Page 1

SENIOR DESTINATIONS MAP SEE P. 12-13

THE

Sp ke

CONESTOGA HIGH SCHOOL, BERWYN, PA

VOLUME 62 NO. 7

JUNE 4, 2012

STOGANEWS.COM

BEHIND THE

BRONZE By J e n n a S poont & He ath er Ward M anag i ng Editor & Co - editor-in - ch ief

J

unior Jenna Stewart lies down, gets comfortable and soaks in the blasting music, whirling fans and beaming lights. She is in a tanning bedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;her escape from realityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, for 6WHZDUWDQDOPRVWGDLO\ULWXDO6KHXVXDOO\WDQVIRXUWRÃ&#x20AC;YHWLPHV per week, going a minimum of two times per week. ´,MXVWGRQ·WHYHQWKLQNDERXW>WKHULVNV@,GRQ·WZDQWWRNQRZ WKDW,FDQKDYHVNLQFDQFHU,MXVWGRQ·WWKLQNDERXWLW,MXVW>WDQ@µ Stewart said. Junior Bobbie Thorn describes tanning as peaceful and relaxing. Before prom, Thorn bought a subscription to a local tanning VDORQ%XWDIWHUZDWFKLQJWKH<RX7XEHYLGHR´'HDU\HDUROG 0Hµ7KRUQFKDQJHGKHURSLQLRQRQWDQQLQJ ´,VDZ>WKHYLGHR@ZKHQ,VWLOOKDGP\VXEVFULSWLRQVRRQFH LWUXQVRXW,·PQRWJRLQJEDFNDQ\PRUH,W·VQRWZRUWKLWµ7KRUQ said. See TANNING, p. 4 Photo Illustration: Margot Field and Karolis Panavas/The SPOKE


PAGE 2 THE SPOKE

“I got into the TV studio program freshman year and I was just so taken in by the amount of equipment that we have at Conestoga and the opportunities that we really have.”

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

NEWS

stoganews .com Scan this QR code with your smartphone camera to read a story about the tennis team’s second consecutive PIAA Class AAA Team Tennis title on May 19 at the Hershey Raquet Club.

Junior Zach Lowry describes his TETV package that placed fourth in the Student Television Network’s Summer Nationals. Full story on Stoganews.com.

Follow us: @thespoke Yuge Xiao for The SPOKE

Beaumont fourth graders wait beside the ’Stoga track before the Conestoga Relays on May 22. Hundreds of elementary school students competed at the event in teams of four.

Pioneer Posts: Upcoming in community Reflections will be held today, June 4, at Daylesford Abbey at 7 p.m, with speeches and musical performances. Graduation will take place tomorrow, June 5, at the Villanova University Pavilion at 7 p.m. Final exams begin on June 7 for English and world languages. Social studies and science finals will be held on June 8. Math and makeup exams will be held on June 11. June 12 is a half day and the tentative last day of school for all students. Students should be ready to return their textbooks to their teachers. Sports preseason practices begin on Aug. 13. Those planning to play a fall sport must turn in their athletic forms before the season begins.

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Find us on Twitter (@thespoke) and Facebook for exclusive online content.


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

PAGE 3 THE SPOKE

NEWS

English department closes book on â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;One Book, One â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Claire Moran Business Manager

lar program in Philadelphia and at other schools. In the program, the entire school reads a certain book for summer reading and holds discussions about the book, with students from every grade level particiSDWLQJGXULQJWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWFRXSOHZHHNV of school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Book, One â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stogaâ&#x20AC;?

not to continue the policy for this coming summer. ´:HZHUHKDYLQJWURXEOHĂ&#x20AC;QGWhen freshman Paulina Freed ing a book that would be approfirst came to Conestoga in Seppriate, or books that would be tember, she was nervous about appropriate, for all grades and all starting a new school. She knew, levels of readers, something that however, that there was at least could be a meaningful experience one thing she would for everyone,â&#x20AC;? English have common with teacher Megan Doyle everyone else at the said. â&#x20AC;? school, her sumWendy Towle, a mer reading. With district curriculum Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;One supervisor, agrees, Book, One â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stonoting the diversity gaâ&#x20AC;? program, every between the youngest Conestoga student, and oldest students regardless of grade could not be bridged and English class in one book. read â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Glass ´, GHĂ&#x20AC;QLWHO\ OLNHG Castle.â&#x20AC;? the idea behind the -Curriculum supervisor Wendy Towle â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me, the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;One Book, One â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stofact that you know gaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; approach to buildat least something ing a reading comthatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be the same in every PXQLW\,WKLQN,GHĂ&#x20AC;QLWHO\DJUHHG grade [was reassuring],â&#x20AC;? Freed said. was instituted after the 2009-2010 with the teachers and the feedback â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coming in [and] everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school year, when all students were we got from the kids too that it was reading the same books so it kind of assigned to read Mark Haddonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s YHU\YHU\GLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWWRĂ&#x20AC;QGDJRRG â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Curious Incident of the Dog book that appealed to kids who are helps bring the school together.â&#x20AC;? The â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Book, One â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stogaâ&#x20AC;? in the Night Time.â&#x20AC;? However, the ninth grade and kids who are in program was modeled after a simi- English department has decided 12th grade,â&#x20AC;? Towle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just at very different places, different interests, different levels of maturity [and] different levels of literary skill.â&#x20AC;? Choosing summer reading is a GLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWEDODQFLQJDFWIRUWHDFKHUV because they must pick books that relate to the course curriculum and appeal to a broad range of stdents in order to avoid alienating them from reading over the summer. 7KHDGGHGWDVNRIĂ&#x20AC;QGLQJDERRN that would be appropriate for all grades proved too challenging for the English teachers this year. Although choosing summer reading books for individual classes helps to ensure that each class has a book WKDWPHHWVLWVVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FQHHGV'R\OH believes â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Book, One â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stogaâ&#x20AC;? provided the school with a sense of unity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We thought it would be something neat to do so siblings could talk about it and friends in other grade levels and it would keep, I think, some students from feeling marginalized, like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m reading this little book and someone is reading this big book.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; So we saw it as kind of a unifying experience,â&#x20AC;? Doyle said. Conestoga is not alone. Numerous libraries, cities and schools across the country have adopted similar programs to unify their

Students are â&#x20AC;&#x153;just at very different places, different levels of maturity [and] different levels of literary skill.â&#x20AC;?

Books every student read underâ&#x20AC;&#x153;One Book, One â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stogaâ&#x20AC;?in the summers of 2010 and 2011, respectively.

Some of the books Conestoga students will read under this summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s reading requirements Photo Illustration: Lavi Ben-Dor/The SPOKE

FRPPXQLWLHV 7KH Ă&#x20AC;UVW VXFK SURgram originated in Seattle in 1998 when the Washington Center for the Public Book used grants and funding from local sponsors to initiate its â&#x20AC;&#x153;If All Seattle Read the Same Bookâ&#x20AC;? program. According to the Library of Congress, in December 2005, there were more than 350 â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Bookâ&#x20AC;? programs in the United States. These programs have a similar purpose as Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program. They aim to unite the community through discussion over a common book. Junior Brendan Bense believes asssigning different books for different courses is a better approach than â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Book, One â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stogaâ&#x20AC;? because with the books under the program are often not challenging

enough for higher-level English courses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttimeâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;was more aimed at what seemed like, I feel like would be something I wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve read in sixth or seventh grade comparatively to now,â&#x20AC;? Bense said. Sophomore Alyssa Marino thinks that â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Glass Castleâ&#x20AC;? was a good choice for the Conestoga community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel like we need to be exposed to different experiences than what we have around and different life stories so we can learn and have a more well- rounded community,â&#x20AC;? Marino said. Claire Moran can be reached at cmoran@stoganews.com.


PAGE 4 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

NEWS

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MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

PAGE 5 THE SPOKE

NEWS

Students seek healthy alternatives, avoid consequences

Continued from p. 4

Hitting home Erin Stava gazed at her infant, Anne, who sported a white t-shirt with her grandmother’s picture printed on the front. Stava is the daughter of former Valley Forge Elementary School teacher Mary Anne Copeland, who passed away from melanoma in 2009. “It’s challenging to have someone that you love go through something so serious,” Stava said. “Especially with melanoma, I feel like there’s more awareness of it now, but when my mom went through everything, we didn’t know that much about it.” Stava said she felt honored to take part in the Safe From the Sun Walk & 5K Run on May 12 at Villanova University with her baby daughter. After emotionally reminiscing the life of her mother, Stava gave advice to those who have embarked on a similar journey with their loved one. “Just be as strong as you can be,” Stava said. “Just having enough people around you to support you is the most important thing that you can do.” Catherine Poole, president and founder of the MIF, battled melanoma 22 years ago. She later started a forum on the MIF website for caregivers and those dealing with the disease, regarding treatment plans, doctors and moral support. “My biggest message to people is check your skin. You know your body better than any doctor does, so check your skin regularly. If you see something that’s different, new, has

changed, get it checked,” Poole said. “When the disease spreads, it goes to your brain, it goes to your liver and your lungs and it kills you, quickly. We have some therapies, but not good ones. Find it early; get cured.” Melanoma kills more young women than any other cancer, including breast cancer, according to Poole. She said that melanoma does not have the same amount of camaraderie and awareness as breast cancer does. In order to gather patients and supporters, Poole organized the annual Safe from the Sun Walk in 2003. “This event is actually the largest [melanoma event] in the world,” Poole said. “This is like family reunion day for a lot of people that have lost people or have somebody ÀJKWLQJWKHGLVHDVHµ Sophomore Jordan Sticklin ran with a team of 20 people to support his neighbor, who is currently battling melanoma. “It’s a great cause and I know that there are a lot of people out there who have melanoma, and that they might not even know about it,” Sticklin said. “And it’s important to raise money for it and be aware.”

Mela-no-more According to the CDC, melanoma survival rates are at 99 percent when the cancer has been discovered before it enters the skin. However, once the melanoma enters the skin and into the lymph nodes and bloodstream, the survival rate drops to 15 percent. “We’re still a long way from an ideal treatment,” Brod said. “Catch-

ing it early makes all of the difference in the world.” Junior Min Chun found a mole on her skin when she was in seventh grade and decided to get it checked out by a dermatologist. “There was a little something above my ear and they thought it was skin cancer, so over the summer I had an operation to remove it,” Chun said. ´,WGHÀQLWHO\PDGHPHPRUHFDUHIXO around the sun.”

Bronze safely Students who desire a healthy glow have other options, such as spray tans or the use of tanning moisturizers. Junior Molly Dudrear applied Jergens natural glow lotion every night for three days before junior prom. “I just wanted to stay away from anything that could potentially cause skin cancer,” Dudrear said. “I just wanted to go with the healthier option.” Dudrear said that her family certainly recognizes the importance of applying sunscreen. “We make sure to reapply after being in the water for too long. We call everybody out at the same time and we all apply the sunscreen together to make sure we’re all covered,” Dudrear said. Chun decided to take the healthier option as well. She got a spray tan and used the Jergens cream, but still believes that the sun gives the best tan.

“I used a cream … and I thought it was better than a spray tan. It was simple—you just put it on. You don’t have to drive anywhere and if you don’t like it you can just take it off. I think people want something quicker, though, because you have to put [the lotion] on repeatedly,” Chun said. Sunless tans, including creams and self-tanner can be purchased in drug stores, and most tanning salons offer spray tans as an alternative to UV ray beds. Although the FDA is still conducting tests on many sunless tanning products, they have been proven to be safer than UV rays as long as they are combined with a sun protection factor (SPF). Although the staggering statistics

about skin cancer are rising, exposure to the sun is inevitable, especially with summer just around the corner. “As for being outside, I think it’s about making smart choices,” Newcomb said. Newcomb suggested that the use of sunscreen and protective clothing, such as hats, can make all of the difference. “If kids know that all of [their] friends are jumping on this bandwagon and realizing that [skin cancer] can happen, maybe we’ll all start to be a little more accepting of the skin we’re in,” Mariani said. Jenna Spoont can be reached at jspoont@stoganews.com.

Runners take off at the starting line of the Safe From the Sun 5K Run/Walk at Villanova University on May 12.

Photos Karolis Panavas/The SPOKE Graphic: Margot Field/The SPOKE

Anne Stava, granddaughter of former Valley Forge Elementary School teacher Mary Anne Copeland sports a t-shirt in memory of her grandmother at the melanoma awareness Safe From the Sun 5K Run/Walk.


PAGE 6 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

NEWS

Junior Classical League conquers at state convention Claire Moran & Patrick Nicholson Business Manager & Staff Reporter

in a lot of work: the club met every other Friday, practiced for Certamen, a Roman quiz show and organized a routine for the spirit competitions. Individual students worked on art More than 700 people gathered to projects and speeches. Conestoga is part of Division walk around in togas and offer burnt food offerings to the Roman gods. Two, because it has a smaller JCL This scene, however, was not one team. Students took academics tests from a book or movie about Ancient in a number of Latin-related subjects. Rome; it was the scene of the Penn- There was a Roman banquet, a toga sylvania Junior Classical League parade, and spirit competitions. Conestoga students also received points Convention on May 18-20. Twenty-six students from the for submitting to the state newsletter. Conestoga Junior Classical League, According to senior JCL co-president including five from Valley Forge Nina Gurak, the convention is a unifyMiddle School, participated in the ing experience for all participants. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a JCL song that we all 61st annual Pennsylvania JCL Convention at Penn State University. The sing and we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really know what WHDPZRQĂ&#x20AC;UVWSODFHIRUWKHWKLUG\HDU weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing, but we all get together in a row and received many individual and hold hands and sing this song. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very unifying and I kind of like that awards as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We won our division, but we sort of moment when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all one won it last year too, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re continu- and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like competing; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just ing on in our domination, Roman for fun,â&#x20AC;? Gurak said. Freshman Bobby Pragada said style,â&#x20AC;? JCL sponsor and Latin teacher Kirsten Whitaker said. It was â&#x20AC;&#x153;just his favorite part of the convention a really stellar performance by all involved a chariot built by junior Jed Thompson. participants.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;He brought a wooden chariot, and To achieve their victory, JCL put

my friend and I pulled the chariot up and down the streets of Penn State shouting out to different cars and people. And that was actually pretty hilarious,â&#x20AC;? Pragada said. For Gurak, who has seen this club JURZIURPLWVEHJLQQLQJVDVDĂ&#x20AC;YH person club at Valley Forge Middle School to the current twenty-sixmember state champions, the win is particularly memorable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Its just been really, really great. JCLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a little bit of a home for me in the school community because Latin is a language that attracts interesting people and I think thatâ&#x20AC;Ś [is] really showcased through JCL kind of getting to hang out with and learn from and experience all these fun things with great individuals,â&#x20AC;? Gurak said. Sophomore Manasvi Ramanujam, attending for the fourth year in a row, said she appreciated the way students could bond with others who share their passion for Latin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really great for anyone who takes Latin, and I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a way that you know, if you think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all alone in your Latin

Courtesy Kirsten Whitaker Members of JCL show their spirit at a spirit contest at the state convention, KHOGIURP0D\7KHWHDPZRQĂ&#x20AC;UVWSODFHIRUWKHWKLUG\HDULQDURZ nerdi-ness, you go there and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just as passionate about Latin as you are, and it makes you feel like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re part of this big community,â&#x20AC;? she said. Ramanujam also noted that what made the convention special was the fact that everyone could FRPSHWH LQ D Ă&#x20AC;HOG WKH\ HQMR\HG from athletics to art and music to poetry recitation.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a bunch of disciplines coming together so that everyone can have fun, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just Latin,â&#x20AC;? Ramanujam said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a place for everyone there, and I like that Latin brings you together like that, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see that in a lot of other languages.â&#x20AC;? Claire Moran can be reached at cmoran@stoganews.com.

School board works to expand revenue with donation button Lavi Ben-Dor & Isha Damle News Editor & Staff Reporter Over the past few months, the T/E school board has been battling its $6.17 million deficit. Because of a new proposal, cutting school programs and faculty may no longer be needed. The proposal, approved at a policy meeting on May 23, would set up a button on the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website that would allow community members to donate to the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general fund, which supports all school programs in the district. According to school board president Karen Cruickshank, the board is looking to raise money for a more general population through a button that takes users to a donations page. There are â&#x20AC;&#x153;lots of people who want to go to [the] website and have an easy way to just â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;clickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and donate money. I think the population is really used to doing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re used to going to a website, clicking a button and making a donation,â&#x20AC;? Cruickshank said.

Initially, according to Cruikshank, the website will provide information to send a check to a specific address, but hopes that by the end of the summer the board will have a PayPal program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To start with, the [school boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal] is going to be kind of broad- itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to gain more contributions towards the general fund,â&#x20AC;? Cruickshank said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that once [the button] has been up there and we have time to see how it works, [the school board] will start narrowing its focus more and do more with publicity to make sure people know about it. More will develop once [people] start getting used to it.â&#x20AC;? The public has always been able to contribute to the school district, but donations are usually in the form of items like SmartBoards and books. According to Cruickshank, the board but has never promoted its ability to accept financial donations.

Though the board hopes that the revenue the button creates will alleviate the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget deficit, Cruickshank does not believe that it is the only solution for helping the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial situation. She said that the best way to resolve the crisis is for

swer, because the problem is too bigâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I think it really has to be solved a multitude of ways.â&#x20AC;? Junior Surabhi Ghai said that she believes the button will be utilized and helpful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that a donation button is a great idea. We receive a great education, so I think most people who can afford it will be willing to donate, especially now more than ever because of the circumstances with the increasing deficit,â&#x20AC;? Ghai said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how much money it could potentially raise, but any amount would help.â&#x20AC;? David Levine, father of sophomore Noah Levine, agrees. He donated $100 for each of the 53 total years his family has studied at T/E schools at the March 27 board meeting after understanding the difficulty of the budget situation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had gone to the meeting with no intention of donating, and I lis-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If everybody does a little, then we can ÂżQGRXUZD\WKURXJKWKLV´ %RDUGSUHVLGHQW.DUHQ&UXLFNVKDQN the community to rally together and help the board succeed in its negotiations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The problem is a multimillion dollar problem. So, do we think that we can raise millions? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think we canâ&#x20AC;Ś[the button] is one piece of the puzzle that is our answer [to the financial situation],â&#x20AC;? Cruickshank said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If everybody [in the district] does a littleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;if everybody does a piece of the puzzleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;then we can find our way through this. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think this is the only an-

tened to the students and the board members talk,â&#x20AC;? Levine said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands were tied, and I decided to write a check as an appreciation for the great work the board has done.â&#x20AC;? Levine also believes that a donation button could succeed if the board publicized it so that the community would know how to donate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great a idea, [but] I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably going to need some people to encourage others to contribute, to explain what a good deal Tredyffrin-Easttown is and what exceptional schools we need to contribute to,â&#x20AC;? Levine said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It needs to be more than just a button.â&#x20AC;? Cruickshank admits that the success of the button is not easily predictable, but hopes for the best. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would like to say that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty optimistic about the success of the button, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know. Money is tight for a lot of people, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m willing to be cautiously optimistic,â&#x20AC;? Cruickshank said. Lavi Ben-Dor can be reached at lbendor@stoganews.com.


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

PAGE 7 THE SPOKE

NEWS

Teachers continue passion for teaching after Conestoga Shwetha Sudhakar Operations Director Starting next year, students will no longer hear the characteristic Italian opera drifting out of Room 244 as they pass by the language hallway. Italian teacher Anthony Russo is retiring at the end of this year, along with art teacher Gary Kerschner and special education teacher Nancy McMullen. Russo began teaching one year after the Italian program started and has continued to develop the program for 17 years. McMullen, a Conestoga graduate, has taught here for 27 years, while Kerschner has been teaching at Conestoga for 42 years. While these teachers will not return next year, Russo has plans for the future—teaching Italian to adults and possibly singing. Russo said he will especially miss the “positive student reactions” and “excitement for learning,” but hopes to continue to receive such reactions from adults. Russo’s son, math teacher Vincent Russo, said that he enjoyed working alongside his father for eight years. “We both really treasure this op-

portunity to teach at the same time and place and be colleagues as well as father and son,” Vincent Russo said. “It’s really been an exceptional experience for us.” Vincent Russo added that his father was an inspiration to him to begin a teaching career. “During my early years, [my father] gave me guidance because he had been here a while and knew how things worked,” Vincent Russo said. “Even though our disciplines are different, his passion for his Italian inspires me to share my passion with my kids.” Junior Katherine Connolly had Anthony Russo as a teacher and enjoyed his methods of teaching. “Mr. Russo always makes class interesting with his classic quips from 'Seinfeld' and 'The Godfather,'” Connolly said. “I can’t imagine him not teaching Italian, so I can understand why he would still want to teach adults.” Similar to Anthony Russo, McMullen hopes to continue teaching, but by acting as a substitute and tutoring after school. Because of her experiences with elementary school

Courtesy Pioneer Yearbook

Special education teacher Nancy McMullen, art teacher Gary Kerschner and Italian teacher Anthony Russo are retiring at the end of the year. Russo and McMullen both hope to continue to teach after they leave. students as part of REACH and Peer Mediation, she wants to work with younger students as well. “I enjoy working with older age groups because it’s stimulating mentally in the subject areas,” McMullen said. “I love all age groups, though, so I want to substitute for all ages.” Junior Chelsea Harbison had McMullen as a teacher this year and said she will miss McMullen’s teaching style.

“I’ll miss her [because] she’s always so bubbly,” Harbison said. “She’s always so excited to see her students and [is] a great teacher.” While both McMullen and Anthony Russo have various activities planned for the future, both retain fond memories of Conestoga and its students. Anthony Russo said he will remember the bonding experiences he gained from having students for all three years of Italian, as well as Italian Culture Day.

McMullen said that as she continues to teach and also tutor after school, what she will remember most of all is the relationships formed with the faculty and students. “I will miss the faculty and the intelligence, the group of people, the creativity,” McMullen said. “I don’t WKLQN\RXFDQÀQGDPXFKÀQHUJURXS of people to work with.” Shwetha Sudhakar cam be reached at ssudhakar@stoganews.com.


Opinion MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

The Spoke is published seven times per year at Bartash Printing. It consistently receives the Gold Award from the Pennsylvania School Press Association and is a National School Press Association Pacemaker awardwinning publication. The Spoke serves as a public forum for student expression. Editors-in-chief: Heather Ward, Haley Xue Managing Editor: Jenna Spoont News Editor: Lavi Ben-Dor Op-Ed Editor: Allison Kozeracki Features Editor: Natalie West Sports Editors: Maddie Amsterdam, Abby Pioch Centerspread Editor: Noah Levine Convergence Editor: Suproteem Sarkar Design Editor: Margot Field Photo Editor: Karolis Panavas Business Manager: Claire Moran Operations Director: Shwetha Sudhakar Graphic Designer: Anisa Tavangar Cartoonist: Maggie Chen Photographer: Madeline DeVlieger Staff: Kelly Benning, Isha Damle, Courtney Kennedy, Emily Klein, David Kramer, Aly Mingione, Patrick Nicholson, Sophia Ponte, James Redmond, YingYing Shang Faculty Advisers: Susan Houseman, Cynthia Crothers-Hyatt

Submissions The Spoke will print letters of general interest to the student body and community. Signed letters under 200 words may be submitted to Heather Ward, Haley Xue, Susan Houseman or Cynthia Hyatt. Unsigned editorials represent the views of The Spoke editorial board, and not necessarily those of the administration, student body, community or advertisers. The opinions expressed in signed columns are those of the writer and not necessarily the opinion of The Spoke.

Dose of reality The Spoke encourages school administration to take more action against drug problems at Conestoga An entry on Urban Dictionary about â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stoga reads: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slogan: welcome to Conestoga High School, where the grades are high and the students are higher.â&#x20AC;? Although Urban Dictionary is considered a TXHVWLRQDEOH VRXUFH RI LQIRUPDWLRQ VLQFH GHĂ&#x20AC;nitions are user-generated, the entry reveals the teenage perspective of our school, a perspective that suggests that Conestoga, like many other schools across the nation, has a drug problem. Results from the 2009 Pennsylvania Youth Survey show alarming statistics regarding drug abuse in Chester County. According to the survey, the past-30-day consumption of alcohol is 33 percent among high school sophomores and 50.3 percent among seniors. Marijuana past-30day use is 15.9 percent and 26.1 percent respectively. Compared to the national statistics shown in the Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey, which is conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Chester Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s percentages were slightly higher than national averages. Despite the statistics and various drug-related incidents during the school year, the school administration has yet to explicitly address the drug problem at Conestoga. The alleged selling, buying and use of drugs this school year by students is no secretâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been reported in our local media. The Spoke believes that the school administration should openly acknowledge that drug abuse is a serious issue at our school and for teenagers in general. Doing so will help provide the safer, more productive and more enriching learning environment that the school continually VWULYHVWRDFKLHYH$FNQRZOHGJHPHQWLVWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW step in developing solutions to combat teenage drug abuse. Although the school has taken actions to promote a drug-free environment, such as having

GUXJVQLIĂ&#x20AC;QJGRJVLQVSHFWVWXGHQWEDFNSDFNVDQG lockers, the administration should realize that simply relying on already-established methods alone ZLOO QRW VLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQWO\ UHPHG\ WKH GUXJ SUREOHP Instead, the administration should take a proactive stance and educate both students and teachers to recognize the symptoms of who may be under WKHLQĂ XHQFHRIGUXJVDVZHOODVZRUNWRIRVWHUD more open and frank attitude in addressing drugrelated incidents. We are a part of the school, and we have the right to know of any occurrence that may threaten the learning atmosphere. With the end of another school year just days away, the school should adopt new policies in order to create a better learning environment for the upcoming school year. The administration should consider holding an assembly, similar to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Date Rapeâ&#x20AC;? assembly, to explicitly outline the disciplinary actions related to illegal possession of drugs and to openly express that Conestoga has a drug problem that the administration LVZRUNLQJWRĂ&#x20AC;[$ORQJZLWKKDYLQJ´VXVSLFLRXV persons announcements,â&#x20AC;? we should also have announcements and letters informing community members of drug abuse incidents. Programs like DARE, which is provided to middle-school students, should be continued. Resources should also be allocated to additional programs such as those provided by the COAD Group (formerly Chester County Council on Addictive Diseases) to further promote drug prevention. At the same time, we should also celebrate Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s many achievements, including its ranking as the third best high school in Pennsylvania. However, while keeping in mind our academic excellence, it is more important to openly acknowledge that problems exist and actively work with members of the school community to Ă&#x20AC;[WKRVHSUREOHPV

Contact Us Email: spoke@stoga.net Phone: 610-240-1046 The Spoke accepts paid advertisements. Email cmoran@stoganews.com. Visit The Spoke online at www.stoganews.com News Director: Suproteem Sarkar ssarkar@stoganews.com

Margot Field/The SPOKE

From the Editor:

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was little...â&#x20AC;? Haley Xue Co-editor-in-chief Every time I hear the words â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, when I was littleâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? from my parents, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m seized with an uncontrollable urge to sigh loudly and roll my eyes. As hard as I may try to pay attention to the often long childhood ramblings about walking two miles to school every day at the crack of dawn, or about walking a mile to the local well to fetch buckets of water to lug home for baths, ,IUHTXHQWO\Ă&#x20AC;QGP\VHOI]RQLQJRXWDQGVXGGHQly engrossed by the pencil in my hand that has seemingly become extremely interesting. Although I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t admit this to my parents, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m consistently impressed by what they had to HQGXUHDVFKLOGUHQDQGKRZPXFKPRUHGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOW life must have been for them when comparing their lives to the life full of modern technology and luxuries that I have the privilege of enjoying. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m also thankful because the lessons they learned from their experiences are the ones they teach to meâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the most important being not to take things for granted. But most of all, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m scared. Every time I hear about how my dad had to cook, clean, sew, do the laundry and take care of his little brother while both his parents were away at work until the late hours of the night, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m plagued by feelings of anxiety and worry. I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had the chance to experience as many hardships as my parents had when they were teenagers, leading me to believe that I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to grow or mature enough as they have. Especially in the era of computers, the Internet, luxury cars and designer handbags, my concern LVDPSOLĂ&#x20AC;HG:KLOHP\PRP¡VRQO\RSWLRQZDV to walk to school in the rain and snow, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m able to sit cozily on a heated bus as raindrops pound on the window panes. While my dad had to make multiple treks to the local well for water, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m able to take a shower at the turn of a faucet. And while my dad had to learn to cook at the age of seven, I still havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t conquered my fear of knives. Although the â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was littleâ&#x20AC;? stories become a bit boring after several retellings, we can still appreciate them and learn from them as our parents did. As teenagers, although physically most of us have stopped growing, emotionally we still have a lot of room to mature. We still have countless chances to make our own mistakes and encounter new obstacles. And when we do, we shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t run, but face them with the fortitude, GULYHDQGQHFHVVLW\WRWDFNOHZKDW¡VGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOW Haley Xue can be reached at hxue@stoganews.com.


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

PAGE 9 THE SPOKE

OP/ED

Social media overuse spoils societal interactions WLRQUHQGHUVHDFKSRVWLQVLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQWRU your obsession with acquiring â&#x20AC;&#x153;likesâ&#x20AC;? ruins your peace of mind. With the proliferation of social media throughout the student population, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easier than ever to show your support for a causeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as simple as clicking a button. But with this increase in conveSuproteem Sarkar nience comes the risk of â&#x20AC;&#x153;likingâ&#x20AC;? Convergence Editor WKLQJVMXVWWRĂ&#x20AC;WLQZLWKSHHUV:LWK social media overuse, you risk buildI donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like anything. 6SHFLĂ&#x20AC;FDOO\,GRQ¡WIHHODQXUJH ing an online persona that does not to depress my left mouse button over WUXO\UHĂ HFWZKR\RXDUHDVDSHUVRQ upside down thumbs-down symbols but instead demonstrates a desire to that cross my mouse pointerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s path conform rather than form your own opinions. when I am browsing the Web. On Facebook, each post is acFacebook enthusiasts, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got some news to share with youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;some companied by a list of other users important news that you probably that have â&#x20AC;&#x153;likedâ&#x20AC;? it. The idea behind wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;like.â&#x20AC;? Excessive social media this design decision may have been use discourages people from forming to increase social engagement, but it their own opinions and gets in the way also encourages social media users to second-guess themselves when they of real-world communication. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t view this as criticism against are browsing their newsfeeds. <RXPD\Ă&#x20AC;QGLWHDVLHUWR´OLNHÂľ Facebookâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still a remarkably useful tool. Many students have been able or read something that many people WRĂ&#x20AC;QGSURGXFWLYHXVHVIRUWKHVRFLDO you know have â&#x20AC;&#x153;liked,â&#x20AC;? even though networking siteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from organizing it means that you may be missing out on another interesting post that you protests to forming study groups. That being said, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a limit to ignored since it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t well-â&#x20AC;&#x153;likedâ&#x20AC;? how much you can use social media enough. Excessive social media use can before the overabundance of informa-

also develop into a dependence on online interaction. If after posting something especially interesting online, you check back on it every 10 seconds or so to see if someone has commented, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re spending a lot more time on social media than you need to be. A few weeks ago, I was speaking with somebody about a movie that we had both watched. In the middle of our conversation, he pulled out his phone and started checking his news feed. What troubled me the most was that he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even realize that I had stopped talking after he unlocked his phone. He continued to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yeah, I knowâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dude, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crazyâ&#x20AC;? to my speechless face while scrolling through the same posts he had read two minutes earlier. The addictive nature of social media can also lead to sharing information solely for the sake of â&#x20AC;&#x153;likesâ&#x20AC;? or retweets. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no issue with sharing something online that interests you. There is a problem, though, if you think the reason no one â&#x20AC;&#x153;likedâ&#x20AC;? your post is that no one cares about what you have to say. Once, I listened to someone lament about how that one post that she had spent, like, so much time on, like,

only got, like, 37 â&#x20AC;&#x153;likes.â&#x20AC;? I listened to her soliloquy in silence, but now I wish that I could have given her two pieces of advice. One was to stop using the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;likeâ&#x20AC;? as one-fourth of her vocabulary. The other was to take a step back and realize how engrossed she had become with social media and how much more it was troubling her than it should have been. Since her sole interest was to increase the number of â&#x20AC;&#x153;likesâ&#x20AC;? on her post, she failed to realize that the people who decided to click a button after reading a few witty sentences that she constructed probably wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember what they were about after a few days. Without a doubt, using social media as a way to communicate, study or entertain yourself can be healthy in moderation. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid to express your own point of view, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hesitate to reply to what your friends post. At the same time, I encourage you to avoid the consequences of using social media excessively. Chances are, your friends wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like it. Suproteem Sarkar can be reached at ssarkar@stoganews.com.

Report Card Graduation + Seniors move on to next stage in their lives - Have to say goodbye to seniors

One Book, One â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stoga + Removal clears time for other curriculum - No more unity over a common book

Summer Jobs + Source of income without having schoolwork - Less time for fun in the sun

Fourth of July + Barbecues and fireworks rekindle patriotism - Late-night fireworks can make it hard to sleep

Preseason + Earlier start means more time to prepare - Vacation plans may be cut short

Final Exams + Last tests of the year - More studying as the final days of school wind down Maggie Chen/The SPOKE


PAGE 10 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

OP/ED

Facebook helps students succeed

Allison Kozeracki Op-Ed Editor Since I created my account in ÀIWKJUDGH)DFHERRNKDVVHUYHGDVD IUHTXHQWPHGLXPIRUSURFUDVWLQDWLRQ ,QIDFWP\QHZVIHHGRQO\VHHPVWR LQWHUHVWPHZKHQ,NQRZGHHSGRZQ WKDW,UHDOO\VKRXOGEHGRLQJVRPHWKLQJHOVHPRUHSURGXFWLYH6FUROOLQJ WKURXJK WULYLDO VWDWXV XSGDWHV DQG SLFWXUHVVHHPVHVSHFLDOO\HQWKUDOOLQJ ZKHQ D GLIÀFXOW WHVW ORRPV RQ WKH KRUL]RQ 7KDWEHLQJVDLGLWFDPHDVDVXUSULVHZKHQ,UHDOL]HGWKDW)DFHERRN FRXOGDFWXDOO\KHOSPHVWXG\%HLQJ D PHPEHU RI WZR )DFHERRN VWXG\ JURXSV³RQHIRU$3(XURSHDQ+LVWRU\ DQG RQH IRU +RQRUV$PHULFDQ /LWHUDWXUH³KDVKHOSHGPHLPPHQVHO\ WKLV \HDU7KHUHIRUH , HQFRXUDJH HYHU\RQHWRFUHDWHMRLQDQGSRVWLQ )DFHERRNVWXG\JURXSV

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“Are Facebook study groups helpful?”

“ Facebook study groups have the potential to help some students study, and there is really no way for them to hurt a student’s score, so I think that they’re a pretty good idea.” -Freshman Jake Moran

“ Facebook study groups [are helpful] as an outlet for stress where everyone goes in and posts funny videos or comments to make coping with the work easier.” -Sophomore Rachel Klein

“Not only do people post some really helpful study links and videos, but it’s [also] a great place to ask quick technical questions and collectively vent or complain about assignments. ”

-Junior Mariam Sarkessian

Carelessness toward littering disguises serious situation

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MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

PAGE 11 THE SPOKE

OP/ED

Swimsuit season brings new insecurities

YingYing Shang Staff Reporter

Maggie Chen/The SPOKE

To t h e Edi to r Dear Editor,

Letters Policy What are you agitated about? Do you have an opinion about something weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve published? The Spoke will print letters of general interest to the student body and community. Signed letters under 200 words may be submitted to the editorial board. Email us at spoke@stoga.net.

stoganews

.com

Go online to comment on our articles

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m writing in regard to your article on the most recent school board meeting (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students react to proposed teacher demotions,â&#x20AC;? May 2012 p. 1). It was great to see my fellow classmates band together to protest the suggested demotion of teachers. I, like many of my fellow students, was against this plan. Our teachers work hard and they deserve their salaries. I understand WKHEXGJHWFULVLVDW7(LVGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWEXWKRSHIXOO\WKHVFKRROERDUGZLOOEH able to work out the crisis. ,WZDVJUHDWWRVHHVRPDQ\VWXGHQWVWDNHDQLQWHUHVWLQWKHGHĂ&#x20AC;FLWDQG I hope that they continue to stay informed about the issues that our entire community faces. Juliana Clifton Sophomore

Dear Editor, I read your article about the â&#x20AC;&#x153;pink slimeâ&#x20AC;? scare that is sweeping the nation (â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stoga cafeteria bypasses slime scare, sells safe beef,â&#x20AC;? May 2012 p. 6) and I was greatly relieved to learn that Conestoga has avoided selling pink slime to students. In addition to being unappetizing and lacking in nutritional value, pink slime may be unsafe for consumption. Children especially should not be exposed to the potentially harmful bacteria that could slip past inspection. ,DPJODGWRVHHWKDWRXUGLVWULFWLVQRWSXWWLQJĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOFRQVLGHUDWLRQV above the safety of students. Kristen Klemens Sophomore

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graffitied on the wall of the girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bathroom. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scrawled in Sharpie on a pink Post-it note in a locker. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s repeated over and overâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but as summer strips us down to swimsuits and bikinis, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still so hard to believe: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re beautiful. Summer signals the onset of swimsuit season. In todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s media-driven society, where bikinis grow skimpier and billboard models only grow skinnier, summer can also mean a rush of insecurities and body image worries. Summer peels away our protective layers, leaving us vulnerable to unattainable beauty ideals that only lead to discontent with ourselves and our bodies. Open a fashion magazine to any page to see a voluptuous model, the very emblem of sexuality and youth, with a 17-inch waistâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;gloriously Photoshopped, of course. Every ordinary human being not proportioned like a goddess feels automatically inadequate. Both genders experience selfdoubt. Barbieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waist has been shrinking, but G.I. Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biceps have been growing. Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unreasonably thin women or unnaturally muscled men, the media has distorted our perceptions of normality and increased our tendency to judge the book by its cover. Every day, teens are bombarded by unrealistic images of beautiful and â&#x20AC;&#x153;sexyâ&#x20AC;? men and women that we feel compelled to emulate. In an increasingly appearance-oriented culture where swimsuits only get more revealing, everyone is insecure about how he or she looks, no matter

how healthy or beautiful he or she actually is. Frequently, these insecurities hold us backâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;leaving us lingering on the outskirts of the pool or slightly more socially inhibited. At worst, a study conducted by psychologists at Flinders University in Australia shows that women have lower self esteem after swimsuit shopping and are more likely to engage in so called â&#x20AC;&#x153;fat talks,â&#x20AC;? which consist of girls competitively disparaging their own bodies. Maybe Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m an idealist, but to me, summer represents carefree youth, with no room for such insecurities. Summer should be the antithesis of holding backâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a time of fun, relaxation and self discovery at the most important growth period in our lives. We shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t head to the pool worrying about how others will judge our thigh flab or ab muscles (or if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like me, lack thereof). As the trending phrase hit singer Drake recently popularized expresses, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You only live once.â&#x20AC;? With this limited time, limited youth that we possess, fully appreciate yourselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;your health, your worth, your beauty. Stop comparing yourself to others and media-driven images, and instead, learn to love your body and yourself. Find positive aspects in everyone. Learn to accept others how they are and it will be easier to accept yourself. Believe the Post-it note and not the appearance-driven images of the media. Beauty is loving yourself, not in a narcissistic way, but realizing your own self-worth. Beauty, as clichĂŠ as it sounds, is from the inside out. Beauty is the moment you jump into the pool in one fluid movement, the moment you seize the day and embrace your youth in the glory of summer, uninhibited by how you perceive your body. You have one body. Appreciate it. You have one life. Live it. YingYing Shang can be reached at yshang@stoganews.com.


SENIOR DESTINATIONS 2012 WASHINGTON

Seattle University: Elizabeth Mather

ABROAD

High School (Germany): Julia Goettert High School (Russia): Masha Philippova High School (France): Guillaume Rivier McGill University (Canada): Sarah Stern Munich Business School (Germany): Sebastian Ritz Özyeğin University (Turkey): Ali Ozgur Rodoplu Romsdal Videregående Skole (Norway): Lauren Davies

GAP YEAR/SEMESTER Griffin Bellwoar J.J. Burgwin Danielle Heron Ulrikka Makinen Jacob Salvo

MILITARY

United States Marine Corps: Felipe Vieira

UNDECIDED

Gino Del Signore Nicholas Durham Zachary Highley-Gergel Mike Ivers Brian Kotzer Christina Paolisso Grant Perme

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL

Pulse Beauty Academy: Nino Nazghaidze

UTAH

Brigham Young University: Jeannie Kwan

COLORADO

University of Colorado (Boulder): David Cairns, Elliott Cairns, Todd Christy, Kevin Cox, Garrett Creamer

PENNSYLVANIA

Unive Tracy Renn Wash Unive Morg Marle

OKLAHOMA

CALIFORNIA

Loyola Marymount University of Southern California: Griffin Boss, Caroline Moran College of Marin: Daria Gibbs University of California: Berkeley: Ben Kligman Los Angeles: Shea Chuey, Zach Fox, Andrew Metz

MIS

Oklahoma Christian University: Anna Walker

TEXAS

University of Texas: Anthony Poidomani

z

Bloomsburg University: Andrew Burger, Larry Caldwell, Aurora Mc Cue, Chris Vila Bucknell University: Zach Fisher, Clarke Fox Bryn Mawr College: Dana Bronzino, Mariah Ketterman, K.C. McConnell Cabrini College: Tommy Custer, Jordan Highbloom, Shawn Stacey Carnegie Mellon University: Jichao Sun Delaware County Community College: Avery Barrett, Shane Clark, Kyle Conaway, Jackson Gordon, Fatima Hussain, Pedro McCaskill, Mark Phelan, Donald Potts, Kevin Ryana, Chelby Sanders, Sarah Tarquinio, James Wellstein DeSales University: Claire Noone Dickinson College: Caroline Barnes, Matt Cowell, Kyle Liss Drexel University: Ashley Anapolsky, Elliot Bjork, Pari Bonakdarpour, Jascha Brettschneider, Krishna Desai, Michael DiLucca, Johanna DiNardo, Kevin Forde, Jordan Klunder, Mike McGregor, Kelsey Pailet, Zachary Paro, Rebecca Pearce, Julianna Quazi, Marc Rademaker, Miles Thomas, Josh Yan, Sophia Zahan Gettysburg College: CJ Herron, Elizabeth Lanzilotti, Emily McAleer, Katie McCoubrie Haverford College: Neal Patel Immaculata College: Dino Difrancesco , Shamere Haulcy, Courtland Manning, Jillian Pastore, Jasmine VanHoose Indiana University of Pennsylvania: Brittany Birdsell, Jennifer Zhang Kutztown University: Carl Weisbecker La Salle University: Andrew Connors Lafayette College: Carliss Egan, Ricky Lanzilotti, Michael Lee, Christopher Nelsen Lehigh University: Michael Bodo, Benjamin Morosse, Allison Morrison, Sarah Siegel, Lauren Thompson Lock Haven University: Lauren Balabon Millersville University: Kelley Claffey, Derrica Deans, Sierra Hendricks Moore College of Art and Design: Isabelle Staub Moravian College: Dana Sencindiver Neumann University: Patra Palmer Penn State University: Abington: Akash Chilakalapally Altoona: Lizzy Gruschow, Casey McCullough, Jonah Schrager

Brandywine: Eli Cohen, Jack Dalton, William Murphy, Sophie Niami, Yesha Pandya, Paul Santoleri Schreyer Honors College: Madison Miller University Park: Julie Chidester, Joon Choi, Jessica Crimmin, Megan Desjardins, Andrew Diller, Meredith DiRico, Shahroz Fatima, Matthew Fell, Brittany Fischer, Grace Guo, Nico Jao, Taylor Kenan, Nick Laganelli, Connor Leavitt, Griffin Lee, Kevin Leimkuhler, Michael Mc Aleer, Thomas Moody, Kelly Morris, Kelly Morrison, Kelly Murphy, Bree Pecci, Corey Pittounicos, Zoe Rafferty, Adam Rusenko, Caroline Scherer, Amanda Simon, Betsy Simon, Ian Starner, Nicole Stevenson, Clayton Sturgeon, Will Turanski, Julianne Vallotton, Erika Vogt, Micah Waldman, Johnny Ware, Ally Weigand, Kimberly Winters, Tianyu Zhang Philadelphia University: Joshua Boyer, Scott Rose Rosemont College: Ahmed Alfityani, Donieka Miller Saint Joseph's University: Sophia Kerns, Bianca McCormick, Erin Pealer Shippensburg University: Alexandra Celli, Tyler Foreman, Samantha Nelson Susquehanna University: Graham Davis, Jack Mott Temple University: Dan Barone, Arshdeep Bhatti, Christian Bufo, Edwina Cunningham-Hill, Arleigh Dolph, Caleb Haynos, Joe Marlino, Sarah Meehan, Jake Mullins, Karen Ramon, Emma Shimberg, Devin Trejo, Jacob Wasser, Sam Winfield, Karen Zhang University of Pennsylvania: Sam Allon, Allison Higgins, Matt Hoffman, Pooja Khandekar, Ashley Leung, Shanna Luedtke, Carly Meyer, Mario Myers, Wenxin Yang, Linda Zhen, Ling Zhou University of Pittsburgh: Caley Braun, Loren Brutsch, Jamie Buck, TJ Curtis, Leah Fein, Jennifer Fisher, Jason Greenlaw, Kya Kerner, Eric Niu, Dolly Prabhu, Ben Pratt, Benji Rolotti, Emma Sharpe, Gabrielle Sommese, Alex Stuart, Mary Turocy, David Xiang University of the Sciences in Philadelphia: Klajdi Zeqollari Ursinus College: Ryan Zmiewski Villanova University: Nariman Amin, Kathryn Asher, Kristen Carboni, Emily Duffy, Angela Hong, Matthew Hourican, Saher Khan, Patrick Riley, Luke Schanne, David Siah, Terri Walton Washington and Jefferson College: Blaine Berg West Chester University: Christine Baldwin, Tyler Caparoni, Christopher Capolupo, Alexis Domenick, Grant Garbutt, Emma Heywood, Madeline Hirsch, Alexei Markel, Lindsay Maynard, Emma McElroy, Richie Myers, Naveen S.K.V., Austin Shupe, Andrew Sur, Jonathan Vila, Matt Yuan Widener University: Robert Campbell, Patrick McDonnell


MAINE

OHIO

Baldwin-Wallace College: Mark Kaminskas Case Western Reserve University: Fred Li, Eric Ma Cleveland Institute of Art: Kim Menapace Kenyon College: Jared Jacobs Miami University: Nora Casciato, Spencer Vogt Ohio State University: Clay Christmyer, Hailey Schwartz, Raihaan Subhan

WISCONSIN

Beloit College: Annie Hagy Marquette University: Jackie Borzillo, Sarah Priem

ILLINOIS

ssouri: than

Louis:

VERMONT

Green Mountain College: Alexander Rubin University of Vermont: Connor Umsted

NEW HAMPSHIRE Dartmouth College: Laura Weiss

RHODE ISLAND

Brown University: Joseph van der List, Billy Zahn

MICHIGAN

CONNECTICUT

University of Michigan (Ann Arbor): Joe Plastino

DePaul University: Helena Duecker University of Chicago: Scott Shi, Ruth Wellin Wheaton College: Sarah Alexander

Trinity College: Carl Gibney, Stetson Miller University of New Haven: Richard Schmieg Wesleyan University: Nina Gurak Yale University: Chrissy Bradley, Britta Hjelm

INDIANA

Purdue University: Andrew Bohner University of Notre Dame: Adam Goins, DongJu Lee

NEW JERSEY WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia University: Samuel Hudson, Ryan Nance

KENTUCKY

Belmont University: Alan Mc Gee University of Kentucky: Abbey Gilligan

TENNESSEE

Trevecca Nazarene University: Jake Neumar University of Tennessee: Olivia Orico Vanderbilt University: Kevin Liu, Rebecca Stone

ALABAMA

University of Alabama: Sevren Ambrose, Clare Farrow

Bates College: Matt Herbst University of Maine: Luke Mogle, Jeff Switucha

GEORGIA

Emory University: Maria Alvarez, Danny Deutsch, Hongmiao Yu Spelman College: Joy Hamer University of Georgia: Chase Moresco

College of New Jersey: Emily Danta, Lindsay Walheim Princeton University: Andrew Sharo Rutgers University (New Brunswick): Sohan Sheth, Kimmy Watmuff Seton Hall University: Juliet Damasco, Brian Dixon Stevens Institute of Technology: John Atkinson

DELAWARE

Delaware College of Art and Design: Alexa Eger University of Delaware: Rebecca Cizek, Ian Fairorth, Connor Frisina, Ian Hinterleiter, Natalie Houck-Meloni, Kyle Lojek, Jacob Nachman, Jordan Peck, Avery Rogusky, Katie Schofield, Karina Scorzetti, Brandon Twombly, Schyler Wattles, Laurel Young

WASHINGTON, D.C.

American University: Marisa Barley, Claire McDugall, Gabrielle Niggeman George Washington University: Robert Donovan, Conor Smith Georgetown University: Michael Chappelear, Owen Coffin, Philip Coffin, Jess Konolige, Jimmy McDermott

NORTH CAROLINA

NA niversity: Adams, Caroline

Appalachian State University: Kelsey Silvius Duke University: Benjamin Allen, James Brock, Christine Farrell, Jamie Ikeda, Opal Jakhete, Dian Zhu Elon University: Claire Gibbons, Alex O'Neil, Juliana Swaren University of North Carolina: Nic Graesser, Jay Ogunkeye

FLORIDA

Ringling College of Art and Design: Sophie Mintz Rollins College: Charlotte Whiteman Stetson University: Grantland Behmke University of Miami: Brittany Razavi

SOUTH CAROLINA

Clemson University: Brian Campbell Coastal Carolina University: Sophia Frankel, Morgan Noad College of Charleston: Chris Calligan, Jimmy Cunningham University of South Carolina: Connor Brown, Tori Kienzle, Nicholas Nalbone

Centerspread compiled by Margot Field, Noah Levine, & Heather Ward. The SPOKE regrets that some seniors were unable to be contacted.

MASSACHUSETTS

Boston College: Sarah Odell Boston University: Michael Chang, Lauren Force, Ben Graham Brandeis University: Benjamin Levin Emerson College: Christian Allen, Sean Duffy, Erica Kleckner Gordon College: Aaron Hicks, Marissa Meenan Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Geoffrey Hegg, Alan Wang, Kevin Wang Northeastern University: Stacey Anderson, Phil Earley School of the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University: Ali Siegele University of Massachussetts (Amherst): Nicole DeStefano, Abby Purdy Wellesley College: Sara Burns Wheaton College: Kelsey Meyer

NEW YORK

Bard College: A.B. Maynard Barnard College: Allison Murdoch, Jenna Murdoch Cornell University: Christopher Davis, Graham Estabrook, Cuyler Hamilton, Mark McConnell, Kelsey Sheronas, Emily Shertzer Fordham University: Hannah Reiss Hobart and William Smith College: Abby Freed, Justine Shank Ithaca College: Sam Bevan, Laura McCauley, Cameron Miller, Tyler Quinn Marymount Manhattan College: Jeremy Robertson New York University: Charlotte Clifford, Yuki Hamada, Vanessa Karalis, Michelle Liu, Benjamin Sheppard Pace University: Carrie Higgins Rensselaer Polytechnic University: Elise Romberger, Logan Whelan University of Rochester: Kevin Haddad, Jared Seltzer Rochester Institute of Technology: Darina Vassileva Stony Brook University: Raven Dorsey Syracuse University: John Grib, Luke Rafferty, Varun Raghupathi Union College: Brody Shea Vassar College: Emily Omrod

MARYLAND

Johns Hopkins University: Hannah Ingersoll Loyola University: Catherine DeSena, Barbara Onufrak, Kathryn Walsh McDaniel College: Olivia Kunc Towson University: Charles Fazzini, Zack Gregory, Malina Mastrocola United States Naval Academy: Peter Guo University of Maryland (College Park): Tyler Brooke, Maddie Caplan, Bradlee Lord, Matt McAleer, Ali Saltz Washington College: Jimmy Beck

VIRGINIA

Christopher Newport University: Ryan Balfour College of William and Mary: Jackie Ciotti James Madison University: Laura Grace Ailor, Zach Archibald, Maddie Catts, Daryl Fahner, Anja Hencken, Emily Pillion, Danielle Scheponik, Andrew Wagner Mary Baldwin College: A'Kyra Carroll Shenandoah University: Frank Gauthier University of Virginia: Deri Harris, Scott Williams Virginia Commonwealth University: Katie Fix Virginia Intermont: Marissa deSoto Virginia Tech University: Dave Abbot, Jack Guttman, Douglas MacDonald, Stephen Shickel, Mitch Van Ostenbridge Washington and Lee University: Chloe Doto


THE ROAD to

Features MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

What to look for at graduation:

Graduation

Maroon gowns with maroon caps â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all graduating boys White gowns with white caps â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all graduating girls Black, hooded gowns â&#x20AC;&#x201C; board members and staff Gold cords â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All School Scholars. These are the top 10 percent of the class. Pink cord â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tri-M members Multi-colored cord â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NAHS members Blue sash â&#x20AC;&#x201D; NHS members

Reporting by Kelly Benning, Design by Anisa Tavangar

Sept.-Nov.

Seniors are given their order forms for the caps and gowns in Septermber. 7KHĂ&#x20AC;UVWRIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOGXHGDWHIRUFDSDQGJRZQRUGHUVLVXVXDOO\VRPHWLPH during November. Some seniors, like Erica Kleckner, made sure to turn in their forms on time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As soon as we got all those papers I did everything I could to get them in right away,â&#x20AC;? Kleckner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to make sure I had a cap and gown to walk across the stage in. I want everything to go perfectly.â&#x20AC;? Many seniors, however, miss this deadline and have to pay a late fee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was very late,â&#x20AC;? senior Ben Kligman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hand in my order until April.â&#x20AC;? Faculty members Amy Hawkins and Lydia Hallman are in charge of many of the preparations for Commencement. Hawkins said getting all WKHVHQLRUVWRRUGHUWKHLUFDSVDQGJRZQVLVWKHPRVWGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWSDUWRIWKH process for her.

The Week Before

The weekend before: Senior advisers and other faculty members set up the seating arrangement for rehearsal so all graduates will know exactly where to sit. The Monday before: First, students must attend a graduation rehearsal in the morning. By this point it is absolutely mandatory that any debts be FOHDUHG /DWHU WKDW QLJKW VWXGHQWV FDQ DWWHQG 5HĂ HFWLRQV DW 'D\OHVIRUG Abbey which is an event organized by the senior class parents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an opportunity for all the graduates to come together,â&#x20AC;? Hallman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some read poems and speeches and some play music. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a celebration of their time together.â&#x20AC;? This year among the students performing will be senior Jake Neumar playing â&#x20AC;&#x153;For the First Timeâ&#x20AC;? by The Script.

Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Make it? Watch the Ceremony on

Feb.-April

Hawkins orders the cups and cords for the All School Scholars, the top 10 percent of the class, in February. Preparations for Commencement start to intensify in April. While doLQJWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOSUHSDUDWLRQVIRUWKHLULQWHUQVKLSVHQLRUVPXVWDWWHQGDVHQLRU meeting where they choose which teachers from the elementary and middle schools they want to invite. Students who want to give speeches have to tryout in front of a panel of senior advisers and English teachers. The musicians who will play at the ceremony have to try-out with music teacher Susan Dickinger.

May-June

0RVWVHQLRUVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKWKHLUFODVVHVLQ0D\DQGJRRQWKHLULQWHUQVKLSV7KHODVWGD\IRUVHQLRUV is known as the Snow Day in May, when they get to skip most of their afternoon classes for an outdoor cookout. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My favorite part of Snow Day in May was playing drums with my band and getting to listen to the other acts play,â&#x20AC;? senior Joe Plastino said. $WDERDUGPHHWLQJWRZDUGWKHHQGRIWKHPRQWKWKHVFKRROERDUGDSSURYHVWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOOLVWRI graduates. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been more than a year since the space at Villanova was reserved and now the big month KDVDUULYHG&RPPHQFHPHQWLVDOZD\VWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW7XHVGD\RI-XQHDQGWKHIHZGD\VEHIRUHEULQJD Ă XUU\RIDFWLYLW\EHIRUHJUDGXDWLRQGD\

Graduation!

Any students speaking must go to Villanova in the morning to practice their speeches one last time. Later that day, faculty, board members, alumni and distinguished guests will gather for a pre-commencement reception at Bartley Hall. Finally, at 7 p.m. Commencement begins at Villanova. Students DUULYHHDUO\DQGFKDQJHLQWRWKHLUFDSVDQGJRZQVEHIRUHĂ&#x20AC;QGLQJWKHLU seats and waiting to hear their names called after the many speeches. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so joyful, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big triumph and super positive,â&#x20AC;? Hallman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to everyone being together on the stage for the last time because we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be together again,â&#x20AC;? senior Allison Murdoch said. Hallman said that students should not be surprised if they see some graduates they do not recognize. Any student attending CAT Pickering or other alternative education programs who lives in this district gets a diploma from Conestoga. Once the seniors-turned-alumni have crossed WKHVWDJHDQGĂ LSSHGWKHLUWDVVHOVWRWKHOHIWWKHUHLVQRWKLQJWRGREXW SDWWKHPVHOYHVRQWKHEDFNDQGZDWFKRXWIRUĂ \LQJEHDFKEDOOVEHIRUH Ă&#x20AC;QDOO\WRVVLQJWKHLUJUDGXDWLRQFDSVLQWRWKHDLU â&#x20AC;&#x153;The trick is to throw your hat up without the tassel,â&#x20AC;? Hallman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[It] is a nice thing to keep.â&#x20AC;?


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

PAGE 15 THE SPOKE

FEATURES

Members of computer science club compete at new levels

Emily Klein Staff Reporter

The competition consisted of 32 teams working against each other to create a code in order to The buzzing atmosphere of complete programming tasks. busy minds fills room 136 as â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were given a computer, Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s computer science club and then we were timed and we members congregate around the would type up the code, try and central computer screen as if the solve it and then send the coordinaanswer to a hidden mystery resides tors our code,â&#x20AC;? club member and within the computerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coding. sophomore Crystal Wang said. Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s computer science Thompson, who has been proclub offers â&#x20AC;&#x153;an environment where gramming since he was nine, felt you can work with other people,â&#x20AC;? that the event was successful, and club co-president and junior Jed he was content with the third place Thompson said. ranking. The club members put their â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was the first year weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve brains to the test on Feb. 18, ever done it, and I think overall, during the Philadelphia Classic although perhaps we could have Programming Competition held done a bit better, we did pretty at the University of Pennsylvania. well,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said. 7KLV \HDU ZDV WKH Ă&#x20AC;UVW \HDU WKDW Since only some members of Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s computer science the club participated in the comclub participated, and the club sent petition this year, other members two teams. worked on several additional projThe competitive team placed ects, including programming an third, and even though Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Xbox Kinect and creating an Anâ&#x20AC;&#x153;just-for-funâ&#x20AC;? team did not place, droid application. However, both â&#x20AC;&#x153;they still did better than a large the programming of the Kinect percentage of the teams there,â&#x20AC;? and the creating of the app have Thompson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of us were been postponed due to a â&#x20AC;&#x153;lack of at our top game that day, we re- feasibility,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said. ally did bring our [best] skills to Throughout the year, the club the table.â&#x20AC;? has had trouble obtaining access to

Emily Klein/The SPOKE

Sophomore Caroline Mak helps freshmen Dan Xu and Michael Tao Ă&#x20AC;[ DQ HUURU LQ WKHLU FRGH GXULQJ D FRPSXWHUVFLHQFHFOXEPHHWLQJ7KHIUHVKPHQZHQWRQWRSODFHVHFRQGLQDFRPSHWLWLRQKHOGRQ0D\ computers, particularly those with members can reach the same level are for. They help each other,â&#x20AC;? programming software. of programming. Mak holds com- Mak said. Club co-president and sopho- petitions with a program called more Caroline Mak also said Processing that allows less experi- (PLO\ .OHLQ FDQ EH UHDFKHG DW that the lack of Windows 7 on all enced club members to learn basic HNOHLQ#VWRJDQHZVFRP school computers accounted for programming skills with the help the postponement. of more advanced club members. *RWR6WRJDQHZVFRPWRYLHZD In the mean time, the club â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what the people who SKRWRJDOOHU\RIDFOXEFRPSHWL continues to work so that all already are in computer science WLRQRQ0D\

Student environmental groups work toward preservation

population is already in decline. Although they may look like just DQRWKHUW\SHRIKDUPOHVVFUD\Ă&#x20AC;VK this species are extremely damaging to the ecosystem of the park and can have negative effects on a variety of plants and animals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Part of the historical charge to all national parks is to preserve and maintain the cultural, historical and biological resources of that place,â&#x20AC;? said Valley Forge Park Ranger and environmental science teacher Tim Ligget. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to maintain the biological resources, that means getting rid of invasive species.â&#x20AC;? The park has problems with many types of invasive species, Courtesy Tim Ligget both plants and animals. Since -XQLRUHans GaoWDNHVDWULSWR9DOOH\)RUJH3DUNZLWKPHPEHUVRIWKH:HHG these species have no natural :DUULRUVDJURXSWKDWUHPRYHV-DSDQHVHVWLOWJUDVVDQGPLOHDPLQXWHYLQH predators at Valley Forge, they are able to grow at exponential David Kramer distance to see what all the com- rates, often preventing the growth of native species. The park has motion is about. Staff Reporter 7KH&UD\Ă&#x20AC;VK&RUSVDJURXSRU- committed to using the Integrated The sounds of chirping birds ganized by Valley Forge National Pest Management system, meanDQGDEXEEOLQJVWUHDPĂ&#x20AC;OOWKHDLU Historical Park, works to remove ing that they do not use chemical A cool breeze rolls through as an invasive species of crayfish sprays unless there is absolutely no students slosh around in the water, from the park. These crayfish, other option. Instead, they rely on sporting thigh-high rubber boots. which are not native to the park, JURXSVVXFKDVWKH&UD\Ă&#x20AC;VK&RUSV A deer perks its head up in the displace the native species, whose to remove them.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an ongoing battle,â&#x20AC;? Ligget said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are hoping to get the invasive species populations down to about 20 percent of the total number of species in the park. It would be impossible to remove every one.â&#x20AC;? Junior Hans Gao went to Valley Forge with the Weed Warriors, a group that removes Japanese stilt grass and mile-a-minute vine. The group uses gardening tools such as shears and branch cutters to take out the invasive plants. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You do enjoy the feeling of being outside and doing something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for your region, and for all of America, and the future generations,â&#x20AC;? Gao said. Aside from the positive impact Weed Warriors has on cleaning up the park, Gao feels it is also a great experience to be outside and work in the natural beauty of the area. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preserving the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historyâ&#x20AC;ŚIt should be one of our national priorities. The second [priority] is just helping out the ecosystem so that a part of American will be preserved for the future,â&#x20AC;? Gao said. Junior Ben Bussmann works

with the YMCA Earth Service Corps, a group that helps remove invasive species from the woods surrounding the Upper Main Line YMCA. In addition, as president of the Envirothon Club at Conestoga, Bussmann focuses on teaching club members how to identify different plant and animal species. The YMCA Earth Service Corps is â&#x20AC;&#x153;a connection to the natural world in a society thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing ever further away from it,â&#x20AC;? Bussmann said. The unifying goal of the different environmental efforts at Valley Forge Park is to keep the park looking how it did in the winter of 1777-78, when George Washington and the American Continental Army set up camp there during the American Revolutionary War. The park also offers an eight-week paid summer program in which participants help maintain the park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to try to develop in my students an appreciation for the natural beauty of our place,â&#x20AC;? Ligget said. 'DYLG.UDPHUFDQEHUHDFKHGDW GNUDPHU#VWRJDQHZVFRP


PAGE 16 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

FEATURES

Mormon students keep a promise, customize their dresses Natalie West Features Editor

The process of sewing sleeves onto her dress took Gillam a few hours with the help of her mom, who The weeks leading up to prom is an experienced tailor. are stressful, spiteful and somewhat Small was also frustrated with dangerous as girls pursue and battle the lack of variety of dresses availfor their perfect dress. Juniors Ashley able and was inspired to make a Gillam and Maddie Small, however, difference after watching a video ZHUHGLVPD\HGWRĂ&#x20AC;QGWKDWQRQHRI on her churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website about a girl the dresses sold in retail and depart- who collected dresses for fellow ment stores were quite right, and Mormons. A few months before decided to take matters into their prom, Small began putting flyers own hands by altering and lending up in nearby churches and sent out out dresses that fit their personal messages on Facebook, and soon dress codes. had women contacting her, wanting Wearing spaghetti straps or strap- WRGRQDWHWKHLUGUHVVHVWKDWĂ&#x20AC;WFKXUFK less dresses that reveal the shoulders VWDQGDUGV 6PDOO SODQQHG RQ Ă&#x20AC;QGopposes the beliefs of Mormons like ing or sewing matching shrugs or Gillam and Small. sweaters to the dresses that did not â&#x20AC;&#x153;I choose not to wear clothes have sleeves. that are too revealing. No strapless â&#x20AC;&#x153;I keep all the dresses in an [shirts] or spaghetti straps, only oversize closet in my house, and knee-length skirts and dresses, and when a girl has a need for a dress, nothing too low cut in the back or they let me know and we set up a front,â&#x20AC;? Gillam said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In searching time when they can come over and for a prom dress, these criteria are try some on,â&#x20AC;? Small said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So far, I YHU\GLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWWRĂ&#x20AC;QGVR,HLWKHUKDG KDYHOHQWRXWIRXURUĂ&#x20AC;YHGUHVVHVIRU to pay three or four hundred dollars the prom season. [My] favorite part for a modest dress online or make my of doing this project [is] seeing a own sleeves. My dress actually came girl so ecstatically happy that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with a little shawl which matched IRXQGDGUHVVWKDWĂ&#x20AC;WVKHUDQGWKDWLV perfectly, so I just cut up the material simple to just wear a shrug or sweater and used it for sleeves.â&#x20AC;? with. The best part is, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absolutely

freeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as long as they bring it back, of course.â&#x20AC;? Small originally planned on finding shrugs, or small sweaters that cover the shoulders and back, to match the dresses, but found that most girls already had one that was suitable. With the help of her mom, she has made a shrug out of a shawl that matches one of the donated dresses. ´,W¡V H[WUHPHO\ GLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOW WR Ă&#x20AC;QG material that exactly matches a dress, especially formals, so we usually go with ones that just coordinate colors or accents,â&#x20AC;? Small said. Although Small and Gillamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s church discourages revealing clothing, Gillam thinks that this lifestyle has become more of a personal decision, rather than a strict rule. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about respecting yourself and your body, in the same way we are told not to drink alcohol, smoke or do drugs and to eat healthily,â&#x20AC;? Gillam said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I will also say that at this point in my life it is a personal choice I make each day to dress modestly. No one makes me do it. I do it for me because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what makes me the most happy.â&#x20AC;? Gillam believes the experience of making her dress different than

Courtesy Ashley Gillam and Maddie Small

Juniors Ashley Gillam and Maddie Small show off their prom dresses. By sewing on sleeves or wearing a shrug, they were able to stay true to their religious beliefs, which require them to cover their shoulders. most was one that made prom more memorable and personal. 6HZLQJRQP\RZQVOHHYHV´GHĂ&#x20AC;nitely makes me appreciate my dress a lot more, and it makes it seem more

like my dress versus a dress I own,â&#x20AC;? Gillam said. Natalie West can be reached at nwest@stoganews.com.


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

PAGE 17 THE SPOKE

FEATURES

T.S.: What do you plan to do this summer? P.P.: During the summer I work at Camp Tecumseh, a sports camp for boys in New Hampshire. I coach track and help with the day-to-day operation of the camp as a member of the senior staff. Mr. Stabert also works at this

Zion National Park and the Grand Canyon, with five days thrown in on a houseboat on Lake Powell. The second was a 100 mile canoe trip with my son, two of his friends and another dad along the Allagash Waterway in Maine. In both cases, it is the unbelievable scenery, nature and isolation from the rest of the world that I always remember.

camp. Mr. Goodman’s son goes to the camp every summer also. [Also] this summer my wife and I will celebrate our 25th wedding anniversary, and we are planning a cruise to Bermuda.

T.S.: What are your hobbies? P.P.: Track takes up a good bit of my time. I enjoy reading a great deal when I can find the time, mostly during the summer and breaks in the school year.

ing students find successes where they did not think they could is gratifying also, but what I enjoy the most is developing a [connection] with the class that makes it a fun learning environment for everyone.

T.S.: How did you decide to become a teacher? P.P.: While in college, I had the opportunity to become the track coach at my former high school. As I was getting ready to start a Band: Genesis or The Moody Blues job in New York after graduation, I realized Song: “Rudy” by Supertramp that I would really miss coaching and wanted to Movie: “The Shawshank Redemption” find a way to continue doing that. My high Book: “Papillion” by Henri Charriere school calculus teacher helped convince me Quote: Reading is Fundamental (RIF) that teaching would be a great career for Food: Lobster me. I figured I would teach for about five years and then move T.S.: What is your favorite mathinto something else. I fell in love ematical equation and why? with teaching and here I am 30 P.P.: e = 2.71828… years later. The fact that such a seemingly random irrational value could apT.S.: What is your favorite part pear as frequently in math and naof teaching? ture as it does boggles my mind. P.P.: I enjoy the challenge of The real-life applications that are presenting math in a context that involved are staggering. my students will understand. See-

Favorites

T.S.: Which living person do you admire the most, and why? P.P.: I admire my wife more than anyone. She has to put up with me on a daily basis. T.S.: What activities were you involved in in high school? P.P.: Cross country and track, Student Council and German Club. T.S.: When you were in high school, what did you think you were going to be when you grew up? P.P.: I really had no clue. My three older brothers were involved in computers, banking and finance so I kind of figured I would land in one of those areas. In college, I began as a computer major, and then switched to economics. T.S.: If you could have dinner with any three people, who would they be and why? P.P.: I look forward to having dinner with my three children when they are older and have families of their own so I can hear them talk about how hard it is raising kids. T.S.: What is the best vacation you have ever been on? P.P.: There are two actually. My family, with my in-laws, took a vacation that encompassed time at Bryce Canyon National Park,

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T.S.: What is the most difficult part of teaching in your opinion? P.P.: Needing to be creative in how you present material so you reach all of your students is a challenge. When you think you have explained something to the best of your ability and some still aren’t following you, you have to really dig down to find a better way to communicate the ideas.

T.S.: What is your greatest fear? P.P.: My greatest fear is my fear of heights, without question.

^

The Spoke (T.S.): I understand you are a starter for track races. How did you start doing this, and what do you like about it? Paul Poiesz (P.P.): When I became a coach, I was given the job of starter at my first [track] meet. I love being able to interact with the athletes as closely as a starter can. The fact that you have to gain the athletes’ trust, to give everyone a fair start every time, is a challenge that I have enjoyed. An experience like being at the starting line for Usain Bolt’s first world record in the 100 meters is priceless.

Interview by Natalie West, Features Editor

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PAGE 18 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

FEATURES

Seniors receive advice from their former selves so it’s really mind-blowing, the whole concept.” Shalom also writes a cover let“Do you have a girlfriend yet?” ter, which she sends out with meask the letters, written by third mentos after the letters, for every grade students nine years ago. student and tries to give a personal According to Jan Shalom, a touch to each one. Last year she retired Valley Forge Elementary included journal entries from the School (VFES) third grade teach- day after 9/11, which included one er, that is a very common question where her student drew a picture for the boys in her class to write RI WKH7ZLQ7RZHUV RQ ÀUH7KLV to themselves. Since she started year, she is including Power Point working at VFES in 1997, Sha- slides from a presentation she lom has been having her students gave for parents in which students write letters to their future selves, had to tell why they were unique. which she mails to them a couple When senior Caroline Scherer got of weeks before they graduate her letter, her Power Point slide from high school each year. She reminded her that Shalom had said NHHSVWKHOHWWHUVLQÀOLQJFDELQHWV she could light up the darkest room in her basement, along with other with her smile and her laughter. mementos she sends along, which “I think it’s so awesome that range from class photos and poems she would do that for us because they wrote for homework to love it’s such an interesting thing to get letters she found in their desks. nine years later,” Scherer said. “It’s just funny to see what third Senior Meredith DiRico will graders want to write to them- be the third member of her family selves,” Shalom said. “Sometimes to get a letter from her third grade they write something about current self, courtesy of Shalom, since her events or ‘this year this is what two older sisters both had her as a happened’ and ‘what’s happening teacher, too. in the year 2012?’ and they’re “It was funny, especially the writing for nine years in the future question ‘do you have a dog yet?’

Laura Weiss Editor Emeritus

because I’ve been nagging my SDUHQWVIRU\HDUVDQGZHÀQDOO\JRW one when I was in ninth grade,” DiRico said. “It was just funny to VHH KRZ , ÀQDOO\ JRW D GRJ DIWHU eight years of asking.” While Shalom can easily send the letters to students like Scherer and DiRico, she has gone as far as trying to track down students who moved to Europe so that she could send them their letters. “Every child likes to feel that they are valued by the adults in their life,” Shalom said. “I think that this gives kids the chance just WREHUHÁHFWLYHµ Shalom’s dedication to the letters is in keeping with the theme of her career as a teacher—truly caring about her students. Before working in the Tredyffrin/Easttown school district, she married her husband at the elementary school she taught at with 500 students in attendance, a number of whom were a part of the ceremony. As she sent the envelopes of memories to her Class of 2012 students, she made copies of many of the letters and notes to keep and remember her students by.

Anisa Tavangar/The SPOKE

“I don’t think that kids realize how important it is to teachers to hear from them,” Shalom said. “But I also think that teachers are so busy in their profession and the current class and all the work, and sometimes you just don’t have a lot of spare time, but it’s

so great to be able to reach out to \RXUIRUPHUNLGVDQGMXVWÀQGRXW how they are so that they know that they touched you in a very special way.” Laura Weiss can be reached at lweiss@stoganews.com.

CAPCO (Conestoga After-Prom Celebration Organization) extends a huge thank you to all its generous supporters. The Junior After-Prom Party would not be possible without them. DIAMOND LEVEL ($5000) Penn Distributors

PLATINUM LEVEL ($1,500) Wegmans Food Market

DIAMOND LEVEL ($500) ARCH Boenning & Scattergood

SILVER LEVEL ($200-$300) Continental Bank Crimson Review Devon Liberty Friends of Warren Kampf Malvern Federal Savings Bank T/E Education Association The Hardware Center Wawa, Inc BRONZE LEVEL (<= $100) 333 Belrose ACME Analisa Sondergaard Angel Companions Appetite’s Delights Auble Financial Brenda Carpenter Photography Chesterbrook Dental Association Citadel Bank Congressman Jim Gerlach Devon Elementary PTO Easttown Township Police First Trust Bank Flag Lady Gifts IHOP Matthews Paoli Ford McQuiston Insurance Agency NatureScapes Landscapes Paoli Pharmacy Paoli Village Shops Pediatric and Adolescent Dentistry of the Main Line Penn Liberty Bank Plato’s Closet Playdrome Devon Lanes Thomas Tartaglio, District Court 15-1-02 T/E Middle School Waterloo Gardens Wilkes & Buttenbaum Orthodontics AND the Parents of the Class of 2013!

Our Fundraising Partners: Main Line Gold Exchange Main Line School of Rock Waynesborough Country Club The Bagel Factory Bertucci’s Italian Restaurant California Pizza Kitchen Catering by Design Chester County Book & Music Company Club La Maison King of Prussia Bolly Dance Lieberman, Earley & Company Martini’s Italian Market Mojo Fitness Penn Distributors Senator Bob Casey’s Office T/E School District Verge Yoga WRTI-FM Radio ACME Aneu Bistro Auria Earphones CHS Student Artists Clay’s Bakery Corner Bakery Cosi Dunkin’ Donuts (King of Prussia) Elegance Bakery and Café Panera Bread (Gateway) Varani Formal Wear Flowers by Priscilla Prestige Hair Salon Tastykake Brenda Carpenter Photography


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

FEATURES “Here” by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros

Noah’s

PAGE 19 THE SPOKE

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Noah Levine Centerspread Editor As summer nears and we find ourselves with more free time on our hands, it is not uncommon to realize that the songs in our playlists are overplayed or simply out of date. To transition from school to summer, here are three of the best new releases from the alternative genre:

“Bloom” by Beach House

For fans of: Grizzly Bear, The XX Bloom, the fourth full-length album from the Baltimore-based dream pop duo Beach House is arguably its best yet. Showcasing the group’s unique blend of pop and ethereal melodies, each song on the ten-track album transitions almost seamlessly into the next. Bloom does not mark a dramatic departure from previous Beach House albums, but rather it refines and builds upon the song model the band has employed in the past, namely airy vocals coupled with haunting guitar riffs. Bloom does not feature a true hit single either. Take “Myth” for example, the album’s opening track. It is nothing groundbreaking for Beach House. In fact, it could easily be mistaken for a song from the band’s last album, “Teen Dream.” While there are no true standouts, it was most likely not Beach House’s intention to create an album of strong, disjointed singles. Rather Bloom is more like a dreamsomething meant to be experienced in its entirety.

“Port of Morrow” by The Shins

For fans of: Of Monsters and Men, Mumford & Sons Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros is not an easy band to define. Resembling a rag-tag bunch of musicians assembled on a street corner, the group does not fit the mold of the modern and cohesive touring rock group. The band’s music is similarly unconventional; at best it can be described as eclectic, pulling from various styles and genres. “Man on For fans of: Broken Bells, Spoon Fire,” the first song on the group’s new In recent years, The Shins front album, “Here,” starts as an acoustic folk man James Mercer has been busy. tune featuring only the voice of lead singAfter collaborating with DJ Danger er Alex Ebert and a guitar. The eventual Mouse in 2010 on “Broken Bells” layering of the chorus and additional inand “Dark Night of the Soul,” “Port struments on top of the basic folk melody of Morrow” marks Mercer’s return to helps to create the “big band” quality of 7KH6KLQV,QWKHÀYH\HDUVVLQFHWKH the group’s sound. With often upwards band released its last album, “Winc- of eleven members playing everything ing the Night Away,” the group has from the tambourine to the accordion to undergone some personnel changes. the double bass, Edward Sharpe and the In short, Mercer is the only remaining Magnetic Zeros is, in the fullest sense of member of the original lineup. Writ- the term, a big band. The other vocalist and co-founder of ing and singing every song on the album himself, Mercer proves that he the group, Jade Castrinos, takes the lead in does not necessarily need the support the album’s second song, “That’s What’s of other band members. From the Up.”Accompanied by the rhythmic clapcontemplative lyrics of “For a Fool” ping of her band mates, Castrinos’s solo and “September” to the more upbeat harkens back to the gospel tradition. In nature of “Fall of ’82,” with its trum- “One Love to Another,” the band shifts pet solo, and “Simple Song,” “Port of its focus to an entirely different genre, Morrow” is also varied enough to suit adding reggae to its ever-expanding repertoire of musical styles. The mellow most people’s tastes. As far as instruments, Mercer’s vibes of “Child” and “All Wash Out” voice is by far the best on the album. offer a contrast to the otherwise jubilant Clear and catchy, his vocals permeate and energetic feel of the album. Despite the diverse sampling of musieach of the album’s eleven tracks. In “It’s Only Life,” Mercer explores cal styles, “Here” does not stray too far the high end of his range while the from the band’s last album, “Up From choral-like ending of “September” Below.” Both have a certain vintage is reminiscent of the harmonization vibe that creates the impression that they often used by Fleet Foxes. In the al- were recorded in someone’s basement bum’s title track, Mercer’s undulating rather than in a studio. “Here” is certainly wails create the impression of waves a step in the right direction for Edward Sharpe and The Magnetic Zeros, even lapping on the shore. With this album, The Shins proves if that step takes them further off of the that it still has what it takes to make beaten path. great music. Hopefully its fans will QRWKDYHWRZDLWDQRWKHUÀYH\HDUVIRU Noah Levine can be reached at nlevine@stoganews.com. the release of its next album.

Stumped? Find the solutions at Stoganews.com.


Sports

WET& WILD MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

Reporting by Sophia Ponte

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Wind surfing

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Water skiing

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Surfing :KLOHVRPHSHRSOHWUDYHODURXQGWKH ZRUOGWRH[SHULHQFHWKHVXQQ\EHDFKHV VRSKRPRUH6XOO\:LQJHUGGRHVQ·WOLPLW KLPVHOIMXVWWRWKHVDQG³KHLVDOVRD VXUIHU:LQJHUGZKRKDVEHHQVXUÀQJ VLQFHWKHDJHRIVL[VDLGKHKDVEHHQ VXUÀQJIURPWKH-HUVH\6KRUHWR&RVWD 5LFD ´,W·VUHDOO\OLNHVNDWHERDUGLQJRQZDWHUµ :LQJHUGVDLG´<RXNLQGRIMXVWJHWRQWKH ZDYHDQGÁ\,W·VWRXJKWROHDUQEXWRQFH \RXGROHDUQLW·VIXQ³ZKHQ\RXFDWFKD KXJHZDYHLW·VMXVWOLNHDUXVKLWJHWV\RX SXPSHGXSµ :LQJHUGZKRKDVEHHQFRPSHWLQJVLQFH KHZDV\HDUVROGVDLGWKDWVXUIHUVQHHGWR KDYHFHUWDLQSK\VLFDODQGPHQWDOVWUHQJWKV HVSHFLDOO\RQGD\VZLWKGLIÀFXOWZHDWKHU FRQGLWLRQV ´6RPHWLPHVZKHQ\RX·UHWU\LQJWRJHW RXWSDVWWKHEUHDNDQG\RX·UHMXVWJHWWLQJ SRXQGHGZDYHDIWHUZDYH\RXKDYHWR KDYHWKLVVWUHQJWKWKLVSK\VLFDODQGPHQWDO VWUHQJWKWRNHHSRQSDGGOLQJWKURXJKHYHQ LI\RX·UHJHWWLQJFRPSOHWHO\GHVWUR\HGDQG WKURZQRII\RXUERDUGµ:LQJHUGVDLG Sophia Ponte can be reached at sponte@stoganews.com.


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

SPORTS

Crew travels to regattas in Tennessee, England

Courtney Kennedy Staff Reporter With cheers of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stoga, Stoga!â&#x20AC;? accompanying them as they raced down the water, Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girls varsity quad crossed the finish line and immediately collapsed. The quad of sophomores Annie Graf, Maddy Tessier-Kay, Rebecca Simonetti and Meagan Hudson had just won the gold in the largest high school regatta in the world. The Stotesbury Cup Regatta was held on May 18-19 on Philadelphiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Schuylkill River. For the Conestoga crew team, it is one of the biggest events of the season. If rowers in the varsity quad win their event at Stotesbury, their coach will agree to take them to the distinguished Henley Regatta on the River Thames in England over the summer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We definitely wanted to get first, second or third,â&#x20AC;? Hudson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily expecting to get first, so it was a shock and really exciting that we got first.â&#x20AC;? The boys varsity quad of seniors Benjamin Morosse, Cuyler

Hamilton, Mike DiLucca and Nick Nalbone and the girls varsity double of seniors Ali Siegele and Nicole DeStefano placed second in their events. Both boats will also travel to England to compete in the Henley Royal Regatta and the Henley Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Regatta. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was really excited to find out that we were the first menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boat in [Conestoga] club history to go to such a prestigious regatta,â&#x20AC;?

Hamilton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be great to see what we can do.â&#x20AC;? Not only will the varsity crews be traveling to England in June, but several other members of the team will be traveling to Oak Ridge, Tenn. from June 8-10 to participate in the US Rowing Youth National Championships. Conestoga secured six spots in the regatta after competing in the 2012 US Rowing Mid-Atlantic

PAGE 21 THE SPOKE

District Championships on Mercer Lake, N.J. from May 11-12. With 20 boats racing in nationals, there is a lot of pressure for athletes to perform at their peak. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think people definitely underestimate us, but we work really hard, so hopefully our hard work, focus and dedication will pay off in the regattas,â&#x20AC;? Hudson said. With these major regattas coming up, the team will con-

tinue to practice to ensure that they are perfectly in sync and mentally focused once they get on the water. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are going to keep practicing every day because we have to keep our focus. We have to be mentally prepared and go into the race confident but not too confident,â&#x20AC;? Hudson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try not to worry. My boat keeps me calm.â&#x20AC;? In such high stakes races, keeping calm is important in order to compete against the tough competition who are the best of the best in their category. Sophomore Nathan Leibowitz, who rows in the JV quad, looks forward to racing some of the top teams in the country in Oak Ridge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like all of the tough competition. I get to meet people like me from all over the country, and compete against them in a head-to-head race,â&#x20AC;? Leibowitz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I also like the atmosphere, [because] there are thousands of people there watching and cheering us on. It is an amazing experience.â&#x20AC;?

Courtney Kennedy/The SPOKE

Courtney Kennedy can be reached at ckennedy@stoganews.com.

Seniors Ben Morosse, Cuyler Hamilton, Mike DiLucca and Nick Nalbone Ă&#x20AC;QLVKWKHLUUDFHDWWKHWKDQQXDO6WRWHVEXU\&XS5HJDWWD7KHTXDGLVJRLQJWRFRPSHWHLQWKH<RXWK1DWLRQDO&KDPSLRQVKLSVRQ-XQH

Girls lacrosse finds unity, advances to state playoffs Maddie Amsterdam Co-Sports Editor

Karolis Panavas/The SPOKE

Senior Kelly Morrison races down Teamer Field in a lacrosse game against Upper Dublin on May 7. The girls came out on top with a score of 14-9.

Junior Catie Smith said that the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newfound unity combined with their technical skills After an upsetting loss to Har- will make them unstoppable in riton on a Tuesday night in mid- playoffs. April, the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lacrosse team met With ten girls playing Division as a group to discuss what they I lacrosse next year, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stoga has needed to work on. Harriton was a lot of talent to contribute to a a team the girls should have been strong postseason run. able to beat, they said, so why â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a lot of raw talent on did they lose by seven goals? The the team,â&#x20AC;? Smith said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because team agreed that the answer was we are so individually talented, a lack of unity. we have occasional problems Since then, the Pioneers have working together. I would conbegun to connect on and off the sider that our only weakness, and Ă&#x20AC;HOG,QWKHLUĂ&#x20AC;UVWWZRURXQGVRI we have been working on it and district playoffs, the girls beat improving on it throughout the previously undefeated Great Val- season.â&#x20AC;? ley 10-9 and overcame Harriton The girls were able to come 9-7. Senior Kelly Morrison said together as a team during their the team is looking forward to spring break trip to St. Peterscontinued success as they advance burg, Fla. During the trip, the to state playoffs. girls played against some of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our season was tough in the top teams in the country and parbeginning. Our lack of communi- ticipated in a camp run by former FDWLRQRQWKHĂ&#x20AC;HOGZDVGHĂ&#x20AC;QLWHO\ college players. our weakness,â&#x20AC;? Morrison said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Florida was unbelievable. We â&#x20AC;&#x153;It took us a little while to con- really connected as a team, and to nect and adjust, but I think we are me it felt like a big family vacapeaking at the perfect time with tion,â&#x20AC;? Morrison said. playoffs starting.â&#x20AC;? Continuing their postseason

run, the team plans to focus on maintaining their solidarity. Head coach Amy Orcutt said that the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s camaraderie will give them an edge in playoffs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone is always looking out for their teammates and working for each other,â&#x20AC;? Orcutt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have great team chemistry right now which is going to help us through playoffs.â&#x20AC;? Junior Blake Hamblett said that the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent success has given them the adrenaline rush they need to have a strong presence in playoffs. Now that the team has learned from their mistakes, they are ready to come together and compete against the top teams in the state. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really gelling right now, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to ensure our success,â&#x20AC;? Hamblett said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all know what it feels like to lose. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the worst, so I know that this team is going to do everything we can to go far in states.â&#x20AC;? Maddie Amsterdam can be reached at mamsterdam@stoganews.com.


PAGE 22 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

SPORTS

76ers need star player to lead team to success next season

Stephane Hardinger Guest Commentary &RPLQJRIIRIDÃ&#x20AC;UVWURXQGSOD\RIIORVVWR WKH0LDPL+HDWLQDQGWKH1%$ORFNRXW WKLVSDVWVXPPHUQRRQHZDVUHDOO\VXUHZKDWWR H[SHFWIURPWKH6L[HUVWKLVVHDVRQ$IWHUD VWDUWWRWKHVHDVRQ3KLODGHOSKLDZDVGUHDPLQJ ELJ+RZHYHUWKH\ZHQWWKHUHVWRIWKH ZD\ DQG EDFNHG LQWR WKH HLJKWK VHHG LQ WKH (DVWHUQ&RQIHUHQFHSOD\RIIV 7KH\ZHUHJHWWLQJEORZQRXWLQWKHIRXUWK TXDUWHURI*DPHDJDLQVWWKH&KLFDJR%XOOV ZKHQ UHLJQLQJ 093 'HUULFN 5RVH WRUH KLV DQWHULRU FUXFLDWH OLJDPHQW $&/  ,W FKDQJHG WKHIRUWXQHVRIWKHWHDPVLQVWDQWO\WKH6L[HUV ZRQWKHVHULHVLQVL[JDPHVIRUWKHLUÃ&#x20AC;UVWZLQ LQDSOD\RIIVHULHVVLQFH 7KH\SXVKHGDQDJLQJEDQJHGXS%RVWRQ &HOWLFVWHDPWRVHYHQJDPHVLQWKHVHFRQGURXQG EHIRUHEHLQJHOLPLQDWHG$QGQRZFRPLQJRIID

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LQWKHÃ&#x20AC;UVWURXQG7KH6L[HUVFDQ·WIDOOSUH\WR WKHVLUHQ·VVRQJRI´NHHSLQJWKHWHDPWRJHWKHUµ DQG ´EXLOGLQJ RQ WKH SOD\RII UXQµ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·OOVWUXJJOH OLNHWKH\GLGODVWVHDVRQLQWKHVKRUWUXQDQG FULSSOHWKHPVHOYHVZLWKOLWWOHVDODU\FDSURRP LQ WKH ORQJUXQ ,I ZKROHVDOH FKDQJHV DUHQ·W PDGH WR WKH 6L[HUV URVWHU WKLV RIIVHDVRQ WKH IDQVRI3KLODGHOSKLDFRXOGEHZDLWLQJDQRWKHU QLQH\HDUVWRZLQDSRVWVHDVRQVHULHV$IWHUDOO WKHUHLJQLQJ093GRHVQ·WWHDUKLV$&/DJDLQVW \RXLQWKHSOD\RIIVHYHU\VHDVRQ Stephane Hardinger can be reached at spoke@stoganews.com.

15 1612 11 14 20 12 16 12 214 2 710 9 6 0

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*All updates as of June 1.


MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

PAGE 23 THE SPOKE

SPORTS

Player Profiles 1 2

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been playing lacrosse since I was three years old.

Six things you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about...

My favorite part about lacrosse is just the whole team in general. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a really close knit group, and I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice that we have that.

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been running track for six years. I started out running the 100 meter and the 200 meter races and now I run the two mile. I also run the 800 meter, the mile and the 5000 meter in cross country.

2

My favorite part about track is having a team that helps you to accomplish your goals.

3

I think I stand out as a lacrosse player because of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;if you stand out as an individual player itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because you have a good team around you.

3

I try to stay positive when I know itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be hard and not to let that stop me from doing my best.

4 5

Next year, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m playing lacrosse at Duke University.

4 5

I will be running at SUNY Stonybrook next year.

My two brothers are my idols. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of hard in lacrosse to have an idol because not many of the names are too big, but I think having two older brothers who both play is nice. All three of us play defense. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a whole family thing.

A race I would like to run in is the Color Run. You start out wearing white, and every 1000 meters you run, another color of paint gets thrown on you.

6

To prepare for a game, I always ORRN DW P\ MHUVH\ DQG Ă&#x20AC;QG ZKHUH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Conestogaâ&#x20AC;? is. I remember that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not an individual thing, and I just try to focus on that.

1

Raven Dorsey Varsity Track & Field

Jamie Ikeda Varsity Lacrosse

x

x

6

Before a race, I have a routine: the night before I always try to ice, stretch and [use the] foam roller. On the way to the meet, I usually listen to music, and I always pray before I start my race.

Pioneers proceed to postseason, represent â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stoga Top left: Sophomore Alex Mezey Ă&#x20AC;JKWVIRUWKHEDOOGXULQJDODFURVVH JDPH DJDLQVW 6SULQJĂ&#x20AC;HOG RQ $SULO  7KH 3LRQHHUV FDPH RXW YLFWRULRXVZLWKDĂ&#x20AC;QDOVFRUHRI %RWWRP OHIW 6HQLRUV Michael Lee DQG Brandon Twombly UXQ XS D KLOOGXULQJWUDFNSUDFWLFH7KHWHDP Ă&#x20AC;QLVKHG WKH VHDVRQ RQ -XQH  DIWHU FRPSHWLQJLQ&HQWUDO/HDJXH&KDPSLRQVKLSV 7RSPLGGOH-XQLRUBlake Hamblett UXQVGRZQWKHĂ&#x20AC;HOGGXULQJDODFURVVH JDPHDJDLQVW8SSHU'XEOLQRQ0D\ 7KH3LRQHHUVZRQ %RWWRPPLGGOH6RSKRPRUHMonica HoodSLWFKHVWKHEDOOGXULQJDVRIWEDOO JDPH DJDLQVW 6WUDWK +DYHQ RQ $SULO7KHJLUOVEHDW6WUDWK+DYHQ  7RS ULJKW 6HQLRU Fred Li VPDVKHV WKH WHQQLV EDOO GXULQJ D SUDFWLFH DW WKH 8SSHU 0DLQ /LQH <0&$ 7KH WHDP ZRQ WKH 6WDWH &KDPSLRQVKLS RQ0D\ %RWWRP ULJKW 6HQLRU Matt CowellSLWFKHVWKHEDOOGXULQJEDVHEDOO SUDFWLFH7KH3LRQHHUVĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHGWKHLU VHDVRQZLWKDUHFRUGRI Maddie DeVlieger, Karolis Panavas and Luke Rafferty/The SPOKE


VOLUME 62, NO. 7

INSIDE

MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012

Students take to the ocean in water sports See p. 20

Crew to row in Henley Regattas See p. 21

Out of this gaLAXy Girls lacrosse competes in state playoffs See p. 21

Junior Catie SmithÀJKWVIRUWKHEDOOGXULQJDJDPHDJDLQVW8SSHU'XEOLQRQ0D\7KH3LRQHHUVZRQDQGDUHFXUUHQWO\FRPSHWLQJLQVWDWHSOD\RIIV

Karolis Panavas/The SPOKE

The Spoke June 2012 issue. Cover: Tanning  
The Spoke June 2012 issue. Cover: Tanning  

The Spoke June 2012 Issue. Cover: Tanning

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