Page 1

Senior Destinations Map See p. 12-13

THE

Sp ke

CONESTOGA HIGH SCHOOL, BERWYN, PA

VOLUME 63 NO. 7

JUNE 3, 2013

STOGANEWS.COM

What the cell? What is the policy? Are we following it? Is change called for? by Lavi Ben-Dor and Simran Singh Co-editor-in-chief and Managing Editor

Zoe Au for The SPOKE

The policy: “Students are not permitted to use cellphones in school when school is in session. Cellphones must be powered off for the duration of the school day�—Conestoga Student Handbook. The reality: “You can walk through the hallways texting and it’s perfectly normal. No one will question it. It’s just not enforced anymore�—sophomore Nikita Rao.

$OWKRXJKWKHRIĂ€FLDOSROLF\RQFHOOSKRQHV strictly bans student use during the day, some students see a discrepancy between the letter of the law and day-to-day practice. Freshman Casey Waite said that if students are caught using their cellphones in her classes, teachers take action, but offer the offending students a warning before punishing them. “I have teachers who tell you to put it away, and that’s a warning, and the next time >WKH\@VHHLW\RX¡OOJHWLQWURXEOHEXWXVXDOO\ Knowing the rules According to the Conestoga High School people are pretty lenient,â€? Waite said. Rao said in her experience, the majority 6WXGHQW +DQGERRN WKH GLVWULFW¡V RIĂ€FLDO policy on cell phones is that students are not of teachers do not object to student cellphone allowed to use cellphones during the day. If use. “It depends on the teacher, I guess. By students are found to be violating this policy, the Code of Student Conduct dictates now, the students would know if their teacher cares or not. But, generally, if they have that their phones be taken away.

their phone out the teacher won’t care at all,â€? Rao said. “I guess it’s so common now, that they don’t think twice about kids having their cellphones out.â€? Nationally, a Pew Research Study from 2010 found that “43 percent of all teens who take their phones to school say they text in class at least once a day or more.â€? However, at Conestoga, Assistant Principal Kevin Fagan said that the policy is being HQIRUFHGJLYHQWKDWSKRQHVDUHFRQĂ€VFDWHG and consequences are dealt. He also said that the use of technology within the curriculum RIFHUWDLQFODVVHVFDQRIWHQEHYHU\EHQHĂ€cial for students, providing an example of German classes taught by Kevin Nerz, in which cellphones are used to allow students practice speaking the language. Fagan said

that Nerz has permission from the administration to use such technology within his FODVVHVDQGDVDUHVXOWGRHVQRWFRQĂ€VFDWH SKRQHV RU UHIHU VWXGHQWV WR WKH PDLQ RIĂ€FH for the use of such devices. ´:H>LQWKHPDLQRIĂ€FH@JHWUHIHUUDOV:H JHWFHOOSKRQHVVHQWGRZQWRWKHRIĂ€FHDQG then we have parents come and pick them up. So, I know that it’s happening,â€? Fagan said. “I think it depends to some extent. SitXDWLRQVOLNH>WKHFODVVHVRI@'U1HU]ZKHUH obviously kids are using their cellphones in class, we’re not getting cellphones from KLP %XW , WKLQN >WKH SROLF\@ LV EHLQJ HQforced, based on the fact that we get phones every day sent down to us, and we call parents to come pick them up.â€?

See DISTRICT, p. 4


PAGE 2 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

NEWS

Berwyn Fire Co. donates fire truck to West, Texas Mary Mei & Emma Purinton Business Manager & Staff Reporter After the fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas on April 17, the Berwyn Fire Company decided to extend a hand to the WRZQ¡VĂ€UHGHSDUWPHQWDQGLWVFRPPXQLW\ in making a recovery. The Berwyn Fire Department has donated its 1938 E-One engine, which left Berwyn on May 8. The engine will travel to Payne Springs before arriving in West. 0LNH%DVNLQWKH(06/LHXWHQDQWRIWKH Berwyn Fire Department and Conestoga TV aide, said that the department donated its old HQJLQHWRKHOSUHSODFHORVWVXSSOLHV%DVNLQ DGGHGWKDW%HUZ\QKDGSUHYLRXVO\DVVRFLated with the West, Texas Fire Department. “We knew that they lost all their apparaWXVDQGZHDFWXDOO\VROGRQHRIRXUSUHYLRXVDSSDUDWXVWR>D@Ă€UHFRPSDQ\LQ7H[DV that was nearby so we had a connection to that area,â€? Baskin said. “We were in the process of donating the engine anyway so we contacted them and asked if they needed anything.â€? -XQLRU,DQ9DORFFKLDYROXQWHHUĂ€UHĂ€JKWHUGHVFULEHGWKHGHSDUWXUHRIWKHĂ€UHHQJLQH ´7KHHQJLQHZDVDWWDFKHGWRDWUXFNDQGD FRXSOHRIJX\VWRRNLWGRZQWR:HVW7H[DVÂľ 9DORFFKLVDLG´+RSHIXOO\LWZLOOKHOSWKHĂ€UH department there and their needs.â€?

District names new administration Dhanvin Manoo Contributing Reporter

District administrative assignments recRPPHQGHGE\6XSHULQWHQGHQW'DQLHO:DWHUV ZHUH DQQRXQFHG DW D 0D\  VFKRRO ERDUG meeting. :HQG\7RZOHDQG'U5LFKDUG*XVLFNZLOO EHFRQWLQXLQJWKHLUUROHVDV&XUULFXOXP6XSHUYLVRUDQG'LUHFWRURI&XUULFXOXP,QVWUXFWLRQ DQG6WDII'HYHORSPHQWUHVSHFWLYHO\*XVLFN ZLOODOVREHIXOĂ€OOLQJWKHUROHRI&XUULFXOXP 6XSHUYLVRUIRU6RFLDO6WXGLHVWKLV\HDU 5RELQ0F&RQQHOOZLOODVVXPHWKHUROHRI 'LUHFWRURI$VVHVVPHQWDQG(GXFDWLRQDO7HFKQRORJ\'U7RGG3DUNHUZLOODVVXPHWKHUROHRI 'HYRQ(OHPHQWDU\6FKRRO3ULQFLSDODIWHUFXUrent Principal Dr. Thomas Tobin retires, and Dr. Michael Szymendera will replace Parker as Assistant Principal of T/E Middle School. Conestoga English teacher Patrick Gately will replace Dr. Oscar Torres as Assistant 3KRWR&RXUWHV\%HUZ\Q)LUH'HSDUWPHQW Principal at Valley Forge Middle School when 7KH%HUZ\Q)LUH'HSDUWPHQWGRQDWHGRQHRILWVROGĂ€UHWUXFNVWRWKH:HVW9ROXQWHHU)LUH'H7RUUHVDVVXPHVWKHUROHVRI&XUULFXOXP6XSHUSDUWPHQWLQ:HVW7H[DVDIWHUDIDFWRU\H[SORVLRQLQ7H[DVGHSOHWHGWKHV\VWHP¡VUHVRXUFHV YLVRU&XUULFXOXP&KDLURI:RUOG/DQJXDJHV %DVNLQVDLGWKDWWKHHIIRUWVRIDOOWKHĂ€UH before we sent it down there and then we got (QJOLVKDVD6HFRQG/DQJXDJH&DUHHU(GXFDGHSDUWPHQWVKDYHUHVXOWHGLQDJUHDWQXPEHU VRPXFKWKDWZHORDGHGXSDER[WUXFNDQG WLRQ796WXGLR6WDII'HYHORSPHQW&RXUVHV for Credit and Administrative Liaison to the RI VXSSOLHV WKDW ZLOO EH DEOH WR KHOS :HVW VHQWWKHH[WUDVXSSOLHVÂľ%DVNLQVDLG Diversity Committee. These changes were Texas Department. “There were many companies in the area Mary Mei can be reached at mmei@sto- approved at the May 14 school board meeting DQGZLOOWDNHHIIHFWRQ-XO\ WKDWVHQWHTXLSPHQWWRXVWRSXWRQWKHHQJLQH ganews.com.

News in brief Berwyn-Paoli Little League Math Competition Team holds Challenger Day places second in state 7KHUGDQQXDO&KDOOHQJHU'D\ZDVKRVWHG E\WKH%HU\ZQ3DROL/LWWOH/HDJXHWHDPRQ0D\ 18. Held at the Field of Dreams in Berwyn, more than 300 special-needs children attended to meet the Phillie Phanatic and play baseball. Dozens of &RQHVWRJDVWXGHQWVYROXQWHHUHG7KHER\V¡EDVHEDOO team and girls’ softball team were present, as well DVPHPEHUVRI¡6WRJD¡V%HVW%XGGLHV ´,IHHOOLNHHYHQWVOLNHWKHVHWKDWSURPRWHDZHVRPHIULHQGVKLSVEULQJHYHU\RQHLQYROYHGDSXUH EHDXWLIXOMR\WKDWLVH[WUHPHO\UDUH¾VHQLRU0HJDQ Moyer said. -Yuge Xiao, Convergence Editor

The Conestoga Math Competition Team placed second overall in the Pennsylvania 0DWK/HDJXH&RQWHVWLQ$SULO:LWKDFXPXODWLYH VFRUH RI  SRLQWV &RQHVWRJD placed second behind State College High 6FKRRO6HQLRU$OOHQ=KXDQGMXQLRU&U\Vtal Wang also tied for second place in the LQGLYLGXDOFRQWHVWZLWKSRLQWVRXWRID possible 36. 7KLVPDUNVWKHVHFRQGFRQVHFXWLYH\HDU Conestoga has placed second overall in the contest. -Jerry Zhu, Contributing Reporter

JCL takes second in state convention

Boy Scouts lift ban on homosexual youths

&RQHVWRJD¡V -XQLRU &ODVVLFDO /HDJXH VQDWFKHGVHFRQGSODFHLQ'LYLVLRQ,RIWKH3D JCL statewide convention held May 17-19 at Penn State University. Chapters from all over Pennsylvania competed in a variety of LatinEDVHGDFWLYLWLHV(YHQWVLQFOXGHGWUDFNDQGĂ€HOG SDLQWLQJUHFLWDWLRQVRIDXWKHQWLF/DWLQSDVVDJHV a Jeopardy-style competition and tests. -XQLRU$QQLH;XDWWHQGHGWKHFRQYHQWLRQIRU WKHĂ€UVWWLPH “We like to see Latin staying alive and ZHOOÂľ;XVDLG -Rose Kantorczyk, Contributing Reporter

On May 23, more than 1,400 Boy 6FRXWVRI$PHULFDYROXQWHHUVYRWHGWR DOORZRSHQO\JD\\RXWKVFRXWV Opponents of the decision say that it has gone too far, allowing political DJHQGDWRZDUSDWUDGLWLRQDOLQVWLWXWLRQ Others feel the decision does not go IDUHQRXJKVLQFHWKHRUJDQL]DWLRQVWLOO GRHVQRWDFFHSWRSHQO\JD\DGXOWYROXQteers. 2QFHDJD\6FRXWWXUQVKHFDQQR longer be part of the organization. -James Redmond, Op/Ed Editor

Save the date Reflections JUNE SEPT

3 7

Seniors reflect on their high school years June 3 at 7 p.m. with various musical performances at Daylesford Abbey. Reflections will be attended by friends and family of the graduating class. Senior Portraits

JUNE SEPT

3 7

Senior portraits will be taken in the teacher lounge from June 3-7.Members of the Class of 2014 should have received timeslots in the mail. Commencement

JUNE SEPT

4 7

Villanova Pavilion is the site for senior commencement June 4 at 7 p.m. Attend to celebrate the senior s’ final farewells and the tossing of the caps. Book Swap

JUNE SEPT

4 7

The literary magazine book swap will be held in the main lobby from June 4-6. Students may use their tickets to pick up summer reading, AP/SAT prep, fiction and non-fiction books. Last Day of School

JUNE SEPT

19 7

The last day of the 2012-13 school year will be a half day on June 19. The 2013-14 school year begins Sept. 3.


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MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

PAGE 3 THE SPOKE

NEWS

District considers outsourcing aides, substitutes Suproteem Sarkar & Gabrielle Kerbel News Editor & Contributing Reporter $W WKH 0D\  VFKRRO ERDUG PHHWLQJ WKHUH ZHUH QRW HQRXJK seats to accommodate the dozens of SHRSOHSUHVHQW3DUHQWVWD[SD\HUV and Tredyffrin-Easttown employed HGXFDWRUVMRLQHGWRJHWKHUWRSURWHVW a district proposal to outsource VXEVWLWXWHV SDUDHGXFDWRUV DQG SDUDSURIHVVLRQDOV 7ZHQW\QLQH FRPPXQLW\PHPEHUVVSRNHDWWKH PHHWLQJZKLFKFRQFOXGHGFORVHWR PLGQLJKW 7KHVFKRROERDUGKDVSURSRVHG RXWVRXUFLQJDLGHVDQGSDUDVLQUHVSRQVHWRWKH$IIRUGDEOH&DUH $FWZKLFKZRXOGUHTXLUHWKHGLVWULFWWRSURYLGHKHDOWKFDUHEHQHĂ€WV to all employees who work more WKDQ  KRXUV SHU ZHHN7KH HPSOR\HHVZKRZRXOGEHRXWVRXUFHG do not currently receive these health EHQHĂ€WV ´7KHPRGHOKDVDOZD\VEHHQWR UHWDLQWKHFXUUHQWHPSOR\HHVEXWWR contract out so that the retirement fund increases don’t impact the GLVWULFW 7KH$IIRUGDEOH &DUH$FW UHJXODWLRQVUHOHDVHGHDUO\WKLV\HDU DGGHGEXGJHWLPSOLFDWLRQVIRUWKH GLVWULFWWRFRQVLGHUÂľ6XSHULQWHQGHQW 'U'DQLHO:DWHUVVDLG´:H¡YHKDG DERXWEXGJHWVWUDWHJLHVRYHUWKH SDVW IHZ \HDUV:H¡YH GRQH D YDULHW\RIWKLQJVWRLQFUHDVHUHYHQXH DQGGHFUHDVHVSHQGLQJDQGFRQVLGHU LQFUHDVLQJWD[HV7KHVHDUHWKHODVW >SURSRVDOV@ RQ WKH OLVW EHFDXVH RI the value of the services provided E\WKHDLGHVSDUDVDQGSDUDHGXFDWRUVÂľ Under the plan presented at the PHHWLQJ RXWVRXUFHG HPSOR\HHV ZRXOGEHHPSOR\HGE\DQH[WHUQDO DJHQF\ ZRXOG QRW UHFHLYH KHDOWK FDUHDQGZRXOGEHH[FOXGHGIURP WKH3D3XEOLF6FKRRO(PSOR\HHV¡ 5HWLUHPHQW6\VWHP 36(56 7KH GLVWULFW PHQWLRQHG WKH SRVVLELOLW\ RI RXWVRXUFHG HPSOR\HHV WDNLQJ DSD\FXWEXWDOVRDGGHGWKDWWKH employees would receive unemSOR\PHQWEHQHĂ€WVGXULQJWKHVXPmer months and would not have WRSD\LQWR36(567KHGLVWULFWLV FXUUHQWO\ LQ QHJRWLDWLRQV ZLWK WKH &KHVWHU&RXQW\5HJLRQDO(GXFDWLRQ 6HUYLFHV &&5(6 DIWHUWKHSUHYLRXVRXWVRXUFLQJDJHQF\6XEVWLWXWH 7HDFKHU6HUYLFHV,QF 676 SXOOHG RXW EHFDXVH WKH ERDUG¡V GHFLVLRQ WRYRWHRQRXWVRXUFLQJRQ-XQH ZRXOGQRWJLYH676HQRXJKWLPHWR

meet the state’s July 1 documentaWLRQĂ€OLQJGHDGOLQH%RDUGPHPEHUV mentioned that STS had provided WKHORZHVWUDWHRXWRIWKHDJHQFLHV WKDWWKHERDUGZDVFRQVLGHULQJ 1RW DOO FRPPXQLW\ PHPEHUV DJUHH ZLWK WKH ERDUG¡V SRVLWLRQ 0DQ\ZKRVSRNHDWWKHERDUGPHHWLQJ H[SUHVVHG FRQFHUQV DERXW WKH YLDELOLW\RIWKHERDUG¡VJRDOWREULQJ EDFN DOO RI WKH FXUUHQW HGXFDWRUV WKURXJKDQRXWVRXUFLQJFRPSDQ\ “These people are the lowest SDLG ZLWKRXW UHSUHVHQWDWLRQ E\ union and currently don’t have DQ\ EHQHILWV DW DOOÂľ FRPPXQLW\ PHPEHU3DWW\H%HQVRQVDLG´,WLV RXWUDJHRXVWKDWLWKDVFRPHWRWKLVÂľ 6XVDQ3HWHUPDQDSDUHQWZKRVH VRQZRUNVUHJXODUO\ZLWKDLGHVEHOLHYHVWKDWRXWVRXUFLQJPD\GLVUXSW DFDGHPLFFRQWLQXLW\ ´7KH \RXQJHU NLGV UHO\ RQ WKH paraprofessionals and form relaWLRQVKLSVÂľ3HWHUPDQVDLG´7KH\¡UH UROH PRGHOV IRU >\RXQJHU VWXGHQWV@Âľ 7R RXWOLQH SRVVLEOH VDYLQJV WKH VFKRRO ERDUG FUHDWHG D SODQ EDVHGRQWKHQHFHVVDU\KHDOWKFDUH FRVWV RI URXJKO\  VXEVWLWXWHV DQGSDUDSURIHVVLRQDOV,QRUGHUWR SURMHFWWKHRXWFRPHWKHERDUGXVHG administrators’ health care costs and worked off of the assumption that those presented with a new opportunity for health care would XWLOL]HLW 5HJDUGOHVV VRPH PHPEHUV RI WKHFRPPXQLW\EHOLHYHWKHVFKRRO ERDUG¡V FRVWV DUH H[DJJHUDWHG &RPPXQLW\PHPEHUVDWWKHERDUG PHHWLQJ TXHVWLRQHG ZKHWKHU LQGLYLGXDOKHDOWKFDUHSDFNDJHVIRUVXEVWLWXWHVDQGSDUDSURIHVVLRQDOVPLJKW EH OHVV WKDQ WKH DGPLQLVWUDWRUV¡ SDFNDJHV$OVR VRPH TXHVWLRQHG LI DOO  HGXFDWRUV ZRXOG XWLOL]H GLVWULFWKHDOWKFDUHVLQFHPDQ\PD\ KDYHVSRXVHVZLWKKHDOWKFDUHSODQV %RDUGPHPEHUV´QHHGWRDFFXUDWHO\SUHGLFWWKHPHGLFDO>FRVWV@Âľ one T/E employee said in an inWHUYLHZ :DWHUV 'LUHFWRU RI 3HUVRQQHO 6XVDQ 7LHGH DQG VFKRRO ERDUG

TheSpoke Spoke congratulates The congratulates Editor Emeritus Emeritus Jenna Editor Jenna Spoont on on being being named thethe Spoont named Journalism Education National Scholastic Press Association’s 2013 Association’s 2013National Student Student Journalist of the Year Journalist of the Year.

Alex Arena for The SPOKE

Community members line up to share their thoughts toward a district proposal to outsource substitutes and aides at the 0D\VFKRROERDUGPHHWLQJ%HFDXVHRIWKHKLJKOHYHORIFRPPXQLW\LQWHUHVWWKHGLVWULFWDOVRXVHGRYHUĂ RZURRPV 3UHVLGHQW .HYLQ %XUDNV PHW ZLWK DLGHVWKDWZRXOGEHDIIHFWHGE\WKH proposal at a district inservice held 0D\ /LEUDU\ $LGH .DWK\ 3ROLWHV VSRNH RXW DJDLQVW WKH SURSRVDO DW WKH PHHWLQJ ZLWK WKH DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ ´,¡PQRWKHUHWRVXSSRUWP\VHOI EXW,¡PKHUHEHFDXVH,ORYHZKDW, GR,ORYHWKHVFKRROÂľ3ROLWHVVDLG LQDQLQWHUYLHZ´6RLW¡VQRWDERXW WKH PRQH\ LW¡V DERXW WKH IXOĂ€OOPHQWZKDW\RXJHWIURPWKHMRE %XWLI\RXWKLQNWKDW,DPVRHDVLO\ UHSODFHDEOH E\ VRPHERG\ RXWVLGH WKH GLVWULFW IURP DQ RXWVRXUFLQJ FRPSDQ\RUHYHQWRKDYHPHZRUN IRUDQ\OHVVPRQH\,¡PLQVXOWHGÂľ &RPPXQLW\PHPEHUDQGVFKRRO ERDUG FDQGLGDWH 6FRWW 'RUVH\ VSRNHDJDLQVWERDUGEXGJHWSROLFLHV DWWKHPHHWLQJ “Certainly we can pan it and VSLQ>RXWVRXUFLQJ@DVDZD\WRVDYH

PRQH\:HXQGHUVWDQGZHDUHXQGHUDEXGJHWFRQVWUDLQWEXW,ZLVK ZHZRXOGKDYHKDGWKDWEXGJHWFRQVWUDLQWZKHQZHJDYHDVZHHWSD\ UDLVHWRRXUDGPLQLVWUDWRUVÂľ'RUVH\ VDLGUHIHUULQJWRDUDLVHDGPLQLVWUDWRUVUHFHLYHGHDUOLHUWKLV\HDU As a result of the community UHVSRQVHWKHERDUGGHFLGHGWRWDEOH WKHRXWVRXUFLQJSURSRVDOLQRUGHUWR

ORRNDWLWPRUHFORVHO\ZKLOHFRQGXFWLQJIXUWKHUWDONVZLWK&&5(6 7KH ERDUG ZLOO KROG D ÀQDQFH PHHWLQJ-XQHWRIXUWKHUGLVFXVV RXWVRXUFLQJ7KHSURSRVDOZLOOEH EURXJKW WR D YRWH DW WKH -XQH  ERDUGPHHWLQJ Suproteem Sarkar can be reached at ssarkar@stoganews.com.

Chestnut Village Shoppes 36 Chestnut Road, Paoli


PAGE 4 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

NEWS

District moves toward Bring Your Own Device initiative Continued from p. 1 French teacher Josée Brouard posted two signs in her classroom earlier this year to remind students that the usage of cellphones is not permitted during the school year. “A few times, I’ve had to interrupt my lesson to remind a student of the rule. Since the sign was posted, I’ve found that I don’t have to do that as much. I think those signs really do help,” Brouard said. “Because of all the applications [available for the iPhone], the students’ argument is that they are able to use their iPhone for some of their studying, such as flashcards which is great. But, because it’s hard for me to check, and I don’t want to intrude and go see what they’re doing, I just told them that as a general rule, no one is allowed [to use their phone] for any reason.”

Technology in class Change may soon come to Conestoga’s cellphone policy with the district’s Bring Your

Policy:

Reality:

“Students are not permitted to use cell phones in school when school is in session. Cell phones must be powered off for the duration of the school day...When cell phones and/ or other electronic items are in use without authorization during the school day, the equipment will be confiscated and turned over to an assistant principal to be returned to a parent of guardian.” Student Handbook Policy on Cellphone Usage

“I’ve never seen [people who have their phones out in class] get in trouble.” Freshman Brian Weiss

“Teachers will usually ignore it or ask them to put it away... I think it’s okay, as long as [students are] not disrupting the lesson.” Junior Chelsea Yasgur

“It depends what teacher you have. Some teachers do confis-­ cate it, or they give warnings. I feel like either they don’t see it or they just ignore it com-­ pletely.” Sophomore Cecilia Mabilais

“You can bring your cellphone to school as long as it’s turned off and stays in your locker. The reality is that the policy is totally ignored; most students keep theirs on them all day and use it.” Senior Caroline Donahue Zoe Au, Sam Sedor and Victoria Stern for The SPOKE

Own Device (BYOD) initiative, which will be implemented in the 2014-2015 school year. Once in place, the policy will allow students to bring certain predetermined devices, potentially including cellphones, of their

own to school to use in class, according to district Director of Technology and Services Robin McConnell. The district will decide which devices will be allowed and how the initiative will be phased into schools, and will also upgrade the network and wireless system in the summer of 2014. However, McConnell said that the actual implementation of the initiative may vary from classroom to classroom. “Once introduced, individual teachers will determine classroom rules for the use of the BYOD technology. They will set limits, timelines, assignments, classroom activities and assessment procedures. They will provide supervision as appropriate,” McConnell said. “If the rules are not followed, then appropriate actions will be taken.” Assistant Principal Andrew Phillips said that the reasons for implementing the initiative are increased learning opportunities and greater flexibility for teachers and the curriculum. “We’re trying to increase our opportunities for learning across all the different subject areas and there are obviously a lot of different technologies that are available right now, which are not supported by our network,” Phillips said. “The BYOD initiative, where students can bring in their own technology, will allow teachers a little more flexibility to use those things in their classrooms as they make those determinations, and perhaps increase and

enhance the experience that kids have in classrooms. It can be more dynamic, and doesn’t have to be as planned.” Philosophy and US Historyteacher John Koenig feels that the transition to classes becoming more technology-friendly is important to keep up with the pace of the world. “I think it’s inevitable that [technology] will play a more prominent role in teaching and learning. That’s just the direction that things are going. How to manage that direction, and how to work with that direction to maximize growth and student achievement is the larger looming question,” Koenig said. Sophomore Juliann Susas attended Clements High School in Sugarland, Texas before coming to Conestoga; the school had a BYOD policy, and Susas said that she felt it was “more practical to encourage students to use technology in their studies.” “You were encouraged to bring in your iPad and your Kindle and all your technology. For the learning experience, that’s what we’re accustomed to, so I think it’s easier for me to learn. For tests, they make us put our backpacks against the wall, and make sure our phones are in it,” Susas said. “In Spanish, if we didn’t know a word, we would just look it up on our phones. It was so much easier.” Brouard said that she would be open to the initiative, but that measures would have to be taken

to ensure that the class is still manageable. “I think I would support [BYOD] simply because we have to adapt to change. As we adapt to any transition, we have to reflect on some of the possible issues, and maybe try to come up with some strategies to minimize the risks,” Brouard said. “It becomes more difficult to control. Part of being a teacher is to remain in control all the time. It’s very important that the teacher’s responsibility remains the same even with the changes. But I don’t think it means that we cannot welcome a change that is a normal change in the society.” McConnell said that the district will strive to ensure that BYOD does not lead to an increase in technology-based cheating. “School-wide, there is an understanding that cheating will not be tolerated and there are penalties for doing so,” he said. “Within individual classrooms, teachers will determine how and when technology can be used. Should a student or students decide to use technology to cheat, they will be breaking the trusting relationship and will suffer the consequences.” Fagan agrees, saying that with the introduction of the new initiative, guidelines and rules may have to be adjusted, but the administration hopes to create a new bond with students in which students are expected to be responsible and accountable for their own actions.

Continued on p. 5


MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

PAGE 5 THE SPOKE

NEWS

Cellphone use creates potential for cheating in digital era Continued from p. 4 “If we begin the BYOD initiative, does it present sort of a new facet and a new challenge maybe, to maintaining academic integrity? Yes it does. We have to remain vigilant, and mindful. We’re really looking to create a partnership with students. Academic integrity is based to a very large extent on students ensuring that they’re doing their own work, and that’s a responsibility that we want them to take on,” Fagan said. “We’re trying to put some things in place through the policy to help ensure that happens, and that there are guidelines for how the administration would respond in the event that academic integrity is violated through online or handheld devices.”

Choosing to cheat Although administrators are working to prevent digital cheating, some students who own cellphones use their devices to cheat. For sophomore Nate Moss*,

Yuge Xiao/The SPOKE

cheating is an infrequent hobby. Moss said that he cheats because he believes that he will not be caught, and does not see it as taking a risk. “Cheating is an art. [People cheat] because school values grades more than students value learning,” Moss said. “I know I can get away with it. Before you do anything, you have to weigh out the consequences and the

risks, how risky it is to pull off anything.” Junior Will Kowalski* said he cheats only when he feels that he cannot do well on an assessment and also ensures that he is taking minimal risk of being caught prior to choosing to cheat. “A couple of times you look up and you see the teacher looking at me and you think they know what’s going on. For the most

part, I wouldn’t do it if I thought I’d get caught,” Kowalski said. “I think either teachers are oblivious to the fact that people cheat, or they know and they let them go.” This past September, the use of cellphones was linked to cheating in prestigious public high school Stuyvesant High School in New York, when more than 60 students were implicated for using cellphones to take picWXUHV RI ÀQDO H[DPV DQG VHQGLQJ the pictures to one another. Kowalski said that the increased availability of technology such as smartphones means that some students feel they are able to cheat without getting caught. Technology “makes it a lot easier; everybody has their phone on them all the time. I keep it under my leg or next to me or under my sweatshirt. If a teacher is walking by, you can just lock your phone and put it in your pocket,” Kowalski said. After attending a school where

BYOD was in place, Susas thinks that implementing it at Conestoga might not necessarily cause cheating to rise. “It’s not going to be easier to cheat, because teachers will be on their toes,” Susas said. “And besides, if I’m learning it better I wouldn’t need to [cheat] anyway.” Koenig said that while technology can provide challenges to academic integrity, it can be ultiPDWHO\EHQHÀFLDOIRUWHDFKHUVDQG students. “Many things will change, as far as the culture and the climate, and an approach to learning, especially if you have the ability to look things up immediately, and it’s widely accessible to students, there’s tremendous, tremendous opportunities there, instructionally, for teachers and for students,” Koenig said. “But I think both teachers and students will need to learn how to do it well.” Lavi Ben-Dor can be reached at lbendor@stoganews.com.

*To protect the privacy of the students interviewed, their names have been changed.

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PAGE 6 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

NEWS

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Suproteem Sarkar News Editor Over the past several months, senior Maddie DeVlieger spent several hours producing â&#x20AC;&#x153;Radiant,â&#x20AC;? a documentary that depicts the life of her uncle who lives with Down SynGURPH'H9OLHJHUĂ&#x20AC;OPHGWKHSLHFHLQ December, and although she suffered a concussion during school year, she continued to edit and finalize the documentary. On May 2, DeVlieger ZDVKRQRUHGDWWKH*UHHQĂ&#x20AC;HOG<RXWK Film Festival, winning the most nominations for special awards, the most prestigious honor at the ceremony. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was really awesome to receive the award and be recognized and hear the judgesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; great reviews,â&#x20AC;? DeVlieger said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I think honestly what made this award special was the fact that my uncle was at the awards ceremony and he came up on stage with me. Just seeing how happy he was and how proud he was made it that much better. â&#x20AC;? Senior Ben Fall received an award in the experimental category of the film festival with his music video titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;RGB.â&#x20AC;? Seniors Drew Gottlieb and Zach Lowry won in the music

Photo courtesy Keith Petersen

From left: TV teacher Katie Frazer, sophomore Jack Zabinski, seniors Keith Petersen, Drew Gottlieb, Zach Lowry and Ben Fall, Chris Blake and seniors Maddie DeVlieger and Emily Seeburger SRVH ZLWK DZDUGV DW WKH  *UHHQĂ&#x20AC;HOG <RXWK )LOP )HVWLYDO video category with their music video a music video where the singer is for English teacher Ben Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s song singing over the course of the video. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love Potion #10.â&#x20AC;? It just kind of acted out what the music Senior Keith Petersen, who was the meant. It was really fun getting our script supervisor for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love Potion hands on professional-grade stuffâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I #10â&#x20AC;? video, said he found the process felt like I was on a professional set.â&#x20AC;? of producing the piece rewarding. DeVlieger worked on a project that â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was basically a narrative-type she believed would promote a mesmusic video,â&#x20AC;? Petersen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sage. She said that the documentary format was â&#x20AC;&#x153;an opportunity to really GLYHLQWRVRPHWKLQJWKDW\RXĂ&#x20AC;QGIDVFLnating and explore it more,â&#x20AC;? and found that telling a story about her uncle made the process more rewarding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The real reason I was inspired to do this was that I have a respect and personal connection with people with disabilities, but certainly thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not true for everyone,â&#x20AC;? DeVlieger said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought that if I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know a good chunk about how he became who he is today, certainly other people wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

know that about disabilities as a whole. But it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a super hard task to make a story about this because my uncleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really amazing guy.â&#x20AC;? DeVlieger also said she was thankful for the help she received from her family and TV studio students and instructors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Something like this, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it on your own,â&#x20AC;? DeVlieger said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even if you shot everything and edited everything on your own, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much support and outside things that really make it possible.â&#x20AC;? Lowry was also recognized at the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Mid-Atlantic Emmy Awards, winning the Arts and Entertainment/Cultural Affairs category with â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Timeless Artist,â&#x20AC;? and the News Storyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;General Assignment category with senior Jenna Spoont for â&#x20AC;&#x153;AIDS Walk Philly.â&#x20AC;? Spoont also won in the Talent category, after creating a 10-minute compilation of her broadcast journalism work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was such a rewarding feeling when my name was announced,â&#x20AC;? Spoont said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had the biggest smile on my faceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I am so proud to represent Conestoga. The high school takes a lot of pride in our television program, and I owe it to all of the incredible teachers, administrators, students and community that have supported my passion throughout my high school career.â&#x20AC;? Sophomore Ryan Frascella was also nominated for the News Storyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; General Assignment category at the NATAS awards for his package that discussed drug abuse in Chester County. Frascella said the piece is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;proudest storyâ&#x20AC;? he has produced.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I did it to uncover a problem that is growing among teenagers in our community, to expose it and hope that some kids would see it and maybe help them realize their behavior probably isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t one that is going to lead them down the right path,â&#x20AC;? Frascella said. Lowryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s project, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Timeless Artist,â&#x20AC;? depicted the life of third-generation Doylestown shoemaker Perry (UFROLQR/RZU\Ă&#x20AC;OPHG(UFROLQRLQKLV VKRSDQGDOVRĂ&#x20AC;OPHGWKHVKRHPDNHU VHOOLQJKLVZDUHVLQ1HZ<RUN&LW\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt that [Ercolino] would be a really compelling character for the documentary because his family has this tradition and this passion for an art,â&#x20AC;? Lowry said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During the interview I talked to him about the art of shoemaking and how he felt the art is portrayed right now. He feels the art of shoemaking is timeless, and that it is DQDUWVRQDWXUDOO\WKHĂ&#x20AC;OPZDVFDOOHG â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Timeless Artist.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Inspired by the documentary, Lowry spent his internship with 2012 â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stoga graduate Luke Rafferty travelling around the country in May and Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJGLIIHUHQWDUWLVDQV ´,WGHĂ&#x20AC;QLWHO\JDYHPHDQHZORRNDW handmade products and what it really takes to run your own company and produce something with your hands and carry on a tradition from past generations of your family,â&#x20AC;? Lowry said â&#x20AC;&#x153;I got to see a lot of America, I got to see some beautiful landscapes, and we met a lot of interesting people and told a lot of compelling stories, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking forward to sharing those stories with the world.â&#x20AC;? 6XSURWHHP6DUNDUFDQEHUHDFKHGDW VVDUNDU#VWRJDQHZVFRP

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MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

NEWS

PAGE 7 THE SPOKE

FLITE incorporates 'Innovation in the Classroom' program Maggie Chen & Wendy Tan Staff Reporters

Additionally, new digital cameras have been introduced to the Yearbook course, and a robotics course has been granted to the Engineering Tech classes. A biology student peels back the skin of When the biology department decided a frog. Carefully, he explores the internal last year that dissecting frogs was not ecoorgans of the creature, but instead of wield- nomical or animal-friendly, they applied and ing scalpels or forceps, he holds a computer received a FLITE grant to purchase a virtual mouse. The student is using â&#x20AC;&#x153;Froguts,â&#x20AC;? a dissection program. software made possible by the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Innovation Biology teacher Brooke Eidell is grateful in the Classroomâ&#x20AC;? program by the Founda- that FLITE funded Froguts and expects the tion for Learning in Tredyffrin-Easttown software to improve the learning experience (FLITE). of her students. )RUWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVW\HDUHYHU´,QQRYDWLRQLQWKH â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope that kids are going to be able to Classroomâ&#x20AC;? is allowing teachers to apply for see things in the virtual dissection that they grants for classroom technology and sup- wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to see with their regular SOLHV7HDFKHUVĂ&#x20AC;UVWVXEPLWDSSOLFDWLRQVWR frog. Sometimes dissections can be hard to principal Dr. Amy Meisinger for approval, do and not everybody can see everything,â&#x20AC;? who decides whether or not the programs in Eidell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Froguts is a great way to give TXHVWLRQZLOOEHHGXFDWLRQDOO\EHQHĂ&#x20AC;FLDO,I something back to the students here at Conthe programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cost exceeds a certain thresh- estoga and a great use of the funds. I think old, a board of three FLITE members must itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wonderful.â&#x20AC;? judge the proposal for educational value. Another software â&#x20AC;&#x153;Innovation in the Other programs that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Innovation in the Classroomâ&#x20AC;? has funded is SmartMusic. Classroomâ&#x20AC;? has funded include the Roto- Music students can play their instruments Vap for the chemistry department, which is a into a microphone and SmartMusic will device that helps with the study of chemical grade their performance based on accuracy properties, and the World Affairs Council in pitch and rhythm. Their scores can also of Philadelphiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Global Economic Forum, be sent to their teachers. Band teacher Wilwhich enables â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stoga students to participate liam Seaton has been using SmartMusic for as mock delegates in a simulated Global practice assignments. Economics Forum with other students from â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great program, a revoluthe region. tionary program that changes the way that

students approach their practice, which is essentially their homework. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a motivating tool and I think it was eye opening for a lot of students to see where they were making mistakes,â&#x20AC;? Seaton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had a positive impact on allowing students to practice more effectively and PRUHHIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\Âľ Sophomore band member Michael Tao appreciates how SmartMusic assists students with practicing their instruments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The SmartMusic software is really helpful for those who want to practice their parts. It plays the other parts of the band, so you know where your part is and where you belong in the band,â&#x20AC;? Tao said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SmartMusic is a great tool for people who want to practice and bring the band home with them.â&#x20AC;? All the programs created by FLITE are an effort to continue academic progress and enrichment at Conestoga. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope to help foster creativity and innovation in the classroom in order to continue to make Conestoga one of the most competitive high schools in the country,â&#x20AC;? FLITE chair Paige Skelly said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the students at Conestoga are outstanding and they produce great academic results year after year and we want to help make that continue into the future.â&#x20AC;? Maggie Chen can be reached at mchen@stoganews.com.

"Innovation in the Classroom" allows teachers to purchase educational technology using FLITE grant money Froguts is a virtual frog dissection program SmartMusic helps musicians improve their playing Engineering Tech classes now contain a robotics unit

Yearbook members have been given digital cameras Graphic: Zoe Au for The SPOKE

%GEHIQMGXIEQTPEGIW½VWXMRWXEXIWIRMSVLSRSVIHJSVGSQQMXQIRX Yuge Xiao Convergence Editor

breaker questions. After Conestoga failed to FRUUHFWO\DQVZHUWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWTXHVWLRQ%HQQHWW and senior Ary Swaminathan answered the The House chamber was silent as quiz- second and third questions. The fourth quesPDVWHU-LP6WRGGDUGEHJDQWRUHDGWKHĂ&#x20AC;IWK tion went to another team, leaving Bennett to DQG Ă&#x20AC;QDO TXHVWLRQ RI WKH Ă&#x20AC;QDO URXQG WLH- DQVZHUWKHĂ&#x20AC;QDOTXHVWLRQDQGVHDOWKHYLFWRU\ breaker at the Pa. state academic competition. for Conestoga, 85-75-75. 6WRGGDUGDVNHG´7KHĂ&#x20AC;UVW:RUOG6HULHVZDV â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stoga continued its winning streak when played in 1903 and the Boston Americans Bennett was announced Player of the Year for defeatedâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? Pennsylvania at the Academic Competition %HIRUH 6WRGGDUG KDG WLPH WR Ă&#x20AC;QLVK KLV banquet on May 20. In addition to Bennettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s question, senior Michael Bennett pressed his award, the team will travel to Harrisburg buzzer and replied, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pittsburgh Pirates.â&#x20AC;? again on June 10 to be recognized by the Pa. The audience burst into applause and gave a House of Representatives. Conestoga will standing ovation to the 2013 state champions. automatically have a spot in next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state Conestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academic Competition Team FRPSHWLWLRQDVDUHVXOWRIZLQQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UVWSODFH traveled to Harrisburg on May 3 to compete Bennett said the team was successful in the Pa. State Academic Competition. because of the tight-knit relationships beConestoga placed first overall, winning tween teammates as well as each memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the state championship for the second time contribution of his or her individual skill set. ever, after winning the inaugural 1992 state â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would attribute our success to the feelcompetition. ing of camaraderie we have. I feel like we However, the road to the state title was really did have a familyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not that we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t not without pressure. After two rounds of in past years, but we were very close as a regulation, State College Area High School, unit this year,â&#x20AC;? Bennett said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And moredefending champion West-Chester Hender- over, not only were we a family, we were a son High School and Conestoga were tied family whose members [worked] equally at at 70 points, resulting in an unprecedented contributing. Someone would come up with three-way tiebreaker round. a [literature] question, someone would come After a 15-minute break, the three teams up with a science question, everyone chipped SURFHHGHG WR DQVZHU WKH Ă&#x20AC;YH WRVVXS WLH- in, everyone pulled their weight.â&#x20AC;?

Photo courtesy Susanta Sarkar

Academic Competition Team members sophomore Suproteem Sarkar, junior Manasvi Ramanujam, coach Michael Cruz and senior members Michael Bennett, Kevin Li, Ary Swaminathan and Dennison Richter SRVHZLWKWKHLUWURSK\7KHWHDPSODFHGĂ&#x20AC;UVWDWWKH3DVWDWHFRPSHWLWLRQ The departure of several Academic Competition veterans will impact the team. +RZHYHU%HQQHWWVDLGKHLVFRQĂ&#x20AC;GHQWLQQH[W yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team and encourages any students who are interested to try out for Academic Competition next fall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you let your fear of failure hold you back, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the worst thing that happens, you try again next year. Just give the dice a

roll,â&#x20AC;? Bennett said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I would also say to P\ WHDPPDWHV , KDYH DEVROXWH FRQĂ&#x20AC;GHQFH in you, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been wonderful for four years, thank you so much, and I just know that [Academic Competition] at Conestoga has a bright future.â&#x20AC;? Yuge Xiao can be reached at yxiao@stoganews.com.


Opinion MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

The Spoke is published seven times per year at Bartash Printing. It consistently receives the Gold Award from the Pennsylvania Scholastic Press Association and is a National Scholastic Press Association Pacemaker awardwinning publication. The Spoke serves as a public forum for student expression.

Editors-in-chief: Lavi Ben-Dor, Allison Kozeracki Managing Editor: Simran Singh News Editor: Suproteem Sarkar Op/Ed Editor: James Redmond Features Editor: Emily Klein Sports Editors: Courtney Kennedy, Navin Zachariah Design Editor: Sophie Bodek Centerspread Editor: Callum Backstrom Convergence Editor: Yuge Xiao Business Manager: Mary Mei Cartoonists: Callum Backstrom, Sophie Bodek, Maggie Chen Staff: Andy Backstrom, Maggie Chen, Patrick Nicholson, Sophia Ponte, Emma Purinton, Shivani Sanghani, Wendy Tan Faculty Advisers: Susan Houseman, Cynthia CrothersHyatt

Submissions The Spoke will print letters of general interest to the student body and community. Signed letters under 200 words may be submitted to Susan Houseman, Cynthia Hyatt, Lavi Ben-Dor or Allison Kozeracki. Unsigned editorials represent the views of The Spoke editorial board, and not necessarily those of the administration, student body, community or advertisers. The opinions expressed in signed columns are those of the writer and not necessarily the opinion of The Spoke.

A sacred right

The Spoke condemns overreaching actions of Justice Dept. It was revealed last month that federal investigators had secretly seized telephone records of reporters for the Associated Press $3  VRPHWLPH WKLV \HDU 7KH 86 'HSDUWment of Justice obtained two months of records IURP WKH MRXUQDOLVWV¡ SKRQH OLQHV LQFOXGLQJ their home phones and cell phones. Although WKH-XVWLFH'HSDUWPHQWGLGQRWJLYHDQRIĂ&#x20AC;FLDO reason for the inquiry, it was likely related to an ongoing investigation into the leaking of information about a Yemen-based terrorist plot thwarted by the CIA. While the government has the right to conduct these types of investigations, we believe this particular one was overreaching. In conducting such investigations, the government must respect the rights of the press, particularly a source as respected as the AP, a nonSURĂ&#x20AC;WQHZVFRRSHUDWLYHZLWKHPSOR\HHV worldwide. By not announcing the seizure, or the reason for it, the government denied the AP the opportunity to challenge it in court. Such extreme measures should only be taken as a last resort. Gary Pruitt, President and CEO of the AP, called the seizure â&#x20AC;&#x153;a massive and unprecedented intrusion by the Department of Justice into the newsgathering activities of The Associated Press,â&#x20AC;? in a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We regard this action by the Department of -XVWLFHDVDVHULRXVLQWHUIHUHQFHZLWK$3¡VFRQstitutional rights to gather and report the news,â&#x20AC;? Pruitt said in the letter.

Facing mounting criticism, President Barack Obama ordered a review of the deSDUWPHQW¡V ´JXLGHOLQHV JRYHUQLQJ LQYHVWLJDtions that involve reporters.â&#x20AC;? Attorney General +ROGHUVDLGKHZLOOUHSRUWEDFNE\-XO\ The President is right to do so. By secretly seizing phone records, the Justice Department infringed on not just the rights of the press, but the rights of the public to be informed of what its government is doing. Amid all the talk about the Second Amendment, we must not forget about the First. The freedom of the press is absolutely fundamental to our democracy, and anything that threatens it cannot be taken lightly. Disrespecting the freedom of the press can only increase the likelihood of other Constitutional violations. Unless there is a clear and present danger to QDWLRQDO VHFXULW\ JRYHUQPHQW RIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOV FDQQRW feel afraid to speak to the press. The Obama administration has pursued six current or forPHU JRYHUQPHQW RIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOV RYHU OHDNVÂłRQO\ three had been pursued in total under all previous administrations. The reporters at The 6SRNHNQRZDOOWRRZHOODERXWKRZGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWLW is to get sources to speak up about important stories, and this intrusion will only make it that much harder. It is obvious why the Justice Department ZRXOGIHHOWKHQHHGWRFRQFHDOVRPHFRQĂ&#x20AC;GHQtial information from the public. But while the government does not want all of its activity scrutinized and overexposed, it must not forget to offer the same respect to the press.

Contact Us

Email: spoke@stoga.net 3KRQH The Spoke accepts paid advertisements. Email mmei@stoganews.com. Visit The Spoke online at www.stoganews.com News Director: Yuge Xiao yxiao@stoganews.com

Sophie Bodek/The SPOKE

From the Editor:

Cheating ourselves

Allison Kozeracki Co-editor-in-chief

6SLWHLVDKDUGFRQFHSWWRGHĂ&#x20AC;QH$FFRUGLQJWR the Merriam-Webster dictionary, spite is â&#x20AC;&#x153;petty ill will or hatred with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart.â&#x20AC;? Seems simple enough. Given this GHĂ&#x20AC;QLWLRQ,¡PDVVXPLQJIHZSHRSOHZRXOGDGPLWWREHLQJVSLWHIXOEXW,¡YHQRWLFHGDJURZLQJ SUHYDOHQFHZLWKLQRXUVFKRROFRPPXQLW\+HUH¡V an example: Test day. As soon as class lets out, students can already be heard in the hallway, yammering to their friends about what to expect on the test and how the answer to number 7 is B, not&7KHUH¡V something almost sweet about itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a cheating caPDUDGHULHLI\RXZLOO,W¡VDUDUHVLJKWDW&RQHVtoga: students doing something to help their peers ZLWKRXWDQ\DSSDUHQWEHQHĂ&#x20AC;WWRWKHPVHOYHV But someone decides to disrupt the circle of life by reporting the unethical students to the teacher. Maybe the person just thought they were GRLQJWKHULJKWWKLQJEXWWKHUH¡VVRPHWKLQJVSLWHIXODERXWLWKDUPLQJRWKHUVZLWKRXWEHQHĂ&#x20AC;WLQJRU perhaps even hurting, yourself. We turn on each other. We are so incensed by the idea of another student unfairly gaining a few points that we are willing to actually take action to prevent it, even if it has no bearing on our own performance. Perhaps this is a cynical outlook because I am a bitter, cynical person, but spite is a concept that has been studied in more formal settings than the hallways of Conestoga. One famous economic experiment is â&#x20AC;&#x153;the ultimatum game.â&#x20AC;? In the ultimatum game, one person is given a certain sum RIPRQH\ OHW¡VVD\ DQGWROGWRGLYLGHWKH money any way they choose between themselves DQGRQHRWKHUSHUVRQ7KHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSHUVRQSURSRVHV how to divide the money, and the second person can either accept or reject the proposal. If the second person accepts, the money is split according to the proposal. However, if they refuse, neither person receives anything. 5DUHO\ ZLOO DQ\RQH DFFHSW DQ RIIHU WKDW¡V OHVVWKDQSHUFHQWRIWKHPRQH\  ,QRWKHU ZRUGV WKH\ ZRXOG UDWKHU DFFHSW  WKDQ KDYH the other person get what they see as an unfairly ODUJH VKDUH   ,W VHHPV LUUDWLRQDO DQG HYHQ D bit sad, but the study of spite offers a fascinating insight into the human condition and the desire to destroy welfare to restore equity. Ultimately, I think spite comes down to whether we measure our successes against the successes of others or against our own. I prefer the latter. Allison Kozeracki can be reached at akozeracki@stoganews.com.


MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

PAGE 9 THE SPOKE

OP/ED

American Dream fades from memory the right to freedom. A representative democracy must ensure parity in political participation, and that serves as the foundation for economic fairness and national prosperity. My parents and my older brother moved from India in 1997, in hopes of pursuing the American Dream. My father enrolled in a small, little Simran Singh known university. He graduated Managing Editor with a doctoral degree in business in Just yesterday, I asked my dad, a little more than three years. He has â&#x20AC;&#x153;Does the American Dream exist taught me the value of hard work and anymore?â&#x20AC;? Without hesitation, he determination. Today, he is DĂ&#x20AC;QDQFHSURQRGGHGDIĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLYHO\ In this great country we all call fessor at home, we believe in the principle of one of the democracy. All people, irrespective of most wellsocial, economic or racial standing, known universities in can let their voice be heard by voting the nation. When I look at IRUWKHLUFKRLFHRIHOHFWHGRIĂ&#x20AC;FLDOEH him, I it a school board representative or the s e e President of the United States. We t h e encourage our citizens to be both politically aware and politically active. However, linked very closely to the principle of democracy is the idea of equality. Equality means that every person has just as good of a chance as Callum Backstrom/The SPOKE the next in achieving his or her goals, provided that he or she works hard. The American Dream is not just $PHULFDQ 'UHDP H[HPSOLĂ&#x20AC;HG %XW related to how much money one when I see an ever-increasing disearns, or the profession one pursues. parity between the rich and the poor The American Dream is founded on in our country, I wonder if he is an the principle of justice, liberty, and exception rather than the norm. My fellow Main Liners, many of equality, that everyone has an equal right to earn a respectable living, pur- us have grown up in an upper-middle sue individual happiness, and exercise class family, seeing only a comfort-

able and privileged life full of endless opportunities and resources to pursue our dreams. We attend one of the best high schools in the nation, where, irrespective of costs, most of us attain the best academic education, including tutoring and college preparation FRXUVHV1LQHW\Ă&#x20AC;YHSHUFHQWRI&RQestogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 graduating class chose to attend college, while, according to Pewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Philadelphia Research Initiative, only 49 percent of the youth within the

attend an excellent college? If he canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to enroll in tutoring lessons or SAT classes, how will he be prepared to battle the war known as the college admissions process? If he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a strong enough college education, will he be qualified enough to be hired for a well paying job? Or will he be forced to live in a poor neighborhood, where his own kids will also be enrolled in an under-funded public school, unable to participate in extracurricular activities and unable to receive college preparation assistance? Americans born into the highest and lowest rungs on the ladder of economic standing tend to stay there as adults, according to a study conP h i l a d e l - phia ducted by Pewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Economic Mobility public school system did so. While Project. Another study conducted by it is comforting to know that we are the same organization concluded that pursuing our dreams and opening up mobility in the United States is lower GRRUVWRRXURZQPDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQWZRUOG than that of Western Europe and it is heartbreaking that students just &DQDGD7KHSUREDELOLW\RIPRYLQJ a few neighborhoods away from us up the social ladder is at an all time are struggling to graduate from high low, according to a 2007 study by the school. 1DWLRQDO %XUHDX RI (FRQRPLF 5HThe American Dream is based search. Economic inequality and the on the principle that hard work is resulting social strife are the primary rewarded with success; if one works reasons that the American Dream is hard and truly wants to improve so hard to achieve. WKHLUFRQGLWLRQWKH\FDQGRVR%XW I am convinced that America is the consider this: if a child lives in a poor greatest country in the world, but I neighborhood because his parents feel that it can be even better if we can cannot pay for a wealthier residence, give everyone back the right to dream. and thereby attends an under-funded public school, is he going to be getting Simran Singh can be reached at an education that will permit him to ssingh@stoganews.com.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do you think the American Dream can be achieved today?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153; I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot harder than it used WREHÂľ -­  Freshman  Miranda  Moody

I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think so, because â&#x20AC;&#x153;VRFLHW\LVWRRVWUDWLĂ&#x20AC;HGÂľ -­  Sophomore  Ethan  Zhao

Report Card No More APâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, SATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Keystones + Time to let that brain turn back to mush 6SXXMRKžIWLWQIPPWMGO]

Health Fair + Breaks up the daily routine - Hundreds of kids trapped in a sticky, humid gym also smell icky

Graduation + Bittersweet departure into a wide, new future - All that pomp and circumstance

Climate Control + Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not melting in class - Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re freezing

Memorial Day + Kick back and honor those whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve given everything - Should be more than one day

â&#x20AC;&#x153; Absolutely. While there is disparity, with hard work and a little bit of luck the American 'UHDPLVDWWDLQDEOHÂľ -­  Junior  Chase  Ciotti

â&#x20AC;&#x153;soWith the level of education unequally distributed, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWÂľ -­  Junior  Claudia  Willis

Finals + Cumulative tests provide opportunity to cement knowledge - Everyone. Hates.Them.


PAGE 10 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

OP/ED

SCOPES By James Redmond, Op/Ed Editor Cartoons by Callum Backstrom, Centerspread Editor

The seniors have gone, and the torch is passed. That’s right—it is now my duty, like Paul Revere, to warn you all of the perils of the coming years! Not sure what to worry about? Need some help directing your listless, directionless fears? Then come check out my Conestoga Horrorscope, and be the first to know what to do and when to cower under the safety and security of the nearest fire blanket.

Freshmen no longer In a word, late pass. It’s been a great run, but that whole “I got lost” thing just isn’t gonna cut it once you’re no longer a freshman. Teachers will be cracking down on late arrivals, and you’ll need more than a fire blanket to protect you if you incur the wrath of an American Lit instructor. Time to up the ante. So when you know you are going to have to slog your way to the opposite corner of the school, pushing through crowds of upperclassmen ambling along in their free-period lethargy, that

yellow sticky-note late pass adhering to your sweaty fingers is your best friend. Slide on in, stick that sucker on the front board, and strut off to your seat like you do it for a living. If you don’t have one, better to play it clandestine and slip over to your desk like a baby cobra in a room full of sleeping mongooses. Bottom line: get a pass or feel the wrath.

Sophomores no more People will tell you junior year is the hardest of them all, and they’re right. But it’s not for the reasons you’d think. Consider this. Everyone is watching you. Everyone. Underclassmen are watching you to see what you do. Teachers are watching you so they can write things about you. Colleges are watching you to see if you’ve got what it takes, and your parents are watching you to make sure you don’t look bad to any of these people. And it makes it

all the creepier when you open your email inbox and a thousand unread messages from colleges are staring back at you asking you how your three blind cats and your pet tuna fish Bobby Joe are doing. Bottom line: the hairs on the back of your neck might as well get some padded soles or something, ’cause they are going to be standing on end quite a bit.

mediate destiny, just as the trippy circuit breaker for my kitchen wall is in control of my bagel’s immediate destiny—like the bagel, I’m sure you’d rather have something more reliable holding the keys to your future. But these

Juniors in repose You might be thinking it’s gonna be smooth sailing next year. Just get those college essays done, and as soon as the apps hit the mailbox it’s time for some naps, right? Wrong. Once all the applications are mailed and you’re sittin’ pretty on top of the school, it may dawn on you that there’s absolutely nothing you can do. Pieces of paper in an envelope or electrons down the tubes are now in control of your im-

days the Man needs your life to be neatly packaged and quantified so that it can be plugged into the program and fed to the machine in tiny little zeros and ones. And so we will wait in suspense, hoping our little numbers have the stuff to make o u r dreams come true and our bagels goldenbrown. Bottom line: Fire blanket isn’t going to be enough, so now might be a good time f o r a new hobby to take your mind off things. If you’ve got

a pool or a neighbor with a pool I’d recommend underwater basket weaving, but if you don’t, I really don’t know what to tell you. Maybe get a pool. Well, the celestial bodies have spoken, and it looks like t h e r e ’s p l e n t y to be afraid of. There’s really no point trying in getting around it— this is going to be another terrifying year. Probably won’t

be any fun at all. You should just stay in bed all summer and practice cowering in fear. But, actually, that’s the opposite of what you should be doing. See, people around here seem to have this tendency to try to figure out what they should be afraid of before it happens. How bad is that English test going to be? How strict is this teacher? We’re not satisfied until we know precisely when we should be soiling ourselves in anticipation. This is wrong. Stop worrying and live your life, Conestoga! James Redmond can be reached at jredmond@stoganews.com.


MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

OP/ED

PAGE 11 THE SPOKE

In professional sports, not every closet needs a spotlight activists Chris Kluwe and Brendon Ayanbadejo claim that several NFL athletes plan on coming out within the next few months. But while pro athletes certainly have every right to reveal their sexuality to the public, do the social implications of such actions really need to be forced down the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Patrick Nicholson throats? Because when I hear that a Staff Reporter group of closeted football players are Jason Collins deserves a lot of coordinating together to come out at things. He deserves tolerance. He the same time, it sounds more like a deserves respect. He deserves rec- promotion of social change than an ognition for his courageous act one act of personal emancipation. And if month ago, when he came out as the itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social change that these players first active gay professional male want, professional sports is not the athlete. But he does not deserve a spot place to make it. In professional sports, there has on a sports magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cover page, nor 24/7 coverage from every single always been one go-to social change sports television network. He does not success story: Jackie Robinson. But deserve these things because they are other than that one success, professional sports is surprisingly lacking demeaning to him. 7KH Ă RRGJDWHV PD\ EH FUHDNLQJ in progressive achievements. Sure, open on the homosexual pro athlete there are social programs and charities population in American sports, which in place throughout the professional up until Collinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement leaguesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the NFL has United Way, had abided by its own version of the NBA has NBA Cares. Kevin the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Ask, Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Tellâ&#x20AC;? policy. Durant even made news recently by Major League Soccer already has donating $1 million to Oklahoma its own gay athlete in Robbie Rog- tornado victims. But when I see a pro ers, and NFL players and gay rights athlete on TV helping build a park or

teaching inner-city kids, the skeptic gression; apparently a quarterback within me questions the athleteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s killing dogs merits three years in jail, sincerity, while the sports fan within but Donte Stallworth killing a human me just doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care. This mindset is only merits 30 days and a bit of comtrue for many sports fans, and unfor- munity service. With such contradictunately such indifference extends to tions still existing within professional both the good and the bad. sports, how can we expect pro athletes See, while not every pro athlete to lead the rest of the sports world achieves celebrity status, far too towards greater tolerance? many are granted the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;exceptionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Now donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get me wrong, the overoften associated with Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s whelming outpouring of support for Ă&#x20AC;QHVWÂłH[FHSWLRQV WKDW QR RQH GH- Collins since his announcement has serves, regardless been very promisof their yards per ing. And to accuse catch or points the gay rights orgaper game. Cases QL]DWLRQVRIĂ DXQWof crime and mising him as some conduct among kind of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;poster boy such athletes for equalityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; would are rarely suffibe incorrect; that ciently punished, distinction belongs and as sports to Nike. However, fans we are far Collins stated that too quick to forhe never set out to give and forget. make a social stateAnd even though ment through his many famous actions, and I fear athletes have rethat the media isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ceived time for getting the mestheir crimes, the sage. prison term rarely So if profesmatches the transsional sports is not Sophie Bodek/The SPOKE

the stage for social change, where do we go now? If the LGBT movement and its media supporters want to make a real difference in sports, they need to attack intolerance at the sourceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at the collegiate and high school levels. Because although the lives of professional athletes are held up to the magnifying glass of an ever more tolerant society, the locker rooms of colleges and high schools are spared such transparency. See, the real tragedy with Jason Collinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story lies in how long he had to wait WRĂ&#x20AC;QDOO\FRPHRXW%HIRUHWKLV\HDU he had never felt comfortable with revealing his sexuality; not in middle school, not in high school and not in college. And his experience is in no way out of the ordinary; in the history of NCAA menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball, no athlete had ever felt comfortable enough to come out as gay in college until Jallen Messersmith did so on May 29. Only through focus on the amateur rather than the professional level of sports can we support gay athletes and help them feel comfortable with coming out earlier. Patrick Nicholson can be reached at pnicholson@stoganews.com.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Green lightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; helps students look toward brighter future

Lavi Ben-Dor Co-editor-in-chief In early May, as many headed to the local theater to watch the newly released â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Great Gatsby,â&#x20AC;? I was stuck smack-dab in the middle of one of the most challenging times of my school year: AP exam season, when I desperately try to remember everything I learned during the year only to find that most of what I studied isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t on the exam and most of what I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t study is. I hardly had time to breathe, much less to watch a movie. Still, I thought back to the good olâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; days of American Literature and our study of F. Scott Fitzgeraldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel on which the movie is based, in which the eponymous Gatsby hopes to win

back the girl of his dreams, from whom he is separated by a bayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and yearns for a green light on her dock. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gatsby,â&#x20AC;? the narrator says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s no matterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther.â&#x20AC;? So I decided I would find my own green light, something that would motivate me to go on instead of giving up and sobbing in frustration. I pinpointed the Pennsylvania Junior Classical League convention, which came two days after my last exam and promised to be a weekend of camaraderie and fun. When I began studying for my exams, it seemed like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to travel through all of time and space to get to Convention, but before I knew it, it was May 17 and I was hopping onto a school bus,

heading off to Penn State with my friends. It was then that I realized how important it is to have a green light during times of difficulties. Well, maybe not a literal one; I doubt the authorities would approve of you kid-

event or place or person that you can look forward to; by keeping that in mind, you force yourself to reach for the light, and thus the burden of everything you need to accomplish becomes lighter because of the power of hope in a less stressful future. So when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re awake in the wee hours of the morning finishing a paper for Lang or American Lit due the next day that you shouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve started weeks ago, try to think of something that you can look forward to, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upcoming graduation parties you can attend after youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re free of that paper or an exciting and intense summer vacation that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll napbe able to enjoy ping traffic lights. Sophie Bodek/The SPOKE once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re done with A green light is an the school year. Or when

you have to juggle all your extracurriculars and six tests during the same week, think of the relaxation you can enjoy once you get through that week. It is only by finding that green light that we can get over the roadblocks we face. Without that dream of a better tomorrow, we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even start to build a better today. Without a vision, a hope for something more awesome than what we have now, how can we make it happen? We must desire to run faster and work harder, or we will never reach that elusive dock on the other side of the bay. So the next time youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re up against a wall, be like Gatsby and find a green light in your life. Although it may initially seem far beyond your reach, if you keep dreaming and hoping, eventually youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll achieve it. Although maybe donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try to do so by throwing huge overthe-top parties. I hear they can sometimes end in disaster. Lavi Ben-Dor can be reached at lbendor@stoganews.com.


Features MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

Final Days of the Spring Sports Season Whether it be the end to the season or the EHJLQQLQJRISRVWVHDVRQFKDPSLRQVKLSVWKH HQGRIUHJXODUVSULQJVSRUWVVHDVRQVHUYHV as a reminder that summer is not far behind. $VVFKRROSUDFWLFHVDUH UHSODFHGZLWKVXPPHU OHDJXHWU\RXWV&RQHVWRJD·V DWKOHWHVNQRZWKDWWKHVXPPHU LVRQLWVZD\

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A G O T ‘S F O SIGNS R E M M SU By Emily Klein, Features Editor Cartoons by Maggie Chen, Staff Cartoonist Design by Sophie Bodek, Design Editor :LWKVXPPHUIDVWDSSURDFKLQJEHKLQGÀQDOH[DPV VWXGHQWVDQ[LRXVO\VHDUFKIRUVLJQVRIWKHFRPLQJ YDFDWLRQ$VLGHIURPWKHW\SLFDOFOHDQHGRXWORFNHUV and warmer weather that denote summer around the QDWLRQ&RQHVWRJDVWXGHQWVFDQHDVLO\ÀQGVLJQVRI VXPPHUXQLTXHWRWKH%LJ´&µ

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MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

PAGE 15 THE SPOKE

FEATURES

Students take break from vacation, give back to community Emma Purinton Staff Reporter

dogs are there for a reason and many have been abused and have lost an eye or leg,â&#x20AC;? Lindsay said. Junior Aaron Davis is also volAs the average Conestoga student prepares to relax during summer unteering this summer, however vacation, some Conestoga students Davis is spending his time working use summer as an opportunity to take DW WZR GLIIHUHQW FDPSDLJQ RIĂ&#x20AC;FHV and pursuing his interest in politics. part in something new. Instead of spending vacation at Davis will be interning two days a the beach or pool, some students use week with the Tredyffrin Township the summer break as an opportunity Democrats, and volunteering twice to volunteer in or around the Tredyf- a week at 2014 Pa. Governor candidate Katie McGintyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign frin and Easttown area. For junior Nicole Lindsay, sum- office. Davis was motivated to mer means volunteering at the Main become involved in order to help Line Animal Rescue in Phoenixville inform community members about political issues. every Saturday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realized that the stuff people â&#x20AC;&#x153;We take out the dogs and walk WKHPRUWDNHWKHPRXWLQWKHĂ&#x20AC;HOG need to know can be easily told and We pretty much have as much free- people are open to hearing it,â&#x20AC;? Davis dom as we want and we just give said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just that a lot of people them lots of love and attention,â&#x20AC;? arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t involved with local issues and LW¡VGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOWIRUWKHDYHUDJHSHUVRQWR Lindsay said. Lindsay has been volunteering know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on, so I thought at the Animal Rescue since the fall, I could just be a portal.â&#x20AC;? Junior Annie McCarthy is serving when she turned 16, the minimum age requirement. Through her ex- as a volunteer counselor for a camp perience, Lindsay has learned about at the Philadelphia Zoo this summer. ,WZLOOEHKHUĂ&#x20AC;UVWWLPHSDUWLFLSDWLQJ the abuse that many animals face. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You gain an awareness of the in the three week camp. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I enjoy types of animal abuse out there like working with children and I just like SXSS\PLOOVDQGGRJĂ&#x20AC;JKWLQJ$OOWKH the environment of the Zoo so I just

Photo Courtesy Alex Arena

Junior Aaron Davis (left) Ă&#x20AC;UVWEHFDPHSROLWLFDOO\DFWLYHE\ZRUNLQJZLWKWKH<RXQJ'HPRFUDWV&OXE VHHQDERYHZLWK SROLWLFLDQ0DQDQ7ULYHGL DQGZLOOIXUWKHUKLVLQWHUHVWE\YROXQWHHULQJDWORFDOFDPSDLJQRIĂ&#x20AC;FHVRYHUWKHVXPPHU thought [the camp] was a good blend of the two,â&#x20AC;? McCarthy said. McCarthy is also looking forward to the camp as a way to interact with people she may otherwise not have met. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to get a chance to be outside and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get to bond with kids that I normally wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able

to talk to or help out. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about the experience of helping kids and making memories,â&#x20AC;? McCarthy said. For McCarthy, her camp experience will give her a glimpse into what could be a possible career. She encourages other students to try programs in a similar way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that just generally kids

that are looking to do stuff over the summerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;think about what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested in. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m interested in animals so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pursuing something I would like to do in the future,â&#x20AC;? McCarthy said.

In AP Statistics, students do an entertaining assignment that involves data collection and analysis. â&#x20AC;&#x153; The most popular project we do is the school wide taste test on cookies, sweets and soda,â&#x20AC;? AP Statistics teacher Kathleen Curry said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done this project every year and each year itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a lot of fun for the students and a nice project to end off on.â&#x20AC;? Gately admits to missing the seniors and sees that in the other students as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s different without them,â&#x20AC;? Gately said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes there are certain times in class when my juniors will say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I wish so-and-so was here because they would say this.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

While Curry also misses her senior students once they leave, she uses the smaller classes as a new opportunity to get to know her remaining students better. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love my seniors and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so exciting to see their transformation into amazing and mature individuals,â&#x20AC;? Curry said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;However, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really nice with the seven students I have left in my classes,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I get to know more of what their aspirations and goals are along with what they value inside and outside school.â&#x20AC;?

Emma Purinton can be reached at epurinton@stoganews.com.

Children left behind: students face classes without seniors

Mary Mei Staff Reporter Once the seniors leave for internship, the hallways and cafeteria are not the only places where their absence can be felt. After the seniors depart, teachers and students alike adjust to the absence of seniors in their now-smaller classes. Classes such as European and British Literature, along with AP Statistics have seen a decrease in the number of students because they are generally senior-dominated. Semester-long courses like Honors Economics are Sophie Bodek/The SPOKE also smaller after the seniors leave. All of these classes continue to go on Students in Judith Shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s European Literature class discuss despite the three to eight student class the book they are reading. Many classes, including this one, found sizes, though the usual workload may their sizes drastically reduced after seniors left for internship. However, Fouladi admits that the mean lack of work for the remaining be replaced by an alternative end-ofdisappearance of seniors has not been students. Projects are assigned in all the-year project. Junior Armon Fouladi sees the at- widely discussed in his class and does of the classes, ranging from essay writing to bookwork. mosphere of his European Literature KDYHVRPHEHQHĂ&#x20AC;WV â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one has actually come out In British Literature, teacher Karen class as normal, though the lack of seniors is felt among the remaining to say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;we want the seniors back,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Gately uses the period to have her Fouladi said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While it feels differ- juniors work on writing their college students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In European Lit, everything is ent without them, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having the essays. â&#x20AC;&#x153; I get to give them a lot of direct generally friendly. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a small class same learning experience and the now and was small to begin with, teachers have a bit more time to talk attention and direct instructions for improving their college writing,â&#x20AC;? which makes it feel a lot emptier,â&#x20AC;? to students.â&#x20AC;? Yet the lack of seniors does not Gately said. Fouladi said.

Mary Mei can be reached at mmei@stoganews.com.


PAGE 16 THE SPOKE

FEATURES

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

’Stoga chef serves up some rock and roll on the side Patrick Nicholson Staff Reporter Jim Delecce spends most of his morning preparing food for ’Stoga students. Yet once every couple nights he heads out to a local restaurant, and while others do the cooking, he’s the one rocking out on stage. Delecce has worked in the Conestoga cafeteria ever since the new kitchen opened back in 2002. But far before “Chef Jimmy” was shredding cheese in the ’Stoga Cafeteria, he was shredding guitar in bands and music duos. “I was 19 when I went on the road with a band,” Delecce said. “I did two weeks in every spot from the top of New York to the bottom of Florida and out to the Midwest, and I did that for three years.” Ever since, Delecce has played with a whole bunch of groups, including bands called Karma, Renegade, Back Seat van Gogh and Fox. Although Delecce is no longer part of a band—his last trio broke up six years ago—he still finds ways to fit music into his life and keep his passion alive. “I have five or six guitars. I got one sitting everywhere, and I’m always playing at home. And then I just started getting back into playing out, doing a solo gig, just at local bars. I’ll be doing that until I die,” Delecce said. Delecce says he was first hooked on music at age 13 thanks to his older brother, whom he describes as a “Beatles freak.” One thing led to a n o t h e r, a n d s o o n e n o u g h Delecce was listening to the Beatles on a regular basis and wanting to perform their music. “I started listening to the Beatles and I was [thinking], ‘What’s he playing? Guitar? Got to get one of those. What’s he playing? Piano? Got to get one of those,’” Delecce said. Delecce has since learned a whole host of instruments, from guitar to bass to keyboard. In fact, the only band instrument Delecce has yet to “dabble in” is the drums, due to rare access to a drum set. According to Delecce, as his interest in music increased,

his interest in joining a band followed suit. “I learned how to play because I wanted to play Beatles tunes. And then I found out that you could stay up late and hang out in bars if you got into a band, and I found out girls like guitar players, so I put them all together and said, ‘I need to get into a band,’” Delecce said. After his first band broke up, Delecce entered the restaurant business as a prep cook. By a “simple twist of fate,” Delecce’s boss moved him from prep cook to line cook early on, and thus started Delecce’s career in the restaurant business. Delecce soon found that bands and the restaurant business were somewhat interconnected, and to this day his passion for cooking stems from the same love of creativity that inspired his passion for music. Cooking “is creative. It’s like playing guitar and music; it’s another form of creativity. Especially back then, restaurant work and band guys, they were all a lot of the same crowd,” Delecce said. “I knew everybody else from other restaurants who knew people who were hiring the bands, and they just kind of fed off of each other.” To this day, Delecce’s favorite music genre remains the one that first got him started in music: classic rock. And after all these years, Delecce’s favorite band is still the Beatles, who he appreciates for their versatility. The Beatles “covered or created at some point during their short six years at the top every genre known,” Delecce said. “When you look at what songs were on top compared to what the Beatles were doing at the same time you realize how far ahead of their time they were.” While he can spew out nu-

Sam Sedor for The SPOKE

Chef Jim Delecce can often be found in the music wing playing his favorite Beatles tunes on the piano. Delecce has also played guitar, bass and keyboard in his musical career. merous facts on why the Beatles were so great—16 albums in six years, 27 number one hits—Delecce doesn’t have as specific reasons as to why he loves music. According to Delecce, his passion for music is much more intuitive. “What draws me to playing that doesn’t draw me to [some other thing like] horseback riding? I don’t know,” Delecce said. “It’s something you just feel like you need to do. So you do it, and you’re happy for doing it.” Patrick Nicholson can be reached at pnicholson@stoganews.com.


MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

FEATURES

S P I L L I H P Y TAC

S

The Spoke (T.S.): How long have you been teaching? Stacy Phillips (S.P.): 11 years. T.S.: Why did you decide to become a Spanish teacher? S.P: I had a great Spanish teacher in high school that was really inĂ XHQWLDOLQP\GHFLVLRQDQGWKHQ, studied Spanish in college but after studying abroad in Spain and then OLYLQJLQ&RVWD5LFDIRUD\HDU, just fell in love with the language and the culture.

PAGE 17 THE SPOKE

Spanish Teacher GRQH YROXQWHHU ZRUN ZLWK WKHP and watch Spanish movies. Every aspect of my life outside of school uses Spanish. T.S.: ,I\RXFRXOGWUDYHODQ\ZKHUH where would you go? S.P.: I would travel to Africa on a safari.

T.S.: What did you want to be ZKHQ\RXZHUHDNLG" T.S.: 2WKHUWKDQWHDFKLQJGR\RX S.P.: , ZDQWHG WR EH D GRFWRU DQ use Spanish in your everyday life? REVWHWULFLDQ , ZDQWHG WR GHOLYHU S.P.: Yes! Every part; I listen to babies. 6SDQLVKPXVLFORYHWRJRWR6SDQLVKUHVWDXUDQWVNHHSLQWRXFKZLWK T.S.: What is your favorite part of Spanish host families I lived with your job? LQRWKHUFRXQWULHV,¡YHGRQHWXWRU- S.P.: The interactions with the LQJ IRU RUJDQL]DWLRQV WKDW ZRUN VWXGHQWV JHWWLQJ WR KHDU DERXW ZLWK PLJUDQW ZRUNHUV DQG ,¡YH WKHLU OLYHV DQG WKHQ WKH SURIHVVLRQDOVLGHMXVWVHHing how much they improve throughout the year. Some of the students I have for two years in AP so I can really see a difference after two years. So just having that daily interaction with students and watching them grow and learn a lot of Spanish.

FAVORITES MOVIE: Slumdog Millionaire SONG: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crushâ&#x20AC;? by Dave Matthews Band HOLIDAY: Christmas TV SHOW: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Property Brothersâ&#x20AC;? FOOD: Shrimp Tacos BAND/SINGER: Maroon 5 BOOK: â&#x20AC;&#x153;La Voz Dormidaâ&#x20AC;? by Dulce ChacĂłn

T.S.: What is your least favorite part of your job? S.P.: Not having hardly any free time during the day to plan for classes or PDNH D SKRQH FDOO or use the bathroom.

RQHRIP\QHZKREELHVLW¡VUHDOO\ GRUN\EXWLW¡VIXQ T.S.: What is your biggest fear? S.P.: 3URIHVVLRQDOO\QRWHQMR\LQJ what I do anymore. T.S.: If you could have dinner ZLWKDQ\WKUHHSHRSOHZKRZRXOG they be? S.P.: ,WKLQNIRUPHLWZRXOGQ¡W be anyone famousâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it would be people in my life that are no longer here that were special WR PH OLNH P\ JUDQGSDUHQWV DQGP\PRP¡VWZLQVLVWHUWKDW passed away.

T.S.: 0RVWVWXGHQWVNQRZDERXW your recent engagement. How did you feel about being proposed to in school? S.P.: I thought it was really brave of my Ă&#x20AC;DQFHH WR FRPH LQWR school. I thought it was really VSHFLDOWRKDSSHQDWVFKRRO,NQRZ T.S.: What do you P\ VWXGHQWV DUH DOZD\V DVNLQJ OLNHWRGRRXWVLGHRI questions about my life and if I school? S.P.: Outside of VFKRRO , OLNH WR JR KLNLQJDQGND\DNLQJ DQGJHRFDFKLQJ,W¡V

KDYHDER\IULHQG"$QGGR,WKLQN ,¡PJRLQJWRJHWHQJDJHGVRRQ", FRPHKRPHDQG,DOZD\VVD\´2K WKLVFODVVZDVDVNLQJDERXW\RXRU trying to get informationâ&#x20AC;? and so KHNQHZWKDWVFKRROZDVVXFKDQ important part of my life and that P\VWXGHQWVDUHDOZD\VDVNLQJVR KHWKRXJKWLWZDVDJRRGSODFHDQG for me it was just so fun because WKHNLGVZHUHMXVWDVH[FLWHGDV, was. T.S.: Would you rather visit the past or the future? S.P.: 7KHIXWXUHIRUVXUH T.S.: Who is your role model? S.P.: Both of my parents are my role models. From them I get a VWURQJZRUNHWKLFDQG,ZDVWDXJKW to be a good person and follow my GUHDPVDQGWKH\¡UHVWLOOWRJHWKHU DIWHUIRUW\VRPH\HDUVVRWKH\¡UH the best role models that I have. Interview by Emily Klein, Features Editor Photo and design by Sam Sedor

GEOCACHING: A treasure hunt for hidden containers around the country using GPS or cell phone navigation as a guide.


PAGE 18 THE SPOKE

FEATURES

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

Sam Sedor for The SPOKE


MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

PAGE 19 THE SPOKE

FEATURES

Photos and Reporting by Sophia Ponte Staff Reporter Steve Eberly Steve Eberly knew he was going to pursue a career in the French language since he was a senior in high school, when his French teacher took a group of students on a trip to France. Eberly decided that he was going to major in the language and since then, he has taught almost all levels of French at Conestoga. Eberly will be retiring after 35 years of teaching. Eberly plans to continue keeping in touch with some students and close friends that he acquired from teaching over the years. In fact, he said that these relationships have been some of his favorite things about teaching at Conestoga. “I’m going to miss the interactions with the kids,” Eberly said. “There were certain kids that I would have for three years or four years in marching band or in

class, certain groups of kids that you got to know very well, and those interactions were the most fun part.” While Eberly will miss interacting with students on a daily basis and the routine and structure of the school community, he is also happy to say “au revoir” to Conestoga. “Leaving the school is very bittersweet,” Eberly said. “My favorite part would be working with the kids, but it just seemed to get more and more stressful as the years would go by.”

Scott Holland

After 35 years teaching almost all levels of both French and Spanish, and eight years as the chair of the language department, Holland has decided to retire. Aside from teaching either French or Spanish, or a combination of both languages, Holland has also been involved in a variety of extracurricular activities, including National Honor Society, and various drama productions. Next year, once he is retired, Holland will not fully part with the French and Spanish languages. He has plans to visit family in France, possibly do some mission work in Central America, and maybe even tutor. But despite that he is happy to leave, he does feel that he will miss the structure of the school’s schedule. “It is almost disconcerting to know I am not going to be back here next year,” Holland said. “It’s two sided. School is a very structured environment. We are run by the bells, we know exactly what we are doing each day. Now all that structure will be gone. So I am going to have to create my own structure, and that will be challenging, but interesting. I am a creature of habit, so I will form some sort of structure, but I don’t know what that is yet, so that is disconcerting. But I’m not fearful, and since I just became a grandfather, I will have time to spend with the family.”

Stephen Hughes

Tim Husband

Cheryl Keller

Physics teacher Stephen Hughes is also retiring at the end of this year—the only retiring teacher who is not in the language department. Hughes currently teaches accelerated physics at Conestoga, but in the past has taught honors physics, chemistry, and several math courses. Before he came to Conestoga as a teacher, Hughes was a chemical engineer. He worked on a project that centered on turning soft contact lens material into artificial arteries. Hughes decided to switch out of engineering to become a teacher because he was looking for a more collaborative atmosphere.

Spanish teacher Tim Husband will also be retiring this year, after 35 years of teaching at both Conestoga and Valley Forge Middle School. Even though he has taught both French and Spanish, Husband will also be remembered for the vast multitude of clubs and projects that he supported. “It’s funny because if and when I die, I am going straight to heaven,” Husband said. “Because I’ve done work for Gay-Straight Alliance, Best Buddies, African American Student Union, Take a Blink for Pink, Pulsera Project and Peer Mediation. I am proud of the fact that GSA is so popular at Conestoga, because when it started it was not.” Now that he is retiring, Husband has few regrets or qualms about leaving the school. “I can’t wait, I have no negative thoughts. I will miss laughing when the kids are cute and funny, and the students make me feel proud to be a teacher here,” Husband said. Husband will be selling his house in Phoenixville this year and moving to the Delaware

Spanish teacher Cheryl Keller will wave Conestoga goodbye after 12 years of teaching at the school. Keller has taught in a number of districts around the country, including ones in Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . a n d N e w Haven, Conn., and worked with students from many different

“I like synergy. I like the idea of people working together,” Hughes said. “That’s what I found here: all the teachers share. [In engineering], people would work together, but it wasn’t a given. Here it is a given. I have never had anybody not share with me.” After having taught at Conestoga for 29 1/2 years, Hughes has realized that one of his favorite things about teaching at Conestoga has been the working with the students. “The kids really work with you,” Hughes said. “They really go out of their way the majority of the times to go along, if you are trying to make a joke, they will go along with you even if it is a little old fashioned. They are really wonderful here.”

shore. “People ask me whether I’m going to be bored, but I will have plenty to do,” Husband said. “I am going to do whatever I want, whenever I want, with whomever I want, and I just can’t wait.”

backgrounds. Keller owes many of her positive teaching experiences to the diverse group of children that she has taught. “The most dedicated, talented people that I worked with had nothing to do with the school I was in. It had to do with the ability of the community,” Keller said. Keller links the rewards of teaching to her students as well. “The most exciting thing is when students catch my enthusiasm and my interest in my subject, and they go on to live it. That is the most rewarding part of teaching for me. There is a lot behind the faces. It’s not like teaching elementary school students who are adorable and sweet and cute. When you are dealing with a high school student, they’re much more complex, far more to explore,” Keller said. Sophia Ponte can be reached at sponte@stoganews.com.


Sports MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

RAC E TO Navin Zachariah Co-Sports Editor

REPLAC E

As senior quarterback Joe Viviano leaves for college, the competition to replace him is heating up before summer training camp starts on Aug. 12.

Word from the coach:

Design: Sophie Bodek/ The SPOKE Photos: Navin Zachariah/ The SPOKE

“Coming into next season, the quarterback competition will be wide open. Whoever performs and executes the best during camp will be the starter.” -Coach John Vogan

The Candidates . . .

Damase Bagbonon

Owen Crowley

Jonathan Locantore

Timmy Miller

Previous Experience: JV Team Class of: 2015 My Strengths: Agility, Athleticism What I need to work on: Footwork, Strength Why I deserve it: “I deserve the spot because I feel that my diligent work ethic in the offseason has really helped my knowledge, footwork and strength.” What ‘Stoga can expect from me: “They can expect 10 good games of fun, hard work, and lots of points.” My QB Idol: Cam Newton

Previous Experience: JV Team Class of: 2015 My Strengths: Knowledge, Versatility What I need to work on: Strength, Arm Why I deserve it: “Not only am I working out every day, but I am watching tape every day too. I have seen immense improvement since last year.” What ‘Stoga can expect from me: “They can expect a great year.” My QB Idol: Donovan McNabb

Previous Experience: JV Team Class of: 2016 My Strengths: Knowledge, Arm What I need to work on: Footwork, Timing Why I deserve it: “The coaches and I have worked hard during the offseason to improve my game. I feel I am ready to compete to win the starting position.” What ‘Stoga can expect from me: “Expect hard work and dedication from us. We want to be the champs.” My QB Idol: Drew Brees

Previous Experience: Freshman Team Class of: 2016 My Strengths: Arm, Mobility What I need to work on: Knowledge, Playing Faster Why I deserve it: “I am very hardworking and have a great arm. I am also a very improved player.” What ‘Stoga can expect from me: “Expect a leader to command the line and lead us to our ultimate goals.” My QB Idol: Tim Tebow


MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

PAGE 21 THE SPOKE

SPORTS

Boys tennis makes history with championship three-peat Courtney Kennedy Co-Sports Editor

RQFHDQGWKHQWZLFHWKHGLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOW\ is in maintaining your enthusiasm for victory. You kind of get spoiled. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more of a psychological battle.â&#x20AC;? Not only was there pressure to make history, but the team also dealt with other teams trying to deny Conestoga the three-peat.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we went into the state tournament, we had a target on our backs,â&#x20AC;? sophomore Eric Yen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it is hard for teams to win three years in a row, because you can never lose your focus, and all the other teams know that you are the team to beat.â&#x20AC;?

7KH VHPLĂ&#x20AC;QDO URXQG DJDLQVW /D Salle High School, where the team won a tight and emotional round, proved to be the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toughest challenge. The team moved onto the Ă&#x20AC;QDOURXQGDJDLQVW6KDG\6LGH$FDGemy in a repeat of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chamSLRQVKLS Ă&#x20AC;QDO:LWK VWURQJ VLQJOHV

When the Conestoga boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tennis team stepped on the Hershey Racquet Club court to play for their third consecutive state championship, they knew exactly what to expect. They were ready to make history, and they certainly did. On May 18, the Conestoga boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Picture Picture Coming Soon tennis team defeated Shady Side Academy to win the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association AAA State Tennis Championship. With the victory, Conestoga entered WKHUHFRUGERRNVDVWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWVFKRRO to ever win three championships in the AAA division for boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tennis. Not only did the team win three titles, but they also won three years in a row. Coach Jonathan Goodman said that the possibility of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;three-peatâ&#x20AC;? motivated the team throughout the season, since Goodman and coach Blake Stabert made sure the athletes knew the hisWRULFDOVLJQLĂ&#x20AC;FDQFHRIDWKLUGYLFWRU\ Photo Courtesy Jonathan Goodman â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the idea that we could win three in a row set the bar even higher,â&#x20AC;? The boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tennis team celebrates their third consecutive PIAA state championship on May 18. The team Goodman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve won made history, being the first team to ever accomplish this feat.

performances from Yen, senior Jason Sutker and junior Brian Grodecki combined with excellent teamwork between senior Josh Sutker and sophomore Steven Yang in the doubles match, the team defended their title and captured the championship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest strength is that we have a lot of excellent tennis players. But beyond that, they get along with each other well, they pull for one another, they are a good group to be around. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s camaraderie,â&#x20AC;? Goodman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each year, some of our better players graduate, but we have also had a lot of incoming freshman and sophomores that are very good and contribute a lot.â&#x20AC;? The new incoming players have only added to a strong base that has lasted over the past three years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are a great group of guys who support and make each other better,â&#x20AC;? Yen said.â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year was such a great experience playing alongside them, and it was even sweeter to take home the state championship.â&#x20AC;? Courtney Kennedy can be reached at ckennedy@stoganews.com.

Volleyball player prepares for trip â&#x20AC;&#x153;Down Underâ&#x20AC;?

Andy Backstrom Staff Reporter

Brisbane, Australia. 15,860 miles from Conestoga. No student is traveling farther away from school this summer than junior Amy Rohn. The Down Under International Games recruited Rohn and many other aspiring volleyball players from the United States and Australia to play volleyball in Brisbane in their thirteenth annual tournament. The nine day trip, which runs from July 14-22, includes practices, tournaments and sightseeing. American and Australian volleyball teams will compete in the international Indoor Volleyball tournament, a two-day event where each team plays ten games. Rohn believes that her training in Australia will do more than inspire memories, since it will expose her to international volleyball, a style of play very different from high school volleyball in the United States. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Different countries have different techniques that they like to use,â&#x20AC;? Rohn said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I actively followed the Olympics, and from watching the Olympics, you can tell there are slight technical differences from each different country.â&#x20AC;? Whether it is substitution patterns

or changes in game plans, international volleyball can be a learning experience for all players. Conestoga head volleyball coach Diana Felker HPSKDVL]HG WKH EHQHĂ&#x20AC;WV RI WDNLQJ advantage of this unique opportunity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The trip is a chance to travel and see different cultures, and a chance to meet people from other parts of the world that you might not have a chance of meeting,â&#x20AC;? Felker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know, meet players from

Photo Courtesy Diana Felker

Junior Amy Rohn heads for Australia for the 13th Annual Down Under Games this summer.

around the world. It is an experience that not everybody has a chance to do.â&#x20AC;? Rohnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dedication has allowed her to excel in her volleyball career throughout her life. She has been playing volleyball since 7th grade and hopes to continue at the collegiate level and has committed to playing at Washington College. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She is an extremely hardworking volleyball player,â&#x20AC;? Felker said. ´6KHLVDYHU\VHOĂ HVVSOD\HUDQGVKH worked hard to gain her position. She GHĂ&#x20AC;QLWHO\ZDVQ¡WJLYHQDQ\WKLQJ6KH worked very hard to gain everything that she got in volleyball.â&#x20AC;? On this trip, Rohn will hone her own individual skills and hopes to share her experiences with her Conestoga teammates. Along with developing her game, she will check something off her â&#x20AC;&#x153;bu cket list.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never really have been out of the country. I always wanted to go [to Australia],â&#x20AC;? Rohn said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a wonderful opportunity, and it also is something I can use on a resumĂŠ and say I played internationally.â&#x20AC;? Andy Backstrom can be reached at abackstrom@stoganews.com.


PAGE 22 THE SPOKE

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

SPORTS

Culture shock: Chip Kelly brings innovation to Philadelphia

Stephane Hardinger Columnist Emeritus It was to be expected that things would be different in Philadelphia after the departure of longtime Eagles head coach Andy Reid following a dismal 4-12 season in 2012. When Chip Kelly was announced as his successor, change was all but guaranteed. Kelly, the former head coach at the University of Oregon, had garnered a reputation over the past few years for being unorthodox and innovative during his time in Eugene, Oregon. His â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blurâ&#x20AC;? offense wowed fans, pundits and opponents alike as it set conference records, lit up scoreboards and exhausted the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mascot, who did a push-up for each point the Oregon Ducks scored in their games.

.HOO\¡V RQĂ&#x20AC;HOG LQQRYDWLRQ DW least offensively, was inevitable. He would move quickly to install his run-oriented, no-huddle offense that he had so much success with at Oregon. This would be a stark contrast from Andy Reidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pass-dominant offense that seemed to be moving in slow-motion at times. One of the keys to Kellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s philosophy on the offensive side of the ball is creating mismatches and, although itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still early in the process, he appears to be trying to do that on defense as well, mixing and matching 3-4 and 4-3 looks. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to create mismatches and thus have sucFHVVRQWKHĂ&#x20AC;HOGLI\RXGRQ¡W have the right players. This is another area where the Eagles underwent change this offseason, and Kellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fingerprints were all over it. GM Howie Roseman kept his position despite Reidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s departure, but the team went after different types of players. James Casey and Connor Barwin were signed away from Houston. Casey can play fullback and tight end and

has incredible athleticism for someone his size, which is what Kelly said he liked the most about him. 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;5 tight end Zach Ertz was WDNHQODWHULQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWURXQGDQG he creates matchup problems for the opposition as well: too big to be covered by a defensive back and too fast to be matched up with a linebacker. Whereas Andy Reid looked for small, speedy players on both sides of the ball, Kelly has shown a preference for taller, more athletic players. As Kelly said in a February press conference, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want taller, longer people because bigger people beat up little people.â&#x20AC;? Short, sweet and to the point. The change Kelly has brought with him schematically and personnelwise has been evident, but the culture in Philadelphia has already changed as well. Gone are Victoria Stern for The SPOKE â&#x20AC;&#x153;Taco Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;?

uses his hulking 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;4 frame in a variety of ways, while Barwin rushes the passer from many different VSRWVRQWKHĂ&#x20AC;HOGDQGFDQSOD\LQ different defensive schemes. In the draft, the Eagles took former QB turned OT Lane Johnson fourth overall. The 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;6, 310 pound tackle

and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fast-Food Fridayâ&#x20AC;? that were staples under Reid. Also gone are the day-long practices broken up by meetings and film that Reid held. Instead, Kelly has each player on a personalized nutrition plan, complete with daily individual protein smoothies. And at his minicamp practices, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s condensed the timeframe to allow for high-velocity increased repetition and fewer stops instruction, saving that for meetings. Kelly also blares music during practice to help simulate game situations, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strongerâ&#x20AC;? by Kanye West or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Panamaâ&#x20AC;? by Van Halen like it was earlier in minicamp. The Eagles organization has recognized the shortcomings of the Andy Reid-era teams and bought wholeheartedly into the changes that Chip Kelly believes in and has preached. Whether the team ultimately succeeds or fails under Kelly, one thingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for sure: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be different, and it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be for a lack of trying.

Stephane Hardinger can be reached at shardinger@stoganews.com.

14

10

12

16

23

4

5

7

10

10

4

2

2

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 *All updates as of May 28.


MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

PAGE 23 THE SPOKE

SPORTS

College playing experiences continue to shape coaching styles Shivani Sanghani Staff Reporter Every coach has their own unique style, influenced by personality, skill and experience. For several Conestoga teachers and coaches, experience from their days as college athletes has greatly shaped their coaching styles. Many ‘Stoga coaches and teachers competed at the collegiate level in a variety of sports. When they began their careers as educators and coaches, they brought their athletic passion to their new role as high school coaches, where their experiences at the collegiate level shaped the coaching styles they use today. Physical education teacher John Jones said the outlook of his coach at Widener University influenced his approach to coaching the Conestoga girls’ basketball team. “I truly believe my college coach’s negative command style really helped shape my approach in coaching in a different direction,” Jones said. “I search for ways to motivate and achieve

success, while building confidence through a more positive atmosphere.” Track and field coach Leashia Rahr had a different experience in college. Her coach at Villanova University instilled a positive outlook, and today she tries to act the same way. “Just by [my college coach] setting the standard and tone, that was a motivation for me to do better as a student,” Rahr said. “I really liked working with the athletes and students, and I felt that I could make an impact on them, emotionally and socially.” Like Rahr, other coaches’ own playing experiences have shown them how athletics can affect an athlete’s life. Field hockey coach Megan Ryan said her main coaching goal is to share the life lessons she learned as an athlete at Villanova with a new generation of student athletes. “Seeing what I’ve gotten out of the sport—the qualities that I have [developed] because of being that athlete—it has allowed me to acquire that determination, that drive and that feeling that I can accomplish something,” Ryan

said. “My goal is ultimately not to merely teach my athletes about field hockey, but to instill in them those essential life lessons.” Athletes are not the only ones learning lessons. For JV B girls lacrosse coach Gabija Fischer, who played at Penn State University, the transition to coaching showed her the differences between the mindsets of coaches and athletes when it comes to games, practices, and the team as a whole. “You almost have to look at it from a different lens when you’re a coach, because you have to think about what’s best for the team,” Fischer said. “Who could be an asset at what position? What kinds of skills do you want to focus on? I think that is important, as a whole team what I, as a coach, can do for the individual player as well as for the entire team, versus what a player does.” Although there are many differences between coaches and athletes, one thing that ties them together is their passion and love for their sport. Assistant girls lacrosse coach Meaghan McDugall said her true love of the sport

Courtney Kennedy/The SPOKE

Coach Meaghan McDugall (left) played collegiate lacrosse at Bloomsburg University. She is currently the assistant coach for the varsity girls lacrosse team. has inspired her to continue her imagine not having practice to go involvment with lacrosse beyond to,” McDugall said. “The teacher her playing days at Bloomsburg in me was my main inspiration to University. continue coaching lacrosse, even “[Lacrosse] has always been to this very day.” a big part of my life, I’ve always had sports since I was old enough Shivani Sanghani can be reached to play sports, and I couldn’t at ssanghani@stoganews.com.

To the Class of 2013, If you think back to your first days in kindergarten, your early experiences at T/E Middle School or Valley Forge Middle School or those confusing first weeks at Conestoga, the idea of graduating probably seemed very far away. Your day is here now, and we, your teachers in all eight of TE’s school buildings, have been delighted to watch you grow into the competent, thoughtful and responsible young adults that you are today. As you move on to new endeavors, know that you have touched our hearts and made us proud. We celebrate your successes and congratulate you on your accomplishments. -The teachers of the Tredyffrin-Easttown Education Association


VOLUME 63, NO. 7

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

Tennis wins state championship See p. 21

INSIDE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Stoga coaches share college experiences See p. 23

Effort above everything Girls lacrosse competes in state tournament, loses to Harriton See more photos at Stoganews.com.

Senior Catie Smith runs down the field on May 29 in the first round of the PIAA state tournament. The Pioneers lost to Harriton, 10-7.

Courtney Kennedy/The SPOKE

The SPOKE June 2013  

June 2013 issue of The SPOKE Cover: What the Cell? Conestoga's cellphone policy

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