Page 1


The

CADUCEUS

ST. LUKE'S SCHOOL for BOYS NEW CANAAN, CONNECTICUT

1947


DEDICATION ONE STEP

of which we were sure in compiling our

Y E A R B O O K was the dedication. M r . Pearsall's loyalty to St. Luke's and his ability to manage extracurricular activities always commanded our respect, but, as w e grew older, w e realized that he k n e w us perhaps better than anyone else. His understanding advice, full of humor and thought, helped us solve our problems, however small. Humbly, yet with all our sincerity, w e give this token of our admiration to R a y m o n d S. Pearsall.


R A Y M O N D S. PEARSALL


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-:-"~^ Second Row: M r . White, Mr. Cibere, Mr. Skuly, Mr. Pearsall, Mr. Mara. Front PiOw: Mrs. Bailey, Mr. Graves, Mr. von Fabrice, Dr. Kidd, Miss Hancock, Miss Raynor

The Faculty J O S E P H R. K I D D

Headmaster, English

A.B., Lafayette College; B.D., Yale University; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh.

HENRY P. GRAVES

Assistant Headmaster, French

A.B., Brown University; M.A., Harvard University.

W I L L I A M V O N FABRICE

Mathematics, German

B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Columbia University; N e w York Llniversity.

RUTH A. HANCOCK

Third and Fourth Grades

B.S., Danbury State Teachers College.

R A Y M O N D S. P E A R S A L L

Social Studies, Latin

A.B., Amherst College; M.A., Columbia University; Hofstra College.

[4]


J O H N A. W H I T E

English, Mathematics

Cert., N e w Paltz State Teachers College; B.S., Albany State Teachers College; Elamilton College.

WILLIAM J. CIBERE Social Studies, Science A.B., Franklin & Marshall College; M.A., N e w York University. WILLIAM MARA Spanish, Latin A.B., Holy Cross College; University of Connecticut; Fordham University.

JOAN M. RAYNOR

First and Second Grades

B.E., N e w Paltz State Teachers College. Mathematics, Science

JOSEPH S K U L L Y B.S., Dayton University; M.S., Washington University.

L A U R A M . BAILEY

Art

B.F.A., Syracuse University; N e w York University; University of Southern California.

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Second Row: Mr. Pearsall, Prins, Bogin, Tabell Front Row: V a n Steeden, Beall, Pennybacker, Eyman, Mellin

Caduceus Staff Editor in Chief Managing Editor

BRUCE PENNYBACKER RICHARD EYMAN

Art Editor KIMBERLY PRINS

Associate Editor LESTER T. BEALL, IR.

Class Editor

ANTHONY

M.

TABELL

Photography

DONALD

B.

MELLIN

Photography

THOMAS

M.

THOMAS

Advertising Manager

PETER VAN STEEDEN

III

Business Manager BRUCE BOGIN Faculty Advisor RAYMOND S. PEARSALL

[6]


LESTER T. BEALL, JR. Wilton Johns-Hopkins Football 1, 2, 3, Manager 4; Hockey 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 3; Athletic Association 4; Dance Committee 3; C A D U C E U S 4; Sentinel 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 3. Les proves that spirit and determination are more important than physical size in displaying true sportsmanship. H e will always be remembered as St. Luke's only cheerleader, trick knee and all. At the piano Les displays his distinctive personality, and his liberal ideas have kindled many serious bull sessions. Les has done his best for St. Luke's and has become an unforgettable part of the school.

RICHARD H. E Y M A N Stamford St. Lawrence Hockey 3; Baseball 3, 4; Athletic Association 4; C A D U C E U S 4; Sentinel 3, 4; Dramatic Club 4. Dick's stay at the hilltop has been short in years but long in accomplishments. From his first day among the Saints he has taken a genuine interest in all school activities. His sports writeups for the Sentinel have been an outstanding part of the school paper. Comes the spring and he drops everything to cavort around the bases. Whatever Dick m a y decide to do in the future, w e know that his personality and ability will make him an outstanding success.


ROBY H A R R I N G T O N III Weston Princeton Football 1, 2, 3, Captain 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 2, 3, Chairman 4; Athletic Association 2, 3, 4; Sentinel 2, 3, Editor 4; C A D U C E U S 2, 3; Dramatic Club 3, 4. Roby typifies the St. Luke's spirit. H e has tackled the school's problems with a zest and thoroughness which have m a d e him admired and respected throughout his four years at St. Luke's. His literary works will not be forgotten, and he has proven himself as a fine leader, athlete, and actor. Roby's wit, integrity, and good sportsmanship will long be remembered at St. Luke's.

RICHARD M. H E W I T T Stamford Harvard Sentinel 4. C o m i n g to the hilltop in his Senior year, Dick has w o n the friendship of both the faculty and student body. Famous for his luncheons with Linse, he has further distinguished himself in the field of theme writing. M a n y of his classmates envy him for his celebrated ability to memorize most of the history text book. His interests lie in the field of hunting andfishing,but he is generally well informed and delights in discussing topics of the day with all w h o will listen. Dick will assuredly find success in hisfieldof endeavor.

[9]


WILLIAM A. H O F F M A N Stamford Lafayette Basketball 4; Baseball 3, 4. Since his junior year, Bill, with his flaming red hair and well-groomed appearance, has been a lively m e m b e r of the class of 1947. His tall tales have provided m u c h entertainment for the boys during recess and after lunch. H e is a very likeable fellow with a typical red-haired personality, and his classmates admire his ability and willingness to say just what he thinks. A n ardent sports fan, he m a y be seen daily during the spring term, outdoors with bat and ball, indulging in his greatest hobby. Today a baseball player, tomorrow an engineer, is the forecast.

FRANKLIN LINSE Stamford Auburn Football 3, 4; Baseball 4. Slipping silently into our midst in his junior year, Frank soon m a d e his presence felt in his o w n quiet way. Frank abides constantly by the old rule, "Think twice before you speak". H e appears to be easygoing and nonchalant, but in reality he is one of St. Luke's most conscientious students. Although not a socialite, Frank's taste in clothes and dates is admired by all. O n the footballfieldhe has shown his excellent sportsmanship, and his spirit and will tofightand win will stand him in good stead through the college years ahead.

10 1


D O N A L D B. MELLIN New Canaan Undecided Football 1; Dance Committee 3; Sentinel 3; C A D U C E U S 4.

This young fellow enjoys a distinction which raises him far above any of his classmates — he has served the longest term at St. Luke's. H e is always busy with some new project, either photography,flying,or pounding the drums for his latest band, and is easily recognized by his classic grin and his happy-go-lucky attitude toward life. Don, it may be said, has the wonderful gift of understanding people, which makes him greatly liked and appreciated by everyone. His sense of humor, too, will help him over the obstacles in life.

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H. OLIVER M O R L E Y New Canaan Peahody Football 3, 4; Basketball 4; Student Council 2; Sentinel 4; School Pianist 1, 2, 3,4. To begin with, Ollie is regarded by his classmates as a genius in thefieldof music. However, music is not his only interest, for he o-oes out for all the sports which the school provides. His speed when running will always be marvelled at on the hilltop. Ollie has been for the past four years the school pianist and a definite part of the chapel exercises. In view of his excellent musical talent and his persistence, we are sure that he will make a great name for himself.

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BRUCE PENNYBACKER Redding Middlebury Baseball 1; Student Council 4; Dramatic Club 3, 4; Dance Committee 3, 4; C A D U C E U S Editor 4.

Bruce is different from most of his classmates; he studies. There is, however, the musical side of his life. W h o can ever forget the w a y he plays the trumpet under water? Then, too, his sense of humor cannot be paralleled on the hilltop, although he uses it but sparingly while in school. A leader in his class, Bruce is also among the foremost at the Senior dining table in either eating or talking. His capabilities, hidden sometimes under the guise of not studying, place Bruce well up in the esteem of his class.

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KIMBERLY PRINS Wilton Pratt Institute Football 4; Baseball 3, 4; Dance Committee 3, 4; C A D U C E U S 4; Dramatic Club 3. Easily recognized by his booming bass voice in Chapel or his boisterous laugh in the dining room, Kim, after a faltering start hisfirstyear, has become one of the propelling influences of the Senior Class. Here is a boy w h o by coupling his natural talent with perseverance is bound to become a successful artist. There is not a more goodnatured or generous fellow on the hilltop, and one could not have a better friend. By his Ford, his art, or his voice, K i m will be remembered by all his friends at St. Luke's.

12


ROBERT H. R O W A N Norwalk Long Island A & T Football 2, 3, 4. A ready grin and a quiet good nature: these have characterized Bob throughout his career at St. Luke's, and these are the qualities that have w o n him friends at every turn. W h e n he isn't dreaming of his future vocation as a scientific farmer, he m a y be seen putting his plow-trained muscles to work on the footballfield.Also numbered among the select w h o drive school cars, Bob is entrusted with piloting a load of boys to school in the big black Buick. Certainly his quiet competence and passion for hard work will bring him success in his chosen profession.

FREDERICK H. S C H O L T Z Riverside Amherst Football 4; Basketball 4; Baseball 4; Athletic Association, Chairman 4; Dramatic

Club 4. Here's a guy that was born to keep the world happy. Fred is always ready with a joke or some information on his favorite hobby, sailing. W e still think of him as Andy's kid brother, but he has m a d e a lastting place for himself at St. Luke's. O n the athleticfieldand in the class room, Fred is in the center of everything. His ready sense of h u m o r and easy going ways will m a k e the future a pushover for him, whether in college or in later life.

13


PHILIP S. T E D E S C O Silvermine Kenyon Phil came to St. Luke's to continue his studies before entering college in February and immediately attained the enviable position of becoming a good friend of M r . Kidd, Mr. Von, and M r . Graves. H e also ranked high in the estimation of the boys because he never made use of his post-graduate privileges. Although he wasn't an official member of the Dance Committee, Phil's highly original decorations enhanced the atmosphere at the seasonal dances. W h e n reminded of his affability, generosity, and integrity, all will agree that Phil's stay on the hilltop was far too short.

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TFIOMAS M. TFIOMAS Westport Undecided Football 1, 2, 3, 5, Captain 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 5; Baseball 1, 2, 4, 5, Captain 3; Student Council 1, 2, 3, Chairman 4; Sentinel 1, 2, 3, 4; Dance Committee 3,

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CADUCEUS 4.

Since the seventh grade, except for a year's sojourn in the Navy, T o m m y has been keeping the halls of St. Luke's lively and merry. Besides driving the Westport Express, he m a y often be seen piloting a seaplane over Connecticut's sunny shores. His telephone calls have become legend and his athletic ability has benefited m a n y a Maroon and Gray team. W h e n w e think of T o m m y , w e shall always remember his speed and his laughter.

11-


PETER V A N STEEDEN III New Canaan Kenyon Football 4; CADUCEUS 4.

T h e football varsity will feel the absence of Peter next year w h e n the time comes for building a charging line. In his year at St. Luke's Pete lost no time in becoming a permanent m e m b e r of the family, and he was quickly recognized by his classmates as a friendly and obliging chap. His intricate social life is a continuous source of amazement to his friends w h o always call on Pete w h e n they need a date and transportation. Although his gridiron feats m a y overshad o w his classroom efforts, Pete can still excel in math and the interpretation of poetry.

Second Row. Hoffman W., Rowan, Hewitt, Van Steeden, Linse, Scholtz, Tedesco Front Row: Beall, Morlev, Prins, Harrington R., Thomas T., Pennvbacker, Mellin, Hyman

[15]


Class of 1947 Statistics Handsomest SCHOLTZ Neatest

LINSE

Best All Around Best Athlete Biggest Bluff Best Student Wittiest Most Modest Best Natured Least Appreciated Most Capable Most Likely to Succeed Most Likely to go to Seecl Most Original Most Useful Class Operator Biggest Drag with the Faculty Likes Work Least

MELLIN HARRINGTON V A N STEEDEN

Brightest

PENNYBACKER

Best Dressed Most Popular Best Sport Most Prominent . Most Respected

HOFFMAN SCHOLTZ MORLEY

HARRINGTON THOMAS PRINS PENNYBACKER SCHOLTZ MORLEY TEDESCO PRINS PENNYBACKER

EYMAN MELLIN SCHOLTZ

EYMAN

HARRINGTON PENNYBACKER

Educational Statistics St. Luke's Greatest Need Kindest teacher Easiest to recite to Hardest to recite to Most popular outside class Most popular inside class Most polished Easiest to bluff Hardest to bluff Pleasantest Most respected Intended College Favorite Magazine Favorite Book Favorite Hymn Favorite Poet Favorite Sport

[16]

NEW GYMNASIUM

Mr. S K U L L Y DR. KIDD MR. MARA M R . CIBERE M R . PEARSALL

D R . KIDD MR. MARA M R . PEARSALL M R . GRAVES M R . V O N FABRICE . KENYON

Fortune Magnificent Obsession "LEAD O N , O KING ETERNAL'' MILTON FOOTBALL


SENIOR Famous Fc

Needs

Nickname

Saving Grace

BEALL

Les

crutche

racial tolerance

driver's license

EYMAN

Dick

sister

batting average

a spotter

HARRINGTON

the Third

Peace

rug-cutting

Thes

1IEWITT

Pinky

hair

luncheon with Linse girdle

IIOFFMAN

Willie

LINSE

Cla

exactness

shoe shine

MELLIN

Melleroonie

cars

tardi

MORLEY

Ollie

accent

bicycle

PENNYBACKER

Pennybottle

marks

speec governor

PRINS

Prir

shoulders

less "It"

ROWAN

Bob

sincerity

farming tales

Almanac

SCHOLTZ

Freddy

Andy

facial expressions

ghostwriter

TEDESCO

Tabasco

sense of h u m o r

drag with Big Three

relief from nervous tension

THOMAS

Tom Tom

ruptured duck

Hying

co-pilot

V A N STEEDEN

Pete

parties

blind dates

bodyguard

Name

a sister

i pipe

[18]

de-icer

comb


SYNOPSES Dislikes

Ambition

Destination

Always Saying

Bathing suits

li.T.O.

B.U.M.

"You square, you'

Television

Sijorts casting

Peanut Vendor

" N o w the Red Sox-

Math

Editor

Newsboy

'Don't wisey-wise"

Socialized Medicine

Information Please

Juvenile Jury

"Si, Senor Mara, Pero"

Mirrors

Electrical Engineer

Conductor

" D o w n in Joisey"

Blind dates

Test-pilot

Moon

Nothing

Gay deceivers

None

Same

" W h a t happened in Chapel?"

Chewing g u m

Concert Pianist

Piano Tuner

"Oh, golly"

Musician

Band boy

" N o w look, M r . Skully'

Curfews

Artist

House painter

"She's the best looking."

Flowers

Scientific Agriculturalist

Sheep-herder

" W a n n a see m y rope trick?"

N e w C a n a a n Cops

Naval Architect

Plumber

"I'll get it in"

Gossips

Doctor

Cigarette Ad

' W h y don't you ask Joe?

Profanity

Flight Instructor

Baby sitter

Censored

Work

Broker

Broke

"Fill out m y application"

I 19 1


Class History The St. Luke's ideal is a refreshing varia-begin to improve our intellects and let the faculty give us some m u c h needed advice tion on the old theme of education, and w e in the ways of the world. So ardent was of the Class of 1947 have grown up with it our desire for education that Mellin acand feel that it is deeply imbedded in our tually purchased a vehicle to insure his character. O u r development has run paralprompt arrival at the hilltop each morning. lel to the development and growth of St. Luke's and all it stands for. T h e "Glamour Boys" were heartily disapproved of by all except Harrington, w h o O n e gloomy day a group of starry-eyed strayed from the unromantic fold. W e were freshmen wandered up the Hill with a feeling that school was becoming an unavoidbusy. T h e Dance Committee, Athletic Asable nuisance. It wasn't long before w e sociation, Student Council, Sentinel, C A D U C E U S , and Smokers' Club were all suprealized that St. Luke's offered n e w possiported by the enthusiastic juniors. Hoffbilities, and w e became determined to see m a n and Linse entered our swelling ranks the brighter side of school life. T h efirstof with hopes of preparing for technical colour non-scholastic enterprises was that of eating record amounts of food in our favorleges, but they soon found theme writing ite h a u n t — t h e dining room. A Sentinel an unsurmountable obstacle. While Bill flash of that time might have read, "Other and Frank were still learning their c o m m a tables skimp while freshmen grow fatter". rules, E y m a n came in just in time to do a Led by Pennvbacker, Beall, Harrington, wonderful "cover up" job in writing up our Mellin, and Morley, w e were then and baseball team's defeats. O u r athletic prowhave continued to be Frieda's dilemma. ess was still undeveloped. W e approved of athletics, small doses of In our senior year w e found it hard to study, and attending school dances, but w e realize that w e were at last on top, and w e still felt that the Honor Roll was for sissies still acted like juniors. In ourfirstEnglish only. class w e countedfifteenheads — some with O u r physical size was augmented in our brains — and thought back to the days sophomore year by the bulging-biceped w h e n a graduating class of four was conPrins and the husky horticulturalist, Rowsidered large. Hewitt, Scholtz, Tedesco, an, w h o also proved their worth at the dinand V a n Steeden had enrolled for that final ner table. W e began to gain a certain push into college. W e were all college conprominence in school affairs: w e put Harscious. W e spent most of our time filling rington, w h o impressed us as a writer and out applications. speaker, and Morley, a budding musical N o w at the end of our preparatory term genius, on the Student Council; Beall conw e stand upon another threshold. As w e tinued to pursue his athletics; and Pennyglance back once more before looking forbacker, the stinker, stunned us all by studyward to the future, w e like what w e have ing; Mellin still had us baffled. seen. W e have few apologies, no regrets. A tiny suspicion of things to come was M a n y of our thanks will remain unexseeping into our jazz-crazed minds and w e pressed, but our school will understand. thought that in our junior year w e should You k n o w us well.


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1WW« Second Row: Kipnis, R.euther, Lundv P., Round, Bancroft R., Austin Front Ron': Bailey, Bogin, Levers, Carr, Hertz, Tabell, Cutler J., Clapp

Junior Class W e , the members of next year's senior class, can safely say that w e form an integral part of St. Luke's life. T o illustrate, w e m a y say that w e can hardly imagine just what school would be like without people around like: A d d Austin, breaking all speed records for getting his " C h e w y " off the grounds at 4:15; Dick Bancroft, w h o can win the Golden Gloves tournament by his face alone; Steve Bailey, w h o breaks class tradition by studying; Bruce Bogin, w h o loves to get good marks, even if it m a y mean studying; Jack Carr, wistfully trying to impress his sincerity upon an unbelieving M r . Kidd; T o m Clapp, explaining his m a n y and diverse theories on w o m e n to his less enlightened comrades; Johnny Cutler, yelling at

anyone in the candy line smaller than himself; Dickey Hertz, trying to apply football tactics to the classroom; Igor Kipnis, still trying to find someone to appreciate his jokes; Bob Levers, w h o tries to see the artistic side of life; tall and red-headed Paul (Iwuz-just-on-my-way-to-study-hall) Lundy; Jack Reuther, holding his daily discussion group on things timelv, not maritimely; Pete Round, staunchly defending his car against the sneers of the scornful; and lastly, T o n y Tabell, St. Luke's o w n marathon swimmer. Seriously, however, w e do have our sane moments. W e hope we'll be worthy of the honor of being next year's seniors, and, as seniors, we'll be remembered favorably in the golden years to come. [22 1


Second Row: Stephanak, Hoyt, Campbell, Moore, Billard Front Row: Pinchbeck H., Heinemann, Thomas G., Vivian B., Heartt, Hoffman R.

Sophomore Class sorta; D o u g Moore, wearing red and green flannel shirts in the Christmas tradition; Joe Pinchbeck, inventing a flower that will never wilt; Flarold Stephanak, teasing M r . V o n with large pieces of h a m ; Buddy Thomas, trying to make peace with all the faculty at once; Brook Vivian (exception), the only one w h o brings his brain w h e n he visits the hilltop. That, in brief, is the Sophomore class. T o appreciate us, you should k n o w us better. Talented or not, as w e m a y be, w e k n o w that our assorted abilities will inevitably be well received by the world at large, and that w e will successfully fill the shoes of our predecessors in the junior class next year.

T h e Sophomore Class which is just n o w beginning to assume its rightful place among the aristocracy of the upper school is a diverse assortment of gentlemen â&#x20AC;&#x201D; rarely scholars. However, w e of the tenth grade are well pleased with ourselves and k n o w w e could do better scholastically if only w e didn't have so m a n y other interests. For instance, meet Alan Billard, driving slowly, resolving forevermore to keep free from the arms of the law; Jim Campbell, roaming the woods, practicing moose calls; Steve Heartt, dreaming of skiing at S u n Valley; Eric Heinemann, talking with local salts about sailing or pondering over navigation charts; Bob Hoffman, compiling his o w n special translation of Caesar; David Hoyt, doing just the things he oughta,

23]


Second Roxv: Judd, Riordan, Runnette Front Row: Molyneaux, Haviland, Cutler R., McGhie, Harter, Archawski M .

Freshman Class T h e Class of 1950, just n o w emerging from its lower school daze promises soon to become most active in school affairs. T o give an idea of our possibilities, let's introduce ourselves. Michele Archawski, France's gift to the hilltop, is famed for his French conversations with M r . Graves. Robert Cutler, Student Council member, is the scholar of his class and could well be imitated by m a n y of his fellows. Leigh Harter, a gentleman and athlete if not a scholar, is infamous for his driving habits. T h e source of M r . Cibere's gray hairs, T e d Haviland, still works as hard as anyone in the class. Floward Judd has one ambitionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to steal the clapper from the Princeton bell. Bruce M c G h i e was considered shy and contented where he

came from. Here he's contented. Edward, call m e Ted, Molyneux is likeable and sincere, and good in baseball practice. N e d Neiley is popular. H e has a charge account with the N e w Canaan C a b Company. Shy and reserved until you get him on a footballfield,T o m Riordan is one of the big cogs in varsity sports. John Runnette, n e w this year, proved himself old in point of St. Luke's spirit by spearheading the league football team. Last, but not least, Sheldon White, the mighty atom, another Student Council member, is respected by every m e m b e r of his class. We're finding our place in the school slowly. Occasionally w e have trouble with the powers that be, but we're learning and we're growing. Just wait until next year.

[24]


M4 .^NH

Second Row:

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Smiles, Mason, Tiemer, Findlav, Young R., Simpson, Patt, Cudlipp, Hubbell, Douglass

Front Rou'.- Milton, Skinner }., Murphy C , Fawcett, Dr. Kidd, Vivian J., Ferris, Gregg, Nobbe R., Schaub

Grade Eight Scholastically, hardly a marking period has gone by without seeing at least one eighth grader on the honor roll; and on the basis of comparative scholarship the class ranks a m o n g the highest in the school. M e m b e r s of the class are already on the Student Council and Sentinel, and in future years it is expected that more committees will take members from the present eighth grade, and that the class will take a large responsibility in school government. T h e eighth grade has an extremely commendable record in every field that it has thus far entered. Indications are that its class competence will continue and that it will soon take its place as an outstanding class in the upper school.

Just n o w starting to place itself higher in the estimation of both upper and lower school, the eighth grade has already established for itself an extremely creditable record in both scholarship and athletics. T h e class interests and hobbies vary from the collection of model airplanes and coins to neckties. O n the intellectual side, certain m e m b e r s of the class are k n o w n to possess valuable collections of books and rare prints. Athletically, both junior and league teams have been strengthened considerably by the addition of eighth graders to their ranks. Already there are m a n y prospects being seriously considered as varsity m a terial in the not-distant future, and these Guarantee a creditable future to St. Luke's o

athletics.

[25]


Grade 7

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Second Ron'.- Kellogg, Davis, Pullen, Payne, Flevdt, Donaldson, Nobbe G. Front Row: Walton, Armbrister, Frothingham, Willis, Strauss L., Jennings, Wendt, Bancroft F., Day

Grade 6

Whitredge J., Whitredge P., Ryland M., Bijou, Mr. White, Murphy Jon., Capen, Lundy T., Kelly, Smith M .

[26]


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Second Row: Scholfield, Archawski J., Bucknell, Oxley, Quaintance Q., Miss Hancock, Young, Fay, Milligan, Wadsworth, Bucciarelli Front Row: Strauss R., Long, Goodridge, McCloughan, Pepin M., Beck, Moody, Allen, Skinner A., Pepin D.

Grades 2 and 3

Second Roxv: Graham, Zweben, Durant, Traendly, Mosle, Miss Raynor, Hanson, H a m m o n d , Quaintance, P., Litchfield, Ryland, P. Front Row: Pinchbeck, John; Murphy J., Sadder, Pinchbeck Jay, Inkster, Chickering, Ulmer, Skinner D., Thomas P., Gaston

[27]

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Second Roiv: Mr. Kidd, Levers, Van Steeden, Prins, Riordan, Bancroft R., Pinchbeck H., Moore, Rowan, Linse Front Row: Beall, Round, Scholtz, Thomas T., Hertz, Harrington R., Thomas G., Stephanak, Reuther, Lundy P., Mr. Cibere

Varsity Football Having but four veterans returning from last year's winning combination, M r . Cibere proceeded to build an awkward but eager squad of eighteen players into a well-oiled, smoothly-running machine, slow to start, but strong at the finish. O n e of the keys to the team's success was its almost impenetrable forward wall. Although he was hampered by injuries throughout the season, Coach Cibere managed to find able replacements and maintain an impressive line. In the backfield, the Maroon and Gray showed an equal balance of speed and power. Jack Reuther did the line-bucking, while Scholtz's passing was supplemented by the running abilities of halfbacks T h o m a s and Hertz. In only one game were the Hilltoppers

outclassed. In Milford Prep they met an opponent of superior strength. After suffering an inexcusable loss to Brunswick, Captain Harrington led his team on to four successive victories. /Although the Saints' triumph over Jesse Lee was not particularly outstanding, the 13 to 0 win over King School brought joy to every St. Luke's follower. Continuing along their victory trail, the Hilltoppers travelled to Peekskill to take St. Peter's into c a m p by three touchdowns. In their final and certainly their most brilliant effort of the year the varsity eleven trounced a highly favored Edgewood team 40 to 14. Again this year a highly successful football banquet closed the gridiron season for a varsity that is even n o w looking forward to next year's schedule.

[30]


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R O B Y H A R R I N G T O N III

Coacfe

LESTER T. BEALL, JR.

Captain

Schedule

Manager

Lineup Left End

St. Luke's

0

Milford

St. Luke's

0

Brunswick

St. Luke's

6

Jesse Lee

St. Luke's 13

King

St. Luke's 19

St. Peter's

St. Luke's 40

Edgewood

Round

19

14

[31]

Left Tackle

Levers

Left Guard

Rowan

Center

Harrington R., Captain

Right Guard

Prins

Flight Tackle

Van Steeden

Right End

Riordan

Quarterback

Scholtz

Left Halfback

Thomas T.

Right Halfback

Hertz

Fullback

Reuther


League Football T h e 1946 edition of the Maroon and Gray League team was made up of an aggressive group of hard fighting boys from the 11-14 age group. This year, under the able coaching of M r . Mara, the team undertook a four same schedule. Although they were a very light team, they were able to offset this handicap with their fighting spirit and natural ability. M a n y times during the season they were outweighed and outplayed, but never were they outfought. T h e squad consisted of both veterans and newcomers. Most noteworthy among the latter was a lad from Westport, Johnny Runnette by name. Equally outstanding were White, responsible for the team's passing, and quarterback Tiemer.

LINEUP Brigham Bogin

Left End Left Tackle Left Guard Center Right Guard Right Tackle Right End Quarterback Plight Halfback Left Halfback Fullback

Judd Findlay Molyneux Hoyt Cutler, J. Tiemer Hoffman, R. White Runnette

SCHEDULE St. St. St. St.

[32]

Luke's 13 Luke's 26 Luke's 0 Luke's 0

Bedford King Bedford Daycroft

26 0 19 13


Third Row. Donaldson, Fay, Armbrister, Frothingham, M r . Pearsall Second Row: Vivian B., Walton, Capen, Ryland M., Strauss L., Flarrington S., Day, Compton, Skinner A. Front Row: Kelly, Kellogg, Wendt, Nobbe G., Jennings, Murphy J., Milton, Schaub, Whitridge J., Nobbe R., McCloughan

Junior Football Junior football with all its color came back to the hilltop last Fall after several years of wartime restrictions. M r . Pearsall sent a group of about 30 candidates through the vigorous routines of training and practice scrimmages. T h e boys spent m a n y long hours learning the rudiments of A 1 to the right and A 3 to the left, a difficult feat, complicated by a T formation with the Notre D a m e shift. In the backfield went George Nobbe, W e n d t , Johnny M u r p h y , and Pete Whitridge. T h e line, centered by McCloughan, consisted of Kellogg, Harrington, Rvland, OO

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game of the season, the Junior Juggernauts sent their arch rivals d o w n to an overwhelming 49-0 defeat. Then, after a two-week intermission to convert the team into a sixm a n cyclone, Pearsall's Midgets took to the field and delighted the h o m e crowd with a 48-6 triumph over Rippowam. High scorers for the season were Murphy, Jennings, W e n d t , and Kellogg, w h o scored ten of their team's 14 touchdowns. O n the defense the work of Kelly, Rickey Nobbe, Milton, and McCloughan was particularly good. T h e fact that the Junior T e a m could win was not the main reason w h y they had such a great following this year. It was because they always put on such an interesting exhibition of football.

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Kelly, Bucciarelli, and Fay. A n able group of substitutes m a d e the second team as strong as the first. Travelling to King School for their first

[33]


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Second Row: Beall, Heydt, Levers, Tabell, Mr. Cibere, Thomas G., Morley, Hoffman, Eyman Front Piou'.- Thomas T., Scholtz, Campbell, Clapp, Pieuther, Harrington R.

Varsity Basketball LINEUP

Again this year the Hilltoppers were entered in the Southern Connecticut Private School Basketball League. Flaving but three veterans back from last year's team, M r . Cibere built his varsity around m a n y young newcomers. T h e quintet was hampered by the lack of proper facilities for regular practice and by a veritable epidemic of injuries which kept the boys from performing together as an entire team every time there was a game. This year's high scorers were Reuther and T o m m y Thomas, while the defensive maneuvers of Clapp and Scholtz prevented m a n y enemy baskets. A n able, though inexperienced, group of substitutes rounded out the squad which owed m u c h of its success to thefightingspirit of Buddy Thomas.

Left Forward

Thomas, T. Thomas, G. Reuther Scholtz Clapp

Right Forward Center Left Guard Right Guard

SCHEDULE St. Luke

[34]

23

Cherry L a w n

57

St. Luke s 25

Edgewood

St. Luke s 30

Brunswick

47 47 58 44 31 58 45

St. Luke s 24

Brunswick

St. Luke s 55

King

St. Luke s 44

Edgewood

St. Luke 's 28

Cherry L a w n

St. Luke's 44

Daycroft


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Second Row. Beall, Hertz, Pinchbeck H., Hewitt, Mr. Mara, Reuther, Campbell, Levers, Prins, Morley Front Roiv: Thomas T., Thomas G., Runnette, Eyman, Round, Riordan, Harrington R., Harter, Hoffman R.

Varsity Baseball developing of batting power. If, along with a reliable moundsman, these two items can be perfected, the Maroon and Gray should enjoy a successful season on the diamond.

Once again the varsity baseball team approached its season without the services of any veteran hurlers. H o w successful M r . Mara, a worker of miracles on occasion, has been in uncovering pitching talent for this year's team, you all know by now. Leading candidates for the infield positions include Harrington, Harter, T o m m y Thomas, E y m a n , and Runnette. Hertz, Scholtz, Bill Floffman, Riordan, and Buddy T h o m a s will patrol the outfield; while Prins will attempt to catch the varied offerings of our untried moundsmen, Reuther and Griswold. T h e main things that coach Mara is attempting to achieve in his practice sessions is the cutting d o w n of errors and the

22 25 29 May 2 May 6 May 13 May 16 May 19 May 20 May 23 May 27

April April April

[35]

SCHEDULE Edgewood Cherry Lawn King Brunswick Daycroft Cherry L a w n King St. Peter's Brunswick Daycroft Edgewood

Home Away Home Away Home Home Away Home Home Away Away


Second Row; Patt, Vivian B., Findlay, Payne, Mr. Pearsall, Young R., Tiemer, Heydt, Vivian J., Schaub Front Row: McGhie, Molyneaux, Pullen, White, Archawski, Haviland, Judd, Neiley, Nobbe R.

League Baseball Perhaps the most enthusiastic group of ballplayers on the hilltop are those boys in the eighth and ninth grades. For these boys the baseball season starts in January and ends in October. T h e league team this year hopes to play a schedule which will include such opponents as King and N e w Canaan Country Day. Great attention will also be paid to an intramural schedule, since there will be an opportunity for m a n y more boys to play. Such names as White, Findlay, Brigham, Judd, Vivian, Nobbe, Kellogg, Young, Jennings, Molyneux, Milton, Tiemer, M c G h i e , and Payne will make the diamond headlines this spring. W i t h a reasonable amount of natural ability among his charges, a host of candi-

dates, and an intense spirit of co-operation, as ingredients, M r . Pearsall will find little difficulty in putting a capable squad on the field this season. Good pitchers are hard to find in all leagues, and infielders are scarce, too, but the veterans of last year's team will be aided by those w h o are coming u p from last year's successful junior team, so the outlook is good. While the rest of the school m a y be suffering from spring fever, these ballplayers, under the capable guidance of M r . Pearsall, are out every day learning the tricks of the trade which should enable them year after year to enjoy any number of successful seasons as they pass from the league team to join the varsity of future years.

[36]


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Second Row: White, Brigham, Heartt, Cutler R. Front Row: Pennybacker, Hertz, Mr. Kidd, Harrington R., Vivian B.

Student Council through the efforts of the Council, found to be more conducive to study as the vear progressed. A patrol of the halls lessened the danger in going from class to class, and the "coke" room was cleared of hockey games and fugitives from study halls. Above all, the most important work lies in the hands of the individual members of the Council: that is, to set a good example. T h e younger boys naturally look to the older fellows for leadership, and setting a good example is the most effective w a y to show boys h o w to be good and helpful school citizens. In all, the Student Council faithfully continued to help keep the hilltop a perfect place to live and learn.

T h e increased size of the student body m a d e it all the more important for the Student Council to do their utmost in helping the headmaster see that things were kept in good order around school this year. Being on the Student Council gives a boy a mature outlook on school life, and the responsibility implied was not overlooked by this year's group. W i t h Harrington at the helm and the perennial Hertz as secretary, the boys found that previous Councils had built up an unbeatable set of standards concerning behavior both in and out of classroom. O f course, the inevitable pranksters were brought up, and a word to the wise usually was sufficient. Study Halls continued to be the major problem, but they were,

40


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Second Rorv: Mr. Mara, Tabell, Mr. Cibere, Mr. Pearsall, White Front Rory: Beall, Billard, Scholtz, Harrington, E y m a n

Athletic Association In its third year of existence, the Athletic Association has once again devoted itself to the betterment of athletics on the hilltop. T h e puipose of this organization is to enforce regulations whereby the athletic activities of the school m a y be governed and carried out. T h e group also tries to encourage good sportsmanship a m o n g the students w h o participate in the different fields of sports. It also attempts to induce as m a n y as possible to become interested in sports where the opportunity to play is available to every student in the school. B y doing this, they assure complete co-operation between the coaches and players. Since the organization was founded, it has been largely responsible for fostering the mutual interests between the boys and

masters. T h e seven boys on the committee have greatly aided the director of athletics and the coaches in matters such as the issuance of school letters, the scheduling of o

games for all teams, the appointment of managers for all teams, and other important duties, such as keeping u p the maintenance of the athleticfieldand sports equipment. In years to come, it is expected that the association will become even more of an asset than it is now. This year's committee, selected by the Student Council, was led by Fred Scholtz as chairman. Other members included Dick E y m a n , secretary, Robv Harrington, treasurer, T o n y Tabell, Alan Billard, Sheldon White, and Lester Beall. Advisors were M r . Cibere, M r . Pearsall, and M r . Mara.

[41]


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Second Row: Mr. von Fabrice, Heartt, Pennybacker, Pinchbeck, H . Front Row: Hertz, Carr, Levers, Prins, Cutler J.

Dance Committee dance. Decorations were attractive and tasteful. Secondly, the committee finally discovered an orchestra that suited one and all. George Blum played at all but the record dances, and even the most critical were satisfied. O f course, in rendering credit where credit is due, mention must be m a d e of Frieda's wonderful refreshments. Dance committees m a y come and go, but Frieda's punch and cake are still two of the ingredients most necessary to make an outstanding dance committee. A full schedule of dances this year, beginning with the Hallowe'en get-together and climaxed in the Spring dance, has put the challenge to the Seniors to put on the best Prom ever.

This year's dance committee will go d o w n in St. Luke's history as one of the most conscientious ever assembled. S o m e of the members this year were even willing to come up to school on that proverbial "day after," and help put the building back into shape for the next day's classes. M r . V o n , the faculty advisor, was always helpful with suggestions, and is rapidly becoming a connoisseur of dance music, good and bad. There were a number of reasons w h y the dances were so satisfactory this year â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and everyone will agree that they have all been most enjoyable. For one thing, the whole dance committee, under the chairmanship of Bob Levers, pitched in and really did a noteworthy job of decorating. There was no lack of eye-appeal at any

[ 42 ]


Second Row: Bogin, Thomas G., Cutler J., Levers, Clapp, Vivian B., Hertz Front Row.- Pennybacker, Scholtz, Bancroft R., Harrington R., Eyman, Mr. Graves

Dramatic Club Actors, by tradition, should be pampered individuals, but this doesn't hold true at St. Luke's. Dick Bancroft was literally dragged into tryouts this year by M r . Graves' henchmen to be convinced that he should take a major role in, "The Milky W a y . " Directors, it is said, are temperamental characters, but M r . Graves produces his plays only through his ability to handle boys and his great mental discipline which never permits him to blow up. W h e n it came to casting the play, m a n y of the boys w h o did such a fine job in last year's hilarious success were missing. However, n e w and green talent abounded, and M r . Graves took pains developing each character into his stage role. Harrington suddenly became interested in milk; E y m a n and Scholtz began primping and

keeping their seams straight; Clapp developed a Brooklyn accent; Pennybacker began promoting snowball fights; Bancroft didn't change. Play rehearsals began as insignificant gatherings after school, but in the last week before curtain time, studies were forgotten, and everyone developed nervous indigestion and symptoms of floodlight fright. After a deplorable dress rehearsal, both nights at T o w n Hall were most enjoyable and well received by all w h o attended. Plays, as well as athletic contests, dem a n d above all teamwork, and one can come very close to grasping the full meaning of the St. Luke's spirit on opening night.

[43]


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Second Row: Beall, Carr, Mr. Graves, Hewitt, Morley Front Row: Milton, Bogin, Levers, Harrington R., Cutler J., E y m a n

Sentinel Staff cepted by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, which sponsors a convention and competition annually. O n e of the objects of this, obviously, is to win a prize. As M r . Graves says, " W e are hopeful." Flis optimism was justified for the Sentinel w o n a second place. W e look forward with interest to the Sentinel of next year. EDITORIAL B O A R D Roby Harrington III Editor-in-Chief John Cutler Assistant Editor Robert Levers Assistant Editor Literary Editor Brook Vivian Richard E y m a n Sports Editor Philip Milton Junior Sports Editor Special Features Richard Hewitt M r . Graves Faculty Advisor

Again this year the Sentinel Staff has proved its worth in producing an outstanding school magazine. Although the personnel of the staff was greatly changed this year, it still remains a compact group, capable of producing interesting reading. It has also succeeded in increasing the number of issues and the amount of content in each issue. T h e long-felt need for a sports editor was also ended this year by the appearance of Dick E y m a n , whose sports notes are supreme. Also n e w to the Sentinel was the "extra" which appeared on the very first day of school. Under the able guidance of Roby Harrington, its editor, and M r . Graves, its faculty advisor, the Sentinel has been ac-

[44]


t Huke'g ikijool FOR BOYS Commencement Exercises

JUNE SIXTH Nineteen hundred and forty-seven ^tia Canaan, Connecticut

k


T ro g ra m m STAR SPANGLED BANNER

- - - -

AUDIENCE

REV

INVOCATION

- MERRILL F. CLARKE

BIBLE BEADING : 1 Corinthians 13

JACK CARR, 1948

LORD'S PRAYER SCHOOL HYMN-Lead On, 0 King Eternal

AUDIENCE

MR. HENRY P. GRAVES at the Organ

R E M A R K S OP W E L C O M E

-----

ORATION-The Future Is Now ATHLETIC A W A R D S

-

ORATION-Introspection HYMN-America

HEADMASTER

ROBY HARRINGTON, ill MR. RAYMOND s. PEARSALL

- -

BRUCE PENNYBACKER

- - - - - - - -

C O M M E N C E M E N T ADDRESSThe End of the Beginning

AUDIENCE

DR. CHRISTOPHER MORLEY

AWARDING OF PRIZES PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS PRESENTATION OF LOYALTY CUP ALMA MATER BENEDICTION

. . .

.

- -

- - - - - -

AUDIENCE HEADMASTER


(graduates of the Qlass of

1947 LESTER THOMAS BEALL, JR. RICHARD HARRISON EYMAN ROBY HARRINGTON, III WILLIAM ARTHUR HOFFMAN RICHARD MARSHALL HEWITT HARRY FRANKLIN LINSE DONALD BATES MELLIN HUGH OLIVER MORLEY BRUCE PENNYBACKER KIMBERLY PRINS ROBERT HENRY ROWAN, JR. FREDERICK HENRY SCHOLTZ THOMAS McKEAN THOMAS PETER VAN STEEDEN, III


L E A D ON, 0 KIHG

ETERNAL

(St. Luke's School Hymn) Lead on, O King Eternal, The day of march has come Henceforth infieldsof conquest Thy tents shall be our home: Through days of preparation Thy grace has made us strong And now, O King Eternal, W e lift our battle song.

Lead on, O King Eternal, Till sin'sfiercewar shall cease, And holiness shall whisper The sweet Amen of peace; For not with swords loud clashing Nor roll of stirring drums, But deeds of love and mercy, The heavenly kingdom comes.

Lead on, O King Eternal, W e follow, not with fears, For gladness breaks like morning Where'er Thy face appears. Thy cross is lifted o'er us; W e journey in its light. The crown awaits the conquest; Lead on, O God of might.

ALMA

MATER

Hail to thee, our Alma Mater, hear our voices clear, Singing of thy glory and the name we hold so dear, Days may come and days may go, yet hearts will beat for thee. To St. Luke's, our Alma Mater, loyal be. In the morning of our lives we heed thy kindly call, Working, playing, thinking, praying in this hallowed hall. As the years pass by, those days return in memory, Hail, St. Luke's our Alma Mater, hail to thee.

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Caduceus 1947