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2017

SUMMER CLASSICS

p Way Out West

AT ST. JOHN’S COLLEGE IN SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO


july 2 – 7 THREE WEEKS OF July 9 – 14 SEMINARS July 16 – 21

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REGISTRATION

“Good books, good friends and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”

Register online: www.sjc.edu/summer-classics Register by e-mail: santafe.classics@sjc.edu Register by phone: 505-984-6105

Summer Classics Tuition

Tuition for Summer Classics is $1,280 per individual seminar. A seminar includes a morning series of classes or an afternoon series of classes in a given week. If you are a film or science aficionado, you might consider registering for a speciality series, which are known as Film at Summer Classics and The Science Institute.

~Mark Twain

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Teacher Tuition Assistance

St. John’s College offers tuition assistance to a limited number of full-time licensed teachers (K-12). With proof of current employment as an educator, participants will receive a 50-percent discount on tuition.

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what does the WEST mean to you?

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Destiny Beauty Violence Promise Thievery

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Spirituality Conquest Exploration Greed Power Individualism Machismo Wildness 3

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ENGAGE IN SUMMER CLASSICS AT ST. JOHN’S

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july 2 – 7 THREE WEEKS OF July 9 – 14 SEMINARS July 16 – 21

This summer, we invite you to engage in timeless literary, scientific, philosophical and artistic works in our Summer Classics program—which is comprised of weeklong seminars led by St. John’s renowned faculty members, whom this year’s Princeton Review rated as the second finest in the nation. If you’ve never attended Summer Classics, it is an opportunity for people from a variety of backgrounds to learn in an unrivalled intellectual environment that follows St. John’s lauded seminar approach, where two members of our faculty act as guides, not experts, to groups of 18 or

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fewer participants. Specilized knowledge of a work or topic is not required, but a passion for learning and deep engagement is.

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REGISTER AND LEARN MORE SJC.EDU/SUMMER-CLASSICS

WHAT WE WILL STUDY

From the literary canvas of Willa Cather to the cinematic landscape of Sam

engaging deeply with the likes of Socrates, Goethe, and Gogol. As in the

Peckinpah, the American West has played an outsized role in the American

past, attendees will also have the opportunity to purchase group rate tickets

story and psyche. It has also influenced peoples and cultures around the

to the Santa Fe Opera with transportation available to all.

world. At this year’s Summer Classics, we will engage with the idea,

Spend the week of your choice delving in depth into one or two seminar

promise, and mythology of the West—and will do so in the heart of the

topics. Take one seminar and spend your free time exploring the city and

West itself. Each week of seminars will include the choice of one book and

mountains of Santa Fe, or reading for the next day’s seminar on our beautiful

one film that explores the American West, while also including great works

campus. Or take two seminars and spend both your mornings and afternoons

from both Eastern and Western civilization.

in class. If you enroll in The Science Institute you will automatically be

Our location is fitting, as St. John’s is nestled in the rugged Sangre de Cristo

enrolled in morning and afternoon seminars. Regardless of how you

mountains of Santa Fe, New Mexico. From this perch, we will ponder the

schedule your time, your week at Summer Classics will be an intensive

meaning of works by Western authors, filmmakers, and thinkers, while also

intellectual retreat.

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A WEEK AT SUMMER CLASSICS

WEEKLY SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Registration Sunday, 2-4 p.m. Peterson Student Center

Open House Thursday, 4-5 p.m. Graduate Institute, Levan Hall

Opening Reception Sunday, 4-5:30 p.m. Peterson Student Center

Closing Lunch Friday, 12-1:30 p.m. Coffee Shop

Seminars Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-noon and 2-4 p.m. Classrooms

Opera Wednesday and Friday, 8:30 p.m. Santa Fe Opera House Details on page 7

Morning Mingle Monday and Thursday, 9-10 a.m. Schepps Garden Music on the Hill Wednesday July 12 and 19, 6-8 p.m. Athletic Field

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SANTA FE OPERA

WEEK I: July 2-7 Wednesday, July 5 Strauss, Die Fledermaus, 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 7 Donizetti, Lucia di Lammermoor, 8:30 p.m.

Orchestra section tickets are available to Summer Classics attendees at a reduced price. Purchase tickets when you register for your seminar online or by phone. Tickets are available until sold out.

WEEK II: July 9-14 Wednesday, July 12 Donizetti, Lucia di Lammermoor, 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 14 Strauss, Die Fledermaus, 8:30 p.m. WEEK III: July 16-21 Wednesday, July 19 Rimsky-Korsakov, The Golden Cockerel, 8:30 p.m. Friday, July 21 Donizetti, Lucia di Lammermoor, 8:30 p.m.

Van transportation is $10/person per opera. To attend pre-opera talks, you must arrange your own transportation

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SUMMER CLASSICS SEMINAR SCHEDULE

WEEK I: July 3–7 Morning Socrates’ Forebears: Two Presocratics Heraclitus and Parmenides EVA BRANN AND DAVID CARL William Faulkner’s Light in August JAMES CAREY AND FRANK PAGANO Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment CHESTER BURKE AND CAREY STICKNEY Willa Cather on Love, Happiness, and the American West CLAUDIA HAUER AND KRISHNAN VENKATESH The Upanishads PATRICIA GREER AND DAVID TOWNSEND Virgil’s The Aeneid WILLIAM BRAITHWAITE AND LIJUN GU

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Afternoon Tolstoy: Tales of Death and Life, Passion and Heroism LITZI ENGEL AND DAVID TOWNSEND FILM AT SUMMER CLASSICS The Western: The Cowboy and His Role in Shaping the American Vision Through Cinema “Formation of a Genre” DAVID CARL AND KRISHNAN VENKATESH Morning and Afternoon SCIENCE INSTITUTE Infinity in Mathematics from Zeno to Hilbert PHILIP LECUYER AND PETER PESIC

“These sayings, no matter how unimportant, were given oracular significance and pondered by those who


WEEK II: July 10–14 Morning Classical Western Novels EVA BRANN AND JANET DOUGHERTY Vladimir Voinovich’s The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Ivan Chonkin and Nikolai Gogol’s The Government Inspector SHERRY MARTIN AND MIKE PETERS Plato’s Symposium JUDITH ADAM AND WARREN WINIARSKI Elena Ferrante: The Neapolitan Novels, vol. 1 and 2., My Brilliant Friend and The Story of a New Name ERIC SALEM AND CAREY STICKNEY “If Not Now, When?” Three Essays by Dogen PATRICIA GREER AND KRISHNAN VENKATESH Goethe’s The Metamorphosis of Plants ROBERT ABBOTT AND SUSAN STICKNEY Afternoon Bach’s The St. Matthew Passion ANDY KINGSTON AND DAVID TOWNSEND

must one day go the same road.”

-Willa Cather, Death Comes for the Archbishop

FILM AT SUMMER CLASSICS The Western: The Cowboy and His Role in Shaping the American Vision Through Cinema “Expanding the Tradition” DAVID CARL AND LISE VAN BOXEL Morning and Afternoon SCIENCE INSTITUTE Alan M. Turing: Computation, Machines, and the Limits of Thought GRANT FRANKS AND ALAN ZEITLIN WEEK III: July 17–21 Morning Homer’s Odyssey EVA BRANN AND PATRICIA GREER Marcel Proust’s Finding Time Again VICTORIA MORA AND PETER PESIC Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Winter’s Tale NATALIE ELLIOT AND WALTER STERLING

An Introduction to Carl Jung’s Two Essays on Analytical Psychology JOHN CORNELL AND TOPI HEIKKERÖ Mark Twain: What is an American? MICHAEL BYBEE AND MICHAEL GRENKE Afternoon “In the Beginning”: Reading Genesis RON HAFLIDSON AND ZENA HITZ FILM AT SUMMER CLASSICS The Western: The Cowboy and His Role in Shaping the American Vision Through Cinema “The Last Stand” DAVID CARL AND DAVID MCDONALD Morning and Afternoon SCIENCE INSTITUTE In Defense of Flora: An Exploration of the Hidden World of Plants GREG SCHNEIDER AND LINDA WIENER

Jane Austin’s Persuasion RON HAFLIDSON AND KRISHNAN VENKATESH

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week 1 | JULY 3-7

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WEEK 1 | JULY 3-7 MORNING 10 A.M. TO NOON

Socrates’ Forebears: Two Presocratics, Heraclitus and Parmenides EVA BRANN AND DAVID CARL Heraclitus is the oldest philosopher of the West, and Parmenides, who is his junior by a little and his antagonist by a whole world, will be our authors. They establish the great themes and initiate the tradition of thinking by which we live: what Speech is, what Being is, what makes the world a Whole. Only fragments remain, but they are laden with significance. William Faulkner’s Light in August JAMES CARY AND FRANK PAGANO Light in August belongs with The Sound and the Fury and Absalom, Absalom!, the greatest of Faulkner’s novels. The work is a meditation on personal, social, racial and human identity. Joe Christmas has no personal identity largely because he lacks a racial identity. In the post-World War I South race grounds all social connections. Faulkner depicts Joe Christmas as the outsider in order to reveal the delusions of those who believe themselves to be insiders. The novel displays the problem of human identity in the dimensions of the Southern small town. Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment CHESTER BURKE AND CARY STICKNEY Crime and Punishment is not an ordinary “whodunit”. But it is full of mystery, and hard to put down. We know from the start who killed the old woman,

but the “who?” question broadens to include: “Who are we?” As one might expect, Dostoyevsky is not afraid to answer from a Christian perspective. The novel includes one of the great literary characters of the 19th century Raskolnikov and Dostoyevsky’s portraits of him, his love, and his relentless pursuer are unforgettable. Willa Cather on Love, Happiness, and the American West CLAUDIA HAUER AND KRISHNAN VENKATESH Willa Cather’s My Ántonia and Death Comes for the Archbishop explore Cather’s aesthetic fascination with landscape and place, particularly the unique topography of the American West. My Ántonia, written in 1918, is a rich meditation on immigrants in the American experience, as well as one of the greatest love stories in the English language. In her 1927 novel, Death Comes for the Archbishop, Cather moves past her concerns about WWI in order to immerse herself in exploring the way landscape reflects self. Both novels explore the way we appropriate wild landscape and engage in world-making that continuously reflects the importance of place. This seminar will have the unique opportunity to read Cather’s novels in Santa Fe, where she experienced her own artistic awakening, and the town in which her character, the Bishop Latour, builds his Cathedral with exquisite concern for the way humans create worlds crafted out of the unique materials of the wild environment. As Cather writes in My Ántonia, “That is happiness; to be dissolved into something complete and great. When it comes to one, it comes as naturally as sleep.” 11

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The Upanishads PATRICIA GREER AND DAVID TOWNSEND The Sanskrit word upanishad means “to sit down near”: what a student does to hear the esoteric instructions of a teacher. Composed from 600 to 200 BCE, they are the first texts in the Indic tradition to articulate concepts of karma, rebirth, renunciation, and enlightenment. They are poems; they are mysteries. I do not think that I know it well; But I know not that I do not know. Who of us knows that, he does know that; But he knows not, that he does not know. (Kena Upanishad) Schopenhauer said of his own volume of the Upanishads, “It has been the solace of my life; it will be the solace of my death.” We will closely read a selection of these profound philosophical and metaphysical texts. Virgil’s The Aeneid WILLIAM BRAITHWAITE AND LIJUN GU A Latin sequel to Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, The Aeneid is a poetic account of the founding of Rome and its Empire by Aeneas, a prince of Troy who with his father and son fled that city as it was being burned and pillaged by the Greeks at the conclusion of the Trojan War. Like Odysseus, Aeneas survives many trials during his long journey from Asia Minor to Italy. We will try to discern what Virgil is saying about the causes of Rome’s greatness, and thereby (though indirectly), the causes of its later decline.

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WEEK 1 | JULY 3-7 AFTERNOON 2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.

Tolstoy: Tales of Death and Life, Passion and Heroism LITZI ENGEL AND DAVID TOWNSEND In the shorter works that we will read —“The Death of Ivan Ilyich”, “The Kreutzer Sonata”, “Master and Man”, “Father Sergius”, and “Hadji Murat”— Tolstoy asks his perennial question, “What do men live by?” These luminous, searching stories look to the concrete details of the human world to show God’s presence and absence in our hearts and minds. FILM AT SUMMER CLASSICS The Western: The Cowboy and His Role in Shaping the American Vision Through Cinema “Formation of a Genre “ DAVID CARL AND KRISHNAN VENKATESH In our segment titled Formation of a Genre, we will study the early development of the American Western and the evolution of the figure of the cowboy from John Ford’s seminal Stagecoach (1939) starring John Wayne, to his portrayal of Wayne in his later masterpiece The Searchers (1954). We will see how the heroic figure of the cowboy collides with a range of societal norms, moving from the savior of his community, in Fred Zinnemann’s High Noon

(1952), to tormented outsider in Ford’s later work. We will look at challenges to the gender normative figure of the cowboy in Nicholas Ray’s Johnny Guitar (1954) and the portrayal of the female heroine in each of these films. We will study each of these films with an eye to their technical innovations and mastery as well as consider how the Western genre itself develops over a 27-year period. See page 31 for more information about Film at Summer Classics.

“Figure a man’s only good for one oath at a time; I took mine to the Confederate States of America.” -John Ford, The Searchers

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WEEK 1 | JULY 3-7 MORNING AND AFTERNOON 10 A.M. TO NOON AND 2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.

THE SCIENCE INSTITUTE Infinity in Mathematics from Zeno to Hilbert PHILIP LECUYER AND PETER PESIC The concept of infinity has haunted Western mathematics and philosophy since early Greek times. Through blackboard presentations by participants and discussions, we will explore some crucial texts and arguments: Zeno, Aristotle, and Euclid first presented the paradoxes of the infinite as well as its mathematical powers; Galileo reopened those paradoxes, which Georg Canto addressed with arguments so bold that they continue to divide mathematicians; L. E. J. Brouwer led the fight to remove the infinite from mathematics, but David Hilbert vowed that “no one will drive us from the paradise that Cantor created for us.� We will visit that paradise. See page 30 for more information about The Science Institute.

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Classical Western Novels EVA BRANN AND JANET DOUGHERTY These four Westerns of the twentieth century have all become classics of the genre. They are good reads but by no means light literature. Life and death, cowardice and courage, love and loss, will be our large themes illustrated by some memorable characters. We might also ask what distinguishes this genre. We will read Owen Wister’s The Virginian, Jack Schaefer’s Shane, Charles Portis’ True Grit, and Elmore Leonard’s Valdez is Coming. Serious fun. Vladimir Voinovich’s The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Ivan Chonkin and Nikola Gogol, The Government Inspector SHERRY MARTIN AND MIKE PETERS Voinovich’s satiric masterpiece (1969) ought to be better known. The seminar will follow the “adventures”—mostly misadventures—of the kind-hearted but dim-witted Private Chonkin and the bizarre characters he meets when he is sent to the small village of Krasnoye on the eve of World War II to guard a downed plane. Although sometimes compared to The Good Soldier Schwejk and Catch 22, the satire of this novel is less dark. It does, however, highlight, in often hilarious ways, the effect the Soviet system has on both officials and ordinary citizens.

week 2 | JULY 10-14

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WEEK 2 | JULY 10-14 MORNING 10 A.M. TO NOON

Plato’s Symposium JUDITH ADAM AND WARREN WINIARSKI One of the most poetic dialogues is Plato’s report of a “dress-up” dinner party, which begins with the dismayed observation that Eros, the god of love, has not been praised by poets of the past. The partygoers propose to remedy this omission by their several speeches. These speeches take the form of what looks like an ascent from the erotic effects of bodily beauty to what transpires in the souls of lovers, to what might be the true causes of that experience of love, and ultimately to the question of the nature of love itself. The ascent thus raises the question of the god himself. In reading the dialogue, you may keep in mind your own experience. Elena Ferrante: The Neapolitan Novels, vol. 1 and 2, My Brilliant Friend and The Story of a New Name ERIC SALEM AND CAREY STICKNEY The Neapolitan Novels of Ferrante are a beautiful example of the universality of the particular. The first begins with the disappearance of Lila, the narrator’s oldest and dearest friend, who grew up in the same building and in the same poverty-stricken neighborhood of Naples. Her disappearance seems almost expected. The narrator, perhaps more in anger than in sorrow, wrestles with questions of identity: who was her friend? And why was she who she was? The chronicle of their friendship and of their parallel but also divergent lives is a rich and subtle story, taking us from early childhood to Lila’s brilliant and disastrous marriage in Volume One, My Brilliant Friend, and to some of its many consequences in Volume Two, The Story of a New Name.

Voinovich’s spiritual ancestor is Gogol, whose drama The Government Inspector (1842) is both a comedy of mistaken identity and a satire of political corruption in Imperial Russia. The play’s cast of characters also allows us to laugh at human greed and idiocy. 15

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“If Not Now, When?” Three Essays by Dogen PATRICIA GREER AND KRISHNAN VENKATESH The greatest philosopher of Japan and of Buddhism, Dogen is also one of the world’s most brilliant writers. He is a fusion of poetic wit, wily logic, and stabbing insight‒but he is also a very dense, difficult writer who keeps his readers on their toes and constantly undermines complacency and easy answers. We will study three seminal works: in the “Instructions to the Tenzo (monastery cook),” Dogen finds the secret of living well in the preparation of food; in the dazzlingly imaginative “Painting of a Rice Cake,” he investigates the significance of studying for the spiritual seeker; and in the startling “Waters and Mountains Sutra,” he strives to understand what it is to think in a universe where everything is in flux.

[Spoken to Johnny Guitar, with a certain scornful bitterness] “A man can lie, steal... and even kill. But as long as he hangs on to his pride, he’s still a man. All a woman has to do is slip—once. And she’s a “tramp!” Must be a great comfort to you to be a man.”

Goethe’s The Metamorphosis of Plants ROBERT ABBOTT AND SUSAN STICKNEY Goethe describes the moment that eventually gave rise to his book in the following way: “It came to me in a flash that in the organ of the plant which we are accustomed to call the leaf lies the true Proteus who can hide or reveal himself in all vegetal forms.” To see such unity in diversity requires an imagination grounded in the observation of detail. In this seminar we will observe a variety of flowers— the plant form Goethe most often addresses in his book—by dissecting them and looking through lenses, as well as sketching and employing our imaginative faculty to see if we can see as Goethe did. Perhaps we will be able to say along with him: “I cannot tell you how readable the book of nature is becoming for me; my long efforts at deciphering, letter by letter, have helped me; now all of a sudden it is having its effect, and my quiet joy is inexpressible.”

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~ Nicholas Ray, Johnny Guitar (film)


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WEEK 2 | JULY 10-14 AFTERNOON 2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.

WEEK 2 | JULY 10-14 MORNING AND AFTERNOON 10 A.M. TO NOON AND 2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.

Bach’s The St. Matthew Passion ANDY KINGSTON AND DAVID TOWNSEND

THE SCIENCE INSTITUTE Alan M. Turing: Computation, Machines, and the Limits of Thought GRANT FRANKS AND ALAN ZEITLIN

Both the music and drama of this unsurpassed oratorical work will be examined carefully and analytically as we attempt to understand how the choruses, chorales, arias, and recitatives imprint the mind, heart, and spirit with pure wonder and awe. Bach’s masterpiece presents the human drama of the Passion, one that inspired Mendelssohn to champion it in the 19th century and renew its power and wonder for a universal and secular audience. FILM AT SUMMER CLASSICS The Western: The Cowboy and His Role in Shaping the American Vision Through Cinema “Expanding the Tradition” DAVID CARL AND LISE VAN BOXEL

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No technological change characterizes the modern landscape more than the ubiquitous presence of computers. No writing was more pivotal in the development of the modern computer than Alan M. Turing’s brief (36 page) paper from 1936 “On Computable Numbers.” With the help of extensive supplementary materials, we will read and demonstrate the propositions Turing develops concerning the universal computing machine (the “Turing Machine”) and the lurking issue in all computing, the “Decidability Problem,” the computer programmer’s analogue to Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem in formal logic. We will work through Turing’s paper and reflect upon its significance for computers and for the humans who use them. See page 30 for more information about The Science Institute.

In the segment titled Expanding the Tradition, we will look at how the Western movie develops from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, a period of radical change in American society, from the post-Korean era to the tumult of Vietnam. The Western movie, during this period, reflects changes in American culture and the shifting portrayal of the cowboy, from noble hero of the community (in Hawks and Ford) to solitary loner and mysterious stranger. As American society struggles with its sense of self-identity throughout the 60s, the line between lawman and criminal, hero and villain becomes increasingly blurry in the movies that try to reflect our national struggles.

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See page 31 for more information about Film at Summer Classics. 17

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WEEK 3 | JULY 17-21 MORNING 10 A.M. TO NOON

Homer’s Odyssey EVA BRANN AND PATRICIA GREER The Ancients thought that The Odyssey was the epic of Homer’s old age, probably because of its acute humanity. The poem might be entitled “Odysseus: His Own Poet” or “Odysseus: One Wife and Many Women” or “Odysseus: The Truth-telling Liar”. We will follow the epics’ events, real and imaginary, its characters, loveable and otherwise, and its plot, action-filled and intricate. Inexhaustible. Marcel Proust’s Finding Time Again VICTORIA MORA AND PETER PESIC The final volume of Marcel Proust’s In Search of Lost Time brings his monumental work to a profound conclusion with Finding Time Again. His themes of love, memory, and loss reverberate in the aftermath of the Great War; his characters are unforgettable; his writing is transcendent. This seminar is intended to complete our previous summer seminars with the last volume in this multi-volume series, and accordingly offers first choice to its participants; others are welcome, if space allows, but they are expected to have read the previous volumes on their own so that they could participate fully in discussions that will doubtless reach to those works.

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An Introduction to Carl Jung’s Two Essays on Analytical Psychology JOHN CORNELL AND TOPI HEIKKERÖ

A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Winter’s Tale form a natural pair. Aside from being seasonal counterpoints, the two reflect upon each other in a number of significant ways. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is an early play, set in Athens, and conforms to the structure of classical comedy. The Winter’s Tale, on the other hand, is a late play, set in Christian Europe, and its comic resolution is altered by Shakespeare’s innovations in the form. Together, they invite us to consider how Shakespeare understands comedy against the backdrop of the classical and Christian worlds, illustrate how his comic vision might evolve over the course of his career, and give us a glimpse into his philosophical understanding of comedy. We will read the plays in sequence, spending the first two days on A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and the last three days on The Winter’s Tale. We will consider each play on its own terms, and use the two together to develop a broader view of Shakespeare’s comic vision.

Two Essays on Analytical Psychology is widely considered the best place to begin a study of Jungian theory, for it treats the full range of Jung’s characteristic ideas — the Collective Unconscious, Archetypes, Anima and Animus, and the Mana Personality. Yet experienced students of Jung find themselves returning to this text too, because of its theoretical depth and synoptic understanding of the psyche. In addition, for all its theoretical seriousness, the Two Essays represent a practical course. Readers will draw inspiration here for their own work of individuation and of integration of the Unconscious with the Conscious Mind.

Jane Austen’s Persuasion RON HAFLIDSON AND KRISHNAN VENKATESH Published six months after her death, Persuasion was Jane Austen’s last completed novel and arguably her most mature work. Its heroine, Anne Elliot, first meets Captain Frederic Wentworth when she is 19, only to decide finally he is not the right match. Eight years later, circumstances align so that Elliot and Wentworth’s romance is given a second chance. This seemingly clichéd marriage-plot, in Austen’s hands, will offer seminar participants a singular opportunity to explore the nature of our humanity, which she never fails to illumine and tease.

week 3 | JULY 17-21

Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Winter’s Tale NATALIE ELLIOT AND WALTER STERLING

Mark Twain: What is an American? MICHAEL BYBEE AND MICHAEL GRENKE What distinguishes “real” Americans from wanna-be-Europeans who happen to live in North America? When American authors, and philosophers, and historians and attorneys stop aping European values and start thinking independently, what do they identify as characteristically American virtues? Can Mark Twain explain to us why the values that Europeans typically thought of as virtues are really mortal vices? This seminar will examine Mark Twain’s work Life on the Mississippi and Huckleberry Finn to tackle these questions.

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WEEK 3 | JULY 17-21 AFTERNOON 2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.

“In the Beginning”: Reading Genesis RON HAFLIDSON AND ZENA HITZ The stories of Genesis are known to us from such diverse sources as Broadway musicals, Hollywood blockbusters, and our various religious traditions. This seminar offers a rare opportunity to explore Genesis from beginning to end, chapter by chapter, without any unexamined doctrinal, historical, or scientific presuppositions. We will raise and discuss questions about the origins of life, the universe, the family, and human community, with an eye to what these stories teach us about our common humanity.

FILM AT SUMMER CLASSICS The Western: The Cowboy and His Role in Shaping the American Vision Through Cinema “The Last Stand” DAVID CARL AND DAVID MCDONALD In the segment titled “The Last Stand,” we will study the development of the cowboy movie during the last decades of the 20th century into the early years of the 21st century. As the Western movie genre keeps pace with changes in American culture, filmmaking itself changes, and the social and cultural themes of these movies reflect a range of social and ethical concerns through the development of new cinematic styles. From Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (featuring and with a soundtrack by Bob Dylan) to Tommy Lee Jones’ The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, the Western changes along with American society itself, and the cowboy remains a reflection of our own problematic sense of national and personal self-identity. See page 31 for more information about Film at Summer Classics.

“You are what your deep, driving desire is. As your desire is, so is your will is, so is your deed. As your deed is, so is your destiny.” -Anonymous, Upanishads

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WEEK 3 | JULY 17-21 MORNING AND AFTERNOON 10 A.M. TO NOON AND 2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.

THE SCIENCE INSTITUTE In Defense of Flora: An Exploration of the Hidden World of Plants GREG SCHNEIDER AND LINDA WIENER This class will combine reading and discussion of botanist Francis Halle’s book In Praise of Plants with fieldwork involving plant identification, observation, and a short research project. HallÊ devotes his work to dispelling our prejudices in favor of the animal kingdom, highlighting the uniqueness of plants, and teaching us how to look at the world from a plant perspective. A book that can change your whole view of nature, his topics range from the differences between plants and animals to more philosophical questions involving the ways plants manipulate animals and whether plants can be considered persons. Essential to these sessions will be our own investigations of the plant world around the college; one session each day will be held outdoors. See page 30 for more information about The Science Institute.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

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SANTA FE

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Santa Fe, the oldest state capital in the nation and its second-largest art market, is a vibrant city that consistently ranks as one of the best places to live in the United States. An amalgam of the three cultures present and celebrated in New Mexico — Native American, Hispanic, and Anglo — the city is a magnet for those engaged in creative arts, for intellectuals, and for lovers of outdoor recreation. July offers such events as Spanish Market, the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Arts and Crafts show, the International Folk Art Market, the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, and the world-renowned Santa Fe Opera. Additionally, Santa Fe’s best outdoor music happens right on campus Wednesday nights when the concert series Music on the Hill presents live jazz and world music in a family-friendly, relaxed atmosphere including gorgeous sunset views. St. John’s is located only three miles from Santa Fe’s historic downtown plaza and within walking distance

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of four major museums and the famous Canyon Road art galleries.

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REGISTRATION, FEES, POLICIES, AND ACCOMMODATIONS

Summer Classics Tuition for Summer Classics is $1,280 per individual seminar. Individual seminars meet once a day in either the morning or the afternoon. Tuition includes registration, books, other course materials, weekday lunches, special events, and library and gym access. A $250, non-refundable deposit for each seminar is required to hold your space and to receive seminar materials. Balances must be paid in full by June 1, 2017. Those registering after June 1 must pay in full at the time of registration. Discounts are available for multiple seminars and full-time licensed teachers (K-12). Science Institute Tuition for The Science Institute is $1,900 per week. Tuition includes a seminar in both the morning and afternoon, registration, books, other course materials, and weekday lunches. Discounts are available for multiple seminars and full-time licensed teachers (K-12). Multiple Seminar Discount Individuals registering for two seminars will receive a $100 discount on the total cost, and those registering for three or more seminars will receive a $250 discount.

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REGISTRATION Register ONLINE: sjc.edu/summer-classics Register by e-mail: santafe.classics@sjc.edu Register by phone: 505-984-6105

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Teacher Tuition Assistance St. John’s College offers tuition assistance to a limited number of full-time licensed teachers (K-12). With proof of current employment as an educator, participants will receive a 50-percent discount on tuition. Discounts will be available to the first 30 teacher registrants. No additional discounts are offered for multiple seminars. When applying online, please provide the name and address of your place of employment and contact information of someone who is authorized to verify your employment. For additional questions about this discount please contact: santafe.classics@sjc.edu. College Counselor Scholarships St. John’s College offers a limited number of college counselor scholarships to introduce St. John’s College to professionals who inform young people about college opportunities. The program offers counselors a personal experience with a St. John’s College seminar. College counselors are eligible to enroll in any seminar, including The Science Institute. College counselors interested in attending a Summer Classics week should not register online, but should contact Carolyn Kingston, Director of Community Events and Outreach at 505-984-6105 or santafe.classics@sjc. edu to learn more about the program and to request an application. Minors Participants under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian and must notify the Summer Classics office that he or she is a minor at the time of registration. Persons under the age of 18 may find our Summer Academy more appropriate for their participation. Please see page 33 for more details.

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Accommodations The college offers housing in a limited number of suites on campus. Accommodations are simple yet comfortable, with five single-occupancy bedrooms arranged around a shared living room. Suites share a double bathroom. Housing is located about a five-minute walk from the classrooms and dining area. Due to the cool summer evenings, our accommodations are not fitted with air conditioners. An ethernet port is provided in every room as well as a telephone for local or calling-card calls. Wireless service is available in most areas throughout campus. Cell phone service can be unreliable in some parts of campus. Room and Board Fees These include accommodations, linens, and meals from Sunday dinner through breakfast on Saturday. A linen exchange is offered to individuals staying more than one week. All rooms are single occupancy. Housing is available on a firstcome, first-served basis. If suite housing is no longer available, the college will be happy to place you on a wait list, or dormitory-style space may be available. Use of the college gymnasium is available during your stay. The college gymnasium offers exercise equipment, racquetball and basketball courts, showers, and locker rooms. Room and board fees are $525 per week per person. Payment for housing is due at the time of registration.

If you anticipate having any special needs during your stay on campus, please inform the Summer Classics office at the time of registration. Due to limited space on campus we cannot accommodate early arrivals or late departures. Room keys will be available at registration on Sunday. Checkout time is 10 a.m. on Saturday. Please make travel arrangements to accommodate this schedule.

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Cancellations Cancellations made prior to June 1, 2017, will receive a full refund minus the $250 non-refundable deposit; cancellations thereafter forfeit the full payment. If you need to cancel your registration, please contact: Summer Classics St. John’s College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca Santa Fe, NM 87505 E-mail: santafe.classics@sjc.edu. General Tourist Information Contact the Santa Fe Convention and Visitors Bureau at www.santafe.org or call 1-800-777-2489. Transportation to Santa Fe The closest major airport is in Albuquerque, a one-hour drive from Santa Fe. Travel reservations from the airport to Santa Fe may be made with an airport shuttle service or by visiting www.cabq.gov/airport. The Santa Fe airport also operates a limited number of commercial flights. Limited public transportation is available within Santa Fe by bus. For greater flexibility, a rental car is recommended.

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THE SCIENCE INSTITUTE

The Science Institute draws on St. John’s College’s tradition of teaching science through the discussion of original texts and hands-on experimentation. Each weeklong session is an intensive immersion in landmark topics and texts, with twice-daily seminars centered on discussion among participants. The Science Institute is open to those who want to delve more deeply into the questions raised by science and mathematics and requires only an acquaintance with high-school mathematics. July 2-7 Infinity in Mathematics from Zeno to Hilbert PHILIP LECUYER AND PETER PESIC

Three seminar offerings that run concurrently with Summer Classics. Two sessions daily 10 a.m. to noon | 2 to 4 p.m.

July 9-14 Alan M. Turing: Computation, Machines, and the Limits of Thought GRANT FRANKS AND ALAN ZEITLIN

July 16-21 In Defense of Flora: An Exploration of the Hidden World of Plants GREG SCHNEIDER AND LINDA WIENER

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Mr. Pesic, tutor emeritus and musician-in-residence, is the director of The Science Institute at St. John’s College, Santa Fe.

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FILM AT SUMMER CLASSICS

The Western: The Cowboy and His Role in Shaping the American Vision Through Cinema The goal of this class is two-fold: first, to learn to see and understand the art of cinema more deeply through a close study of some of the greatest examples of “The Western” movie by some of cinema’s most important directors; and second, to deepen our understanding of the art of cinema through the analysis of technical aspects of filmmaking, such as camera work, editing, mis-en-scene, visual effects, landscape, and narrative. We will also study the evolution of The Western as a uniquely American film genre and the figure of the cowboy and the changing ideas and ideals of heroism that attach to his character. We will consider how these films reflect aesthetic, social, and philosophical concerns such as the conflict between good and evil, the notion of social responsibility, and themes related to the questions of heroism, the use of violence, and moral conflict. Is the cowboy a uniquely “American” hero? If so, how does he or she differ from the figure of the hero in other examples of world literature? If not, what common themes of heroism emerge from our study of “The Western” as a film genre?

ONE THEME three seminars choose one or more JULY 2-7 Formation of a Genre David Carl and Krishnan Venkatesh JULY 9-14 Expanding the Tradition David Carl and Lise van Boxel JULY 16-21 The Last Stand David Carl and David McDonald

Participants may enroll in any one, two, or all three of the seminar weeks. Each week will be a self-contained, individualized curriculum, which, taken together, will offer a 65-year survey of the evolution of the Western over the course of the history of cinema itself, from the 1930s to the 21st century. Tuition for a film seminar is the same as other Summer Classics seminars. 31


X WANT AN EVEN DEEPER SUMMER EXPERIENCE? Enroll your teenagers in our Summer Academy while you’re in Summer Classics. Enroll yourself in our summer-long Graduate Institute.

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SUMMER ACADEMY

SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO June 25-July 1: Origins July 2-8: Life July 9-15: Self-Knowledge

A PRE-COLLEGE, RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AGES 15 TO 18

ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND July 16-22: Justice, Nature, and Law July 23-29: The Heart of the Matter

The Summer Academy at St. John’s College offers 15- to 18-year-olds the opportunity to experience the college through an immersive, weeklong course of study based on a specific theme. Students will delve into a diverse collection of primary texts and engage in stimulating discussions that highlight questions central to the human mind and spirit. With exciting classroom activities and numerous off-campus group excursions, the Summer Academy program provides opportunities to build friendships both in and out of the classroom. Summer Academy seminars are led by St. John’s College faculty and employ the college’s discussion-driven, collaborative method of learning. Participants are encouraged to express their opinions, to listen, to discuss openly what they do and don’t understand. Through this process, students’ minds are sharpened and their views on education are transformed. Tuition for each session is $1,100. Tuition includes room and board, books, activity fees, and transportation to and from the airport. Students may participate in multiple sessions and financial aid is available. For more information visit: sjc.edu/summer-academy or contact Anne Young at santafe.academy@sjc.edu, 800-331-5232.

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A PROFOUND SUMMER-LONG PROGRAM ENGAGE WITH THE GREAT BOOKS ALL SUMMER LONG BY ENROLLING IN OUR GRADUATE INSTITUTE. Enroll for four summers and acquire a Master of Arts degree.

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Graduate Institute

Many who have enjoyed Summer Classics choose to continue their St. John’s experience by completing the Master of Arts in Liberal Arts Program (MALA). In discussion-focused classes, students of the MALA dive deeper into Western literature, religion, philosophy, science, and history. Over the course of four semesters, the MALA provides the opportunity to explore enduring, fundamental questions through engaging discussion, careful reading, and thoughtful writing. Similar to Summer Classics, we read only original texts, and our classes are entirely devoted to deepening our understanding of these works — no lectures, no exams, just the earnest exploration of ideas and our own thinking about these ideas. In order to accommodate a wide range of students, a number of options provide flexibility: students may begin the program in the fall, spring, or summer semester, take the segments in a number of different sequences — such as four summer semesters — take time off between segments, and transfer between the Santa Fe and Annapolis campuses at the start of any segment. The Santa Fe campus also offers the Master of Arts in Eastern Classics. In this three semester program, students immerse themselves in the thought of India, China, and Japan while studying Classical Chinese or Sanskrit. The program introduces students to the breadth and richness of these traditions and how the conversation among them lends insight into the fundamental and enduring questions of humankind. For more information contact santafe.giadmissions@sjc.edu or 505-984-6083.

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“There was nothing but land: not a country at all, but the material out of which countries were made. I had the feeling that the world was left behind, that we had got over the edge of it, and were outside man’s jurisdiction.” -Willa Cather, My Antonia

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Photo Credits for Western Images COVER: Photographer: Robert A. Christensen Title: Landscape, Valencia County, New Mexico Date: 2008 Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number HP.2013.16.3 INSIDE COVER: Photographer: Dana B. Chase Title: Cowboys in camp, New Mexico Date: 1884 - 1892? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number 056992 PAGE 2: Photographer: T. Harmon Parkhurst Title: Monument Valley, Arizona Date: 1935? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number 055193 PAGE 4: Photographer: Patricia Galagan Title: Endurance Date: 2015 Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number HP.2016.08.14 PAGE 6: Photographer: Nancy Hunter Warren Title: Apache Teepee, New Mexico Date: 1975 - 1990? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number HP.2003.29.16 PAGE 7: Title: Cowboys branding cattle, Red River Ranch, Cimarron, New Mexico Date: 1915? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number LS.0143

PAGE 8: Photographer: Ben Wittick Title: “Marita the old Zuni woman accused of witch craft and tortured by the ‘Priests of the Bow’. Rescued by the mission people.” Date: 1897 Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number 015998 PAGE 9: Photographer: J.R. Riddle Title: Group of people posed on rock formations, New Mexico Date: 1886? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number 076058 PAGE 10: Photographer: Philip F. Metcalf Title: Fire Sentinel Date: 2015 Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number HP.2016.08.03 PAGE 12: Photographer: Ben Wittick Title: “Captain Jack Crawford, The Poet Scout” Date: 1880 - 1890? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number 015747 PAGE 14: Photographer: Dana B. Chase Title: Cowboys branding cattle, New Mexico Date: 1884 - 1892? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number 056989

PAGE 16: Photographer: T. Harmon Parkhurst Title: New Mexico landscape Date: 1940? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number HP.2009.54.1 PAGE 18: Photographer: Nancy Hunter Warren Title: Kiva interior, Pecos, New Mexico Date: 1973 Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number HP.2003.29.14 PAGE 20: Title: Clyde Tingely and actors pose during the filming of “The Texas Rangers” in Albuquerque, New Mexico Date: ca. 1936 Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number 128710 Notes: Caption reads, “Mayor Tingley made a habit of courting celebrities and movie stars. Here he got into the act with Jack Oakie, Fred MacMurray and Jean Parker, who were on location in Albuquerque.” He may have been governor of New Mexico at the time this photo was taken. PAGE 21: Photographer: Jesse Nusbaum Title: Cebollita Valley, Hodge Expedition, New Mexico Date: 1913? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number 139414 PAGE 22: Photographer: Dana B. Chase Title: Cowboys eating dinner, New Mexico Date: 1884 - 1892? Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA) Negative Number 056994


1160 Camino Cruz Blanca Santa Fe, NM 87505 sjc.edu

St John's Jollege 2017 Summer Classics brochure  

St. John's College 2017 Summer Classics Brochure from the Santa Fe campus

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