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Summer Classics


at St. John’s College “Over hill, over dale, Thorough bush, thorough brier, Over park, over pale, Thorough flood, thorough fire, I do wander everywhere, Swifter than the moon’s sphere; And I serve the Fairy Queen, To dew her orbs upon the green. The cowslips tall her pensioners be: In their gold coats spots you see; Those be rubies, fairy favors, In those freckles live their savors.” –Fairy (II.i)


Summer Classics at St. John’s College For more than 20 years, Summer Classics at St. John’s College has hosted participants from around the world for week-long seminar classes in classic literature, science, history, philosophy, and opera. Summer Classics is an opportunity to experience lively, in-depth, and highly participatory discussions modeled after those of the St. John’s Program. Held on both the Santa Fe and Annapolis campuses, Summer Classics is an unmatched intellectual journey. Seminar discussions begin with an opening question presented by a faculty member. Participants around the seminar table, each with varying life experiences and perspectives, contribute to the discussion by presenting ideas and interpretations.

The act of listening is just as important as speaking and making connections among ideas. No previous knowledge of the author, text, or subject is required. In fact, participants should refer only to texts the group studies together. The weeklong seminars are limited to 18 participants each. Groups are led by two members of the St. John’s College faculty, called tutors. Tuition covers one seminar (either one morning or one afternoon topic) in a given week. You may register for both a morning seminar and an afternoon seminar. In Santa Fe, participants are welcome to register for more than one week of seminars.


St. John’s College St. John’s College, a co-ed four-year liberal arts college with campuses in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Annapolis, Maryland, offers small discussion-based classes and a distinctive curriculum based on the foundational texts of the Western tradition. All students undertake a unified and multidisciplinary program, reading and discussing classic works of philosophy, literature, theology, history, political science, economics, mathematics, astronomy, physics, biology, and music. In this vibrant learning community, faculty members do not lecture and are not segregated into departments; instead they learn with and guide their students as they read and discuss these foundational texts in small, seminar-style classes. St. John’s has no religious affiliation and is the third oldest college in the country. In addition to the undergraduate program, St. John’s College offers graduate degree programs based on these same principles: the Master of Arts in Liberal Arts, on both campuses, and the Master of Arts in Eastern Classics, on the Santa Fe campus only.

“And pluck the wings from painted butterflies, To fan the moonbeams from his sleeping eyes.” –Titania (III.1)


ANNAPOLIS Registration Sunday, June 23 3 - 5 p.m. McDowell Hall

Morning Mingles with Continental Breakfast Monday & Thursday 9 - 10 a.m.

Opening Reception Sunday 5 - 6:30 p.m. Mellon Hall CafĂŠ

Lunch Monday - Friday Noon - 1:30 p.m.

Seminars Monday - Friday 10 a.m. - noon and/or 2 - 4 p.m.

Schedule of Events: JUNE 23-28


Events Crab Feast Tuesday 6:30 - 9 p.m. Stargazing (weather permitting) Tuesday Mellon Hall Observatory 9 p.m. Wednesday Night Lecture and Question Period 7:30 p.m.


Seminar Schedule: Annapolis June 24-28

Morning Homer’s Iliad Eva Brann and Lise van Boxel

Federalists and Anti-Federalists: The Debate over the Constitution William Braithwaite and William Pastille

Afternoon “For there she was.” Two Novels of Virginia Woolf Tom May and Joan Silver

Plato’s Republic Matthew Caswell and John Tomarchio


“If we shadows have offended, Think but this and all is mended: That you have but slumb’red here, While these visions did appear. And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream, Gentles do not reprehend; If you pardon, we will mend. And, as I am an honest Puck, If we have unearned luck Now to scrape the serpent’s tongue, We will make amends ere long; Else the Puck a liar call: So, good night unto you all. Give me your hands, if we be friends, And Robin shall restore amends.” –Puck (V.I)


ANNAPOLIS June 24-28 | Morning

Homer’s Iliad Eva Brann and Lise van Boxel

Homer is perhaps the greatest poet ever to have lived. The Iliad is his most famous poem. It is a song about the rage of Achilles, the most famous hero in the Western world and the archetypal warrior. Superlatives abound! Paradoxically, Achilles’ rage does not draw him further into the battle against the Trojans. Instead, it causes him to withdraw from the war for much of the poem. Ultimately, his rage seems to focus on questions about the human condition and the action—and inaction—of the gods in human life.

“And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet’s pen

Federalists and Anti-Federalists: The Debate over the Constitution William Braithwaite and William Pastille

In advance of the votes to ratify the Constitution, citizens in every state gave speeches and wrote newspaper articles both for and against ratification. James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay wrote the most comprehensive series of proConstitution arguments in various New York newspapers. These came to be known collectively as The Federalists Papers. Among the most prominent opponents of ratification, called Anti-Federalists, were Patrick Henry, and pseudonymous authors called “Brutus,” “Centinel,” and “John Dewitt.” We will read and discuss competing arguments regarding the need for union, protections against tyranny, states’ rights, representation, and the justice system.

Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name.” –Theseus (V.I)


ANNAPOLIS June 24-28 | Afternoon

“For there she was.” Two Novels of Virginia Woolf Tom May and Joan Silver

Virginia Woolf ranks as one of the great innovative novelists of the 20th century in her abandonment of conventional linear narrative and exposition, favoring instead the poetic effects produced by indirect narrative and interior monologue. Participants will read two of her principal novels, Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse. The first describes a fine and full June day as its heroine, Clarissa, plunges into the bustle of London to purchase flowers for her party that evening. The second relates the daily life of the Ramsey family summering in the Hebrides over several years. Each novel is charged with the realization that it is both wonderful and “very, very dangerous to live even one day.”

Plato’s Republic Matthew Caswell and John Tomarchio

If Western thought may be called “a footnote to Plato,” then the rest of Plato’s dialogues may be called a footnote to his Republic. This epic dialogue sets the terms of ethical, political, and metaphysical debate for millennia to come. In it, Socrates rises to the challenge of two youths to prove to them that justice alone could make them happy, absent any benefits of honor or wealth. To do so, Socrates undertakes with them to construct a just city in speech, as an image of a just soul writ large, to search within it for the native seat and power not only of justice, but of the virtues of wisdom, courage, and temperance, as well as the graces of human education, friendship, and philosophy.

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ANNAPOLIS SUMMER CLASSICS REGISTRATION 2013 Please complete a separate form for each participant, detach, and mail to address on reverse; or call 410-626-2881 to register by phone. Please note that, depending on enrollment, not all offerings may be available at the time of registration.

REGISTRATION INFORMATION NAME

MR.

MRS.

(Please complete ALL information.)

MS.

PREFERRED NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

HOME PHONE

CELL PHONE

E-MAIL

FAX

EMERGENCY CONTACT NAME (REQUIRED)

ZIP

PHONE

HOW DID YOU HEAR ABOUT SUMMER CLASSICS?

DO YOU HAVE ANY DIETARY RESTRICTIONS OR SPECIAL NEEDS?

ARE STAIRS A PROBLEM?

SEMINARS Please note thattuition foreach sem inarin the m orning orafternoon is $1,250.

Single Week | June 24-28 MORNING Homer’s Iliad Federalists and Anti-Federalists: The Debate over the Constitution

AFTERNOON “For there she was.” Two Novels of Virginia Woolf Plato's Republic

PLEA SE C OMPLETE IN FOR M ATION ON R EVER SE SID E.


FEES TUITION Tuition per seminar

$1,250

x

seminars

$

TEACHER TUITION ASSISTANCE (please include proof of full-time educator status) Deduct $625 per seminar –$ MULTI-SEMINAR DISCOUNT

(not available with Teacher Tuition Assistance)

–$

Two seminars: Deduct $100

ON-CAMPUS ROOM Single

Double

$240 per person (Sunday – Friday)

$

Name of roommate

TOTAL DUE

$

AMOUNT ENCLOSED

–$

BALANCE DUE

$

METHOD OF PAYMENT Check made payable to St. John’s College MasterCard

Visa

American Express

Discover

CREDIT CARD NUMBER

CVV#

EXPIRATION DATE

NAME AS IT APPEARS ON CARD

BILLING ADDRESS (IF DIFFERENT FROM OBVERSE)

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

SIGNATURE

ZIP

DATE

MAIL CHECKS AND REGISTRATION FORM TO: Community Programs Office St. John’s College P.O. Box 2800 Annapolis, MD 21404

Note: We cannot reserve spaces and enrollment will not be processed until the $250 non-refundable deposit per seminar has been received. If full payment is not received by May 15, 2013, your enrollment will be cancelled and the deposit(s) will not be returned.


Registration Sundays 3 - 5 p.m. Peterson Student Center

Morning Mingles Mondays & Thursdays 9 - 10 a.m. Schepps Garden

Opening Reception Sundays 5 - 6:30 p.m. Peterson Student Center

Events Graduate Institute Open House Mondays 4 - 5 p.m. Levan Hall

Seminars Monday - Friday 10 a.m. - noon and/or 2 - 4 p.m.

Tuesday Night Events TBA

Schedule of Events: JULY 7-26


Nature Walks (weather permitting) Thursdays 4:30 - 5:30 p.m.

Music on the Hill™ Wednesdays 6 - 8 p.m. Athletic Field

Operas (by advance purchase) Wednesdays and Fridays 8:30 p.m.

Closing Lunches Fridays 12 - 1:30 p.m. Coffee Shop


Seminar Schedule: Santa Fe Week I: July 8 -12

Morning Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead and Home Patricia Greer and Eva Brann

The Spy Novel in the Hands of the Master: Three John le Carré Novels Sherry Martin and David Carl

The Gnostic Gospels: Selections from the Nag Hammadi Scriptures John Cornell and Topi Heikkerö

Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace Mike Peters and Steve Isenberg

Afternoon Xenophon’s The Education of Cyrus Richard McCombs and Janet Dougherty

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro William Fulton and Andy Kingston

Roman Political Life: Works by Gaius Julius Caesar and Marcus Tullius Cicero Greg Schneider and Arcelia Rodriguez

Michel de Montaigne: Selected Essays Guillermo Bleichmar and Judith Adam

Afternoon Marguerite Yourcenar’s The Memoirs of Hadrian

Week III: July 22 - 26

Morning

Natalie Elliot and John Cornell

Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina

Stendahl’s Charterhouse of Parma

Stephen Houser and Erika Martinez

James Carey and Frank Pagano

Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics Michael Golluber and Marsaura Shukla

Week II: July 15 - 19

Morning Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Parts I and II, and Henry V Mike Peters and Victoria Mora

Herodotus’ The Persian Wars Janet Dougherty and Eva Brann

Shakespeare’s Comedies: A Midsummer Night’s Dream and A Comedy of Errors Warren Winiarski and Judith Adam


Marcel Proust’s In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower Victoria Mora and Peter Pesic

Afternoon Two Dialogues on Virtue: Plato’s Laches and Charmides David Levy and Michael Golluber

Isaac Newton’s Opticks Peter Pesic and Guillermo Bleichmar


WEEK ONE: Santa Fe July 8-12 | Morning

Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead and Home Patricia Greer and Eva Brann

Home continues the story begun in Gilead, a tale of a pious and not-so-pious family in a small farming community in Iowa. By ordinary standards, nothing much happens—externally. But the “nothing much” is gripping since the motions of remarkable souls provide the action and the half-hidden lives supply the suspense. Who can understand America without trying to see religion from the inside? As a bonus, there is Marilynne Robinson’s prose: the American analogue of Jane Austen’s non-boring perfection.

Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace Mike Peters and Steve Isenberg

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy is a true epic and regarded as one of the most important works of world literature. It is historical in scope, detailing the events surrounding the Napoleonic Wars and the French invasion and their impact on Russian government, society, and culture. It is also an intimate study in character as well as a philosophical treatise on the relationship of the individual and history. The novel does all this through the lives of three of the most well-known figures in literature: the illegitimate son Pierre Bezukhov, the noble and principled Andrei Bolkonsky, and beautiful and willful Natasha Rostov and their families. 


Xenophon’s The Education of Cyrus Richard McCombs and Janet Dougherty

Cyrus, the founder of the monarchy of Persia, excelled in ruling human beings to such an extent that Xenophon remarks, “no one attempted anything against him.” In The Education of Cyrus, Xenophon explores the nature, education, and actions of this extraordinary man. This work illuminates how it is possible for a leader to make human beings, who usually wish to govern themselves, willingly abandon themselves, willingly abandon their judgment, and submit to authority to such a degree that they become slaves. The Education of Cyrus was a seminal work for Machiavelli, who cites it several times in The Prince, and a great but too often neglected classic of ancient political thought.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro William Fulton and Andy Kingston

Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro – 1786) was his first collaboration with his most gifted librettist, Lorenzo Da Ponte. Based on the play by Beaumarchais, it is a story of class conflict on the eve of the French Revolution. Perhaps more importantly, it gives us insights into human nature and relationships, enhanced and deepened by Mozart’s brilliant and beautiful music. Some describe this work as the finest opera ever written. No prior experience or knowledge of music or opera is required. Participants are encouraged to attend the performance of this opera at the renowned Santa Fe Opera.


WEEK ONE: Santa Fe July 8-12 | Afternoon

Marguerite Yourcenar’s The Memoirs of Hadrian Natalie Elliot and John Cornell

Marguerite Yourcenar is one of the most distinguished writers of historical fiction in the 20th century. The first woman to be elected to the prestigious Académie Française, Yourcenar first received acclaim for her epistolary novel, Memoirs of Hadrian. “My dear Mark,” it begins: Hadrian addresses his eventual successor, the young Marcus Aurelius, philosopheremperor to be. The emperor’s letter of fatherly advice gradually turns into the intimate record of his life. A masterpiece of historical irony and poetic sensibility, these memoirs of Hadrian seem to refute the Stoic ideas of Marcus Aurelius long before Marcus inscribed them in his famous Meditations. Readers will find in this fanciful ancient document a genuine modern classic, a timeless expression of philosophical life. Stendhal’s Charterhouse of Parma James Carey and Frank Pagano

The Charterhouse of Parma is a novel of politics, intrigue, and love. Stendhal centers his narrative on the life and exploits, romantic and military, of a young Italian aristocrat. The novel is set in the first half of the 19th century, and it contains, among other things, a close up depiction of the Battle of Waterloo that was greatly admired by Tolstoy. Stendhal writes with irony and dry wit, but with sympathy for his characters as well. Nietzsche had particularly high praise for Stendhal’s psychological insight. The Charterhouse of Parma is an early example of literary realism. Balzac, a master of the genre, judged The Charterhouse of Parma to be the finest novel of its time.


WEEK TWO: Santa Fe July 15-19 | Morning

Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Parts I and II, and Henry V Mike Peters and Victoria Mora

Among Shakespeare’s history plays, Henry IV, Parts I and II, and Henry V offer remarkable insight into the overlapping intricacies of the political and the personal. The plays explore the challenges of consolidating and maintaining power in the wake of a questionable succession, with the action ranging from the courts, to the battlefields, to the flea-bitten inns of London. High politics, shrewd statecraft, and low comedy all find keen expression in the political drama, and in the unlikely friendship of two of Shakespeare’s most memorable characters, Henry V and Sir John Falstaff.

Herodotus’ The Persian Wars Janet Dougherty and Eva Brann

Herodotus is as bright a historian as Thucydides is dark; for Herodotus tells of the rise and glory of Greece, Thucydides of its decline and fall. Long before his time the Greeks invaded Asia Minor and took Troy. Now the Persians invade Greece and fail to take it. Question: Imagine who we would be had they succeeded? However, Herodotus is not only the first historian but a great anthropologist. His “inquiry” is full of human and divine occurrences. Question: Are they reports of facts or tales naïvely recorded?


The Spy Novel in the Hands of the Master: Three John le Carré Novels Sherry Martin and David Carl

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963) tops most lists of the best spy novels, not just because of the suspense of the plot and the Cold War setting, but through the art of le Carré’s prose. George Smiley figures among the supporting characters in this classic novel and moves to center stage in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974). Once again le Carré draws us into the world of spy craft in the hunt for the mole in the Circus (the British secret service). In The Secret Pilgrim (1990) Smiley is retired and speaking to a graduating class of students about how “spying is eternal,” even in a world of glasnost and perestroika. He triggers memories in his host, Ned, who himself is retired from field operations, that begin during the Cold War but move beyond and resonate in the present. This novel is in some sense a collection of short stories, with unforgettable characters who could easily become protagonists in their own novels. In another sense it is a summation of the Cold War and spying themes that le Carré examined in his writings about the period before the dissolution of the Iron Curtain. Though the genre of spy fiction may in itself have fans, how is it that le Carré elevates the convention beyond the gadgetry of James Bond? What role does the political background play in engaging readers? What are the moral-philosophical ambiguities that haunt the espionage community in these novels?

The Gnostic Gospels: Selections from the Nag Hammadi Scriptures John Cornell and Topi Heikkerö

In December 1945, two Egyptian fellahin, digging for fertilizer in the Nile river valley, stumbled upon an ancient storage jar that proved to be the most spectacular archeological find of the 20th century: a collection of some 52 manuscripts representing a mystical stream of early Christianity known as Gnosticism (from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis). The Jesus in these texts sometimes resembles an enlightened Zen Master more than the Savior of the canonical Gospels. What are we to make of this “second coming” in 1945? What is the import of this “other” Christ for our reading of Church history and the received New Testament? Might his teachings affect, even today, our understanding of the human condition? We shall read and discuss seven key texts from these Nag Hammadi scriptures: the Gospels of Thomas, of Mary, and of Philip; the Secret Books of John and of James; the Book of Thomas; and the Valentinian Gospel of Truth. Two sessions will focus on the Gospel of Thomas, which some scholars regard as the “Fifth Gospel.”


WEEK TWO: Santa Fe July 15-19 | Afternoon

Roman Political Life: Works by Gaius Julius Caesar and Marcus Tullius Cicero Greg Schneider and Arcelia Rodriguez

Caesar’s choice to “cross the Rubicon” and fully embark upon his quest for power in ancient Rome sets the stage for a devastating civil war and, ultimately, his own death. One of his opponents in that endeavor, Marcus Tullius Cicero stood as a powerful champion of a return to traditional republican government. This seminar will be an opportunity to explore Julius Caesar’s and Cicero’s own words on political life, in good and bad times, in ancient Rome. In The Civil War, Julius Caesar provides a first-hand account of the civil war events of 49-48 BCE, while On Duties, written as a letter addressed to his son Marcus, represents Cicero’s final thoughts on the ideal political life.

Michel de Montaigne: Selected Essays Guillermo Bleichmar and Judith Adam

The Essays of Montaigne, a seminal expression of the spirit of Renaissance humanism, are a sustained exercise in unbridled thought. They are at once profound and humorous; deeply personal, yet of universal scope; dealing with everything under the sun, yet always, at heart, with the mystery of the self. To read them is to form a friendship with a mind of inexhaustible counsel, experience, and imagination.


WEEK THREE: Santa Fe July 22-26 | Morning

Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina Stephen Houser and Erika Martinez

Leo Tolstoy experienced a spiritual crisis during the writing of Anna Karenina, which treats the private and public considerations and consequences surrounding Anna’s adulterous affair with Count Vronsky. Her sensitivities, reflections, and changing position within society unfold amid a densely populated setting of other stories of love, marriage, and adultery, the relationship between Kitty and Levin being foremost among these. Anna’s deep problem of happiness directs us to confront for our own selves the problems and questions of happiness. The unflinching eye of the narrator in revealing Anna’s perceptions and doubts is one of the great compelling features of the novel, which William Faulkner described as “the best ever written.”

Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics Michael Golluber and Marsaura Shukla

The concern of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is the good life for a human being. Aristotle observes that “if there is an end which we wish for its own sake…will not the knowledge of it, then, have a great influence on our way of life?” The stakes are high for us. Since the human good turns out to be “an activity of the soul in accordance with virtue,” the possibility of our happiness requires an exploration of the various virtues in particular, and of human excellence in general.


William Shakespeare’s Comedies: A Midsummer Night’s Dream and A Comedy of Errors Warren Winiarski and Judith Adam

We will explore the range of Shakespearean comedy in two distinctive plays. First, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, a fabulous story of love whose comedy, with its young lovers who seek to unite beyond the law, presents a counterpoint to Shakespeare’s tragic treatment of the same theme elsewhere. In the comic dream in the woods, with its magical mixing of couples, confused identities, and misdirected love, the truth of love is playfully tested. Then in A Comedy of Errors, we will explore the theme of confused identities taken to farcical, purely comical extremes. Perhaps only for the purpose of invoking joy and laughter in the audience, this deliciously ridiculous play presents the situation of two sets of long-separated twins whose lives ultimately and magnificently collide.

Marcel Proust’s In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower Victoria Mora and Peter Pesic

Marcel Proust’s monumental series of six novels In Search of Lost Time concerns love, desire, memory, jealousy, betrayal, and loss. In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower, the second volume in the series, follows its narrator during an enchanted summer, encountering old and new loves, visiting longed-for places. No less a master of social drama than of individual consciousness, Proust writes with great clarity, wit, and almost painful beauty. This seminar is intended to continue our seminar on Swann’s Way from last summer, and accordingly offers first choice to its participants; others are welcome, if space allows, but they are expected to have read Swann’s Way on their own so that they can participate fully in discussions that will doubtless reach back to that work.


WEEK THREE: Santa Fe July 22-26 | Afternoon

Two Dialogues on Virtue: Plato’s Laches and Charmides David Levy and Michael Golluber

The great Islamic philosopher al-Farabi tells us that in the Laches Plato “investigated the courage of which the citizens of cities are reputed for being courageous; what the courage is that is believed by the multitude to be courage; and he explained the courage that is true courage.” In the Charmides he “investigated the moderation generally accepted in cities; what the moderation is that is true moderation; what the moderate man is who is believed to be moderate; what the moderate man is who is truly moderate; what is the way of life of those who are truly moderate; and how the multitude have been ignorant of what true moderation is.” Are these two virtues, courage and moderation, finally incompatible, or is there a kind of human life that is the reconciliation of both?

Isaac Newton’s Opticks Peter Pesic and Guillermo Bleichmar

Newton’s Opticks is a masterpiece of curiosity and wonder; an exploration of the nature of light that owes as much to the imagination as to the intellect. In a remarkably accessible manner requiring little mathematics, Newton guides us into the phenomena of reflection and refraction, the workings of the eye and telescopes, the causes of the rainbow, and the theory of colors. Along with our reading of the text, we will delve first-hand into the study of nature by conducting Newton’s key experiments.


Santa Fe Opera Tickets: Santa Fe Opera Tickets range from $107 to $136, depending on the evening. Week I: WEDNESDAY, JULY 10

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro FRIDAY, JULY 12

Jacques Offenbach’s The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein

Week II: WEDNESDAY, JULY 17

Gioachino Rossini’s La Donna del Lago FRIDAY, JULY 19

Jacques Offenbach’s The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein

Week III:

Transportation is available to

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24

and from the Santa Fe Opera

Giuseppe Verdi’s La Traviata

performances. The cost for van

FRIDAY, JULY 26

opera. Payment for opera

Gioachino Rossini’s La Donna del Lago

tickets and van service is due

service is $15 per person per

at the time of registration. Tickets are limited. For more information about the Santa Fe Opera, visit www.santafeopera.org.


General Information Santa Fe Founded in 1610, ten years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock, Santa Fe was the seat of power for the Spanish Empire north of the Rio Grande. It has remained a capital city ever since; four nations have flown their flags over the historic Plaza, claiming it as their own. Truly one of the world’s most unusual cities, Santa Fe is known as “The City Different.” Santa Fe was rated the third most popular travel city in Conde Nast Traveler magazine’s 2011 Readers’ Choice Awards. At an elevation of 7,200 feet, Santa Fe is situated in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains (the southern portion of the Rocky Mountains). Home to a rich cultural heritage, a dynamic art and music scene, and spectacular archaeological sites, Santa Fe in July offers visitors such events as Spanish Market, the Eight Northern Indian Pueblo Arts and Crafts show, the International Folk Art Market, the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, and performances of the world-renowned Santa Fe Opera. St. John’s College is located only three miles from the historical downtown Plaza and within walking distance of four major museums and the famous Canyon Road art galleries.


Annapolis Founded in 1649, Annapolis is a historic seaport city situated on the Chesapeake Bay. It is the capital of the state of Maryland and has more 18th century buildings than anywhere else in the United States; three of these buildings are on the St. John’s campus. Annapolis is known as America’s sailing capital and is home to the National Sailing Hall of Fame, the Annapolis Sailing School (the oldest in America), and the United States Naval Academy. It is a popular destination for the visual and performing arts. Forbes Traveler named Annapolis as one of the country’s Top 20 Prettiest Towns. The college’s Annapolis campus is located in the heart of the historic district, with art galleries, shops, restaurants, music venues, hotels, and bed and breakfasts within walking distance. From City Dock, visitors can board a water taxi to area restaurants or Woodwind Schooner for a cruise of the Chesapeake Bay. Annapolis is 26 miles south of Baltimore and 29 miles east of Washington, D.C.


Fees, Policies, and Accommodations Tuition The tuition for Summer Classics is $1,250 per individual seminar, which includes registration, books and other course materials, lunches, and special events. A $250 non-refundable deposit for each seminar is required to hold your space(s), and in order for you to receive seminar materials. Santa Fe: Balances must be paid in full by June 1, 2013. If payment is not received by this date, you will forfeit your space in the seminar. Those registering after June 1 must pay in full at the time of registration. (Tickets to performances at the Santa Fe Opera are not included in the tuition.) Annapolis: Balances are due by May 15, 2013. If payment is not received by this date, you will forfeit your space in the seminar. Those registering after May 15 must pay in full at the time of registration. Multiple Seminar Discount Those registering for two seminars will receive a $100 discount. If you register for three or more seminars, you will receive a $250 discount. Seminar Selection Changes Participants may switch from one seminar to another, or add a seminar, should space be available, up to two weeks before the first session for which they are registered. Teacher Tuition Assistance St. John’s College offers tuition assistance to a limited number of licensed teachers (K-12) and college professors. With proof of current employment as a full-time educator, participants will receive a 50% tuition discount. Discounts will be available to the first 30 teacher registrants. No additional discounts are offered for multiple seminars. In Annapolis, teacher discounts are limited to the first 10 teachers. Minors Participants under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian and notify the Summer Classics office that he or she is a minor.


Cancellations Santa Fe: Cancellations made prior to June 1, 2013 will receive a full refund minus the $250 non-refundable deposit; cancellations thereafter forfeit the full payment. If you need to cancel your registration, contact the Summer Classics office in writing (preferred), by phone: 505-984-6105, or via e-mail: summerclassics@sjcsf.edu. Annapolis: Cancellations made prior to May 15, 2013, will receive a full refund minus the $250 non-refundable deposit; cancellations thereafter forfeit the full payment. If you need to cancel your registration, please contact the Community Programs office in writing (preferred), by phone: 410-626-2530, or via e-mail: kathy.dulisse@sjca.edu.

Accommodations Santa Fe Accommodations General tourist information is available from the Santa Fe Convention and Visitors Bureau on the web at www.santafe.org or by calling 800-777-2489. The college offers limited housing in suites on campus. Accommodations are simple, with five separate single-occupancy bedrooms, arranged around a shared living room, and a double bathroom. Housing is located uphill from the


classrooms and dining area; walking is, therefore, required. Suites are neither air-conditioned nor equipped with televisions; internet and cell phone access may be limited. Room and board: Fees include accommodations, linens, and meals from Sunday evening through breakfast on Saturday. A linen exchange is offered to individuals staying more than one week. All rooms are single occupancy. Suite housing is available on a first-come, first-served basis. If suite housing is no longer available, the college will be happy to place you on a wait list, or simpler dorm space may be available. Room and board fees are $510 per week per person. Payment for housing is due at the time of registration. Should you have any special needs while staying on campus, please inform the Summer Classics office at time of registration. Due to limited space on campus we cannot accommodate early arrivals or late departures. You may check into your room at the time of registration on Sunday; keys will be available at registration. Checkout is by 10 a.m. on Saturday. We suggest you make travel arrangements to accommodate this schedule.


Annapolis Accommodations The Annapolis campus offers simple accommodations in its Gilliam Hall dormitory, located on College Creek. Guests may reserve a double or single room. All beds are twin size, and bathrooms are shared among eight guests. There is no telephone service, and guests bringing computers must provide their own ethernet connection service (wi-fi is available at other locations on campus.). Room Rate: $240 per person, including a $12 linen rental fee. No meals are available on campus other than the breakfasts and lunches that are included in the Summer Classics tuition, but there are many nice restaurants within walking distance of the college. For off-campus housing, please visit www.stjohnscollege.edu, click on “Friends,” then “Business Friends,” then “Accommodations.” General tourist information is available from the Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Conference and Visitors Bureau on the web at www.visitannapolis.org.

Transportation Transportation to Santa Fe The closest major airport is in Albuquerque, a one-hour drive from Santa Fe. Travel reservations from the airport to Santa Fe may be made with an airport shuttle service or by visiting www.santafe.com — click on “Hotels, Lodging, & Travel.” The Santa Fe airport also operates a limited number of commercial flights to and from a few select airports. Limited public transportation is available within Santa Fe by bus. For greater flexibility, renting a car is recommended. Transportation to Annapolis The Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI) is 25 miles from the Annapolis campus. Car rental and shuttle service to Annapolis can be easily arranged on the BWI website. Washington National Airport (DCA) also serves the Annapolis area, but is not as convenient. Limited public transportation is available within Annapolis by bus and taxi. For greater flexibility, renting a car is recommended.


SANTA FE SUMMER CLASSICS REGISTRATION 2013 Please complete a separate form for each participant (you may copy this form) and mail to address on reverse or call 505-984-6105 to register by phone. Please note that, depending on enrollment, not all offerings may be available at the time of registration.

REGISTRATION INFORMATION NAME

MR.

MRS.

(Please complete ALL information.)

MS.

PREFERRED NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

HOME PHONE

CELL PHONE

E-MAIL

FAX

EMERGENCY CONTACT NAME (REQUIRED)

PHONE

HOW DID YOU HEAR ABOUT SUMMER CLASSICS?

DO YOU HAVE ANY DIETARY RESTRICTIONS OR SPECIAL NEEDS?

SEMINARS Please note that tuition for each seminar in the morning or afternoon is $1,250. Week One | July 8-12

Week Two | July 15-19

Week Three | July 22-26

MORNING

MORNING

MORNING

Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead and Home

Shakespeare's Henry IV, Parts I and II, and Henry V

Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina

Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace

Herodotus’ The Persian Wars

Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics

Xenophon’s The Education of Cyrus

Three John le Carré Novels

Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and A Comedy of Errors

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro AFTERNOON

The Gnostic Gospels: Selections from the Nag Hammadi Scriptures AFTERNOON

Marguerite Yourcenar’s The Memoirs of Hadrian

Roman Political Life: Works by Caesar and Cicero

Stendhal’s Charterhouse of Parma

Michel de Montaigne: Selected Essays

Proust’s In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower AFTERNOON

Plato’s Laches and Charmides Newton’s Opticks

OPERA OFFERINGS

OPERA OFFERINGS

OPERA OFFERINGS

Wednesday, July 10 The Marriage of Figaro $117 x tickets Van – $15 x tickets

Wednesday, July 17 La Donna del Lago $117 x Van – $15 x

Wednesday, July 24 La Traviata $112 x Van – $15 x

tickets tickets

Friday, July 12 The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein $137 x Van – $15 x

Friday, July 19 The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein $137 x Van – $15 x

Friday, July 26 La Donna del Lago $112 x Van – $15 x

tickets tickets

tickets tickets

tickets tickets

tickets tickets

PLEA SE COMPLETE IN FORM ATION ON REVER SE SIDE.


FEES TUITION Tuition per seminar

$1,250

x

seminars

$

TEACHER TUITION ASSISTANCE (please include proof of full-time educator status) Deduct $625 per seminar –$ MULTI-SEMINAR DISCOUNT

(not available with Teacher Tuition Assistance)

–$ –$

Two seminars: Deduct $100 Three or more seminars: Deduct $250

ON-CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD x

week(s)

$

Single suite per week

$510

SANTA FE OPERA TICKETS

total from previous page

$

VAN SERVICE

total from previous page

$

TOTAL DUE

$

AMOUNT ENCLOSED x ____ seminars – $

$250 nonrefundable deposit*

BALANCE DUE

$

METHOD OF PAYMENT Check made payable to St. John’s College MasterCard

Visa

American Express

Discover

CREDIT CARD NUMBER

CVV#

EXPIRATION DATE

NAME AS IT APPEARS ON CARD

BILLING ADDRESS (IF DIFFERENT FROM OBVERSE)

ADDRESS

CITY

SIGNATURE

STATE

ZIP

DATE

MAIL PAYMENT AND REGISTRATION FORM TO: St. John’s College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca Santa Fe, NM 87505-4599 Attn: Summer Classics Or via email: summerclassics@sjcsf.edu

*Note: We cannot reserve spaces or process registration until the $250 non-refundable deposit per seminar has been received. Full payment is due by June 1 to avoid cancellation.


Image Credits Cover: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). Bear the Changeling Child to my Bower in Fairy Land, illustration, 1908, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616. Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Inside Cover: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). Puck, illustration, 1908, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616. Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Page 4-5: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). Puck depositing magic powder on the eyelids, illustration, 1908, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616. Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Page 6: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Titania and Her Court. 1908. Pen and ink and watercolor. Photo: Knud Petersen. Location:Kunstbibliothek, Staatliche Museen, Berlin, Germany. Photo Credit: bpk, Berlin, Staatliche Museen. Art Resource, NY. Page 7: Turner, Joseph Mallord William (1775-1851). Queen Mab’s Cave, 1846. Oil on canvas. Support: 921 x 1226 mm frame: 1070 x 1374 x 70 mm. Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856. Photo Credit: Tate, London / Art Resource, NY. Page 8: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Music of the Goblins. 1908. Pen and ink and watercolor. Photo: Knud Petersen. Kunstbibliothek, Staatliche Museen, Berlin, Germany. Photo Credit: bpk, Berlin, Staatliche Museen. Art Resource, NY. Page 10: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, by William Shakespeare. Illustration by O. Prinz, Hungary, c. 1900. Photo Credit: CCI / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Page 13: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939).Titania Queen of the Fairies, illustration, 1908, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616. Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Page 14-15: Blake, William (1757-1827). Oberon, Titania and Puck with fairies dancing. ca. 1785. Watercolor and drawing on paper. 47.5 x 67.5 cm. Tate Gallery, London, Great Britain. Photo Credit: Tate, London / Art Resource, NY. Page 17: Reynolds, Sir Joshua (1723-1792). Puck or Robin Goodfellow. Oil on canvas, 368 x 298 mm. Photo Credit: Tate, London / Art Resource, NY.

Page 19: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Dance of the Goblins. 1908. Pen and ink and watercolor. Photo: Knud Petersen. Kunstbibliothek, Staatliche Museen, Berlin, Germany. Photo Credit: bpk, Berlin, Staatliche Museen / Art Resource, NY. Page 21: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). The quarrel of Oberon and Titania, King and Queen of the Fairies, illustration, 1908, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616. Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Page 25: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939) Puck, illustration, 1908, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616. Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Page 27: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939) Elvin tailors under the roots of a tree, illustration, 1918, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616. Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Page 29: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). Titania Queen of the Fairies and Nick Bottom the weaver, transformed by Puck into a man with a donkey’s head, illustration, 1911, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616. Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Page 30-31: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). Titania and the fairies make flower garlands for the Indian changeling baby, illustration, 1911, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616. Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY. Page 32: Photo by Doug Plummer. Page 33: Photo by Doug Plummer. Page 35: Rackham, Arthur (1867-1939). Helena in the forest, illustration, 1908, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare, 1564-1616 Photo Credit: Kharbine-Tapabor / The Art Archive at Art Resource, NY Page 37: Photo by Doug Plummer.


60 College Avenue Annapolis, MD 21401 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-4599 www.stjohnscollege.edu

St. John's College Summer Classics Brochure 2013  

St. John's College Summer Classics Brochure 2013 for the Santa Fe and Annapolis campus'

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