a half before the assemblies for coaching on aspects of effective public speaking. “We spend that preparation time going through the script, choosing and reading their poem, talking about where to stand on stage, how to use a microphone, body language awareness, projecting confidence,” Johnson says. “Once they’re done, most kids—even our shyest, most introverted kids—will tell us ‘I kind of want to do that again. That was a great experience. A little scary, but really fun’.”

Leading a Lower School assembly is an important milestone at SPA, and for good reason, says Bryn Roberts, Head of School. “The Lower School has always been a warm place with rich relationships and a real culture of caring,” Roberts says, “and the assemblies are an important piece of that culture. They are

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Traditions like Emcee Day are the foundation upon which the Lower School is built, and are also a big part of the reason why the school continues to thrive and grow in today’s fastchanging educational landscape. As Roberts explains, the Lower School has undergone a “real evolution” in recent years, driven by a new K-12 curriculum alignment process, an explosion in new media and learning platforms, and an increasingly multicultural student body that reflects the growing diversity of the Twin Cities.


Rite of passage: Backstage, Henri prepares to join the generations of fifthgraders by leading an assembly on his Grade 5 “emcee day.�

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Tim Elchert

“The confluence of all of these shifts in schooling in general and within the SPA community specifically has presented the Lower School with a truly unprecedented opportunity,” Roberts says. “It’s given us the chance to reflect on and reimagine what it means to make our students ready for a future that is constantly changing, but will demand even more critical thinking skills, creativity, and the confidence to approach problems in new ways,” he says. “The Lower School’s leaders and teachers have done a tremendous job of taking a close look at all of the strengths that define SPA, then looking for ways to enrich and deepen the program without forsaking or in any way abandoning the roots of the school, which have been fundamentally about the joy of learning in this warm and beautiful space.”

A COMMON LANGUAGE FOR EMOTIONAL LESSONS After nearly four decades as a school psychologist, Dr. Tim Elchert says there’s one constant about kids: “Little people have very big feelings.” That’s one reason why Elchert—or “Dr. E.” as he’s more affectionately known by generations of SPA students—has

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been tapped to introduce the final agenda item for the Friday assembly: announcing the raffle prizes that will be showcased at the Lower School Bazaar in a few weeks. While Bazaar, the beloved spring carnival has been a tradition for decades, so have the tears and hurt feelings that result when a kindergartener realizes she won’t be going home with the oversized stuffed animal she had her heart set on. So while a teacher onstage manages the “big reveal” of raffle prizes (including a scooter that draws excited ooohs and aaaahs from the crowd), Dr. E voices some of the questions that may be on students’ minds. “Now if I spend my twenty-five cents on a raffle ticket, I will for sure get to take home one of these prizes, right?” Dr. E asks. “Nooooo,” comes a chorus of student voices from the auditorium. “You mean I might not win?” “Nooooo.” For the next few minutes, SPA’s Lower School student body schools Dr. E. on the long odds of actually winning the scooter, forcing him to consider the fact that Chelsie Jolley (the Lower School’s technology coordinator, who has now joined him on stage), has an equally good chance of going home with the


families and the faculty, most of whom also wear the lanyard full of laminated “tools” that they talk about with their students throughout the day. In fact, some of the school’s youngest students have even turned out to be the best practitioners of the Toolbox. “The kindergarteners are hilarious with the Toolbox. You’ll hear them say ‘I think I need my personal space right now—would you please give me some breathing room?’” Fidler says, adding that while it may sound humorous to visitors, it’s serious business. “We are teaching our kids to be respectful but also mindful about caring for themselves and others. The sooner they have those skills, the better.”

prize he wants. Dr. E acts out his sadness and frustration, but then turns to his “Toolbox for Learning,” a collection of 12 tools (represented by colorful cards worn around his neck on a SPA lanyard) for social and emotional learning that students have been working with since the start of the year. Dr. E decides he could try out his “breathing tool” and take a calming breath to regain control of himself. As he works through his disappointment, he realizes he could even deploy his “courage tool,” and do the right thing, by congratulating Ms. Jolley on her win—grudgingly. Creating a common language around community values was one of the goals Holly Fidler had when she joined SPA as Lower School Principal in 2014. “It was clear to me, even during my first visit here, what a truly happy place this is, a place where children really feel safe and known,” Fidler says. “But obviously young children aren’t happy all the time; they’re going to melt down. They’re going to have conflicts, and they need guidance and tools for regulating themselves. It’s our job to help teach that,” she says. “We’re very clear that the social and emotional learning of young children is the bedrock for any kind of academic content and intellectual growth.”

Holly Fidler

Launched with a series of community learning sessions, the “Toolbox for Learning” has been a hit with Lower School

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Mary Gallagher

REIMAGINING MATH, SCIENCE, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY Just a few doors away from Fidler’s first floor office, it’s easy to see how the new Toolbox curriculum is giving younger students the skills they need to handle a more collaborative approach to learning than their parents—or even their older siblings— may remember. Rather than working alone on worksheets or watching a teacher demonstrate problems on the whiteboard, first- and second-grade math students buddy up with each other to review the day’s math quiz, and put their heads together in small groups to puzzle out challenging math assignments. Meanwhile, Mary Gallagher, who team-teaches in Grades 1 and 2 with Sarah Irwin, sits alongside a few students working on a subtraction problem and reminds them of a helpful mnemonic: “When’s there’s more at the top there’s no need to stop, when there’s more on the floor, borrow from next door.” One of 12 teachers who are new to the Lower School since 2012, Gallagher says SPA’s low student-teacher ratio, small class sizes, and resources like the Toolbox are critical to effective

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math instruction. “Of course the ‘listening tool’ is one we use a lot with kids this age,” she says. “But in this class, we’ve also been encouraging students to use their patience tool, and putting that in a framework that keeps kids from getting frustrated when they approach a tough problem.” The value of stepping back to approach a problem from a fresh angle is one of the hallmarks of the Lower School’s “Math in Focus” curriculum, which has been in place since 2014. Based on the mastery-over-memorization system used in Singapore, the Math in Focus approach emphasizes problem solving, conceptual understanding, and the use of visuals to support students’ acquisition and application of mathematical concepts. The curriculum was implemented after an intensive year of investigation and evaluation of a number of different programs in a process led by Lower School faculty. David Fuerst, who has taught at SPA since 2000, was an early proponent of the program. “Problem solving is at the center of the Math in Focus framework,” says Fuerst, who was first introduced to the curriculum during his 2009 sabbatical. “By encouraging students to show their problem solving skills through visual representation, they develop the skills to solve more complex problems. In the three years we have been using Math in Focus,


Chelsie Jolley my students are better able to express their mathematical reasoning during our classroom shared inquiry discussions,” Fuerst says. The Lower School’s emphasis on problemsolving is also evident in a new approach to technology. Two years ago, with the arrival of technology specialist Chelsie Jolley, the Lower School set out to completely reimagine the role of technology in the classroom. The model of “computer classes,” in which technology lived mostly in standalone computer labs where students worked with devices separately from their other subjects, felt out of touch. Now, Jolley works closely with homeroom teachers (and the specialists in Spanish, art, music, and science) to integrate technology into curricula. Jolley works across grade levels, dropping into classrooms to assist teachers as they integrate new learning platforms into existing programs, and strategizing ways to expand classroom experiences with interactive tools. Early and ongoing exposure to coding and computer programming is a fundamental part of this approach. In the early elementary grades, devices are used to encourage the beginnings of computational thinking. Kindergartners take their first steps in computer coding using an educational app called Kodable to create small, simple projects. In Grades 1 and 2, they then use those skills to create projects using Scratch (another programming language) in Akbar Muhammad’s science class, although “the idea is not to train computer programmers,” says Muhammad. “The real goal is to get students to think out how to approach a problem, how to work out the steps, and how to keep moving ahead even when they make mistakes,” he says. “We want them to get really comfortable with encountering setbacks now, rather than waiting until they’re in in Middle or Upper School.” By third grade, every student is using an iPad for classroom projects, and learns how to create and

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Rick Magnuson

share work using Google Docs. And in Grade 5, the 1:1 laptop program is introduced to prepare students for how they’ll use technology to for more advanced problem-solving in Middle School. Creating space for problem-solving both within the curriculum and within the Lower School building was the motivation for the school’s “Makerspace”—a classroom space dedicated to hands-on creation and experimentation. The Makerspace, which first opened in 2015 in a small classroom, has now moved into a larger space in the Goodrich activity room due to high demand. The Makerspace is a young inventor’s dream, filled with supplies ranging from hot glue guns and endless stacks of cardboard to a laser cutter and 3D printer (adult supervision required). The Makerspace was one of the first items science teacher Rick Magnuson put on the Lower School’s to-do list after visiting several independent schools in California’s Bay Area to observe innovation in elementary science education. “Application is the key,” says Magnuson, an SPA alumnus who returned in 2008 to join the Lower School faculty. “That’s why we’re doing more to get kids to build, tinker, and try design thinking, because they learn so much more from trying and failing,” than they do from a more traditional lecture-style

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approach, he says. “It requires a shift from ‘teacher as instructor’ to ‘teacher as facilitator,’ which is new, but it makes so many more things possible.” He points to the project his fifth grade classes are currently working on: building Rube Goldberg-style machines designed to deliver a single Band-Aid to a user with as many completely unnecessary steps as possible: one group’s mode of a delivery included a slap from the hand of a plastic Halloween skeleton. On the final Friday of the project, students used iPads to make videos of their machines in motion, which they’ll use later to figure out what worked and what didn’t. “When it comes to teaching science today, we have to consider the skills we want kids to take from the experience, and figure out how to deliver them in a way that is the most impactful and the most exciting for kids,” Magnuson says. “I love talking and sharing information, but now instead of doing that in front of kids, it’s freed me up to do projects and experiments alongside my students, and helping them learn by observation.” He can tell the shift is engaging their curiosity about science, even on days they aren’t in class. “You can tell they’re thinking about things,” he says, “because when they show up in my class, they’ve got a million questions that have popped into their heads even during their time away from a project—and that’s just what you want to see.”


A NEW LANDSCAPE FOR LITERACY AND HUMANITIES Third- and fourth- grade teacher Jill Chang says she’s seen a similar shift in her students’ relationship to the humanities, as the Lower School has introduced a more student-centered literacy curriculum. The new approach reflects the “Readers and Writers Workshop” curriculum currently used in the Middle School, adapted for students who are in the earlier stages of literacy and analysis. According to Chang, the workshop model puts analytical strategies at the center, rather than specific texts: students have a great deal of independence when it comes to choosing books and writing topics to pursue. Classroom instruction focuses on developing the skills inherent in good writing and literary analysis, such as identifying main ideas and characters, predicting the narrative arc of a story, or note-taking.

emerging readers and others who are very sophisticated readers,” Gallagher says, noting that the workshop model allows her and teaching partner Sara Irwin to make literacy instruction appropriate across that spectrum. “We are looking at non-fiction right now,” Gallagher notes, “and that involves a lot of examples and sharing about how to read non-fiction, no matter the topic or the level of difficulty. We talk about what we are looking for in a non-fiction text. What is the difference between a main idea and a supporting detail? How do we take notes about what we read? Our job is to make sure the instruction is relevant for each student,” Gallagher says, “and the goal is to challenge them at their level.” That strategy informs the literacy curriculum all the way up to Grade 5, when students enjoy even greater

freedom to choose the books that appeal to them. And with that freedom, says Grade 5 teacher Kristen Johnson, comes an increased need for careful assessment of where students need to be challenged and where they need support. “Our premise is that no two readers are alike,” says Johnson. “It’s our job to meet them where they are, and give them the right kind of instruction, and push them forward as readers and writers.” Literacy in Grade 5 also uses the workshop model: rather than choosing a few titles that all fifth-graders read together, students work with their teachers to make book selections that reflect where they are as individual readers. Detailed student reading logs help teachers keep track of students’ development; in Grade 5, students write daily reflections about the text they encounter, with their analytical skills growing as the year progresses.

“In our literacy time, we might have students read their own books independently for fifteen or twenty minutes, and then come together—either with a teacher or with each other—to discuss a specific skill,” Chang says. This approach, combined with small class sizes, means that if Chang or Tim Rongstad, her teaching partner, observe a subset of students who seem to be struggling with a particular skill during a given lesson, they can form an ad hoc group to provide more support for that specific skill—a distinct change from the set-in-stone “reading groups” that used to dominate elementary-school literacy education. This same workshop model is being applied across the Lower School, says Mary Gallagher, whose first- and second-graders represent a wide range on the literacy spectrum. “We have students who are

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By the end of the year, the goal is for students to have the kind of critical reading and analytical writing skills that will carry them into Middle School. The April poetry unit is an example of this: every spring, Grade 5 students work with their teachers and a guest poet-in-residence on a study of the poetic form. The capstone of the unit is the traditional “Poetry Tea,” in which students choose a poem from the half-dozen they’ve written to read in front of an audience of peers and parents. Recently, the Grade 5 teaching team has integrated technology into the poetry unit as well: during one week in April, Johnson and Currie’s students were using their poems as inspiration for an iMovie project in which they combined their writing with video images and voice-over. This is far from the only example of technology informing literacy: the Scholastic Weekly Reader, an elementary school staple, is still used in Grade 5, but today’s version includes an interactive iPad app with touch and zoom graphics, 3D maps, music files, and interactive surveys that invite students to write opinion pieces about controversial topics, like whether plastic bags should be prohibited to protect the environment. “It’s not the Weekly Reader our parents remember,” says teacher Kristen Johnson. “The platforms students have to work on now are kind of amazing.”

Jill Chang

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HONORING TRADITION, EMBRACING THE UNPREDICTABLE A huge white board hangs on the wall of Holly Fidler’s office, serving as “brainstorming central”—a place where Fidler and her faculty can jot down new ideas, articles they’ve read and want to share, or topics for future discussion. In early April, the board included a number of bullet items related to the Grade 3 and 4 capstone presentation for their “The World 1000 Years Ago” social studies unit. For most of March, small teams of students researched the cultures, customs, currencies, and social structures at work in the first millennium across China, India, the Middle East, the West African Kingdoms, and Europe. The 3/4 teaching teams alternate this unit every year with a companion unit on immigration, in which students choose an area of the world as a starting point for research into the impact of immigration, both on individuals and on a region as a whole. Newly launched last year, the two-year sequence was designed by the 3/4 team as a way to incorporate a more global perspective into the social studies curriculum. “The changes were the result of some really good conversations that are happening school-wide about being more intentional about everything we do,” says 3/4 teacher Alisa Grewe. “We are constantly asking ourselves whether the content we’re sharing reflects multiple perspectives and a truly global view of the world.” This focus on multiple perspectives reflects the growing diversity of the Lower School community itself. In 2016-17, students of color comprised 35% of the Lower School and 40% of students who attended the Lower School’s admission Open House in November 2017. That growing diversity is a reality that Fidler and her faculty are eagerly embracing. It’s a sign, Fidler says, that “the word is out in the Twin Cities


Holly Fidler: “…When [families] come here… they understand that this is a safe and welcoming place.”

that SPA is a school that cares about diversity, equity, and inclusion. Families may not think about it specifically in those terms,” she says, “but when they come here, they can see it and feel it—they understand that this is a safe and welcoming place.” Fidler’s white board includes several notations about diversity, scribbled in amongst the dozens of initiatives she and her faculty are working on: the hiring of a new literacy support specialist, the continued implementation of the readers and writers workshop program, some new ideas for faculty professional development, and a evergrowing list of new ideas around technology. Fidler eyes her white board with a mix of excitement and trepidation. “I’m not asking the faculty to do anything that I’m not willing to do right along with them, but it is hard work we are doing here,” she says about the process of taking into

account all the new skills and concepts this generation of students will need to master. But she knows for a fact that the hard work is worth it, and that it’s benefiting her students. On a recent pass through the Lower School cafeteria, she overheard a table of four students talking loudly and enthusiastically—about a math problem. “It was a group of fifth-grade boys, and they were trying to figure out the circumference of the table, and wondering how they would come up with the volume of the space,” she says. “They were sitting at lunch, not in a class, but here they were asking big questions about things they don’t even fully know how to do yet. The fact that they’re asking these questions, and getting ready to bring them to someone like me, or Chelsie, or Akbar and ask, ‘How do we do this? Could we try this? Could we 3D print this?’ Well, that’s exactly the mindset we’re trying to create.”

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“WORK HARD, PLAY FAIR, BE KIND”:

THREE “LIFERS” REMEMBER THE LOWER SCHOOL

HOW MUCH HAS SPA’S LOWER SCHOOL CHANGED OVER THE YEARS? In some ways, a great deal: technology, new curricula, greater diversity, and the retirement of a beloved cohort of master teachers has altered the face of the Goodrich campus. But according to these three Class of 2017 “lifers”—students who have been at SPA since Kindergarten—the fundamentals of the Lower School haven’t really changed at all.

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“I have used so many of the skills I learned in the Lower School throughout my time at SPA.”

Kathryn Schmechel “I had fabulous teachers at the Lower School who gave me crucial foundational lessons that have formed the way I think and learn today. My teachers fostered my love of learning both in and out of the classroom, and they supported me every step of the way. When I think of them, I think of the freedom they gave me—the freedom to be who I was.” “When I think of Lower School I think of leadership. I had early experiences in being a leader at the Lower School that definitely contributed to the presentation and leadership skills that I have today. That was especially true in fifth grade, when I was a fifth grade tour guide and did my emcee day at an assembly. “I remember reading A Wrinkle in Time in fifth grade, and loving the detailed conversations and discussions we had about the book in class. That was when I first took part in a ‘literary discussion’ at school. I also remember always getting excited to write my piece for The Torch [the Lower School’s creative writing magazine] not only because it was fun to design my own artwork and to see my writing as a finished product, but also because it was an amazing creative writing opportunity for all students. “I have used so many of the skills I learned in the Lower School throughout my time at SPA. Last year, I found a ruler that I received during an assembly when I was in first or second grade, on which was written, “Work hard. Play fair. Be kind.” That ruler embodies the values I have found to be so important to my SPA experience, particularly my experience at the Lower School.”

Kathryn will attend Yale University in Fall 2017.

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Jack Geller “Molly Kleven was one of my Kindergarten teachers and she left a lasting impression on me that I will have for the rest of my life. When I was in Kindergarten, she was everything. She was my teacher, the tooth fairy, the director of the Hawaiian play. She was such a huge part of my life—even after I was done with Kindergarten, I would always go to her to say hi, ask for advice, or just get a hug. She was one of those teachers who can convey a message of learning and doing your best, and also a message of love. “The mock immigration experience we had in third grade had a big impact on me, because it gave us an understanding of history that felt real—what it would have been like to come to America for the first time. And I found out a lot about my own family history, through interviews and the research we did. And a lot of our science activities—like the egg drop—introduced me to aspects of research and experimentation that I still enjoy.

“Leading the assembly in fifth grade is something that I remember very vividly.”

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“Leading the assembly in fifth grade is something that I remember very vividly. I had watched hundreds of kids do their emcee before I went, and when it was finally my turn, I looked out at the Kindergartners and could not believe I once sat in the seats in the front they were in. I was only 11, but I felt like a leader. In that moment, I felt a strong sense of responsibility. I had those same feelings when I took the stage for my Senior Speech this year—and some nostalgia too. School goes by fast, and those Lower School memories make me understand how far you go in such a relatively short time period.”

Jack will attend Syracuse University in Fall 2017.


Barbara Bathke “Most of what I remember from Lower School is laughter, engagement, and discovery. I think the really special thing about the Lower School is that so many of the experiences were not confined to the classroom. We learned a lot about writing and math and Spanish, but we also raked leaves in the neighborhood, and went to assemblies, and hosted a group of students from Mexico. I feel like my academics at the Lower School extended way beyond the classroom. “I really remember my teachers from fifth grade. Georgia Bond always had a smile on her face when I would come to talk to her or when she was teaching a lesson. She was really good at connecting with us and encouraging us to ask a lot of questions. Tom Lundholm was my other fifth-grade teacher. He always made you feel like your opinion was important. I’ll never forget the Garfield calendar on his desk—every morning I would run over to look at the day’s cartoon, and he would ask how I was doing that day and really listened to my answer. “Another teacher that stands out in my memory is Señora Kathy Olson-Studler. The passion that she has for Spanish inspired me to love languages and other cultures. She’s a big part of the reason I’m going to Paris for college, to study world languages.

“I feel like my academics at the Lower School extended way beyond the classroom.”

“At SPA, you learn early on how to talk in front of large groups of people—that starts in the Lower School. Everyone remembers their fifth-grade emcee day, and that’s a big part of getting ready to move from Lower School to Middle School. And then you give your Senior Speech, and that’s a big part of getting ready to leave the Upper School for college. I feel like my SPA journey has come full circle.”

Barbara will attend the American University of Paris in Fall 2017.

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>> ALUMNI/AE NEWS

ALUMNI/AE EVENT CALENDAR

ALUMNI/AE

COUNCIL CORNER Hilary LeBon ’91, Alumni/ae Council President hilary@hilarylebon.com I want to start by saying thank you to all of my fellow Alumi/ae Council members who have helped make this year such a great success.

August 2017 Golf and Tennis Classic Monday, August 14, 2017

Town and Country Club Visit www.spa.edu/alumni/connect/ events for details

September 2017 Reunion Weekend 2017 September 8-10, 2017

Visit www.spa.edu/alumni/ Reunion_Weekend_2017 for details

A highlight for me this past year was connecting with so many members of the alumni/ae community at our two Speaker Series events. Sean Cairncross ’93 and Aram Destian ’01 discussed politics and the 2016 election in October, and in February, Sean Flahaven ’91 and Bryan Smith ’94 shared their insights on the entertainment industry, theater, and the making of the hit Broadway show, Hamilton. I am very much looking forward to next year’s Alumni/ae Council Speaker Series, which will kick off on the evening of Thursday, October 12, with a panel discussion on environmentalism and sustainability. Mark your calendars and watch your mailbox and email for additional event and registration details. Looking ahead to next year, there are a couple of great opportunities for those of you who are looking for ways to get involved:

October 2017 Alumni/ae Council Speaker Series Thursday, October 12, 2017, 5:30 p.m.

Huss Center for the Performing Arts, Randolph Campus Visit www.spa.edu/alumni/ speaker_series for details

November 2017 Young Alumni/ae Reunions: 5th, 10th, and 15th Classes of 2002, 2007, and 2012 Friday, November 24, 2017

Various locations; more details to follow To volunteer at your Reunion, email alumni@spa.edu

Day of Service: On July 29, 2017, we’ll be sponsoring the first-ever Alumni/ae Council Day of Service. All Twin Cities alumni/ae and their families are invited to join us for a Mississippi River clean-up event (out-of-town alumni/ae are encouraged to volunteer at their favorite local charity and share photos of that service as a way to participate as well!).

2016-2017 COUNCIL MEMBERS Hilary LeBon ’91 President David Salchow ’88 Fundraising Chair Craig Smith ’87 Volunteerism Chair Meaghan Moriarty ’99 Events Chair Joe Benson ’68 Jonathan Brenner ’92 Dan Citron ’89 Sarah Crandall ’02 Lindsay Giese ’05 Mercedes Henderson Clark ’88 Bryce Holstad ’10 Devon Holstad ’07 Steve London ’91 Alex Nemeth ’95 Lauren Nuffort ’02 Pierce Norton ’08

Practice college interview program: The Alumni/ae Council partners with SPA’s College Counseling office to offer practice college interviews—a great opportunity for students to learn interview skills as they get ready for the college admissions process. We are always looking for alumni/ae to add to our roster of interviewers, so please reach out to alumni@spa.edu if you’re interested! And as always, don’t hesitate to contact me or any member of the Alumni/ae Council about our work or how you can get involved. I’m looking forward to seeing many of you at our events in 2017-18.

ALUMNI/AE DAY OF

Many thanks to all alumni/ae who showed their support for St. Paul Academy and Summit School Alumni/ae Council on Thursday, April 27, 2017, for SPA’s third annual Alumni/ae Day of Giving. Sponsored by the Alumni/ae Council, the Day of Giving is a day-long philanthropic event which celebrates all that is made possible at SPA thanks to the generosity of loyal alumni/ae. The Council’s goal was to reach 180 total alumni/ae donors during the month of April; that goal was surpassed, with a total of 188 alumni/ae donors giving to SPA over the course of the month.

04•27•17

All gifts from the Day of Giving are directed to one of five areas within the Annual Fund: student financial aid; student life programs (including athletics, arts, student organizations); academic support for teachers; the Bill Boulger Fund for Teaching Excellence; or an unrestricted gift to the school’s area of greatest need. Thank you for your support!

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DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI/AE AWARD: NOMINATIONS OPEN NOW

Mark your calendars and plan to join us for Reunion 2017! This year we will be celebrating Reunions for classes ending in 2 and 7, and all alumni/ae from all classes are invited to join us in kicking off Reunion Weekend on the evening of Friday, September 8, at the All-Alumni/ae Reception at the Randolph campus. Alumni/ae and their guests will enjoy cocktails and hors d’oeuvres under a tent in the Lilly Courtyard (weather permitting) while listening to live music by local band East of Eagan, featuring SPA alumni Brian Green ’87, Dean Wolfson ’87, and Andrew Mohring ’76. Guests are welcome to find a quiet space for conversation inside the Drake Gallery, which will be exhibiting the works of alumni/ae Patricia “Patty” Saunders ’42, Tuck Langland ’57, Patton Blackwell ’67, and Mystie Brackett ’72 as part of the annual Alumni/ae Art Show. On Saturday morning, alumni/ae of 50 years ago or more will be honored by the school at the Heritage Brunch. Reunion festivities continue on Saturday evening, as individual classes gather for their class parties, hosted at locations around the Twin Cities. The festivities will conclude this year on Sunday with a special event honoring the Summit School’s Centennial on the Goodrich campus. This celebration of Summit’s 100 years will feature a reception, an extensive memorabilia exhibit, and performance piece created especially for the Centennial, featuring historic Summit music and readings. The Summit Centennial Committee (pictured below) encourages all Summit alumnae to attend this once-in-a-lifetime event! Details about the weekend’s activities will be mailed and e-mailed to all alumni/ae over the summer. See you in September!

Members of the Summit Centennial Committee gathered in April 2017 to review items from the archives for the 100th anniversary of Summit School. Pictured left to right are Shotsy Shepard Johnson ’64, Nancy Neimeyer Weyerhaeuser ’49, Jean West ’45, Susan Fisher Koll ’57, and Sally Davis Patterson ’57. Members of the committee not pictured are Perrin Brown Lilly ’41, Minty Klein Piper ’55, Ginny Low Campbell ’56, Vicki Churchill Ford ’56, and Mary Ann Barrows Wark ’65.

Charlie Zelle ’73 accepts the 2016 Distinguished Alumni/ae Award

The Distinguished Alumni/ae Award (DAA) at St. Paul Academy and Summit School honors alumni/ae who have made noteworthy contributions to society through professional or civic accomplishments and involvement. Established in 1987, the award serves to inspire current students and other alumni/ae as role models, to exhibit and publicize the success of the school program as reflected in its alumni/ ae, and to encourage support of the school by alumni/ae and parents who, through the achievements of alumni/ ae, are reminded of the strength and benefits of a St. Paul Academy and Summit School education. The most recent recipient of the award was Charlie Zelle ’73, Commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Transportation, who was honored with the DAA in 2016. DAA nominations are submitted by the alumni/ae community; any SPA graduate may submit a DAA nomination via the online nomination process. Please visit www.spa. edu/DAA for more information on submitting a nomination or email a nomination to alumni@spa.edu.

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>> PHILANTHROPHY

CELEBRATING LEADERSHIP GIVING: NEW GIVING CIRCLES

On May 10, SPA celebrated the 148 members of the Leadership Giving Society (LGS) at the Annual Recognition Evening, held this year at the home of Fred Kaemmer ’88 and Kate Tilney (see photos from the event below). Leadership Giving Society members contribute gifts of $2,500 or more each year to the Annual Fund. In 2016-17, two new giving circles within the LGS were introduced. The Partner’s Circle honors donors of $5,000-$9,999, and the Ambassador’s Circle honors donors of $2,500-$4,999. The President’s Circle continues as the highest LGS level, for those donors giving $10,000 or more; and the Spartan Gold Club LGS also continues to honor those young alumni/ae (15 years or less since graduation) who give to the Annual Fund at higher levels of support. As of May 1, 2017, 26 LGS members were new to their giving circle, either for a first-time gift to the LGS or for an increased gift to a new giving circle. We extend our grateful thanks to all our new LGS members—thank you for leading the way!

A complete list of leadership donors will be included in the 2016-17 Annual Report.

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VOLUNTEERS MAKING THE DIFFERENCE:

PARENT PARTICIPATION CHALLENGE In 2015-16, nearly 75% of current SPA parents gave to the Annual Fund. It’s a remarkable participation percentage— higher than SPA’s peer schools in the Twin Cities and in the top band for independent schools around the country. This remarkable participation is achieved thanks in large part to a group of committed parent volunteers (see list at right) that reach out to all current SPA parents and ask every family to consider a gift to the Annual Fund. This Parent Participation Challenge is now a spring tradition at SPA; view the most up-to-date Parent Participation Challenge results grade-by-grade at www.spa.edu > Giving > Parent Participation Campaign.

Many thanks to our Parent Participation Campaign grade level volunteers! Annual Fund Chair David Kristal Parent Chairs Jonesy and Christina Worrall Division Chairs Judd and Michelle Gilats (Lower School) Michael Brooks and Hari Osefsky (Middle School) Thekla Rura-Polley (Upper School) Grade Level Volunteers Stef Adams Josephine Chung Julie Duckstad Chuck Evens Sue Evens Alicia Evert Kent Green Paula Guerra

Beth Haney Darrell Herndon Maren Hilton Barry Gisser Janet Hallaway Sunny Kase Parul Kharbanda Varun Kharbanda Sara Krasny Aaron Liepins Samantha Liepins Dave McKinney David Murphy Jenny Oliphant John Patterson Dan Ries Jason Ross Bridgette Stanley Herndon Patti Sullivan Robert Tuttle Nancy Verhey Sara Wolff

$1 MILLION GIFT FUNDS CHRISTOPHER THOMAS HOFFMANN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP When Christopher Hoffmann, the father of Nick ’14, Bridget ’16, and Hayley ’18, passed away after a month-long struggle with acute myeloid leukemia in May 2015, the SPA community lost one of its staunchest supporters and most engaged parents. Mr. Hoffmann was a fixture at SPA and was an avid Spartan fan. He could often be found with his wife, Karen, cheering at Nick, Bridget, and Hayley’s soccer, hockey, baseball, and lacrosse games. He was always eager to support the school’s athletics programs in any way he could, whether it was stepping in to help coach the boys’ JV hockey team, or coordinating the installation of photos of SPA student-athletes in the athletic hallway. But his love of SPA went well beyond sports, says Karen Hoffmann. “Chris had so much pride in the experience our kids have had at SPA,” Karen says. “One of his favorite things was Back-to-School Night: he would come home from that event every fall and tell me ‘our kids are so lucky, because those teachers just love what they’re doing.’ And he loved the fact that students at SPA can try anything—they can play sports but also try debate, or art, or music, or The Rubicon. It’s such a welcoming and inclusive place, and he wanted everyone to understand just how wonderful it was.” To honor Mr. Hoffmann’s memory and his love for the school, Karen, From left: Hayley, NIck, and Bridget Hoffmann. along with her parents, Jerry and Alleen Tostrud, have given a $1 million gift to fund the Christopher Thomas Hoffmann Memorial Scholarship. The Hoffman Memorial Scholarship is a permanently endowed fund that will provide financial aid for students applying for Grades 5-9 at SPA who demonstrate financial need. In addition to need, scholarship recipients have the potential to excel academically and contribute to the school’s culture and community. The Hoffmann Memorial Scholarship will be awarded to incoming students beginning in the 2017-18 year. “We are humbled that Chris’s family chose to establish this important scholarship at SPA in his memory,” says Head of School Bryn Roberts. “A gift of this magnitude allows us to provide aid to students who have the ability to succeed academically and enrich our school, but who need assistance in covering SPA’s tuition. It is a fitting tribute to Chris and all he contributed to the school for which we are grateful.”

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SECOND PHASE of

Upper School renovation will transform humanities at SPA When the Hugh K. Schilling Math and Science Center opens its doors in August 2018, SPA will already be in the midst of a second major physical transformation: the interior renovation of the Upper School, including Old Main, and the Ben Thompson-designed additions from the 1970s, including the current math and science wing and the library.

the humanities renovation was important. “We always knew that our math and science facilities had to be done first,” says Roberts, “and with the Schilling Center in place, we will have the physical space to accommodate the significant work that will go into bringing our humanities classrooms up to the same level as our math and science spaces.”

The renovation will focus on humanities learning and teaching spaces, which will be completely reimagined, says Head of School Bryn Roberts. “Our current humanities classrooms do not adequately support the innovative, discussion-based work that takes place in Upper School English, History, and World Language courses,” says Roberts, who notes that the timing of

The cost of the entire Upper School renovation, including both the Hugh K. Schilling Math and Science Center and the humanities spaces, is estimated at $38 million. A capital campaign to raise funds for the project is now underway; for more information about the fundraising campaign, contact Dorothy Goldie ’73, Director of Institutional Advancement, at dgoldie@spa.edu.

HUMANITIES COMMONS: Common spaces will be created throughout the new Upper School, giving students ample room for meeting with peers and teachers.

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STUDENT CENTER: The space currently used for the library’s first floor will be transformed into a bright and airy Student Center for studying and socializing.

HUMANITIES CLASSROOM: A rendering of renovated humanities classroom in Old Main.

ENGLISH CLASSROOM: A rendering of a renovated Upper School English classroom, in a space currently used for science.

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>> CLASS NOTES

’49

Have news to share?

CLASS AGENTS Peggy Lemmon peglem49@comcast.net Augustus W. Clapp bill.clapp@me.com

Email your news to alumni@spa.edu or send it to Class Notes: St. Paul Academy and Summit School 1712 Randolph Avenue, St. Paul, MN, 55105

William Canby was one

We look forward to hearing from you!

Become a Class Agent! Class Agents keep in touch with their classmates and provide updates on SPA happenings. Class Agents also help with special events and reunions. All classes welcome additional volunteers and multiple Class Agents are encouraged. To become a Class Agent, please contact alumni@spa.edu or 651-696-1302.

of three federal judges from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals who heard arguments in February 2017 regarding the U.S. Department of Justice’s proposed “travel ban.” Judge Canby, appointed to the 9th Circuit in 1980 by President Jimmy Carter, is a senior judge based in Phoenix and best known as an expert on Native American legal issues. Among his highest profile cases, he issued a decision later upheld by the Supreme Court that said the Americans with Disabilities Act required the PGA to let disabled golfer Casey Martin use a golf cart during competitions.

’63 CLASS AGENTS Nancy Mulvey nancymulvey@gmail.com

Charles A. Skinner is

retired and currently working at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace in 44

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Costa Rica. As the Director of the Center for Practicing Peace, Charles works with graduate students from around the world to support them in learning and living peace on a daily basis. The group also hosts visitors from around the world to meet with and present to the 100150 students from 50 nations around the world.

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’67 CLASS AGENTS Philip R. Bratnober pbratnober@comcast.net

David Druker was elected to the Del Mar (CA) City Council in November 2016 following an eight-year hiatus from local politics. David was a former Del Mar council member and three-time mayor of Del Mar, a coastal community located 20 miles north of San Diego. David is an executive vice president with DataSkill, a software engineering firm that specializes in IBM Watson software. David and his wife Kristen, a retired history teacher from The Bishop’s School, have lived in Del Mar for 30 years.

’77 CLASS AGENTS Hank Brandtjen hbrandtjen@kluge.biz

Eleanor Doermann has taken on a new challenge in life: she graduated from law school in 2012 and has opened her own practice in Seattle. Tim O’Brien puts the number of lawyers in our class at seven. Catherine Holm continues to freelance write, teach yoga and work as a Community Health Worker. She loves living in Vermont and exploring the beauty of New England. “The hiking and the mountains are magical!” Mike Erickson met up with Chris Kuhn in the Adirondacks

and the picture posted on our class Facebook page is proof positive that our class refuses to show the effects of aging. Further proof is the traveling we are undertaking: in the past year, Liz Stuck went to Ixtapa, Mexico, Sam Kuller was under the sea in Costa Rica, Julia Parranto visited Hawaii, Ben Millard was in Japan, and Bill Farrell had a layover at the Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport.

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CLASS AGENTS

CLASS AGENTS

John B. Edgerton jedgerton@propertiesedge.com

Judy (Nedved) Kunz reports that she is living in St. Paul and would love to hear from her classmates and fellow alumni/ae.

Renee M. Ochaya theochayas@oh.rr.com John W. Patterson johnwilderpatterson@yahoo.com


Thomas Gardner Mairs ’40: A Bequest Celebrates a Lifetime Love of Music The June 10, 1940 issue of Now and Then, the student newspaper of St. Paul Academy, includes a photo and activity list for each senior graduating from the Academy that year. The listing for Thomas Gardner Mairs ’40 includes the athletic and military achievements expected of Academy boys of that era: hockey team, tennis team, manual of arms team, rifle team—the latter two a testament to his talent on the firing range, for which he was named the Junior MN State Trapshooting Champion at age 15.

It’s evidence of a love of music that lasted his entire life, says Mr. Mairs’ son Bob Mairs ’73. “He always loved music,” says the younger Mairs, who notes that his father’s first major purchase after graduating from Yale University was a Steinway baby grand piano. After his father’s death in August 2016, that same Steinway (in addition to a beloved harpsichord built by John Chalice) was donated to the Schubert Club Museum’s collection of historic and contemporary instruments. Thomas Mairs’ love of music is also evident in the generous bequest he left to St. Paul Academy and Summit School in his estate. His bequest has now funded the Thomas G. Mairs ’40 Endowed Fund for Music, established to provide support for the Middle and Upper School music program at SPA.

Towards the bottom of the list, however, is a more unusual item for the Class of 1940—“Charter Member, Glee Club.” Mr. Mairs was one of the boys who, several years earlier, had requested and won the right to form the Academy’s first music club.

The Torch and Lamp Society recognizes those who, through thoughtful and generous planning will light the way for St. Paul Academy and Summit School in the future. Members have made philanthropic arrangements for SPA in their estate and financial plans. If you have included St. Paul Academy and Summit School in your planning and would like to be recognized as a member of the Torch and Lamp Society, please contact Sarah Johnson, Senior Development Officer, at 651-696-1320.

“Our family has always been very connected to SPA, and my father was very clear that he wanted to support the school’s music programs” says Bob Mairs. The family’s ties to SPA span multiple generations: Thomas Mairs and his late wife, Marjorie, had four children who all graduated from SPA: Thomas ’67, Nancy Daly ’71, Robert ’73, and Peter ’80, and Mr. Mairs was one of four siblings who graduated from St. Paul Academy or Summit School: Robert ’35, George ’32, and Mary Mairs Ober ’41. “We are deeply honored by this generous gift, which will make a sustained impact on our music program and ensure the musical development of our students continues for years to come,” says Dorothy Goldie ’73, Director of Institutional Advancement. “Bequests such as this make a lasting difference. We are grateful that Mr. Mairs chose to remember the school in this way. Knowing that he was a part of the formation of the Academy’s first Glee Club is special, and makes this gift even more meaningful to our students and faculty.”

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>> CLASS NOTES

on the new role of the school’s Assistant Head of School for Student Development and Community Engagement. In her new position, Jill will be broadly responsible for creating a more robust and institutionally coherent structure for supporting SPA students’ social and emotional lives. In his note to the community about the appointment, SPA Head of School Bryn Roberts noted that “Jill is particularly wellsuited for this role, which will demand a deep understanding of children’s social and emotional needs as well as exceptional administrative and organizational strength.”

Five class members enjoyed a mini-reunion at Mancini’s in April 2017. Pictured are (back row) Jill Magnuson Romans, Karen Garrett, Gretchen Lilyholm, (front row) Bob Verhey, and Sarah BancroftHoward. After thirteen years as SPA’s Middle School Principal, Jill Magnuson Romans will take

Eric Olson ’82

Alex Gast ’06

’89 CLASS AGENTS Dan Citron dancitron@gmail.com

Wars by Steven Carl McCasland at Mixed Blood Theatre in Minneapolis.

’02 CLASS AGENTS Sarah Crandall crandall.sarah@gmail.com

Elena Giannetti is the founder

of PRIME Productions, a new professional theater company in the Twin Cities. PRIME, which began performing in May of 2017, seeks to explore, illuminate, and support women over fifty and their stories through performance. The company first show was the regional premier of Little

Lauren Nuffort joined the law

firm of Lommen Abdo, P.A. in Minneapolis, MN. Lauren has a national property subrogation practice and brings her skill, passion, and creative thinking to the firm’s Commercial Litigation Practice Group. Her previous professional experience included defending businesses in construction defect litigation, intellectual property litigation, long-term care litigation, and personal injury litigation/ wrongful death litigation.

Jim Hilbert ’85

Speaker Day 2017 brings alumni/ae back to campus In April 2017, three SPA alumni/ae returned to SPA as participants in the Upper School’s Speaker Day, which this year focused on sustainability and environmentalism. Speaker Day is a daylong program of keynote addresses and small-group sessions featuring dozens of guest speakers, organized around a central theme. This year’s theme focused on sustainability and the environment. The day opened with a morning keynote address by Eric Olson ’82, who leads the global consulting practice for Business for Social Responsibility (BSR), a company that designs and implements sustainability strategies for organizations around the 46

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world. Eric also led a breakout session about his work with BSR. Alex Gast ’06 led a breakout session about her work as a Research Investigator with the Center for Health and the Global Environment at the Harvard School of Public Health, focused on the impact of climate change on the healt-care industry. Jim Hilbert ’85 also led a session; Jim is an Associate Professor of law at Mitchell Hamline School of Law, and is the co-director of the Expert Witness Training Academy, which is funded by the National Science Foundation and provides training to climatologists on communicating in courtrooms and legislative hearings.

Adam Vesterholt appeared on the popular television quiz show Jeopardy on March 27-28, 2017. Adam, pictured with Jeopardy host Alex Trebek, earned a twoday winning total of $28,801. At SPA, Adam was on the Upper School Quiz Bowl team, which we are sure is the reason for his Jeopardy success. Sarah Crandall graduated from

the University of St. Thomas in Spring 2017 with a graduate degree in Art History.


’10 CLASS AGENTS Katherine Labuza klabuza@gmail.com

William Lutz is a seasonal assistant athletic trainer for the National Football League’s Atlanta Falcons, and was on the field during the Falcons’ Super Bowl contest in February 2017. He earned a masters of science degree in sports medicine from Georgia State University in 2016 and worked as a graduate assistant athletic trainer there while pursuing his work in kinesiology and health.

’12 CLASS AGENTS

The Class of 2012 is looking for Class Agents! Please contact alumni@spa.edu or 651-696-1302.

a U.S. Teaching Assistantship by the Austrian Government. This program, funded by the Ministry of Education is administered by Fulbright Austria. While at SPA, Sydney participated in the Congress Bundestag Youth Exchange and spent a year in Germany, where she had the opportunity to help teach English to younger students. More recently, she has been working in the Discovery Club after-school program in St. Paul Public Schools. When she returns from Austria, Sydney plans to complete a Master’s degree in Educational Psychology and eventually work as a school psychologist. “I attribute much of my success to my time at SPA,” Sydney says.

’13 CLASS AGENTS Sophia Myers-Kelley smyerskelley@gmail.com

Sam Wood is a recipient of

David Ristau and Ryann Swansen graduated from Iowa

State University in May of 2017 with degrees in mechanical engineering.

the J. E Wallace Sterling Award for Scholastic Achievement at Stanford University, which is presented to the top 25 Stanford students in each year’s class of graduating seniors. The Sterling Award is based on overall academic performance in a Humanities and Sciences department or program. As part of the award, each recipient invites a high school teacher to attend the ceremony in recognition of that teacher’s influence on the recipient’s scholastic career; Sam selected Upper School History teacher and debate coach Tom Fones to join him at the ceremony.

BECOME A CLASS AGENT! Are you looking for a way to support SPA with your time and talents? There is a great volunteer opportunity open to all alumni/ae: becoming a Class Agent. Class Agents are the school’s liaison for each class. They serve as spokespeople for their class, help to promote SPA Alumni/ae Council initiatives, encourage class members to participate in the Annual Fund, and, if their schedule allows, work with Office of Institutional Advancement on their class reunion party.

Sydney Carlson is one of

13 students and alumni at the University of MinnesotaTwin Cities to receive a grant to study and teach abroad during the 2017-18 academic year by the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. Sydney, who majored in Child Psychology at the U, has been awarded

Specific duties include collecting updates from classmates twice a year for inclusion in the Class Notes portion of the SPA Magazine, or encouraging classmates to use the new Class Notes submission form on the SPA website; supporting and promoting Alumni/ae Council initiatives like the Alumni/ae Council Speaker Series and the Alumni/ae Day of Giving; and if they’ve agreed to help with Reunion, working with the Alumni/ae Relations staff on planning their class party during reunion-celebrating years. There is no “term” for Class Agents; it is up to each agent to elect whether it is time to roll-off and recruit a new agent for their class. All classes welcome additional volunteers; many Classes have multiple Class Agents. For more information or to become a Class Agent, please contact alumni@spa.edu or 651-696-1302, or review the Class Agent job description online at spa.edu > Alumni/ae > Connect > Class Agents. Thank you for your consideration, Craig Smith ’87, Alumni/ae Council Volunteerism Committee Chair

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>> IN MEMORIAM

’37 Reverend Mary Allison Bigelow “Molly” McMillan, born July 30, 1919, died peacefully on February 16, 2017, in her apartment at the EagleCrest Presbyterian Home in Roseville. Baptized at the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, Molly grew up in a family that cared deeply about church and community. She attended Summit School and Vassar College, graduating in 1941 with a degree in physics. She met her future husband while singing in the choir at House of Hope and was married to Dick on June 26, 1943. The pair raised five children: Rick ’62, Charlie ’63, Doug ’68, Allison ’70, and Anne ’74. Music remained an important part of family life for Dick, Molly and their children. When Dick died in 1995, Molly commissioned Minnesota composer Stephen Paulus to create an opera, The Three Hermits, as a memorial, and Paulus, in turn, dedicated the opera’s most memorable chorus, “The Pilgrims’ Hymn,” to Molly. Molly was deeply involved in her community. She became president of the St. Paul Junior League in 1957 and served as regional director of the Association of Junior Leagues of America from 1959-1961. In 1962 she received a mayoral appointment to the Ramsey County Welfare Board, and she was a member of the St. Paul Health and Welfare Planning Committee during the 1960s. She was the first woman elected a trustee of

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the Wilder Foundation and served as a trustee of the F.R. Bigelow Foundation. In the early 1970s she enrolled at United Seminary, receiving her divinity degree and, in 1978, becoming one of the half-dozen earliest women to be ordained as a Presbyterian minister in the Twin Cities. Her work at House of Hope and Central Presbyterian Church yielded scores of thoughtful sermons. The Bigelow Chapel at United Seminary stands as a tribute to her commitment to the school, which she served as interim president, president, and board chair. She received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree in 1989, after her service as board chair. She served on the boards of the Collegeville Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research, and the Presbyterian Homes Foundation. Molly was the recipient of five community awards: Two awards were from the United Way, the YWCA award for Leadership in Community Service, the Distinguished Alumna Award from St. Paul Academy and Summit School, and the Sisterhood Award for Humanitarian Service from the National Conference of Christians and Jews. In 2007, at the age of 88, Molly was chosen Fund Raiser of the Year for the state of Minnesota for her leadership in the People Incorporated capital campaign, and she still found the time to teach two bible classes at EagleCrest. She was preceded in death by her parents, Allison Bigelow and Charles Henry Bigelow, and her husband Richard McMillan.

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She is survived by her five children Richard ’62 (Barbara), Charles ’63 (Ronni), Douglas ’68 (Ann), Allison ’70 (Mark), and Anne ’74 (Edward); fifteen grandchildren; and, ten greatgrandchildren.

’46 Robert H. “Bob” Bratnober died on March 8, 2017 at the age of 89. Bob was born January 11, 1928, and lived a life of service to God by serving others in a family business, at Hope Church Richfield, and serving on the boards of Goodwill Industries, Presbyterian Homes, the Union Gospel Mission, United Hospital and more. Bob was preceded in death by wife Susan, and his sister Ellie Joyce ’50. Bob is survived by sister, Carol Thrush; children Laura (Michael) Taylor, Justin ’75 (Pat); grandchildren Jonathan (Lisa) Taylor, Jessica (Ben Schmit) Taylor, Jenna ( Jeff) Anderson, Gretchen (Tony) Kjorstad, Karl ( Jamie) Bratnober; and, 14 great grandchildren.

University. He was captain and platoon leader in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1951 to 1953 during the Korean Conflict. Jim was a member of Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity; Kankakee Lions Club, where he was president twice; Boy Scouts of America, where he was past district chairman; Rainbow Council, where he was vice president and treasurer; and, New Horizons Band, where he enjoyed playing the trumpet. He was an avid sports fan, tennis player with a wicked serve, fly fisherman, and occasional golfer. Jim’s career included vice president of sales and marketing for Roper Corporation and in later years, financial consultant for Shearson, Smith Barney and Cambridge Investments.

Jim married the love of his life, Eve Reczek, in Chicago. The moment Jim laid eyes on Eve, he knew she was the one and only. Family meant everything to Jim. There never was a phone call or visit that didn’t end with “I love you” and his special third-finger salute. Jim enjoyed traveling to places like the Caribbean, Europe, Hawaii, and Mexico, cheering on his girls and grandchildren in their sporting endeavors, ’47 doing the 60-second morning Word Jumble, going on daily James “Jim” P. Brown breakfast outings with Eve, and passed away on Wednesday, his “not often enough” trips March 8, 2017 at Miller to Minnesota to visit family Healthcare Center in Kankakee. and pals; he never wasted a Jim was born in St. Paul, the minute of life. Although he will son of Cyrus P. and Dorothy not physically be a part of the E. Brown. After attending St. family’s future adventures, he Paul Academy, Jim received will be in their hearts sharing a B.A. degree from Williams every single moment. College, and attended Harvard


Jim was preceded in death by his parents, sister Barb, and brother Cy (Shirley) Brown. He is survived by his wife, daughters Elizabeth (Sergio) Murer and Jennifer (Paul) St. Clair, his four grandchildren Alex, Molly, Rachael and Ryan who lovingly referred to him as “Papa Jim,” his nieces Kathie Brown and Leslie (Ed) O’Donnell, and great-nephew Curtis (Keri) Olufson.

’50 Richard “Dick” Harris died peacefully at the age of 85 on March 15, 2017. Dick was a graduate of St. Paul Academy and Yale University. He had a great passion for golf and jazz, and always enjoyed a good martini. Dick loved painting and writing, authoring four books in his lifetime. He spent many years in the family business, B.W. Harris Manufacturing, but upon retiring, created a golf catalogue of unique gift items. Dick served on numerous boards, including USGA Museum Committee, Minnesota Golf Association, Outward Bound, and he was a rotary member. His only regret was he never had a hole-in-one! Dick is preceded in death by his parents Charlie and Sylvia. He is survived by his loving wife of 62 years, Dee Dee; his sister, Jane Wilmer; his children, Wendy ( James) Shapiro, Richie ( Jack Palmquist), Danny ’77 (Ann), Todd ’81 (Laura); his dog, Louie; and his 6 grandchildren.

Thomas Walvoord Osborn passed away on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 at the age of 84 in his home in Laguna Beach, California. Tom was born July 19, 1932 to Stephen and Lillian Osborn, the younger of two brothers. He graduated from St. Paul Academy in 1950 and Northwestern University in 1958. Tom served in the Army as a member of the Army Jazz band, stationed in the US and Germany. Later he worked for Ecolab, launching their still popular Finish dishwasher detergent and was also an entrepreneur, marketing consultant, and Vice President of Marketing at the American Management Association. He also volunteered for several different causes including assisting small businesses with business planning. He continued to play music until his death and was an accomplished painter. Tom is survived by his wife, Valerie Osborn, along with four children: Edward (Masami) Osborn of Houston, Texas, Nicholas Osborn of Chicago, Illinois, Benjamin Osborn of Minneapolis Minnesota, and Gillian Osborn of New Orleans, Louisiana. Tom also had four stepchildren, Vanessa Sinclair, Toby Bonner-Davies, Richard Bonner-Davies and Bronwen Hunter; 16 grandchildren; and one brother, Merritt Osborn ’46 of Cleveland, Ohio. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Penelope Francis Osborn.

’74 Ellen Sell Brynteson passed away on March 1, 2017 while vacationing with her husband Richard Brynteson ’73 in Mexico. Ellen was an amazing wife and mother, grandmother, wonderful daughter, and aunt. Ellen had a golden, vibrant heart that lost its beat too soon. Her radiance lit up every room, Ellen would go above, beyond, and the extra mile for her friends, neighbors, and family. Ellen was a graduate of the St. Paul Academy and Summit School, studied at Ohio Wesleyan University and the University of Minnesota, where she earned her bachelor’s degree in social work. Ellen shared her many talents in a career that spanned the country from San Francisco to New York to Washington D.C. She was an active member of the New Century Club, past member of the Junior League, and a former trustee of her alma mater, St. Paul Academy and Summit School.

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Ellen was preceded in death by her father Donald Miller Sell. She is survived by husband, Richard ’73; step-children, Jeshua (Talia) Livstrom and Illana Livstrom (Dennis Walsh); grand children, Anika, Selena, and Leo Livstrom; mother, Estelle; brothers, Mark, John ’70 and Matthew Sell (Gwen Leifeld); sister, Susan Sell ’75 (Doug Abrahms); nephews and nieces, David, Max, Emily, Rebecca, Nicholas, and Timothy; mother-in-law, Pat Brynteson; and, many other relatives and friends.

Friends Geraldine E. (Binder) Riley passed away on March 29, 2017 at home in Vadnais Heights, Minnesota. Geri was a fixture in SPA’s Randolph Campus library, serving as the Middle and Upper School library assistant until her retirement in 2006. Geri was preceded in death by her parents. She is survived by her loving husband Ronald, sons Randall ( Julie) and Ryan (Maggie); grandchildren Nathan, Caitie, Matt, Becca; sister Jeanne (Marshall) Svendsen.

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>> PERFORMANCES

Middle School Musical: The Music Man March 3-4, 2017

Middle and Upper School Jazz Concert April 30, 2017

Above: The Middle School Jazz Band

The Upper School Intermediate Jazz Band

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Left: Shefali Bijwadia ’17 presents band director Bill Mayson with flowers following the Advanced Jazz Band’s performance.


Concert photos by Greg Helgeson | Theatrical production photos by John Severson

Following tradition, the audience stands for the “Hallelujah Chorus” performed by the Upper School orchestra, choirs, and Community Chorale

Upper School Vocal/Orchestral and Community Chorale Concert April 29, 2017

Upper School One Acts January 27, 2017 A Cold Day in Hell directed by Emily Schoonover ’17

13 Ways to Screw Up Your College Interview directed by Leo Bukovsan ’17

Eiffel Tower Wedding Party directed by Eric Severson, US faculty

The Actor’s Nightmare directed by Mary Grant ’17 and Cole Thompson ’17

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Non Profit Org. U.S. Postage

PA ID

Twin Cities, MN Permit No. 3400 1712 Randolph Avenue St. Paul, MN 55105-2194 Change Service Requested

June 2017

TO PARENTS OF ALUMNI/AE: If this is no longer the current mailing address for your alumni/ae child, please let us know at alumni@spa.edu or 651-696-1318.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS August 2017 Golf and Tennis Classic Monday, August 14, 2017

Town and Country Club Visit www.spa.edu/alumni/connect/events for details

September 2017 Reunion Weekend 2017 September 8-10, 2017

Visit www.spa.edu/alumni/Reunion_Weekend_2017 for details

October 2017 Alumni/ae Council Speaker Series Thursday, October 12, 2017, 5:30 p.m.

Huss Center for the Performing Arts, Randolph Campus Visit www.spa.edu/alumni/speaker_series for details

November 2017 Young Alumni/ae Reunions: 5th, 10th, and 15th Classes of 2002, 2007, and 2012 Friday, November 24, 2017 Various metro locations; more details to follow To volunteer at your Reunion, email alumni@spa.edu

On June 7, 2017, the demolition of the east wing on the Randolph campus began, in preparation for the construction of the Hugh K. Schilling Math and Science Center. Hugh Schilling, whose $15 million gift is making the new building possible, was in attendance. See story on page 4.

Profile for St. Paul Academy

Spa Magazine Summer 2017  

Spa Magazine Summer 2017