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UA&P

University of Asia and the Pacific

Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012


CONTENTS PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE INTRODUCTION

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ABOUT UA&P

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ABOUT THE REPORT 9 SUSTAINABILITY IN ACADEME: BLAZING A TRAIL Elevating the Academic Atmosphere

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Fortifying Man and His Society 37 Advancing Responsible Stewardship

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Fostering Environmental Consciousness

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ASSURANCE STATEMENTS FOR TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE

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ASSURANCE STATEMENT FOR ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE 66 EXTERNAL REVIEW COMMITTEE

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GRI CONTENT INDEX 72 ACADEMIC CONTENT INDEX

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GRI APPLICATION LEVEL CHECK STATEMENT

Photos by Erwin Canlas, Cecilia Forbes, and CCO Archive

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Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

President’s Message

It is my pleasure to present the first Sustainability Report of our University and, for that matter, of an educational institution in the Philippines. We have decided to embark on sustainability reporting because we believe it is a vital means for measuring how far we have gone in achieving our objectives as well as how prepared we are to meet the challenges of the future. To us, the sustainability report is not just one among many reports we produce annually but a unifying mechanism for our regular review processes. It provides a system for consolidating, integrating, and internationalizing all our reporting efforts. The GRI Guidelines has given us an integrating perspective that is aligned to one of our central hallmarks—people development. Its GRI framework—triple bottom line (TBL) reporting—captures an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational success, giving as much premium to social (people) and environmental (planet) aspects as to the economic profit. For an organization such as ours whose business is the formation of people, a commitment to TBL reporting reinforces and refines our commitment to coordinate the interests of stakeholders—students, faculty and staff, partners (which include parents and alumni), and the international Asia-Pacific community—rather than maximize shareholder profit. To make the Sustainability Report more reflective of the functions of an educational institution, we drew up another set of indicators that measure in a more extensive way the performance of an organization whose main concern is the integral development of individuals. We hope that this contribution of ours to the GRI Framework will help other educational institutions go much further in achieving their objectives.

JOSE MARIA G. MARIANO, PhD President

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Introduction

The University of Asia and the Pacific (UA&P) counts itself as one of the few educational institutions that pioneered, and continue to pioneer, the integration of corporate social responsibility (CSR) into its programs. As early as 2001, UA&P began to offer a three-unit CSR course, making it a mandatory subject for the students. This move even preceded the Commission on Higher Education-mandated integration of CSR in business courses. To strengthen our commitment to CSR, we have established the Center for Social Responsibility, which is now one of the hallmark centers of UA&P. The Center takes care of UA&P’s integrated development programs that enable people, particularly the poor and marginalized, to help themselves. Since 2007, the University has been playing an active role in shaping the global sustainability agenda through its elected seat in the Netherlands-based Global Reporting Initiative (GRI).

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It has also been assisting companies with innovative sustainability reporting solutions. To share its technical expertise, promote meaningful dialogue, and exchange ideas about sustainability reporting, it has organized a yearly Sustainability Conference that pools together leaders from all types of Philippine business. Through the years, we have strengthened our commitment and mechanism for transparency and accountability through various means, one of which is stakeholder engagement. We have formed a People Development Committee whose objective is to identify programs and projects that will best benefit employees. We also have a semiannual General Assembly where employees are updated on the operations of the University and how issues they previously brought up are being resolved. In 2011, the Management Committee made a decision to produce a sustainability report for the School Year 2011-2012, the first to be made by any academic institution in the country. According to the University President Jose Maria Mariano, it will help unify and enhance our regular review processes as well as embed a culture of evidence in the University. UA&P is set to blaze yet another trail in its pioneering efforts in sustainability as it comes out with this first ever sustainability report from a Philippine academic institution. This report will allow the University to have a deeper understanding of its current performance and how it can further improve its operations. It is also an important means of engaging with the different stakeholders. The GRI framework has been adopted for this purpose as it describes sustainability performance and addresses corporate social responsibility.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

About UA&P

The University of Asia and the Pacific (UA&P) is a private, not-for-profit institution of higher learning that puts due emphasis on the integral development of the human person and seeks to contribute to the integral human development of the peoples of the Asia-Pacific region. It traces its beginnings to the Center for Research and Communication (CRC), which was established more than 40 years ago as a private think-tank conducting research and offering graduate courses in economics and management. It gradually expanded its education activities and, in 1995, was granted university status by the Commission on Higher Education, the first such act of the then newly established commission. UA&P, located in Ortigas Center, Pasig City, Metro Manila, has a population of 1,750 undergraduate and graduate students. There are 137 full-time faculty members, 98 part-time faculty members, and 216 administrative staff. To date, the University has produced more than 6,600 alumni, including those who graduated from CRC. The University has one college, six schools, and one institute that offer academic degrees: • • • • • •

College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) Institute of Political Economy (IPE), under CAS governance School of Communication (SCM) School of Economics (SEC) School of Education and Human Development (SED) School of Management (SMN) School of Sciences and Engineering (SSE)

Three centers are mandated to promote the corresponding hallmarks of the University: • • •

Center for Student Affairs (CSA), for the values formation hallmark Center for Social Responsibility (CSR), for the people development hallmark Center for Research and Communication (CRC), for the research and communication hallmark

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

UA&PFI Board of Trustees

Placido L. Mapa, Jr., PhD Chairman

Javier J. Calero Vice Chairman

Jose Maria G. Mariano, PhD President

Bernardo M. Villegas, PhD Vice President

Judy Rosario G. Cam Treasurer

Arwin M. Vibar, PhD Secretary

Governance 4

The University of Asia and the Pacific is a project of the University of Asia and the Pacific Foundation, Inc. (UA&PFI) and is governed by its Board of Trustees (BOT). The BOT, which has 14 members, is composed of the Chairman, the Vice Chairman, the President, the Vice President, the Treasurer, and 10 Board members. The mandate of the Board is to manage the affairs, business, and property of the Foundation. Within the UA&PFI BOT, an Executive

Board of Trustees Members Paul A. Dumol, PhD Enrique P. Esteban, PhD Jose Rene C. Gayo, D.B.A. Marie Rose G. Marcella Antonio H. Ozaeta Ambassador Jose V. Romero, Jr., PhD Shirley M. Sanggalang Ireneo U. Tan Antonio N. Torralba, PhD

Committee decides on matters raised during the regular monthly meetings. This is composed of the Chairman, the Vice Chairman, the President, the Treasurer, and one more Board member.

incapacity, inability, or disability of the President, takes over and discharges all the duties of the latter as well as other duties as may be delegated to him by the President.

The Chairman of the Board convenes the Board of Trustees pursuant to the By-Laws of the UA&PFI. He presides over all meetings of the Board and the meetings of the members of the Foundation.

The Treasurer of the Foundation has custody of the funds and the securities of the Foundation, receives for the Foundation any and all contributions from persons and organizations in the Philippines and in other parts of the world, deposits the funds of the Foundation including contributions and securities in such banks or trust companies as may be designated by the Board, and performs all duties incident to the Office of Treasurer. The Treasurer also posts a bond in such sum and with such security as may be determined or fixed by the BOT.

The Vice Chairman of the Board assists the Chairman in the performance of his duties, and acts as Chairman in the latter’s absence. The President of the Foundation, who must be a member of the Board of Trustees, is the Chief Executive Officer of the Foundation and exercises general supervision and control of the corporation’s business affairs. The Vice President of the Foundation, in the absence, death,

The Secretary of the Foundation takes care of the records of the meetings, has custody of the corporate seal, notifies the trustees of their election, and under the


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail Figure 1. UA&P Organizational Chart board of trustees

university secretariat

cas/ipe opcom

College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) Lit His Arts Hum Eng P.E. Rel Fil APS Philo (Lib. (APL) Arts)

Institute of Political Economy (IPE)

sec opcom

smn opcom

scm opcom

Industrial Economics Program (IEP)

Master of Science in Management Program (MScM)

Integrated Marketing Communications

Strategic Business Economics Program (SBEP)

Center for Food and Agribusiness (CFA)

MA in Communication

Applied Business Economics Program (ABEP) Business Economics (BE) Office of Alumni Affairs (OAA)

management committee

Corporate Communications Office (CCO)

Development Office (DEV)

sse opcom

sed opcom

Engineering Information Science and Technology Mathematics Natural Sciences

MA Dev’t Educ MA Child Dev’t Educ

Center For Student Affairs (CSA) opcom

Center for Research and Communication (CRC)

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) opcom

Office of Student Affairs (OSA)

Educ Leadership Human Cap Dev’t

Entrepreneurial Management Program (EM) Continuing Management Education (CME)

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BSBA Program

Chaplaincy (CHP)

general direction of the President, prepares and presents the business to be acted upon at all meetings. The Management Committee (ManCom) is a collegial governing body of the University, directly under the BOT and the Executive Committee. Its prerogatives extend to the implementation of the strategic directions for the University set by the Board of Trustees. Presently, the ManCom is composed of the University President, the University Vice Presidents, and the University Secretary. The President coordinates the work of the other members of the ManCom and presides over the ManCom meetings.

Admissions Office (ADM)

University Library (LIB)

Office of the Registrar (REG)

Assets & Facilities Management (AFM)

Under the ManCom are the Operations Committees (OpComs), each of which is tasked with the governance of a particular school within the University. The members of an OpCom are the Dean of the college/school, the Vice Deans, and the college/ school Secretary. As indicated in the UA&PFI ByLaws, members of the Board shall not receive any stated salary for their services as Trustees. Senior managers and executives are covered by the salary structure of the University. The by-laws state that the members of the UA&PFI shall consist of the incorporators named in the

Financial Management & Reporting (FMR)

Human Resource Information Management and (HRM) Communication Technologies (ICT)

articles of incorporation and such other members as may be admitted only by a majority vote of all the members of the BOT. Admission to membership in the Board is made to prospective members only upon the invitation of the Board and after thorough screening of their qualifications.

Stakeholder Engagement The University has a wide range of stakeholders that include students, employees, alumni, parents, potential applicants, other higher education institutions, the local community, the local government, government agencies, professional organizations, media, and suppliers

Public and International Affairs (PIA)


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

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of goods. Engagement with them takes place through various media such as surveys, focus group discussions, and exit interviews with employees and students. The employees can course comments and recommendations to the ManCom through the People Development Committee, which is a consultative body in matters related to employees. They can also convey suggestions through the employee suggestion boxes or through their immediate supervisors. The University has also institutionalized a semiannual general assembly for employees where issues affecting employees are discussed and views are expressed. For this sustainability report, formal focus group discussions were organized with select stakeholders. Key topics and concerns that have been raised through stakeholder engagement underwent materiality testing and formed part of the performance indicators in this report. In general, we have established avenues for stakeholders to contribute to the improvement of the University. A climate survey was done in 2011 to identify the employees’ work-related concerns. A semiannual general assembly for employees was established so that those leading the University can give the employees updates on the situation of the University. This is also an opportunity for the employees to air out their concerns and ask questions to those in governance. The People Development Committee was also established to identify and provide recommendations to the employees’ concerns. UA&P News Page, the community newsletter of the University, is published fortnightly. We also make sure that students and parents get to interact and

converse with the University officials through get-togethers and informal sessions. Officials of financial institutions and of the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) are met whenever the need arises. For this specific report, the GRI Steering Committee, composed of key university officers, identified the University’s stakeholders and ranked them based on the GRI guidelines. The following were identified as the University’s stakeholders: teachers and administrative staff employed in the University, students, alumni, parents, financial institutions we transact with, suppliers, and

government institutions that regulate higher educational institutions, such as the CHED. We conducted focus group discussions with select stakeholders to identify the issues that are relevant to them. The key topics that were raised during the focus group discussions were the following: 1. Salary and benefits of employees 2. Issues on communication 3. Promotion 4. Ranking and promotion 5. Mentoring 6. Facilities 7. Quality of teachers, teaching, and research

Programs Offered Five-year Graduate Programs •

• • • • •

Master of Arts in Communication, major in Integrated Marketing Communications Master of Arts in Education, major in Child Development and Education Master of Arts in Humanities Master of Arts in Political Economy with Specialization in International Relations and Development Master of Science in Industrial Economics Master of Science in Management

Bachelor’s Programs • • • • • • •

• • • • •

Bachelor of Arts in Economics Bachelor of Arts in Humanities Bachelor of Arts in Integrated Marketing Communications Bachelor of Arts in Media and Entertainment Management Bachelor of Arts in Political Economy Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics Bachelor of Science in Business Administration major in Management Bachelor of Science in Child Development and Education Bachelor of Science in Entrepreneurial Management Bachelor of Science in Human Capital Development Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

Other Graduate Programs • • • •

Master in Applied Business Economics Master in Business Economics Master in Education, major in Child Development and Education Master in Education, major in Educational Leadership


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail The University’s governing bodies have been trying to address the concerns of the stakeholders by putting policies and programs in place. For example, concerns on communications were addressed by setting up the People Development Committee, publishing a newsletter and a magazine regularly, and putting up employee suggestion boxes, among others.

Hallmark Centers The University has three hallmark centers to correspond to its three hallmarks: Center for Student Affairs, for the hallmark of values education; Center for Social Responsibility, for the hallmark of people development; and Center for Research and Communication, for the hallmark research and communication.

Center for Student Affairs Formerly known as the Office of Student Affairs, the Center for Student Affairs (CSA) has recently been made a center to highlight its role as a guardian of one of UA&P’s hallmarks: Values Formation. Aside from the day-to-day services CSA provides, there is also a diverse selection of activities, development

programs, and volunteer projects for students who aim to optimize their college experience. These combine to address the various needs of students and provide an atmosphere conducive to personal learning and growth. In the same spirit, CSA also advocates responsible participation in student-initiated projects and organizations. CSA is composed of five desks that encompass every aspect of student life beyond academics – Student Services, Mentoring and Guidance, Kultura, Civics, and Sports Development.

Center for Social Responsibility The Center for Social Responsibility (CSR) is the social extension center of the University of Asia and the Pacific. It aims to maximize the synergy of the faculty, students, and partner institutions in uplifting the social and economic conditions of marginalized groups in society. This is borne out of the Christian doctrine that every person has the social obligation to reach out to those in need. The Center’s brand of “social responsibility” goes beyond common notions attributed to charity and stewardship that are commonly expressed by dole-outs. Rather, CSR prefers to view social responsibility along the lines of uplifting the dignity, productivity, and sustainability of people, companies, and communities.

CSR utilizes its professional expertise, resources, and entrepreneurial abilities in a process of synergy to create greater impact and sustainability. Throughout the years, the University through the Center has engaged in various, wide-ranging projects:

• •

• • • •

Corporate sustainability Assistance to local government units in obtaining financing Community development Strategic planning Character education Poverty alleviation

Center for Research and Communication The Center for Research and Communication (CRC) was established in August 2010 as a university hallmark center and a joint project of the CRC Foundation, Inc. and UA&P Foundation, Inc. CRC is a non-stock, nonprofit public policy research institution. It undertakes research with the purpose of making current issues understood by decision-makers in business, government, and civil society, who can translate progressive ideas into action. CRC also aims to help form responsible citizenry that can judge policies on the basis of their wisdom rather than populist appeal. It gives priority to areas of research that maximize the contribution to the common good of Philippine society of officials of government, business, and civil society, who will make use of the findings of research to design their respective policies and programs of action.

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Mission Statement of UA&P The University of Asia and the Pacific (UA&P) is an academic community where the pursuit and spread of truth are undertaken according to the highest intellectual and professional standards.  It shall always remain faithful to these foundational aims:

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To pursue, through world-class research, an interdisciplinary synthesis of humanistic, professional, scientific, and technical knowledge, inspired by a Christian view of man and sense of life;

To promote, in an atmosphere of freedom, the integral development of all the members of the University community so that they may work with good will, competence, and team spirit;

To form committed professionals and encourage them to serve with personal initiative and civic responsibility the community in which they work, thereby helping build just and harmonious social structures; and

To create and spread a culture that strengthens the dignity of the human person and the unity of the family, and that promotes understanding and cooperation among persons of all races, beliefs, and social conditions.

To achieve these aims, the UA&P shall •

seek to reach a level of excellence in its research and teaching programs that will earn for the University a place among the most prestigious academic institutions in the Asia-Pacific region;

adopt advanced research and teaching techniques so as to become a source of innovative forms of learning, as well as contribute to a better balance between the cost and quality of research, communication, and education;

adapt its teaching programs, founded upon basic research and the study of the humanities, to the actual needs of a society undergoing progressive change and of a wide region promoting international cooperation;

seek, while working closely with other Philippine institutions, wider regional and international recognition so that it can be present in intellectual fora and policy dialogues;

strengthen and broaden the avenues for cooperation so that it can effectively contribute to the spread of proper values and people development and obtain from various sectors of society the necessary support to carry out its extension work;

organize itself in a manner conducive to internal efficiency and effective coordination, while keeping enough flexibility, so as to enable all members of the university community to contribute freely and responsibly to the fulfillment of their common tasks; and

strive to attain, as a necessary condition for its autonomous development, a level of economic self-sufficiency that will allow the University to firmly establish itself as a center of academic excellence, to initiate new projects, and to admit well-qualified students from the underprivileged sectors of society.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

About the Report

This is the first ever sustainability report to be prepared by a Philippine university. The content of the report, which covers School Year 2011-2012, was put together by a steering committee under the leadership of the Vice President for Administrative Affairs. The committee is composed of key people in the University who can disclose information and management approaches behind the categories required by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) framework. The UA&P GRI Steering Committee, composed of key officers of the University, started the process of defining the report content and materiality assessment by identifying and ranking the various stakeholders of the institution. The committee identified the following as key stakeholders: teachers and administrative staff employed in the University, students, alumni, parents, financial institutions we transact with, suppliers, and government institutions that regulate higher educational institutions, such as the Commission on Higher Education. We deem these stakeholders crucial to the development of the University, and they are considered to be the beneficiaries of this sustainability report. After identifying the stakeholders of the institution, we selected individuals from each

sector and conducted focus group discussions with them to know from their perspective which items in the economic, environmental, and social aspects should be reported on by the University. The committee decided to add another category outside those in the GRI framework: Academic Performance, which is unique and highly relevant to the university setting. The steering committee crafted the subdisclosures on management approaches and identified the key performance index applicable to the University. The committee also included the performance indicators identified by the stakeholders’ consultation as relevant and should be addressed by the University. These performance indicators were subjected to materiality testing following the GRI standard. Given a highest possible score of 16, the committee decided that those key performance indicators (KPIs) with a score of 10 and above would be reported on. Out of the 53 KPIs for the GRI triple bottom line, only 33 were found relevant—23 of which are core indicators while 10 are noncore. For the academic KPIs, all 25 indicators were deemed relevant to the University. Queries regarding the report may be forwarded to Mr. Rolando Sison, Vice President for Administrative Affairs at rolando.sison@uap. asia.

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Sustainability in Academe: Blazing A Trail The University’s sustainability agenda is inspired by its commitment to contribute to the integral human development of the peoples of the AsiaPacific region. Our core business is educating individuals, and our approach to sustainability is therefore rooted in the human person. We believe that sustainability is not only about environmental protection, nor should it only be about economic viability or social development. It has other dimensions that are just as important, particularly in a setting such as a university and with a strategic direction that holds the human person as its driving force. 

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Since the core business of the University is education, its sustainability efforts are anchored on its academic goals and strategic directions. Hence, sustainability endeavors, whether economic, social, or environmental, need to support “the fullest development of everything that is human in the individual.” The University’s sustainability commitments are presented here according to academic, economic, social, and environmental perspectives. We reached the decision to include the academic perspective in addition to the triple bottom line because of the vital role of education in sustainability efforts that are aimed at upholding human dignity. We drew up a set of indicators based on the four major areas of operation that make up the academic life—curriculum, faculty, students, and alumni. Together, they form what we want to call the fourth bottom line: Academic Performance.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail The University seeks to be a university of choice imparting a seamless curriculum, handled by a prestigious faculty, preparing students for competence in life and at work, and with the alumni steeped in social responsibility. •

The university curriculum is founded on a liberal education perspective and a Christian outlook. The core curriculum serves as the University’s gateway to the specialization programs, which in turn are all intended to give the students a more thorough preparation for the exercise of the skills demanded by their professions. The faculty, who are the primary channel of the curriculum, aim to be mindful of their indispensable role in the life of the University, nurturing their personal integrity and professional prestige so that they may contribute more effectively to the integral development of their students and the rest of the academic community through classroom instruction, research, extension, and personalized dealings. The students, the raison d’être of the University, are seen to grow steadily in their pursuit of integral development and, thus, in their disposition to take full advantage of the curricular and co-curricular programs of the school, and even to help create development education initiatives. The alumni, who form the University’s showcase, manifest their appreciation of their experience in the University by committing and contributing time,

money, and effort in the pursuit of the University’s vision and mission statement and the continuity of its corporate aims and goals. The academic and administrative support staff assures the details of the teaching and learning environment in the University, thereby facilitating the full and

pleasant exercise of teaching and learning responsibilities. The goals above are attained through the core curriculum, specialized studies, co-curricular activities, the hidden curriculum, and, in general, campus life, transforming students into persons and professionals who are steadfast in the service of God and society.

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ELEVATING THE ACADEMIC ATMOSPHERE Given our core business of educating individuals and our approach of grounding our sustainability in the human person, the academic life of the University focuses on four major areas of operation: the curriculum, the faculty, the students, and the alumni.


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 Policy and goal-setting, as well as implementation, monitoring, and evaluation are carried out periodically and collegially in all levels of governance, from general assembly, to the faculty, to the department chairs and program directors, to the Operations Committee, to the Management Committee, and to the Board of Trustees. The following performance indicators—grouped into curriculum, faculty, students, and alumni—demonstrate that our educational programs, goals, and strategies are sustainable.

SEAMLESS CURRICULUM

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The course offerings, the program of studies, the course framework, and the course syllabi are founded on and anchored in the reality and development of the human person and his or her relationship with others, the material world, and God. Hence, the curriculum has the human person as its focus and as jumping board of its construction and implementation. In a concrete manner, the curriculum translates the vision and mission of the University. The university curriculum is characterized by a liberal education orientation and a Christian outlook and by a seamless unity across

courses in a given program and between the core and specialization curricula. Each subject is deliberately made coherent with the other subjects in the core curriculum and specialization curriculum. All programs are submitted to all stages of peer accreditation at the appropriate time to guarantee continuing monitoring of quality and upgrading. To ensure that the curriculum is seamless and integrated, we see to it that the following factors are clearly established: •

The specific contribution of each course to the corresponding program;

The specific contribution of each program to the University’s clientele;

The linkages between the core curriculum and the specialization curriculum; and

The delineation between the four- and the fiveyear programs.

Hence, standards, rubrics, and procedures for evaluation of learning in the different courses, including evaluation of research papers and theses, have to be institutionalized.

All these imply the review of the content of the course syllabi in all programs to ensure the attainment of program goals. This helps significantly in the attainment of Level III accreditation in four graduate programs and Level II accreditation in three other programs.

Undergraduate and Graduate Programs UA&P has two types of undergraduate programs: (a) one that serves as core curriculum for the straight master’s program in certain fields; and (b) one that stands alone as a full Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. These programs have an integral connection with graduate programs through the liberal education component and the smooth transition to graduate school founded on the principles of liberal education. The core curriculum subjects (liberal arts) prepare students competently for the specialization curriculum subjects in the graduate schools, particularly in critical thinking, effective discourse, and translating thought to programs and activities geared toward the common good. Differentiation in standards between undergraduate and graduate programs is seen quantitatively in the competency/passing mark in undergraduate programs (3.0 on a scale of 1 to 3.5) and graduate programs (2.5 on the same scale). The departments and graduate schools provide the qualitative meaning of 2.5 and 3.0 in terms of competencies specific to the disciplines.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail Table 1. UA&P Programs Accredited by PACUCOA Programs

Level

Liberal Arts Program

Level III

Master in Business Economics

Level II (3rd accreditation)

Master in Applied Business Economics

Level II (3rd accreditation)

Master of Science in Industrial Economics

Level II (3rd accreditation)

Master of Arts in Education

Level II (3rd accreditation)

Master of Arts in Communication Major in Integrated Marketing Communications

Level I (working for Level II)

Master of Arts in Political Economy with Specialization in International Relations and Development

Level I (working for Level II)

Master of Science in Management

Level I (working for Level II)

A number of programs have been accredited by the Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation (PACUCOA). PACUCOA is a private accrediting agency that gives formal recognition to an educational institution by attesting that its academic programs maintain excellent standards in its educational operations, in the context of its aims and objectives. All academic programs are expected to submit themselves to peer accreditation by PACUCOA through Level III status by School Year 2021-2022. The list of accredited programs is shown on the Table 1. Two other programs (AB Integrated Marketing Communications and AB Political Economy) will have their preliminary visit before the end of School Year 2012-2013. Students’ academic performance is evaluated through a reasoned judgment made by the subject faculty. The sole criterion for student evaluation—on a scale of

1, 2, 3, and 3.5—is acquisition of competencies. A set of rubrics— meaning of each mark, expressed in gradations of .25—has been in use for several years. As part of their academic requirements and as basis for performance evaluation, students are assigned papers on topics coherent with pedagogical expectations according to the students’ respective developmental stages. Students are also expected to undertake research work and hence to submit theses. They are

prepared through formal courses in research in both undergraduate (Communication Arts III) and graduate (Methods and Materials of Research) levels. In the graduate level, the course is mostly geared to thesis writing. The two preparatory approval stages for thesis writing are the topic presentation and the proposal defense (preferably with the same panel for both). The final thesis defense features the same panel as well to the extent possible. The universal criteria for thesis defense include content or substance, contribution to the understanding of the field, coherence among the parts of the thesis, and oral presentation. The different schools in the University translate these criteria according to the nature and demands of their respective programs. The thesis panel has three to five members, including the thesis adviser and an outsider knowledgeable in the theme.

Core Curriculum The number of units assigned to the core curriculum and the specialization studies has been rationally determined on the basis of (a) national policy

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 requirements, (b) dictates of the job market, and (c) the academic thrust of the University. The bulk of the core curriculum is usually completed in the first two years of four-year programs and the first three years of the straight master’s programs. This prepares the students for a seamless transition from core to specialization curriculum, with the core courses as a basis for critical and analytical thinking, application, effective and appropriate communication, and synthesis of faith and reason.

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The core curriculum is classified into three clusters—wisdom, professional skills, and citizenship subject clusters (the hallmarks of the College of Arts and Sciences, which is charged with the delivery of the core curriculum). The wisdom subject cluster includes Philosophy, History, Literature, Art, and Theology; the professional skills subject cluster has English, Mathematics, Science, and Physical Education;

Core curriculum AB and BS programs. From a high of 105 units (for AB programs) to a low of 75 units (for BS Industrial Engineering), depending on the specialization requirements. • Straight master’s program. A high of 120 units (MA Humanities) to a low of 117 for the other programs (MA Political Economy, MS Management, MS Industrial Economics, and MA Communication).

Specialization curriculum • AB programs. From a high of 63 units, including electives (AB Integrated Marketing Communications) to a low of 51 units (AB Humanities), the latter mainly due to the humanities-oriented content of the core curriculum. • BS programs. A high of 132 units (BS Industrial Engineering) to a low of 75 units (BS Human Capital Development). • Straight master’s program. A high of 105 units (MA Integrated Marketing Communications) to a low of 69 units (MA Humanities).

and the citizenship cluster consists of Filipino, Rizal, Asia-Pacific Studies, and Political Economy. While each subject is distinct from the rest and has its reason for being, one subject depends on the rest for a holistic appreciation of its own content. For instance, Art looks into its evolution in History and its expression in Literature. English, Filipino, and Math are tools for a deep understanding of the Humanities. For core curriculum courses, the sole criterion for competence determination is acquisition of targeted knowledge and skills. The evidence can be found in long tests, individual papers, and midterm and final examinations. Personal effort does not enter competence determination; rather, it is seen as a conditio sine qua non for genuine knowledge and skills acquisition. Hence, importance is given to individualized mentoring, where the mentor goes through the study patterns, habits, dispositions, lifestyle, and general academic and personal life of the students he or she is mentoring.

Specialization Curriculum Because the University seeks to offer courses not ordinarily offered elsewhere, we have pioneered in several course offerings. For instance, we offer Integrated Marketing Communications, not Communication; Development Education or Human Capital Development, not Education; Industrial Economics, not Economics; Entrepreneurial Management side by side with Management. The curriculum of specialization courses is crafted and updated by senior faculty handling the course, in close consultation with industry leaders. This has helped guarantee the continuing relevance of the basics and nuances of program content, based on industry and market movements. Apart from direct consultation to ensure continuing relevance is engaging the services of industry practitioners, including alumni entrenched in the industry, for


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail the faculty. In the Integrated Marketing Communications program, for example, a good number of faculty members teach part-time since they are industry practitioners, even executives. These two directions explain the high level of employability of UA&P graduates, whether those in the four-year programs or the straight master’s programs, with the graduates of the latter enjoying an initial advantage over the former.

Control and Accreditation The six straight master’s programs of UA&P have received their respective government

recognition. So do the existing AB programs (Humanities, Economics, Integrated Marketing Communications, and Political Economy) and BS programs (Information Technology, Entrepreneurial Management, Applied Mathematics, and Business Administration). Three BS programs and one AB program are under Government Permit (BS Industrial Engineering, BS Human Capital Development, and BS Child Development and Education; AB Media and Entertainment Management), a preliminary stage to full recognition. All academic programs are expected to have submitted

themselves to peer accreditation by PACUCOA through Level III status by School Year 2021-2022. There is likewise a scheduled rollout of academic programs aimed at the University’s attainment of institutional accreditation or autonomy from the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) by 2018. CHED is the governing body covering both public and private higher education institutions as well as degree-granting programs in all tertiary educational institutions in the Philippines. The target for autonomy has been made coherent with the strategic plan that spans 2010 to 2018.

Figure 2. Proposed Timeline of Accreditation Legend: Existing AB programs (Integrated Marketing Communications, Political Economy) whose Government Recognition was granted by CHED in School Year 2010-2011 Graduate programs (Political Economy, Communication, Management) whose Level I Accredited Status was granted by PACUCOA in March 2010 Graduate programs (Education) whose Level II 3rd Reaccreditation Status was granted by PACUCOA in School Year 20102011 Graduate programs (Industrial Economics, Business Economics, Applied Business Economics) whose Level II 3rd Reaccreditation Status was granted by PACUCOA in School Year 20102011

15


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 Table 2. Timeline of Government Recognition Application of Programs with Permit Program

Status

Expiration

Submission to CHED

BS Child Development and Education

Authorized to operate the 1st and 2nd year levels of the program, effective SY 2011-2012

March 2013

October 2012

BS Human Capital Development

Authorized to operate the 1st and 2nd year levels of the program, effective SY 2011-2012

March 2013

October 2012

BS Industrial Engineering

Authorized to operate the 1st and 2nd year levels of the program, effective SY 2011-2013

March 2013

October 2012

Internationalization

16

The University’s vision for internationalization consists of gaining a deeper understanding of Asia and the creation of niches in Southeast Asia in liberal education and specialization courses, the study of socio-economic issues, and the organization of educators’ forums on basic and higher education concerns. Our 2018 strategic plan goals include the following: •

• •

• •

A niche in liberal education and specialization courses, taking a good lead among other Southeast Asian universities; Think-tank status in Asian politics and socioeconomic issues; Presence of university officials and key faculty members in national and international forums attended by officials and faculty of other universities; Twinning arrangements; Deep understanding of educational partnership practices in Asia and elsewhere; and Teachers on sabbatical as visiting professors.

The University has had several memoranda of understanding

and agreement with European and Asia-Pacific universities. It has organized several conferences involving international academics on social issues affecting university education and social development in general. Most recent is an international research series on World Family Map Project, spearheaded by the University of Virginia, the Ridge Foundation, and six other universities in Europe and Latin America. The University has also signed partnership agreements with Korean and Chinese universities and other private entities on the teaching of English. Ambassadors of Asia-Pacific and Latin American countries have also been invited for exploratory talks on student and faculty exchange, research, and other development initiatives. A recent move is a national essay competition and a photo essay competition on Calidad Humana, with the embassies of Chile and Brazil, the University of Asia and the Pacific, and the University of Santo Tomas comprising the core team. In addition, the UA&P Tambuli Awards has taken what could be its first big step in becoming a truly global event. The Tambuli Awards, launched in 2005 by the UA&P School of Communication, is the first and only award-giving

body globally of its kind, where equal measure is given to both profitable integrated marketing communications campaigns and the simultaneous promotion of societal values. This year, over a hundred entries not only from the Philippines’ top advertising agencies and clients but also from Thailand, Vietnam, India, and Malaysia vied for the awards. The awards show was graced by international delegates, such as the ambassador of the Republic of Chile, His Excellency Roberto Mayorga; First Secretary of the Embassy of Spain, Antonio Garcia; and Third Secretary of the Embassy of Indonesia, Titik Nahilal Hamzzah. Another milestone to look forward to in the academic initiatives of the University is the Advanced Management Program (AMP) offering of the Southeast Asia Business Studies (SEABS) of UA&P. SEABS is envisioned to be a leading business school for understanding and mastering Southeast Asian business issues and opportunities. It will leverage the global experience of IESE Business School (the graduate business school of the University of Navarra, Spain) in case-based executive education and UA&P’s Center for Research and Communication’s track record in business-economics research. The AMP aims to take a


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail general but strategic focus on key business, industry, and global issues that will shape the future business landscape and thinking in Southeast Asia. The program is set to offer a multicultural mix of participants (with senior executives coming from other ASEAN-member countries), modular courses spread out across six months, multilocation delivery (Philippines, Indonesia, and Spain), and an international faculty (the combined roster of faculty from UA&P, IESE Business School, and affiliate schools in Asia).

courses be full-fledged graduates of appropriate master’s degrees, and 60% of the faculty of the specialization programs be in the graduate level with a doctorate degree. This would rationalize the laying out of a clear career path and development program for each faculty member. To enable teachers to carry out their workload efficiently and effectively, the management ensures the following: •

REPUTABLE FACULTY In accordance with university policy, faculty members are chosen from a select pool of candidates with at least a master’s degree if teaching in the undergraduate level, and preferably with a doctorate degree if teaching in the graduate level. From incorporation to separation or retirement, faculty members are given the opportunity to undergo internal and external means of personal and professional development in teaching, research, and extension. They are and shall be appropriately compensated and evaluated toward the further enhancement of their academic performance and initiatives. Interdisciplinary dialogue and faculty mentoring are encouraged among teachers, to enable them to discuss the dynamics and integral applications of the different disciplines and the University’s corporate culture, Christian orientation, and lifestyle. The goal of the University is that 100% of the faculty handling the core curriculum and undergraduate

New teachers are coached through observation and chat sessions at least once a quarter, and one- to three-year teachers at least once a semester; The compensation package is clearly delineated for the faculty in all stages and aspects of their professional engagement; and, A complete database on the University and college/school faculty is maintained as easy reference for policy and other decisions and other needs.

Classification Employees in the faculty track are classified as full-time or parttime. A full-time faculty member renders 44 hours per week of service, equivalent to at least 15 units in a regular semester. He or

she is not employed elsewhere, and after six months of teaching in the University, enjoys all the benefits due to a regular employee of the institution. On the other hand, a teacher who renders service for a minimum of three hours per week is classified as a part-time lecturer. The number of hours he or she renders varies on a semestral basis, and he or she may have professional involvement elsewhere.  Considering the impact of teachers on the lives of the students regardless of number of units taught, the same personal and professional qualifications should be demanded of both full-time and part-time teachers. They shall be subject to the same selection, hiring, salary movements (mutatis mutandis), and separation criteria, and shall be distinguished only by the time they dedicate to university work. Full-time instructors shall have an ordinary load of 30 teaching units a year, open to load reduction but only for mentoring, professorial research, work of governance and administration, or further studies, and subject further to Operations Committee (OpCom) approval. The teaching load of professors is capped at 18 units a year for them to be able to do research.

17


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 Lecturers and teaching associates Lecturers are industry practitioners and other experts who are invited to handle classes over a period of time or even a full term. They are distinct from part-timers, who are salaried on a per hour and semestral basis. Lecturers receive honoraria, which considers the total period of engagement but which may be paid out on a per hour basis. Teaching associates are young graduates with graduation honors, who demonstrate high potential toward teaching competence, but who have not completed a master’s degree. Working either part time or an equivalent of full time, they are required to complete their master’s degree within a stipulated period.

18

Those deemed qualified for incorporation as full-time faculty members are proposed following the standard process of approval and clearance. These teachers follow the policy on conversion to permanent status.

Movement from probation to permanence to tenure Conversion from probation to permanence is one of the more significant and delicate acts of the University. Such conversion

is a declaration of the teacher’s fitness for long-term engagement in the University and his or her contribution to its corporate development as a higher education enterprise. Hence, proposals toward permanence are based on a judgment of the teacher’s moral probity, doctrinal soundness with regard to the Catholic faith, professional competence in his or her field, and clear understanding and application to life of the culture of the University.

The responsibility for ensuring that only teachers who are fit for long-term engagement in the University are made permanent lies with the OpCom of the unit, with the Management Committee’s (ManCom) concurrence. ManCom receives and processes the teacher’s performance evaluation every semester on the first year and every year thereafter. The Human Resource Management (HRM) is responsible for maintaining a complete file of faculty members, including documents related to the decision of rendering a teacher permanent. For School Year 2011-2012, six faculty members were made permanent, 12 were given contract, and one was given tenure.

The country’s law provides a maximum period of three years of probation from date of employment as faculty member before being made permanent. In the University, full-time teachers are admitted on probationary status for a minimum period of six months to a maximum of three years.

Academic ranks

Permanent teachers are dismissed only for cause. Dismissal, however, should be extremely few and far between, on account of the prudence exercised in making a teacher permanent.

Faculty ranking in the University is a process of the faculty member growing in professional competence and maturity and in fullness of commitment to the ideals espoused by the University.

The contract of probationary teachers is on a semestral basis. The services of probationary teachers who do not perform competently are terminated after the contract term.

Ranking begins with the four stages of Instructor and proceeds to Assistant Professor. It eventually leads to tenure upon attainment of Associate Professor and Full Professor. Upon admission, a faculty member with no doctoral degree is classified under any of the four progression steps of the Instructor rank depending on how far the teacher is into his or her doctoral studies. • •

Instructor 1 – With no PhD units coursed Instructor 2 – With 50% of PhD coursework completed


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail • •

Instructor 3 – Comprehensive examination or equivalent passed Instructor 4 – Thesis proposal approved

Graduate studies of teachers correspond to the goals of the University. Hence, the University reserves the right to concur with the teachers’ envisioned graduate study and career path, as well as the choice of institutions of higher learning where teachers should pursue their master’s or doctorate studies. For School Year 20112012, six faculty members finished their MAs and PhD’s. A faculty member is expected to work towards the rank of at least Assistant Professor. Admitted faculty members with fully earned PhD’s do not immediately qualify for Assistant Professor rank. They start off with a special title, Visiting Fellow, which may be equivalent in pay but not in rank to Assistant Professor. If engaged full time in the University, they are subject to the norms of probation. Upon permanence, the faculty member is given the rank

of Assistant Professor, subject to previously mentioned conditions. Professor Djun Kil Kim, a specialist in Korean Studies, was a Visiting Fellow in 2011. He became professorial and research chair of the UA&P Samsung Korean Studies Program, a pilot project of the UA&P Department of Asia Pacific Studies and the Samsung Group that aims to provide more in-depth studies on Korean culture and history. He is currently a lecturer under the Asia Pacific Studies of the College of Arts and Sciences.

work virtues, and character. For School Year 2011-2012, two faculty members were promoted to Associate Professor.

Faculty members teaching in a graduate school are expected to work toward tenure, that is, the rank of Associate Professor. With tenure, they are no longer subject to periodic evaluation. Ranking and teacher evaluation always go together. Rank promotion is based on good teacher performance as reflected by evaluation ratings. Teacher performance is always holistic, that is, with the rating reflective of the totality of the teacher’s professional competence, disposition, attitude, moral probity, doctrinal soundness,

From among Associate Professors and Full Professors, University Fellows are designated by the Board. They are tasked to give recommendations on specified academic questions (e.g., designation of Associate Professors, setting of university standards for graduate thesis, and setting the directions of the University’s research). UA&P has seven University Fellows: Dr. Jesus Estanislao and Dr. Bernardo Villegas, economists and founders of the University; Fr. Joseph de Torre, social and political philosopher and Professor Emeritus of the University; Dr. Paul Dumol, historian and university trustee; Dr. Antonio Torralba, educator and university trustee; Dr. Jose Maria Mariano, university president; and Dr. Emilio Antonio, Jr., economist. The University values its faculty and aims to make each one a partner in institution building. Hence, our care for our teachers

Table 3. Faculty Distributed According to Rank Second Semester, School Year 2011-2012 Full Professor

Associate Professor

Assistant Professor

Instructor

Assistant Instructor

Lecturer

Total by School

CAS

0

3

16

35

7

23

84

CRC

1

1

0

0

0

0

2

CSR

0

0

0

4

0

1

5

IPE

0

0

0

7

0

3

10

SCM

0

1

4

1

0

10

16

SEC

0

2

4

7

0

2

15

SED

0

0

6

2

0

5

13

SMN

0

2

3

10

0

49

64

SSE

0

1

7

13

0

5

26

Total

1

10

40

79

7

98

235

19


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 is a matter of deliberate attention, even beyond retirement.

Appointments Teachers receive their appointments as faculty members from the University, as proposed by the department chairs through the OpCom and concurred by the ManCom. Special appointments are made for governance or administrative work. The University makes appointments for governance positions for ManCom or OpCom work, and for administrative positions for department chairs, program directors, or unit heads.

20

Governance or administration office is seen as crucial to the attainment of the vision and goals of the University. This, however, is without prejudice to the main responsibility of the faculty member, which is to carry out teaching, mentoring, and research work. Ordinarily, the term of office for governance or administrative positions is three years, with the possibility for re-appointment for an additional term.

Determining and Managing Teaching and Mentoring Load Teacher workload determination and distribution

inclusive of mentoring, in a school year of three terms (i.e., two semesters and the summer after), or a usual load of 15 teaching units a semester. In order to suit the teacher’s development needs, teaching units may be distributed in any manner across the three terms.

Reckoning research and other workload Research comprises the teachers’ ordinary workload that requires independent time. Hence, teaching units may be reduced for this work. Where applicable, studies towards PhD replaces research as ordinary workload; hence, teaching units may likewise be reduced for this workload. Administrative work (i.e., department leadership, program directorship) also requires independent time and shall thereby yield to reduction of teaching units.

Teaching, mentoring, and research are the faculty members’ major workload in the University. Teaching units are assigned to each faculty member.

Governance work (i.e., OpCom membership) subjects the faculty members to a different workload, which is reckoning framework, but is accompanied by a strong encouragement to teach.

The teacher’s workload is ordinarily made up of 30 teaching units,

Thesis advising and other equivalent work in some graduate

schools are deemed part of teaching and are considered as teaching units. The OpCom unit may give special assignments requiring independent time (e.g., material crafting, developing a course) to select faculty members. Teaching units may be reduced for the purpose but with the duration of the assignment duly specified. Reduction of teaching units for assignments is done sparingly.

Research The first mission statement of the University is to pursue, through world-class research, an interdisciplinary synthesis of humanistic, professional, scientific, and technical knowledge, inspired by a Christian view of man and a sense of life. Because of its roots in the Center for Research and Communication, UA&P has a competitive edge in the Philippines to be a leading research-intensive university. Faculty members, especially those with professorial rank, are expected to carry out research work not only for their professional development in their field of specialization but also for the research buildup in the areas of interest to the


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail University: poverty alleviation, Asia Pacific studies, education, fashion, media, advertising, family, ecology, work and society, and citizenship. Research, whether personal or institutional, shall seek publication, albeit in various modes. Research and publication are deemed complementary: one cannot exist independently of the other.

Extension The University wishes to give due stress to cultivating a sense of social responsibility among its students, faculty members, and administrative staff.

manner of the implementation of such programs.

hallmark centers. The venue for social outreach is usually, but not always, the adopted community of the University, which is Brgy. San Joaquin, Pasig City.

Compensation

Outreach programs are best highlighted by researches and publications; partnerships with local or foreign businesses, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), or government units; or collaborations with other colleges and universities.

Faculty compensation is based on threshold income levels in accordance with one’s professional stature, which would enable the faculty member to raise a family in decent comfort and provide oneself with the means for continuing personal and professional development.

It is desired that social outreach programs be founded on appropriate research studies, which will then drive the direction and

The policy and praxis on each of these compensation items are described in an administrative handbook.

Faculty members may give time to social outreach but through their field of specialization and professional interest and not at the expense of their more direct responsibilities of teaching, mentoring, and research.

21

The University does extension in any of three modes: •

By providing direct development education interventions for disadvantaged students, teachers, parents, and communities. By putting people together for participative, bottomto-top, multi-stakeholder, and systemic social development initiatives. By inculcating social responsibility among the faculty and students through curricular and co-curricular channels.

Teachers carry out social outreach interventions either personally or on their own initiative, through the unit where they belong, or through involvement in projects of the three

Table 4. Faculty Involvement in Research School Year 2011-2012 Research activities

CAS

SCM

SEC

SED

SMN

SSE

IPE

Number of faculty who presented a paper in a conference

16

1

1

-

2

2

-

Number of faculty with publications

8

1

7

2

5

-

2

Number of faculty who finished a dissertation

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

Number of faculty with ongoing research projects

-

3

-

-

5

-

-

25

5

8

2

12

2

2

Total


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 Development The members of the faculty implement the curriculum and enrich the lifestyle of the University. Their personal and professional development is the crux of the University’s sustainability. They are the main implementers of the curriculum; thus, they are the major agents of the University’s vision and mission. The policies and goals regarding formation and development flow from the beliefs contained in the University Credo: •

22

Education is a lifelong process, and its focal point is and should always be the individual person; The primary purpose of education is the integral formation of the human person, the fullest development of everything that is human in the individual.

They are also driven by the following commitments from the University Credo: •

The highest standards of professional excellence in our academic, scientific, and cultural endeavors; The inculcation of sound and time-tested human and social values and attitudes in people, beginning with those we work and live with and reaching out especially to those in most need of help in society; The creation within the University of an atmosphere of academic serenity conducive not only to disciplined and diligent study, high-level research, and the responsible use of the freedom of scientific inquiry,

but also to mutual respect, openness, understanding, and friendship, without discrimination of any kind. Faculty formation and development is the one single assurance of the University’s attaining its 2018 vision and terminal goals. The faculty is the University’s most direct link to the students and the rest of the academic community. The teachers’ continuing personal formation and professional development becomes a lynchpin of all the institution’s effort towards becoming a sterling University, with a strong liberal education foundation and specialization competencies, a Christian identity, and a clear notion of its role in the AsiaPacific region. Hence, faculty formation and development has to be a constant concern among faculty and the management, as translated into policy and day-to-day operations. The University has a roster of personal and collective channels of faculty formation

and development, as well as the ambience of family life, culture, and serious professional work that teachers imbibe. This is collectively called the Integral Development Program (IDP). The variety of the channels includes orientations, philosophy classes, training programs, meditations, seminars, and doctrine classes. These activities provide the teachers with different opportunities for formation and development with naturalness and real concern for their work and stay in the University. Please refer to the Training and Education aspect of Social Performance (Fortifying Man and His Society) on page 41 for a more comprehensive discussion of the Integral Development Program of the University.

Evaluation Faculty evaluation is seen as a channel for the professional development of the teacher and a basis for performance bonus or upward salary movements. Salary promotion within specific ranks shall be based solely on


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail performance and not on years in service.

while teachers who are permanent are evaluated every year.

The OpCom of the school is ultimately and collegially responsible for the evaluation of their respective faculty, while the immediate superior (i.e., department chair, institute director, or program director) is immediately and directly responsible for it.

In principle, permanent teachers are no longer coached but are perforce still evaluated. There is effort for evaluation to be carried out by a tandem or triad of permanent teachers.

The immediate superior bases his or her faculty evaluation on (a) his or her own experience with the teacher, (b) class observation, and (c) the unstructured or structured feedback received from fellow teachers and the students. Ordinarily, students are not directly involved in evaluating individual teachers. The students’ level of maturity, among other factors, might hinder an objective assessment of the faculty member. Students, however, are free to give feedback to the program director or any other person in program administration or governance. Teachers in their first three years of teaching are rated every semester,

The chief key result areas of the teacher, against which he or she is evaluated, are teaching and research. Other key result areas that can contribute favorably or adversely to the teacher’s evaluation where applicable are extension, graduate studies, faculty development, job assignment, and professional deportment. Whatever evaluation form is used, the teacher shall have the right to see it, acknowledge having seen it, and comment on it if he would want to. The teacher may indicate his objection, if any. At bottom line, the teacher sees faculty evaluation and everything that goes with it as integral parts of his personal and professional development, not as an eagle eye on the lookout for mistakes.

academic deportment of his or her students, subject only to the norms of justice and fair play. Security of employment. Upon permanence, he or she has the right to security of employment and may be removed only for just cause and after observance of due process in the context of a higher education enterprise. Conducive place of work. He or she has the right to a workplace that enables him or her to carry out his or her duties with serenity and effectiveness. Professional care and attention. He or she has the right to expect personal care and attention from the University especially as regards his or her professional development needs, including the periodic evaluation of his or her performance. Guidance. He or she has to the right to guidance in his personal and professional development using the channels provided by the University.

Management of Faculty Retention and Promotion

On the other hand, each member of the faculty carries these grave responsibilities:

Rights and responsibilities

The UA&P teacher is a professional with the following rights: •

Recognition of moral authority. He or she holds legitimate moral authority on the students and among his or her peers that no one may undermine. Recognition of academic authority. He or she has the right to pass judgment on the

Truth in teaching. To endow his or her students with relevant, appropriate, and truthful subject content in accordance with stated course objectives, and consequently, to use only properly assessed materials in teaching. Recognition of academic freedom. To understand and uphold the academic freedom of the University by ensuring the consistency of his or her subject content with the principles upheld by the

23


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

24 •

University and the subject’s distinct role in the core curriculum. Appropriate pedagogy. To make sure that the methods and approaches used correspond to the nature of the subject and the status, needs, capabilities, and particular circumstances of the students. Fairness in student evaluation. To be objective, consistent, coherent, and transparent in observing evaluation standards and implementing evaluation tools. Personal integrity. To uphold his or her personal integrity, preserve his or her moral reputation in and outside the academic community, and enrich his or her professional competence through continuing education, research and publication, and extension. Delicacy in dealings with others. To exercise prudence, respect, refinement, and delicacy in his or her personal and professional dealings with students, colleagues, administrative staff, and superiors. Judicious use of materials. To make judicious use of University material and financial resources in order to derive optimum benefit from them for the members of the academic community. Prudence in handling information. To observe prudence and silence of office in the handling of information affecting the reputation of the members of the academic community and the University itself. Unity with the university. To uphold and defend the

University’s goals, thrusts, policies, standards, and those who represent them, in the interest of solidarity. Openness to guidance. To use the channels provided by the University in ensuring coherence between his or her work, performance, and deportment on one hand, and the ideals of the University on the other. Guidance and mentoring. Within his or her areas of responsibility and authority, to provide appropriate mentoring and guidance to peers and students.

Separation of teachers One of the University’s primary goals is to keep the good teachers and to separate those who “habitually” fail to contribute satisfactorily to the attainment of the vision of the University, despite the regular formative and corrective means available to them. Separation can take place in two ways: (a) by simply not renewing the contract on the part of parttime or probationary faculty, or (b) by a due process of termination in the case of permanent teachers. Acting on the principle that prevention is better than cure,

the OpCom applies a schedule of gradated measures to avoid to the extent possible the ultimate sanction of separation.

Renewal of contract, separation, and promotion The contract of full-time faculty members on probation is renewed yearly; that of part-time faculty members, lecturers, and teaching associates, every semester. They may leave the University at the end of their contract period through simple non-renewal of contract. For School Year 2011-2012, four faculty members chose not to renew their contract. Separation of part-time faculty members or contract teachers not in the faculty is based primarily on non-correspondence with the vision, mission statement, or principles of the university, either in teaching or personal and professional deportment. Retention is premised on good contribution to the attainment of university goals through teaching and personal and professional deportment. Full-time faculty members who have been made permanent enjoy a standing contract but are nevertheless not tenured. They can be separated on grounds enumerated in the faculty handbook and Code of Conduct.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail As a general principle, good teachers are retained and promoted according to existing norms of the University. Sterling teachers are acknowledged or rewarded through a performance bonus, research grants and rewards, support for continuing faculty development, and ultimately, through promotion to tenured positions (Associate Professor and Professor).

COMPETENT STUDENTS The students are the University’s reason for being; hence, they are the main subject and object of our human development thrust and efforts. In broad brushstrokes, the University shapes the minds and hearts of the students the service of others. It enables the latter to be effective agents of their own development and that of their immediate and mediate milieus. In particular, the University crafts the curriculum (its substance and approaches) and prompts its implementors (the faculty) to bring about the self-education of the students towards service to God and society.

are provided to help the students in all aspects of the student value chain. Key to integral formation would be individual mentoring by designated faculty members and administrative staff.

Parameters of University Life The life of the student in the University spans one’s entry up to exit and onto one’s professional life. A student’s engagement in the University presumes selection, personalized education, personal and professional preparation, and continuing education. Hence, the University crafts an implementable student selection and admission procedure, including all the nuances involved in processing special cases. Upon admission, the most crucial initial stage would be to designate a definitive mentor to all students in the undergraduate and graduate programs, aiming to attain at least a 70% level of realized frequency of mentoring chats.

They are given academic workload that would enable them to take full advantage of their stay in the University. Other formative means, such as co-curricular activities, are also at their disposal.

Quality of teaching and learning is premised on clear and coherent syllabi, which clearly establish content, teaching methodology, and criteria for evaluation. It is also important for all teachers handling the same course to abide by the same syllabi. This, with good teaching and a well-established program of academic support to students concerned, has reduced attrition significantly over the past two to three years, and even increased the number of students in the dean’s list by 10% for the period from the current average.

Opportunities for integral formation, individual and collective, and always exercised in the spirit of responsible freedom,

For the effective delivery of student services (i.e., chaplaincy, guidance, library, accounting, enlistment, and registration) and to create a good

Preparedness Student applicants are admitted on the basis of adequate preparedness for good scholastic performance in college.

learning atmosphere, a review of performance evaluation standards and improvement targets is carried out.

Purpose The policy and goals that govern student recruitment and enrolment arise from the University’s principles, contained in the Credo, that the primary purpose of education is the integral formation of the human person, the fullest development of everything that is human in the individual. We are true to our commitment to practice the highest standards of professional excellence in our academic, scientific, and cultural endeavors and to inculcate sound and time-tested human and social values and attitudes in people. We seek to create within the University an atmosphere of academic serenity conducive not only to disciplined and diligent study, high-level research, and responsible use of the freedom of scientific inquiry, but also to mutual respect, openness, understanding, and friendship, without discrimination of any kind.

25


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 Admission and Enrollment The Director of Admissions heads an office that services student admissions–from attracting applicants onto application and providing scholarship grants to giving the students personalized attention all the way to enrollment. Admitted in the University are graduates of Department of Education-accredited high schools, Filipinos who graduated from secondary schools abroad, and foreign or international students who are graduating or have graduated from any high school abroad. They must pass the College Entrance Exams (CEE) to qualify for admission to the University. Procedures and admission requirements are downloadable from www.uap.asia/admissions.

26

During enrollment, freshmen are pre-enlisted by the Registrar’s Office. Upper-level students preenlist/enroll the subjects offered in accordance with the approved curriculum of their program. The University honors online payment from students who do not opt to avail themselves of the oncampus registration and payment. Procedures for online enlistment and on-campus enrollment are accessible on the website at http:// enlistment.uap.asia. Statistical trends provide a basis for redirecting the admissions strategy. However, there could still be more researches done to enrich marketing efforts to promote UA&P programs. The criteria for evaluating admission include attrition rate, number of students graduated, record of graduates, and grade distribution of students. Entry and exit interviews enrich statistical data.

Table 5. Student Enrollees in Undergraduate Programs Second Semester, School Year 2011-2012  Second Semester

CAS

*TELUS AB Programs BS Programs

Total

 

I-III

I-IV

I-IV

I-IV

Male

205

13

53

344

615

Female

331

17

88

340

776

Totals

536

30

141

684

1391

* TELUS International Philippines is part of TELUS Corporation, a telecommunications service provider in Canada. UA&P is one of TELUS International’s educational partners under the TELUS International University (TIU) project, which aims to provide university education to the business outsourcing firm’s employees at subsidized costs. UA&P began its partnership with the company in 2010.

Table 6. Student Enrollees in Graduate Programs (Five-Year Programs) Second Semester, School Year 2011-2012  

CAS Hum

SCM

SEC

SED

IEP

CDE

MADE

SMN

SSE

IPE

Total

Male

10

26

19

1

3

50

0

23

132

Female

12

44

22

32

8

47

0

26

186

Totals

22

70

41

33

11

97

0

49

318

The table below shows the enrollment trend from 2008 to 2012. The freshman intake for School Year 2011-2012 increased by more than 6%.

Figure 3. First Semester Enrollment Trend Total Enrollees ( AB/BS, MA/MS, and Graduate Program)


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail Key statistics of admission are presented to and analyzed with the Operations Committee (OpCom), the Management Committee (ManCom), and even the Board of Trustees, yielding redirections in subsequent marketing and campaign work. The main lesson behind the figures is a more strategic and closely-knit marketing plan and a continued, more deliberate, use of marketing instruments. After admission, the next challenge is student retention until the completion of their respective academic programs. Generally, 50 to 70% of freshman intake reach fourth year, while 30 to 40% complete the straight master’s program.

Load and Instruction Program of studies The 75 to 120-unit requirement of the core curriculum goes beyond the prescriptions of the Commission on Higher Education. The subjects expose and hone the students to research work and paper-writing from the start. The logic of the subject sequence is borne by pedagogy and psychology, as well as the special contribution of the subject to liberal education. Everyone is expected to go through all the subjects of the core curriculum, which are deemed essential to the formation of well-rounded, liberally educated students. The responsibility for the development of the core curriculum belongs to the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), while that of specialization studies belongs to the corresponding graduate schools. Curriculum review is held every five to eight

years, allowing three to five classes to course through the current prescribed curriculum. Every subject in the core curriculum and specialization studies can trace its rationale to to the Credo and Mission of the University.

Co-curricular activities Co-curricular participation is high, especially in sports and arts. By limiting the academic load of the students to 21 units per semester, we aspire to an even higher participation of students in cocurricular activities. There is no university policy on academic qualifications for continued participation in cocurricular activities. This matter is dependent on the decision of the organization, the Center for Student Affairs (CSA), and ultimately, the sense of responsibility of the students. Students are encouraged to evaluate the co-curricular activities before joining them. Co-curricular activities are of three types: civics, sports, and arts. These activities are detailed in the section on Co-curricular Program on page 28.

Instructional process The corporate culture of the University is geared toward holistic and integral development, as seen in the aims of each course and the coherence of all elements of the syllabi. Teachers make extensive use of books, films, and other teachinglearning materials assessed for soundness, level appropriateness, format, and presentation. Given high importance are student researches, student papers, and group techniques (i.e., shared inquiry). In general terms, teaching methods encourage analytical and deductive thinking, expression of thought, and translation of thought to address social realities. Slow but persevering students are helped mainly through mentoring sessions (individual or group), reduction of academic load by policy, and peer guidance.

Classroom management The main channel for encouraging attendance is by making each class day worth the students’ while. The aspiration is to make absence have its own consequences of not

27


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

28

learning. There are rules, however, regarding attendance and the consequent failure due to absence (FDA). Learning management is a matter of university-wide concern and is addressed through periodic and special seminars, and faculty mentoring. Class size is between 30 and 35 students, except for Literature (on account of the shared inquiry method) and English (on account of coaching in writing), whose limit is 25 students.

Academic performance of students There are clear rubrics for evaluation of student learning. Grades of students are based mainly on written measures (quizzes, examinations, and papers). Teachers see to it that oral reports presented by students are processed in class. Furthermore, with the exception of Literature, class participation is not usually given weight in the student evaluation. Examinations are always geared toward determination of the attainment of course objectives. Group projects are discouraged but allowed within certain parameters.

Administrative measures for effective instruction Academic leadership and supervision is made to rest immediately on the Department Chair and the senior teachers and mediately on the OpCom, headed by the dean. Hence, insurance of quality instruction is a collegial responsibility of the Department Chair, the senior faculty, the rest of the departmental faculty, and the OpCom. Consultation dialogues are occasionally held, usually upon the initiative of the students. Students are open with the Department Chairs and even OpCom members for their concerns. These available means have made public dialogues almost inexpedient. Student achievement, on the other hand, is recognized through inclusion in the dean’s list and graduation honors, and for those who qualify, merit scholarships and financial grants.

Co-curricular Program The Center for Student Affairs, which has direct charge of student organizations, has contributed

significantly to the promotion of a sense of corporate citizenship in the University. Well-staffed by alumni and other qualified personnel, the Center is able to provide criteria and guidance on three sets of interests and activities: sports, the arts, and socio-civic programs. Criteria and praxes are penned in documents and periodically updated and enriched during strategic planning of the staff. All programs and projects are connected with the University’s Credo and Mission and are governed by clear guidelines from the initiation and proposal stage to post-event evaluation and submission of notes of experience. There were six accredited civic-oriented student-initiated organizations for School Year 2011-2012. They are the AIESEC, Catalyst, ER+GO, Fu, Han-SaRang, and Sabio. Table 7 shows some of the activities they conducted during the said school year, including those initiated by the Student Executive Board (SEB) of the College of Arts and Sciences. The problem of apathy of students toward varsity sports has been


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail Table 7. Sample Activities and Target Audience of Select Civic-Oriented Student-Initiated Organizations School Year 2011-2012 Org

Project Name

Description

Target Audience

AIESEC

Strong Person, Strong Nation

A leadership conference aimed at instilling among the youth a strong sense of citizenship and moral formation integral to a strong nation.

UA&P students and high school seniors

Catalyst

Medical Mission II

A project to provide UA&P auxiliary staff and their families with free medical services. The total number of beneficiaries was around 250.

UA&P auxiliary staff

Leadership, Intellect, and Values Education Program (L.I.V.E.)

A leadership seminar organized by the youth for the youth. The organization invited Dr. Bernardo Villegas to give a talk on Social Responsibility and Leadership.

Catalyst members

Visit to the Sick

An activity aimed at cheering up the patients of the National Children’s Hospital. The members had a short conversation with the parents of the children and provided them with prayer cards and small gifts.

Catalyst members

Get-together with Rev. Fr. Carlos Estrada

An activity in which the Vice Grand Chancellor of UA&P and Vicar General Catalyst members of Opus Dei in the Philippines, Fr. Carlos Estrada, shared valuable insights that can help the organization in its mission and activities.

Series of Talks and Conferences

A symposium and a seminar on the current situation of the Philippines in handling garbage in dump sites were organized.

UA&P community

Big Hearts Grow Big Trees II

An annual tree planting activity.

UA&P community

Leadership Convention

A seminar for 500 students from AFICS (Alliance of Filipino Chinese Students) member schools as well as non-members from different universities. Businessmen from the Chinese Filipino Business Club and public school scholars took part in the conference, with speakers Mr. Francis Kong and Mr. Wilson Lee Flores.

500 University students (AFICS and non-AFICS members)

Investment Seminar

A seminar which was conducted by the Citisec Online Stockbrokers Company, covering investment topics such as how the stock market works and how to invest money in the stock market.

350 University students

University Scholar’s Program

A series of seminar-workshops that tackled different areas of university life especially geared for scholars.

First-year scholars

Scholars’ Night

A year-ender project of SABIO aimed at gathering all the scholars of the University to recognize the organization’s successful projects, to acknowledge the achievements of the scholars, and most especially, to show appreciation to the benefactors who made UA&P’s Scholarship Program possible and accessible to the students.

Scholars from all levels

Hatchweek 2011

A week-long celebration that served to culminate the adjustment period of the freshmen. The highlight of the event was the Dragon-Egg mentoring where the juniors (dragons) mentored the freshmen (eggs) for the week, guiding the freshmen in assimilating the University’s culture and style.

Freshmen and juniors

Lend a Book Campaign

A project to help save the environment by lending and/or donating their old readings to other students, especially freshmen and scholars on all levels.

Student body

Stand Up For Life

Issuance of the UA&P Students’ Stand Against the RH Bill, a position paper supplementing the official statement of the Management Committee. As the representatives of the student body, the CAS-SEB also launched a signature campaign during the release of the paper.

UA&P Community

ER+GO

Fu

Sabio

CAS-SEB

29


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 significantly addressed this year, aided by good varsity teams performing well in competitions. See Table 8 for the standing of the eight teams under the Sports Development desk of CSA. There were seven accredited arts-oriented student-initiated organizations for School Year 2011-2012. They are the Creative Writers’ Guild, Dulaang Rock Opera Company (theater), Haranya (Philippine language and literature), I-Mic (public speaking), I-SA (dance), ViARE (theater), and the University Chorale.

30

The strength of the UA&P campus life lies in theatre, with three theater groups (ROC, ViARE, and Kultura) in operation, each specializing in theater genres. The past years have featured original works of alumni and students that have generated a satisfactory following. One of the plays staged by ROC was Makbet, William Shakespeare’s famous play rendered for the first time in Filipino in full meter and rhyme by award-winning playwright and UA&P alumnus Christian Vallez and Humanities student Jose Romano Mira.

Endorsed by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts, the fully-booked play drew a diverse audience of artists, actors, educators, and students in one night.

lines caused audiences to gasp for air and shed tears in incessant laughter. One lesson learned from the project is that good outputs yield good viewership and high interest levels and participation.

ViARE, on the other hand, staged LOL: Laugh Out Loud with ViARE, four great one-act plays that did exactly that: make people laugh out loud. With squirrels running around the halls, Shakespeare out of his grave, good actors pretending to be bad actors who are trying to be good actors, and fictional characters leaping out of a play’s pages, the whole smorgasbord of antics and punch

Hidden Curriculum The hidden curriculum, in the context of the University, refers to the material and non-material environment that the students are immersed in during the day. This includes the general university ambience; material order; building and equipment maintenance; cordiality of teachers and staff; efficiency and effectiveness of front-

Table 8. Varsity Teams’ Standing in National Competitions School Year 2011-2012 TEAMS

42nd Women’s National Collegiate Athletic Association (WNCAA)

8th Men’s National Collegiate Athletic Association (MNCAA)

10th Women Colleges Sports Association (WCSA)

Basketball (W)

4th runner-up

4th runner-up

Volleyball (W)

4th runner-up

3rd runner-up

Futsal (W)

3rd runner-up

1st runner-up

Table Tennis (W)

4th runner-up

2nd runner-up

Firestarters

Champion

1st runner-up

Basketball (M)

3rd runner-up

Volleyball (M)

3rd runner-up

Futsal (M)

2nd runner-up

2nd Philippine National Games

Bronze – 3rd place


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

liners, particularly the Admissions, Registrar’s, and Accounting Offices; and optimum security, among several others. These elements of university life do not figure in lesson plans or co-curricular planning but play an important role in the education of students as they go around the campus and interrelate with people. The hidden curriculum is an ongoing concern of the faculty and staff under the guidance of their Operations Committee. New students, teachers, and guests notice the emphasis given to details, but the goal of creating a wholesome environment for teaching and learning is far from being reached completely. It remains the personal responsibility of the members of the academic community to make this goal an intrinsic part of their motivation.

Guidance and Mentoring Student discipline Discipline is seen as a channel of character education. Possible deliberations on sanctions consider the formative influence of the experience on the student(s) concerned. However, while individual disciplinary cases are handled with

thoroughness and professionalism, there is no research being conducted on student discipline. This is one area that can be given more focus. There are efforts to give a positive orientation on the implementation of disciplinary guidelines. One such initiative is the Guidance Office’s student development programs that promote UA&P corporate culture.

Guidance services and mentoring Guidance in the University is offered via a number of services for counseling, career advising, and mentoring. Information dissemination of guidance programs is done methodically and through various forums: the mentors, the parents, the faculty, and the students themselves through peer system or direct instruction. Evaluation of guidance services is done through surveys, intake and exit interviews, and midand end-year evaluation

reports. The Guidance Office is composed of one male guidance counselor, one female guidance counselor, two consultants, one psychometrician, and one testing and evaluation coordinator. The Guidance Office administers a battery of tests to students to determine their interests, attitudes, aptitudes, dispositions, and other aspects that influence their day-

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

32

to-day life. While the mentor may refer to the data to get to know his or her mentees better, guidance research is not intended to replace in any way the individualized personal concern of the mentor over the mentee. Mentoring is a keystone in the life of every student in the University. The personal guidance of every student is in the hands of the individual mentor who is not necessarily a psychologist but who strives to develop friendship and confidence with his or her mentee. The success of mentoring depends heavily on the extent that openness is developed between the mentor and the mentee. Mentoring is given the greatest importance by the University and is considered a pillar of UA&P education and the foundation of its corporate culture. In School Year 2011-2012, the monitoring of the mentoring program for students was given to CSA. For the first semester, 96% of the 1,709 enrolled students

had mentors, 70% of which (or 1,147 students) were met within the semester. The second semester saw an increase in the number of students with mentors. However, out of the 99% (or 1,665 students) of the student population with mentors, only 68% were met within the semester. The terminal goal for the year 2018 is that every person in the academic community be effectively covered for personal and professional development; that every permanent teacher be a qualified and fullfledged mentor; that mentoring assignments be made efficiently (on time and according to choice of students); and that a mentoring formation program be put in place to assist both new and experienced mentors.

Magisterium of the Catholic Church. The University has entered into a formal agreement with the Prelature of Opus Dei for the latter to provide pastoral care to the members of the academic community and ensure soundness in the doctrine the University transmits. The University also declares deriving its inspiration from the teachings of St. JosemarĂ­a EscrivĂĄ, founder of Opus Dei.

Other Means of Personal Formation

With the lay and secular spirituality of the University as foundation, the chaplaincy provides regular means for spiritual, ascetical, and doctrinal enrichment of students, faculty, staff, parents, and the rest of the University’s immediate community. Holy Mass is celebrated regularly, and sacramental confession, as well as spiritual direction, is made available throughout the class day, always in the spirit of freedom and personal responsibility.

UA&P is a lay and secular university with a Catholic orientation. It declares its fidelity to the teachings of the

The chaplaincy also offers the following liturgical and spiritual services: solemn benediction, exposition and adoration of the


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail Blessed Sacrament; separate recollections for professional men, professional women, and housewives; Catholic doctrine classes for ladies; an annual Eucharistic procession; Simbang Gabi or nine-day novena masses at Christmas time; Advent penitential rite; and imposition of ash on Ash Wednesday.

Figure 4. University Scholarship and Merit Assistance Beneficiaries 2007-2012

Scholarships For the past four years, the University has intensified its search for scholars to enable highly qualified student applicants to avail themselves of the UA&P education and corporate culture. The growing number of scholars changed the profile of the university students and contributed significantly to making UA&P a University of choice, conducive to learning, teaching, and wholesome discourse.

assistance, on the other hand, is based on the financial need of the student and a minimum level of high school academic performance, though with the comparable benefits as that for merit scholars.

There are two types of student grants offered: merit scholarship and financial assistance. Merit scholarship is based on high-level high school academic performance and entrance examination results, providing successful applicants with discounts ranging from 25% to 100% of tuition plus a stipend for living allowance. Financial

For this current school year, there is a total of 370 scholars across freshman year to the 5th year of the straight master’s program. More than half of these are merit scholars (52%), with 92% enjoying full scholarship or assistance on tuition. The absolute number of scholars has been on the rise for four years now.

A present target is to avoid deriving scholarships from tuition fees, but rather to secure them from grants, funds, or donations. This move would enable us to reserve more tuition income for faculty development, capital acquisition, and other provisions directly related to instruction. A second target is to maintain the high number of scholarships (i.e., keeping the target of 20% to 25% of enrollment on scholarship) that the University has been awarding for the past four years.

33


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Other Student Services The University provides comprehensive services for students: clinic, Internet facilities, cafeteria, chaplaincy, library, sports facilities, and enlistment and registration system.

34

Peer accreditation with the Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation (PACUCOA) has yielded high marks for student services, including clinic, cafeteria, water dispenser, library, and chaplaincy. One significant improvement implemented recently is the setting up of a medical clinic equipped with first-aid services, and with a medical doctor and a nurse, the result of constant reminder from peer accrediting teams during their visits, though the need was sufficiently met early on by contracting arrangements with a nearby outside clinic, Clinica Manila. Other services and facilities include the following:

Campus administration

The whole function of building and campus administration falls under the Assets and Facilities Management (AFM), with its own managing director and staff. It is directly answerable to the Vice President for Administrative

Affairs, who decides and acts in collegial governance with the Management Committee.

Buildings

For the 2010-2018 period, strategic plans include expansion to other sites. Future expansion is expected in three possible sites, all large tracts of land open to complete donation.

All requirements of building safety, utilization, mobility, traffic, utilities, ventilation, and maintenance are in place. Local and international guests from different sectors have appreciated the building layout, upkeep, features, amenities, and the compact but pleasant character of the campus.

With some minor inconveniences, the present campus is able to hold sufficiently its present population, with room for a small expansion to 200 students more.

The definitive layout and the funding sources for a building complex, comprising a residence hall, a cafeteria, and sports facilities, are being finalized.

The University is located in a highly accessible area, with an excellent environment of business establishments and offices. Because of its proximity to business, the present site is expected to continue housing business-related programs.

Site

Campus maintenance

Classrooms

What is true of the buildings is true of the classrooms: each one displays facilities for sufficient comfort and an environment highly conducive to teaching and learning, better experienced through observation than written about.

The campus has all the amenities required by a university conducive to academic exchange and lifestyle. It is small but well laid-out and deemed elegant by guests, both local and foreign.

Maintenance, tasked to an agency under close internal supervision, is notable and is an integral part of the corporate culture that the University is constantly striving to live.

The size limits activities, but adaptability has enabled it to serve fully the social, physical, athletic, and cultural activities proper to a small university.

Office and staff rooms

The University strives to live unity in all aspects of its operations. Hence, offices and staff rooms are


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail given equitable treatment as well in ensuring function and elegance.

• Assembly and athletic facilities Present limitations of size (and inability to comfortably hold big university assemblies) are expected to be resolved once the College of Arts and Sciences transfers to a bigger campus south of Manila. The multi-purpose court (MPC) has been sufficient in the past four years for hosting all types of activities of a small university involving students, faculty, and/or staff. Four fully equipped meeting halls or auditoriums and two study halls are available for a variety of campus activities and programs.

Building services

Lighting, water supply, washrooms, air-conditioning, maintenance, and other utilities and amenities are all deemed at optimum levels for the faculty and students and other occupants of the building.

Security services

Security services are satisfactory but can improve especially in balancing firmness and pleasantness, which is an integral element in the University’s corporate culture. Hence, programs and activities of security services are planned together with the Center for Student Affairs so that the personnel on duty will be more student-centered and customer-friendly.

University. It is clear, however, that human development is a continuing process; hence, the University makes itself significantly responsible for the continuing growth of its alumni. The University intends to sustain an active developmental communication with the alumni through periodic activities with them and a continuing formal and non-formal education program. Providing for continuing education is a strong objective of the University, supported by a clearly established program for the continuing education of alumni and their consistent involvement in university affairs. The organizational structure and programs of the alumni office are reviewed to ensure efficiency and effectiveness of communication and dealings with alumni, as well as assess the process of strengthening and sustaining the database of alumni. These are done because the University believes that education is a lifelong process, and its focal point is and should always be the individual person.

Monitoring

ACCOMPLISHED ALUMNI

Job fairs are held every year and, indeed, graduates generally find jobs upon completion of either the four-year or the straight master’s program. Movement up the industry or corporate ladder is fast, and a good number find themselves attaining junior executive levels within two or three years of work experience.

The alumni, by their commitment to social development and service to society in their respective fields of specialization, are the positive proof of the effectiveness of the

One of the bigger challenges of the University is the efficiency of its monitoring mechanisms for alumni and the maintenance of alumni data.

Continuing Education and Communications There are several successful attempts at getting alumni to refresh and renew their ties with the University, particularly through the stand-alone graduate programs that are intended for junior and senior executives. There has likewise been initiatives to invite alumni to seminars and conferences, road shows, sports events, business prospect presentations, outreach workshops, and homecomings organized specially for them, or to actively involve them in small and big projects such as theater plays, the Tambuli Values in Advertising Awards, and the Real Love Revolution campaign. Alumni interest is likewise sustained through monthly newsletters on alumni and through social media (alumni.uap.asia/). Since 2008, alumni cards have been distributed, which entitle the bearer to discounts in a number of stores.

Alumni Activities For School Year 2011-2012, some of the most interesting activities done by the alumni, initiated either solely or in collaboration with other members of the community, are the following:

• UNIV 2012 launch to UA&P female students UNIV is an international gathering of university students, which since 1968 the Institute for University Cooperation (ICU) sponsors in Rome. Each year, several thousand students spend Holy Week in Rome, engaging in various cultural encounters, conferences, roundtables, showrooms, and concerts. All of these activities are occasions to delve more deeply into important matters relevant to the

35


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

university, highlighting particularly the spirit of service toward those who are most in need.

36

• 15th Incorporation Rite The Incorporation Rites are an annual tradition held on or close to the University Foundation Day, August 15. This is a short ceremony in which the freshmen are formally welcomed to the University. At this celebration, the freshmen receive an academic sash or a “beca,” as it is called in Spain. It bears the color white (representing the College of Arts and Sciences) and the College seal. The celebration marks the student’s formal “incorporation” or admission as a freshman into the University, signifying his or her membership in the UA&P community. Students are asked to wear their beca during very special occasions and institutional events.

• Soft launch of the League of Red Dragons Fund Initiated by alumnus Nicholas Mapa (MSIE Batch 2003), the

League of Red Dragons Scholarship Fund first aimed to give scholarships to varsity team members who have maintained a satisfactory level of academic performance. Today, the scholarship fund is not just for student athletes but for all UA&P scholars.

• There Be Dragons special screening There Be Dragons, a fictional movie, partly tells the early life of Opus Dei founder St. Josemaría Escrivá, whose vision inspired the principles of the University. Proceeds of the event went to the University’s employee credit cooperative and scholarship program.

• 12th President’s Cup The President’s Cup is a basketball tournament involving UA&P alumni, students, and employees. It is organized by the Office of Alumni Affairs. The alumni program still needs to be more strategic and purposive to be promoted better.

Sense of Social Responsibility Many anecdotal sources indicate a high sense of corporate social responsibility among the alumni. A most recent manifestation is how hundreds of alumni, together with current students, started a volunteer brigade for the many victims of a recent incident of strong rain and heavy flooding in Manila and surrounding areas. The effort caught the attention of mainstream media as a major channel featured the initiative for five minutes in its evening newscast. It also caused a stir in social media when the effort trended No. 1 worldwide on Twitter. This unplanned and unexpected situation showed how UA&P alumni stood out for their appreciation of the moral and social challenges in the country today as they led the university community in relief efforts.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

FORTIFYING MAN AND HIS SOCIETY Beset with issues affecting human dignity, the society in which the University finds itself has provided a fertile ground for members of the university community to carry out their mission of contributing to the integral human development of the peoples of the Asia Pacific region. The preeminence of man’s inherent dignity over medical breakthroughs and faux statistics has been challenged in local and international settings in more ways than one. How the University responds to these issues and beyond reflects to a great extent its fidelity to man as a spiritual, rational, and free being and to the common good of people.

With man’s integral development in mind, the University envisions that by 2018, it will be recognized as a prestigious research and teaching institution that attracts top faculty, staff, and students, and actively engages in partnerships with the public and private sectors—a move that will boost the University’s capacity to influence society. To achieve this, UA&P aims, first, to affirm the strategy adopted by its founders to identify and develop areas of learning and education not already served extensively and excellently by others. Second, it intends to look for answers to the problems facing contemporary society, answers that promote the dignity of the human person in all circumstances. Lastly, the University directs its universal outlook and desire to be a key player among institutions of higher learning.

LABOR PRACTICES AND DECENT WORK Employment The University of Asia and the Pacific places a high premium on its faculty members and administrative staff, who contribute to the formation of the students and in the building of the institution. Thus, the University selects, recruits, and retains personnel who believe in its mission and have the intellectual and professional potential and capacity to contribute to this mission. The hiring process is a delicate aspect of university life because of its formation component consideration; thus, the process requires great prudence and deliberation in its execution. The University, with the help of the Human Resource Management (HRM), deems it necessary to study the competencies and culture fit of those who will

37


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 become part of the University. For both faculty and staff, a thorough background check is done before starting the recruitment and selection process. The schools are also given the prerogative to identify their faculty needs and to screen the applicants on the basis of criteria for faculty hiring. The school’s Operations Committee (OpCom) has to seek the Management Committee’s (ManCom) concurrence before hiring an individual for a teaching post.

employees certain privileges. Temporary and part-time employees are not entitled to UA&P benefits, but they receive all the government-mandated benefits.

The University follows the stipulations of the Philippine Labor Code on the regularization of administrative staff and those of the Commission on Higher Education on the permanence of faculty members.

38

In addition to the standards set by the law, both faculty and staff have to attend the required components of the employee development programs of the University. These programs allow both faculty and staff to grow to their fullest potentials and serve others in the process. The University, through the UA&P benefits, grants full-time

Clothing allowance Laundry allowance

HRM, in coordination with the schools’ OpComs, searches for the best and qualified young professionals who can be relied on for the University’s future. UA&P also recognizes the value of developing young people who can eventually be part of the academic community as faculty members; hence, the University identifies from its own roster of graduates a very select group of bachelor’s degree holders who excelled during their college days and might be attracted to an academic

Medical coverage for employee dependents

Employment Type

Employment Contract

Fulltime

Parttime

Permanent

Fixed Term

Probationary

Temporary

Faculty

137

98

111

124

-

-

Administrative

216

-

204

2

9

1

1:11

Medical cash allowance for employee dependents

Starting 2010, UA&P has been working toward degree program offerings—trailblazers in areas such as law and governance, media and entertainment, human biology, business intelligence, advance executive education, including doctoral programs in business economics and in education philosophy and leadership. Thus, the need for additional teaching personnel in the University is felt even more.

Table 9. Employment Profile of Faculty and Administrative Staff School Year 2011-2012

target teacher to student ratio by 2018 (1:9 as of 2012)

UA&P benefits given to all regular full-time employees

2:1

target faculty to administrative staff ratio by 2018 (1:1.1 as of 2012)

Rice subsidy Wedding cash gift Child birth assistance UA&P emergency loan Maternity benefit Bereavement assistance Educational scholarship for employees Health maintenance program

Dental benefits Group Life insurance Retirement benefit Leave benefits (sick leave, vacation leave, study leave, sabbatical leave, bereavement leave, service incentive leave, study fellowship, extended leave from work, paternity leave beyond 4 child births)

career in the University as Teaching Associates. They should be enrolled or will enroll in a field of MA/MS studies immediately relevant to UA&P education and must have an understanding and acceptance of the mission of the University. They are offered a parttime teaching appointment per semester with a development grant in a Philippine university for an MA/MS in their field of interest.

target 50:50 doctorate degree holder to master’s degree holder ratio by 2018 (39:61 as of 2012)


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail Table 10. Employee Turnover School Year 2011-2012 Employee Profile Male

7

2%

Female

18

5%

<30

12

3%

30-50

11

3%

>50

2

1%

*Note: All employees are from Luzon.

25

7%

25

7%

Gender

Age

Region

Actual Number Rate (actual number/total of Employees Separated from the employee count at the end of reporting period) University

Total However attractive the immense possibilities for growth and development the University may offer, not everyone chooses to remain in the University. For School Year 2011-2012, the turnover is about 7% of the total employee count.

Labor and Management Relations The University is primarily concerned with the development of those who build the institutionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; its faculty and administrative staff. In line with this, we have been putting more emphasis on strengthening and opening new communication lines between management and staff to get to know the areas where those who work in the University can be helped. To maintain academic serenity, the University tries to cultivate good labor-management relations. It is encouraged that the usual channels of management communications, (i.e., the immediate superior or OpCom members) be used by the employees primarily for

relaying suggestions and airing their concerns. Working in a small university, the employed members have open access to those in governance. Official contact details of the University officers are published in the internal website of the university. Employees can also email their suggestions and comments. To foster a two-way communication between employee and management, HRM has been working with the Corporate Communications Office (CCO). One fruit of this collaboration is the UA&P News Page, a fortnightly newsletter for university teaching and administration staff. The University has added venues where employees can voice out their concerns, such as the employee suggestion boxes, regular unit meetings, and the employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; General Assembly usually held before the start of every semester, around May and October. In late 2011, UA&P conducted a climate survey among the employees of the University to get to know their concerns, the results of which were

shared with the employees during the first-ever General Assembly for employees. A series of focus group discussions with randomly selected faculty and staff has been set to validate the survey and engage the employees further. The University has also established a People Development Committee (PDC), an elective body composed of employees from various units that is tasked to identify and provide recommendations on issues of common interest to employees. The body also functions as an independent consultative and advisory group to the HRM. The committee regularly meets at least once a month. They have been able to identify areas of improvement that are relevant to the employees, which were endorsed to HRM for further study. Although it was not directly established to address labor management concerns, the mentoring system can also be an avenue for employees to disclose their concerns. Each employee gets to talk with his or her mentor. During mentoring sessions, the mentor, usually a senior employee or manager from another unit, without himself solving the problem for the mentee, helps the employee think through his concerns and advise him how best to resolve them. Information discussed during the mentoring session are highly confidential; thus, there are no records of frequency of meetings and topics brought up during the mentoring sessions. The University recognizes that the right to collectively bargain is an authentic human right and does not prevent its employees from wanting to claim such right. However, the University does not have a union.

39


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 Thus, it does not practice collective bargaining agreement (CBA) and has not established the minimum notice period regarding significant operational changes. UA&P continues to seek ways and means to achieve workplace democracy for the benefit of everyone in the University.

Occupational Health and Safety The University of Asia and the Pacific follows the provisions in the Occupational Safety and Health Standards of the Philippine Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), which includes the following: â&#x20AC;˘

40

Occupational health services, which includes retaining services of a part-time occupational health physician, a full-time occupational health nurse, and a fulltime first aider (As for the dental services, employees can avail themselves of the services provided in the health maintenance card.);

â&#x20AC;˘

Medical and physical examination for students, pre-employment physical and medical examination, and annual physical and medical examination during employment; and

â&#x20AC;˘

Drug-Free Workplace policies.

We are committed to safeguarding our stakeholders (the faculty, the administrative staff, the students and their families, and the local community) from the harmful effects of dangerous drugs. Thus, we have established a policy with regard to drug use and adopted a set of procedures for

institutionalizing drug awareness as a component of staff training and development, and drug testing as an element of corporate safety and productivity. In line with this policy, the University has implemented a Drug Awareness Program for both the students and the employees, and conducts mandatory drug testing. For School Year 2011-2012, around 70% of the university faculty and administrative staff were tested for drug use, and it yielded 0% positive results. The Drug Assessment Team, composed of 1.7% of the total full-time workforce, operates at the company level as a result of a formal policy in the implementation of a drug-free workplace. As part of the recruitment process, all applicants for fulltime employment who pass the screening are required to undergo physical and medical examination and should be declared fit to work. Full-time faculty and administrative staff already employed in the University are required to undergo the annual physical and medical examination.

The University has also established a hospitalization/medical benefit that will help the employees, and in a limited manner, their dependents, when they get ill. Coverage is dependent on the rank of the employee. The University has also just expanded the physical structure of the university clinic in 2011. The improvements include additional beds, an isolation room, and a dental clinic. Following the new standard for medical equipment, the clinic staff has shifted away from mercurybased sphygmomanometers and apparatuses due to the known harmful effects of mercury. The university clinic is open eight to 12 hours a day during weekdays, and eight hours on Saturdays. Counseling services are also offered on topics such as smoking cessation, diabetes management, etc., as part of the wellness program of the University. The University also responded appropriately during the outbreak of the AH1N1 virus in 2009, which took the lives of about 18,000 people in over 214 countries. Safety measures were


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail implemented in the University during that time. We are set to have stronger and more responsive risk-control programs to assist the workforce members, their families, and the community members when serious diseases strike. These programs would also cut down the risk of the employees involved in occupational activities, such as the school nurse and the university physician, from being infected of specific diseases.

Training and Education Articulated in the strategic plan of the University is the goal of recruiting more bright students; thus, more highly qualified faculty and staff have to be brought on board. By 2018, the University envisions an annual intake of 600 freshmen with high school averages of at least 85%, of the best professors eager to teach them, and of highly trained and motivated staff to run the University. However, the University is also aware that the most ambitious compensation scheme that it can come up with will not be able to compete with what the industry or the corporate world can offer. Instead of competing, the University will seek partnerships with players in the industry

by encouraging, developing, strengthening, and then deploying the consultancy capabilities of its faculty and staff members. Ten faculty members are, at present, involved in consultancy work. The University will establish more robust personnel development programs that will attract and retain its best faculty and staff. It is also established in the 20102018 strategic plan that the University will be maintaining its firm grounding in the tradition and arts of learning in liberal education and the humanities. In this regard, all of our faculty members will continue to have access to the broader horizons of the liberal arts and the humanities, in addition to the higher-order training in their respective fields. Aside from making accessible the usual array of conference and study fellowships, the University will also encourage the development of personal and professional competencies through one-on-one mentoring. This is true for both students and employed personnel. The University is also committed to funding faculty development activities that contribute to the professional development of faculty and administrative staff. We have promulgated a policy on faculty development, which covers funding for higher studies and for

local and international conferences, subject to availability of funds. To help the faculty members focus on finishing their graduate studies or post-doctoral stints, policies on study and sabbatical leaves have also been promulgated. In School Year 2011-2012, seven faculty members were granted sabbatical leaves, while three were allowed to go on study leaves. Sixteen faculty members were able to present their research work in local and international conferences, while 13 were able to attend conferences organized locally and abroad. The University has also institutionalized the Integral Development Program (IDP), which is the manifestation of the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to the total and continuous development of its employees. The program supports and provides specific venues for employees to develop their full potential as a complete person capable of achieving their ultimate goal as Christians while achieving their professional goals, which are congruent with the strategic and operational objectives of the University. It is integral in the sense that it is geared toward the optimum secular and Christian development of the physical, mental, spiritual, emotional, social, and human well-being of employees. The IDP framework of the University is presented in this report.

Table 11. Safety Measures Implemented During the Outbreak of AH1N1 (2009) Program Recipients

Education/Training (distribution of a AH1N1 pamphlet) Yes

Employees

No

X

Counseling Yes

Prevention/Risk Control (screening of body temp. upon entrance in the campus; quarantine)

No

Yes

X

X

No

Treatment (HMO coverage) Yes

No

X

Employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; families

X

X

X

X

Community members

X

X

X

X

41


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 The program is tailored to faculty members and administrative staff, and aims to help them assimilate the culture of the University, train on technical skills, and be educated on the humanities and liberal education. Efforts were heightened to emphasize the need to attend the components of the IDP, since those sessions are required for permanence of faculty members and administrative staff. Each of the 190 administrative staff, 125 faculty members, 171 lecturers, 15 middle management executives, and 6 senior management executives is highly encouraged to devote 48.5 hours per year for the IDP components. Consultants (numbering to 11 during School Year 2011-2012) and project-based employees (2) are not required to attend these sessions but are welcome to do so.

42

To further assess the training needs and development of our employees, we conduct yearly evaluation for all faculty and staff. Due to these regular performance and career development reviews, 25 employees were granted promotion during School Year 2011-2012, comprising 7% of the total number of employees. Although there is no specific policy or articulation of statement regarding diversity and equal opportunity, our mission and vision does not exclude anyone, especially those working in the

institution, provided that they are open and committed to contributing to the mission and vision of the University. The Philippines is not as cosmopolitan and as multi-cultural as other countries; thus, diversity and equal opportunity is not a major concern at the moment.

HUMAN RIGHTS Investment and Procurement Practices The University procures materials, supplies, and equipment, and contracts service providers for the needs of the University at the most economically favorable terms, without sacrificing quality and standards. As a matter of policy, we only partner with service providers that we have accredited. Accrediting business establishments and service providers means that the University ensures that they are legitimate businesses and are compliant with government business permits. Only legal and socially responsible employers (e.g., pay at least the legal minimum wage, remit social security and governmentmandated health insurance contributions) are contracted by the University as its service providers. The University has established evaluation and accreditation procedures for suppliers and service providers. Not only does the University review the documents submitted by the service providers, but UA&P employees involved in the project also conduct plant or site visits. The University is geared toward providing employees with training

on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations.

Non-Discrimination The University will pursue its existing hiring and student admissions policies and will ensure its compliance with governmental regulations on non-discrimination. Our policies on hiring employees and admitting students do not discriminate on the grounds of creed, gender, and age, provided that the applicants meet the professional standards and organizational fit established by the University and adhere and contribute to its mission and vision. In the hiring of faculty members and administrative staff, it is not only their technical expertise that we look into. We also give importance to culture fit and the ability of a candidate to a faculty or administrative post to assimilate the organizational culture. The University has also established criteria and standard operating procedures on student admissions, based on high school grades and


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail ANNEX Integral Development Program: Faculty

Special topics and Current Issues: 1) Family and Life; 2) Media and Entertainment; 3) Social Doctrine of the Church; 4) UA&P and Political Issues;  5) Ecumenism and Religious Tolerance 

Philosophy Classes: 1) Philosophical Anthropology; 2) Work and Society; 3) Ethics; 4) The Family; 5) Epistemology 

Personal Enrichment Program (PEP): 1) Financial Literacy; 2) Spiritual Activities; 3) Health and Lifestyle Wellness; 4) Socio-civic Helpful And  Responsible Engagement (for approval) 

Human Class   (1 session per school year) 

Student Enrichment  (1 session per school year) 

Academic Freedom  (1 session per school year) 

Spiritual Formation  (1 session per school year) 

Mentoring Program   (4 sessions for mentors and 1 session for mentees but subject to change depending on the need) 

University Attire  Guide 

Year  3 

   2 

Midway Chat  with HRM  3 

P.O. Box 13673, Ortigas Center Post Office 

Trunkline: (632) 637-0912 to 26 

Pearl Drive, Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1605, Philippines  

UA&P Work Culture   (1 session per school year)  Catholic Doctrine Classes  (26 sessions) 

                                                                                                  

4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  Year  2 

Faculty Policies 

Year  1 

 

 

43

Professional Excellence Program (PREP): 1) Workplace Management; 2) Customer Service; 3) Development of Technical Skills; 4) Work-related  Skills; 5) Fundamental Faculty Toolkit 

Benefits  Orientation 

UA&P Philosophy and Values Program: Module 1 - UA&P and its Basic Principles; Module 2 - UA&P and its Christian Identity (2 session: January  and July)  UA&P ONE 

Continuing Formation Program Program for Faculty Formation (P3F) Ignition ONE required for permanency Year and Month


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Year and Month

UA&P ONE 

Year 2

Year  3 

 Fax: (632)637-0912 to 26 loc. 337 

Special topics and Current Issues: 1) Family and Life; 2) Media and Entertainment; 3) Social Doctrine of the Church; 4) UA&P and Political  Issues; 5) Ecumenism and Religious Tolerance 

Philosophy Classes: 1) Philosophical Anthropology; 2) Work and Society; 3) Ethics; 4) The Family; 5) Epistemology 

Benefits  Orientation 

Personal Enrichment Program (PEP): 1) Financial Literacy; 2) Spiritual Formation; 3) Health and Lifestyle Wellness;   4) Socio-civic Helpful and Responsible Engagement (for approval) 

Professional Excellence Program (PREP): 1) Workplace Management; 2) Customer Service; 3) Development of   Technical Skills; 4) Work-related Training  Human Class   (1 session per school year) 

Academic Freedom  (1 session per school year) 

Spiritual Formation  (1 session per school year) 

Mentoring Program   (4 lectures for mentors; 1 session for mentees but subject to change depending on the need) 

Faculty  Policies 

Tel. (632)637-0912 to 26 

Pearl Drive, Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1605, Philippines  

Student Enrichment  (1 session per school year) 

Catholic Doctrine Classes  (26 sessions) 

UA&P Work Culture   (1 session per school year) 

44

University  Attire Guide  1 

UA&P Philosophy and Values Program: Module 1 - UA&P and its Basic Principles;   Module 2 - UA&P and its Christian Identity (2 session: January and July) 

                                                                                            

4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36 

Midway Chat  with HRM  3 

   2 

Year  1 

Integral Development Program: Academic non-teaching and Administrative Staff UA&P Culture Program Ignition ONE Continuing Formation Req.  required for Programs to be finished within the first three (3) years of  Program for  regularization employment with the University  reg. 


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail entrance exam performance. When deemed necessary, prospective students are also interviewed. As of press time, there have been no documented cases involving discriminatory practices.

Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining The University of Asia and the Pacific comes from the very land that gave rise to the People Power Revolution, “the revolution that surprised the world.” The University would therefore be trampling on the legacy of that historical turning point if it would bar its very own employees from expressing their freedom to associate and collectively bargain. Thus, UA&P makes every effort to maintain an environment of academic serenity with due regard for freedom of association among its employees. There are no operations identified in the University in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk. We acknowledge and respect the rights of employees to form associations to further their concern not only because it is stipulated in Section 8 of the Bill of Rights and in the Labor Code of the Philippines, but also because it is guaranteed and protected by the Magisterium of the Catholic Church in her Social Doctrine. The University has set up a People Developmwent Committee (PDC), a body composed of employees from various levels and units that is tasked to identify and recommend resolutions to issues of common interest to employees. The body also functions as an independent consultative and

Table 12. Student Distribution by Nationality School Year 2011-2012 Citizenship

CAS

IPE

SCM

SEC

SED

SMN

SSE

Total

American

4

 

 

 

 

7

1

12

Canadian

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

2

Chinese

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

2

Filipino

545

70

154

113

77

542

175

1676

Filipino-American

19

4

2

 

 

5

 

30

Filipino-Australian

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

Filipino-British

1

 

 

 

 

2

 

3

Filipino-Canadian

 

 

1

 

1

3

 

5

Filipino-Chinese

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

1

Filipino-German

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Filipino-Singaporean

1

 

 

 

 

1

 

2

Filipino-Spanish

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

2

Filipino-Taiwanese

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

Indian

2

 

1

 

 

1

1

5

Japanese

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

Korean

13

1

7

2

2

22

3

50

Mongolian

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

Pakistani

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

No Data

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

2

Total

588

76

166

121

80

588

180

1799

*Cut-off dates are June 30 (first semester) and November 30 (second semester).

advisory group to the Human Resource Management (HRM). The main task of the PDC is to develop and recommend welfare, benefit, and productivity programs to the Management Committee through the HRM. These programs should address the needs of the faculty and administrative employees separately and be aligned with the University’s mission and vision of 2018. The welfare and benefit programs for study are those that have direct bearing on the integral development of each employee (that is, professional, personal, cultural, spiritual, economic, and social dimensions).

While the initial set of PDC members was appointed to jumpstart its establishment, the next batches will be elected at large by the employees themselves.

Child Labor The University will abide by government laws with regard to this aspect. As an institution of higher learning, the University usually employs only persons with college degrees. However, as part of the stipulations of its scholarship program for financial aid grantees, student recipients are required to render service to the University

45


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 for certain number of hours depending on the grant they received. Those who received a 100% tuition fee grant are required to render seven and a half (7.5) hours per week, while those who received a 50% tuition fee grant are required to render four hours of service per week. The students are usually assigned to academic and administrative units. They help out in day-to-day office tasks, in data mining for research purposes, or in organizing events for the school. Since they impart these services as part of the scholarship program, the scholars are not considered as employees.

46

For School Year 2011-2012, 131 financial aid grantees composed of 64 freshmen, 43 sophomores, and 24 juniors were assigned to the different units in the University, namely: CSA, Office of Alumni Affairs, Executive Offices, University Library, Admissions Office, and Corporate Communications Office.

Policy on Forced and Compulsory Labor It is clearly stated both in the Credo and in the Mission Statement of the University how we value the dignity of the human person and the unity of the family. In this regard, we observe regular working hours and ensure that our employees have ample time for family and personal development. The Management also urges the employees to refrain from doing overtime work during Sundays and holidays. The University follows the stipulations of the Philippine Labor Code as regards hours of work and rest periods, and provides compensation for overtime work rendered. Aside

from overtime pay, meal allowance is also provided by the University.

officers, and the community as a whole.

Security Practices

The Security Program exists under the rules and guidelines of the University Security Manual, which was created and developed for use in times of crisis and daily operational routines.

The University aims to provide an efficient and effective security program that guarantees the safety and security of the campus and the community. The institution motivates its security personnel to maintain a preventive but responsive and reactive stance at all times, keeping a harmonious working relationship with the community while putting into effect all the security measures, policies, and procedures. UA&P does its best to implement the most dependable and the most reliable standards in security providership 24 hours a day, seven days a week. UA&P adapts a “closed campus” security policy, which means that public access is restricted except for activities that are open by invitation. The conservative approach is consistent with the community’s culture of privacy, formality, and strict observance of moral codes of conduct. The Security Unit is strict in the implementation of rules and policies; the security personnel are responsive and reactive to any threats to its students, employees,

The Security Unit is under the Vice President for Administration, supported by the Managing Director of Assets and Facilities Management and the Consultant for Security who serves as manager of the unit.

Indigenous Rights The University operates in the urban setting, and has no dealings with indigenous people.

SOCIETY Community The University of Asia and the Pacific envisions itself to be a university that is inseparably part of mainstream society, that wrestles with the concrete questions that everyone asks, that works hand-in-hand with others who also want to see things get better—the alumni, local high


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail schools and universities, industries, local government units, non-profit organizations, embassies, and international agencies.

Social service While the University’s reputation is derived mainly both from research and graduate education in business and economics, what many perhaps do not know is that this academic institution, from the very beginning, has always seen its primary mission as preparing its students for service to society. By emphasizing the practice of universal social values, we have always placed primordial emphasis on the formation of students as productive and responsible citizens steeped in a culture of service to society. Such service is manifested, among other things, in the University’s community outreach and people development initiatives, including those directly related to corporate social responsibility. Social responsibility, in fact, has always been a thrust of the University from the very beginning, when it started as Center for Research and

Communication (CRC). CRC has built a reputation for pursuing research aimed at fostering synergy between government, business, and academe, in order to ensure that all sectors are always cognizant of pressing social needs and concerns and act on them for the benefit of the less privileged.  The Center is the University’s research arm. CRC not only pursues the University’s research and communication agenda, but also partners with industries and companies and contribute to their growth by providing the faculty’s research expertise. CRC has projects and consultancies that contribute to the mining, iron and steel, and housing industries. The University’s faculty members and the CRC staff are involved in local government development projects. UA&P is also involved in an international research project on the family.

People formation Another center of the University, which aims to develop a humanistic culture and a firm commitment to serve society, is the Center for Social Responsibility (CSR), which handles UA&P’s social responsibility courses and initiatives. Its mission is derived from the University’s commitment to form people who will produce a positive impact on society. Hence, the Center carries out three groups of activities: First, the Center handles the delivery of academic content, specifically through (a) the state-imposed National Service Training Program (NSTP), which aims to enhance students’ civic consciousness and defense preparedness, and (b) the three-

unit Introduction to People Development – Corporate Social Responsibility (IPD-CSR) course, which carries the University’s banner in CSR education. Second, the Center is involved in social advocacies, which currently revolve around (a) those that are done in Barangay San Joaquin, Pasig City, which we have adopted as prime beneficiary of our extension activities, and (b) the I AM STRONG…I Am Responsible character education program (held in tandem with the I Keep Love Real chastity campaign). Lastly, the Center for Social Responsibility’s staff and faculty are involved in various consultancy projects with other organizations. Of particular note was the Alternative Financing Options for Local Government Units Project (Project ALFI), a technical assistance program in partnership with the United Kingdom Government, which helped underdeveloped local government units source alternative funding for vital community projects. For School Year 2011-2012, CSR handled six extension projects: • Hosting Petron Corporation’s External Review Committee (ERC) of 2011 and 2011 GRI Sustainability Report

Petron Corporation is the largest oil refining and marketing company in the Philippines, supplying more than a third of the country’s oil requirements.

• Generating situational local knowledge on Siocon, Zamboanga by identifying existing resources and capabilities through

47


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 Rapid Rural Assessment (RRA) and by assessing existing Sustainable Development Management Programs (SDMP)

The project was initiated by TVI Resource Development (Philippines) Inc., the Philippine operating affiliate of TVI Pacific Inc., a publicly-traded Canadian company. TVI would like to explore ways and means to make Siocon sustainable after the mining company has left the said community.

periods of the day when consumer demand is at its highest and cannot be fulfilled by other base and intermediate load power sources. • Conducting strategic planning workshops for electric cooperatives of AES Philippines

AES Corporation, a global power company, entered the Philippine market through its acquisition of the 600 MW coal-fired power plant in Masinloc, Zambales.

• Hosting of TeaM Energy’s External Review Committee (ERC) of 2010 GRI Sustainability Report

48

TeaM Energy is one of the largest independent power producers in the Philippines, with over 2,000 megawatts (MW) of installed generating capacity.

• Providing assistance to the integration of sustainability practices in the operations of Energy Development Corporation (EDC)

Energy Development Corporation is a pioneer in the geothermal energy industry with more than three decades of proven business viability.

• Conducting a seminarworkshop on creating corporate value for San Roque Power Corporation (SRPC) and its stakeholders

The San Roque Power Corporation is designed to supply electricity to the Luzon grid during peak

Social empowerment Worthy of note in the social empowerment efforts of UA&P is the role of the Center for Student Affairs (CSA), which seeks to make the University a center for student cultural, civic, and sports development activities for the community in which the University operates. CSA, which advocates responsible participation in student-initiated projects and organizations, has three desks involved in students’ participation in community development and social consciousness: Civics, Student Service, and Kultura (Culture). The Civics Desk promotes awareness of socio-political issues and concerns, responsible citizenship, and leadership

empowerment. Its annual CivAsia Conference Series serves as a venue for reasoned conversation on sociopolitical concerns. In this arena, student leaders from all around the Philippines and even neighboring countries discuss the diverse angles of immediate social issues. These conferences continue to establish a network among university student leaders and more importantly, provide opportunities for the youth to participate in the exercise of nation-building. The Civics Desk also reaches out to the larger community through extension programs that further the students’ sense of responsible citizenship, such as BIGGKAS (acronym for Basa (Reading), Isip (Thinking), Gawa (Action), Galing (Skill), Katesismo (Catechism), Arte (Arts), and Sports) exposes students and other members of the University to social issues and solutions, furthering their sense of active and responsible citizenship. The primary beneficiary of these programs is Barangay San Joaquin, Pasig City. BIGGKAS conducted catechism classes for 50 Grade IV pupils, taught Math and Science to 70 high school freshmen, handed over to the mothers several batches of hydroponic gardens and promoted that project through social networking and radio and television appearances, held a forum on the Reproductive Health (RH) Bill for the mothers and other members of the San Joaquin community, and created a soccer team composed of 9- to 12-yearold boys from the community’s elementary school. The said team played competitively for the first time in the 2011 Football for Good (FFG) Challenge Festival, a grassroots football tournament for children organized by a non-profit organization.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail From the Services and Kultura desks of CSA came Belenistas de Ortigas (BdO), which is a collaborative effort initiated by the University with the Ortigas Center Association, Inc. (OCAI) and Barangay San Antonio, Pasig City. Belenistas de Ortigas is an outdoor Belen-making contest to help bring the Christmas spirit to the Ortigas community, where UA&P is located. It included a soft launch on September 8, 2011; an official launch in Ortigas Center along with the lighting of the Ortigas Center Christmas Trees on December 1; and a culminating activity during the annual “Pasko sa Atin” (Christmas In Our Place) choral festival on December 14. A total of nine buildings officially joined the contest, namely: Ortigas and Co., Union Properties, Inc., San Miguel Properties Center, Orient Square Building, Raffles Corporate Center, Jollibee Plaza Condominium, Emerald Building, Oriental Assurance Corp., and First Philippine Realty Corp. (BENPRES). A major activity was H.O.P.E.S., a disaster relief operation started during Typhoon Ondoy (international name: Ketsana) in 2009 and led by the Student Executive Board of the College of Arts and Sciences. Almost 300 UA&P students, staff, and alumni braved the storm to help pack

relief goods and to distribute food and water to victims stranded in flood-stricken areas. H.O.P.E.S. is reinstated whenever the need arises, turning the University into a major relief center. Such was the case during the onslaught of the monsoon rains termed Habagat (2012). That calamity saw the relief efforts of 1,064 volunteers (UA&P students, alumni, and employees plus concerned individuals and volunteers from outside organizations), bringing in cash donations of PHP 148,045.00 and distributing 29,450 relief packs.

School partnerships We have 11 partner universities in Asia. These are the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (Beijing), the Lingnan University (Hong Kong), the Universitas Surabaya (Indonesia), the Ritsumeikan University (Japan), the Dongguk University (Korea), the Hallym University (Korea), the Hannam University (Korea), the Sookmyung Women’s University (Korea), the University of Incheon (Korea), the Myongji University (Korea), and the Kainan University (Taiwan). From Europe, we have eight partner universities: the GeorgSimon-Ohm Fachhochschule Nurnberg (Germany), the

University of Applied Sciences Schmalkalden (Germany), the Universidad de Alcala (Spain), the University CEUCardenal Herrera (Spain), the University de Cordoba (Spain), the Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (Spain), the Universidad de Navarra (Spain), and the Universidad Catolica de Valencia (Spain). In North America, we tie up with the University of Wisconsin La Crosse, while in Latin America, we collaborate with the Universidad Panamericana (Mexico), the Universidad de los Andes (Chile), the Universided de Piura (Peru), and the Universidad Austral (Argentina). These are the institutions that are aligned with the University’s mission and vision. We also pursue active collaboration with embassies by inviting ambassadors to be involved with the University on specific projects. One such example is UA&P’s collaboration with the embassy of Chile and the University of Santo Tomas (Philippines) in conducting the nationwide essay writing competition on calidad humana, which is translated loosely as “sense of humanity or strength of character.” The competition’s title, “Breaking the Ground: A Life Well Spent,” was inspired by the 2010 heart-stopping rescue of the Chilean miners, which caught worldwide attention. The competition aims to highlight stories of Filipino men, women, families, or communities who are exemplars of calidad humana: people of deep character who faced great struggles and triumphed over them. The contest is open to students not older than 30.

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 Table 12. Sample Activities Conducted by Select Student-initiated Organizations Under the Civics Desk School Year 2011-2012 Org

Project Name Hospital Visit

AIESEC

Catalyst

50

ER+GO

CASSEB

Description

Target Audience

Members of AIESEC in UA&P visited the children’s ward of Pasig City General Hospital. They gave snacks and interacted with the children.

Pasig City General Hospital child patients

English Fair Students of English classes in for a Delightful UA&P organized games and Share II learning activities.

250 students from San Joaquin Elementary School

Youth United for the Philippines (YUP!) Launching

YUP! is a coalition of youth groups that advocate real long-term progress for the Philippines. It believes that through correct reasoning, ethics, and a positive type of activism, young Filipinos can actualize the future they deserve. Nine young legislators aired their stand on the controversial Reproductive Health Bill during the event.

Around 500 prolife supporters from Metro Manila and different schools

In this annual outreach, the members taught the chosen community about environmental awareness and tips on how to help save the earth.

A community located in Commonwealth, Quezon City

ER+GO Teaches and Learns II

Agahang Pasko (Christmas Breakfast)

A fund-raising breakfast event of H.O.P.E.S., a disaster relief operation.

Impact of Operation We set our sight in establishing procedures to identify the nature, scope, and effectiveness of the programs and practices which we use in assessing and managing the impacts of operations on communities, covering the phases of entering, operating, and exiting.  

Fight Against Corruption The University Credo, Mission, Vision, and Educational Principles aim for authentic human formation and development of positive human values. A Code of Discipline for students and employees has been instituted to address issues and violations against the principles

University community and Stella wOrientis Chapel patrons

of the institution, which may also constitute as corruption. UA&P has established a process in addressing reported cases of violations of the Code of Conduct. The University is intent in gathering data related to the percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption, the percentage of employees trained in the organization’s anti-corruption policies and procedures, and the actions taken in response to incidents of corruption.

Public Policy The University will go to great lengths to maintain its stance on

freedom of individual members of the community to express their opinion in the field of their expertise, provided that it is not contrary to the mission and vision of the University and the teachings of the Magisterium of the Catholic Church. As an institution, the University respects the members of the university community’s stand on issues that are opinable and does not impinge on faith and morals. The institution is mindful of not giving an official stance on matters that are opinable and open to discussion. UA&P helps the government by providing research data through the researches done by the Center for Research and Communication (CRC). Its faculty members are approached by various sectors to obtain their opinions on matters pertaining to their expertise. The University’s Corporate Communications Office (CCO) organizes press briefings or conferences to provide a forum where journalists can engage UA&P officials and/or faculty on relevant issues. CCO’s media relations work also include writing and sending news releases and establishing and maintaining friendly ties with media.

Anti-Competitive Behavior As an institution that knows and teaches the value of fair play, the University does not engage in anticompetitive behavior.

Compliance The University complies with the recommendations of accrediting government and non-government agencies to reach autonomous university status. It follows the accreditation schedule established to reach that status.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail We also abide by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) requirements regarding environmental standards. Audit recommendations are being followed by the University. An auditing firm, Sycip Gorres and Velayo, Co. (SGV & Co.), audits the University’s accounting records yearly. We direct our efforts toward complying with all rules. We have no records of monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations. For accreditation status and schedule of accreditation, see Academic Performance indicators on pages 13-15. As regards compliance with environmental standards, please see Environmental Performance on page 59.

PRODUCT RESPONSIBILITY Customer Health and Safety “Customers” is operationally defined as the university students. For customer safety, please refer to Human Rights, Security aspect, on page 46.

As regards students’ health, the University’s aim is to comply with the requirements and indications of the Commission on Higher Education and the Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation as part of the accreditation targets. The University has policies on institutional buildings related to safety, which can be found in the Manual of Operations and Regulations for Private Higher Education (MORPHE). In compliance with the requirements of the Code of Sanitation of the Philippines (PD No. 856), the Student Services Desk of the Center for Student Affairs implements the Annual Physical, Medical, and Dental Examinations. Since the university clinic services both faculty/staff and students, please refer to the performance on Occupational Health and Safety aspect on Labor and Decent Work on page 40.

Product and Service Labelling The University is not a manufacturing company, but an institution of learning that educates students as human persons. Those who graduate from the University’s

academic programs are not considered as “products” of the University. Annually, graduating students are asked to answer an exit questionnaire. This tool serves as a method to gather information about the different aspects of their UA&P education.   Other than offering pioneering degree programs, UA&P is also a trailblazer in offering support programs and services to students, one of which is the mentoring program. Data gathered from the questionnaire has shown that more than half of the students who graduated in June 2011 (School Year 2010-2011) expressed that they were “generally satisfied” with the mentoring program both in CAS (57%) and graduate schools (56%). Questions related to this program, which were revised in School Year 2011-2012, asked students to rate their mentoring experience, how helpful it was, and its impact on their college life. The graduates of batch June 2012 disclosed that they had a positive (*4.69), helpful (*4.62), and valuable (*4.61) mentoring experience. In relation to the different school services, the graduating students of School Year 2011-2012 were

What the Graduating Students Say (School Year 2011-2012)

72%

are generally satisfied with the quality of teaching in the College of Arts and Sciences say that the 96% education they received had prepared them well to work in their chosen field of career

63%

88%

93%

96%

are generally satisfied with the quality of teaching in their respective graduate schools

say that their degree program has kept pace with the recent trends and development with respect to their field of specialization

say that their expectations upon entering the University are met

would recommend UA&P to other prospective students.

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 mostly satisfied with the efficiency of the chaplaincy (*5.20), housekeeping (*5.26), and library (*5.15). In general, the students of UA&P are pleased with the different aspects of their university experience. *highest rating of 6, lowest rating of 1

Marketing Communications

52

External marketing is done primarily to attract quality students from top high schools to enroll in the University. This is done by visiting schools to give career talks and by participating in career fairs and exhibits. Marketing of academic programs is centralized in the Corporate Communications Office (CCO). The University formed a Junior Marketing Communications (JMC) team composed of select UA&P students tasked to be UA&P’s brand ambassadors and to deliver promotional talks in various high schools. Internal marketing ensures that all sectors of the university community are kept abreast of the institutional events and accomplishments as well as plans and targets. This fosters loyalty among the members and bolsters school spirit. These external and internal marketing activities constitute the primary mandate of the CCO. The unit produces UA&P’s institutional publications, marketing brochures, and a quarterly magazine, to name a few. It also manages and maintains the University’s website and monitors traditional as well as new and social media. It aims to move toward a more strategic and integrated marketing communications program.

Customer Privacy

Compliance

All personal information about the students (including class schedules) and all student records are strictly confidential and are not divulged or released to unauthorized persons. Thus, requests for student records and certification must be done in writing, indicating the reasons for the request. Verbal requests or those relayed through the telephone are not entertained.

As an educational institution, the University considers its students as its products and strives to provide them, within the limits of its resources, a quality of education at par with the best schools in the country. Its academic standards are continually assessed by recognized accrediting bodies in the Philippines. UA&P will continue to aim for higher standards found in similar schools internationally.

There has been no recorded complaint of breach of confidentiality.

The Junior Marketing Communications (JMC) Team is envisioned as the centerpiece of the University’s revamped marketing and public relations efforts. The JMC team is composed of outstanding students who do marketing, public relations, and events management work for the Corporate Communications Office, which in turn assists the university management, the schools, the hallmark centers, and other units. Serving as the “face of the university,” they are UA&P’s brand ambassadors who are an astute reflection of UA&P’s diverse student population. The first batch of JMCs was formed in 2008. Currently there are 22 JMC members. Each member stays for two to three years in the team. JMCs undergo rigorous training in public speaking and communication skills every summer. During career talks in high schools, the JMCs take the center stage, promote UA&P to the student population, talk about the academic programs of the University and the financial grants offered, and share their own positive insights and experiences as UA&P students. They are also well versed in rendering the campus tour, keeping visiting students and VIPs entertained and well informed while showing them around. In addition, they help out in doing events management work for institutional events such as the University Day. JMC members also travel around the metropolis and all over the country, promoting UA&P among senior students in public and private high schools. Overall, the team has had a strong impact on the yearly marketing campaigns. The presence of young, personable, talented, and knowledgeable students has opened up a highly pertinent avenue for the University’s message to be conveyed. They make UA&P stand out amidst the profusion of schools making their own marketing pitches.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

ADVANCING RESPONSIBLE STEWARDSHIP Since its inception as a university in 1995, the University of Asia and the Pacific has pursued a level of economic self-sufficiency that not only bolsters its quest for autonomous development but also steers itself toward the progress of the country and the region in which it operates. At present, with the University on the outset of a wide-ranging expansion, there is an ever more pressing need to align the use of its resources with the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission and its heightened interest on sustainability. Key to this step is the financial management at the University, which is one of the responsibilities of the Financial and Management Reporting (FMR) Group. Aside from managing finances prudently and correctly, the unit observes measures to ensure that the flow of resources will be adequate. To help reach this end, the University of Asia and the Pacific, a not-for-profit institution, aims to develop a more responsive business model where there will be greater reliance on diversifying fund sources through partnerships that will contribute to the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission and to the economic conditions of the University stakeholders and the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immediate environs.

THE PRINCIPLE Securing the growth of any organization requires securing the growth of its people beforehand. In a university that breathes in Christian identity, everyone sees the need not only to grow in their financial standing but also to respond to the call of fostering a work ethic marked by, among others, diligence, teamwork,

refinement in speech and decorum, and a great deal of accountability. To this end, the University embraces the guiding principles of fiduciary or financial responsibility, a legal or ethical relationship of trust and confidence, which is also referred to as stewardship. To demonstrate this concept, all schools and units are given responsibility for their operating budgets. Each unit monitors its financial performance and status through a regular reporting of revenues and expenses attributed to clearly identified activities. The members of the Operations Committee (OpCom) conduct periodic performance reviews of the units under them, the results of which are relayed to the Management Committee (ManCom). In the scheduled review with the ManCom, the OpCom presents the income

53


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

statement of the units to see what their actual performance is in reference to the budget allocated to their unit.

54

All constituent units are fully aware and observant of strict financial discipline. Although UA&P thrives in an atmosphere of freedom, the members of the university community know that the institution will be able to fulfill its role best, and thus promote sustainability in all areas, only when its people are capable of making free and morally upright choices. Hence, the University puts a premium in organizing itself in a manner conducive to internal efficiency and effective coordination, while keeping enough flexibility, to enable all members of UA&P to contribute freely and responsibly to the fulfillment of their common tasks.

THE DRIVING FORCE The University of Asia and the Pacific adheres to the belief that at the heart of sustainable development is the human person. Thus, imperative to everything we do is the integral formation of each individual who comes in contact with the institution. The commitment to fully develop all

that is human in the person impels us to seek ways and means to create and spread a culture that strengthens the dignity of the human person and promotes a climate of goodwill conducive to a robust ecosystem, a productive economic activity, a harmonious social structure, and an active academic community.

to others– a trait inherent in the concept of sustainability. As such, the University is working towards the completion of the master plan of the Ortigas Campus. By 2018, UA&P will be ready to expand to a two-campus university, with the main campus just outside Manila. With its growing selection of program offerings, UA&P will be the university of choice for many more bright students, enabling the institution to contribute to the integral human development of the peoples in the Asia-Pacific region.

Thus, even in areas where monetary concerns take the lion’s share, we always affirm our fidelity to the common good of the people. From generating funds to safekeeping, from guarding against complacency to making careful decisions and actions that can impact the economic systems outside the University, we always remain committed to fostering a greater understanding of how one’s resolve to act in accordance with the truth can have profound repercussions for many years to come.

THE PRACTICE

Spurring this ideal on is the University’s strategic plan, which ensures that funds are optimized, resources are made available to address defined needs, and people running the organization are made aware that they are stewards of its resources. As good stewards, they must not only be trustworthy; they must also be incapable of withholding the good that is due

As a rule, all operating units of the University are directed toward ensuring their financial viability, and it is the responsibility of their respective Operations Committee to ensure that this is attained. The University consolidates its finances with the aim of further improving financial control, financial efficiency, and financial allocation.

Financial Viability The University, fully respecting the legitimate authorities and the laws of the state, operates in accord with existing rigorous global and local standards in accounting.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail private corporations following the expanded withholding tax regulations under Revenue Regulations No. 17-2003.

value generated. More than 50% account for employee wages and benefits, where a significant portion is spent for retirement costs.

For School Year 2011-2012, the total amount of taxes paid or remitted by the University to the government is about 32 million pesos.

This practice of providing its employees with a competitive compensation and retirement package is, primarily, one of the University’s concrete contributions to the person’s welfare and development. Cognizant of the fact that without reasonably sustaining the people’s needs, no amount of productivity or efficiency would result in the work these people undertake, the University sees to it that what is due to its employees should be given to them accordingly, without undermining the primacy of man over material realities. In addition, providing a highly attractive compensation scheme would help the University invite and retain brilliant professionals in their fields, who make up our largest asset in our goal of carrying out research in diverse areas of human endeavor.

The total revenue for 2012 was PHP 323 million, while total liabilities for the same year amounted to PHP118 million.

To show forth transparency, monthly income statements are given to all schools or units. The University also has a manual of operations and the documents containing the accounting policies and procedures. Financial reports are delivered during the general assembly for employees. The University complies with tax laws and other government rules. We have been acknowledged by the Bureau of Internal Revenue as one of the top 10,000

Since we are a non-profit, nonstock institution, we do not have capitalization by equity. Instead, we have fund balances. Our total fund balances was PHP1.5 billion, with general funds amounting to PHP1.3 billion and restricted funds amounting to PHP159 million. UA&P has sufficient funds to maintain operations for the next several years.

Employee Benefits Economic value distributed account for at least 90% of the economic

Table 13. Economic Performance (Revenues and Expenses) School Year 2011-2012 Direct economic value generated Revenues

PHP 398,904,793.00

Direct economic value distributed Operating costs Employee wages and benefits Payment to providers of capital (non-stock, nonprofit, no paid up capital); interest on loans

98,091,836.00 203,562,867.00 3,816,691.00

Payments to government (taxes and licenses paid to the government)

459,406.00

Community investments (student scholarship program and donations to communities)

69,438,049.00

Economic value retailed (Economic value generated less Economic value distributed)

PHP 23,535,944.00

The National Capital Region’s current minimum daily wage (as of July 2012) is PHP446.00 while the lowest possible daily minimum wage in UA&P is PHP 460.00. The University’s lowest possible daily minimum wage is 3% higher than the National Capital Region’s minimum daily wage. The University has a defined retirement benefit plan, which is non-contributory on the part of the employees. The retirement plan is 100% contributed by the employer. Seventy-five percent comes from the fund held and maintained separately at Metrobank, one of the largest banks in the Philippines, while 25% comes from the University’s general resources. Contributions to the fund are actuarially determined every May

55


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

PHP 6,298,900.00 Normal cost for plan School Year 2011-2012

All information regarding the retirement plan followed by the University can be found at the UA&P Retirement Plan manual.

Fund Sources

PHP 8,685,463.00 Net fund assets as of May 31, 2012

PHP 83,088,100.00 Actuarial accrued liability as of June 1, 2011

The University has diverse sources of funds, which include internally generated funds of almost 80% from school operations, auxiliary services, and interest income. Externally generated funds from donations and research grants account for almost 20%.

Scholarship Program

56

31. Actuarial valuations are made annually in compliance with the standards set forth in PAS 19 (Philippine Accounting Standards followed for reporting Retirement Funds) and IAS (International Accounting Standard) 19. Pension liabilities are fully covered. The trust fund can cover pension liabilities for three years; additional funds are invested as the pension benefits are paid to employees. There is a separate account for retirement fund, and there is no diversion of funds. Funds are invested in the same bank that maintains the retirement trust fund. Payments for the retirement benefits are drawn from the trust fund. All contributions made to the retirement fund shall be held solely and exclusively for the benefit of the members or their beneficiaries, and no part of the said fund shall be used for, or diverted to, purposes other than for the exclusive benefit of the members or their beneficiaries. All employees who have reached 60 years and 65 years of age and have rendered at least five years of creditable service avail of the retirement benefits.

True to its commitment to be ever attentive and responsive to the needs of the community that sustains it and to elevate the moral, cultural, and material level of the country, the University offers merit scholarships and financial aid to deserving students on the basis of the results of their entrance exam, their high school academic performance, and their financial status. Merit scholarships may cover up to 100% of tuition fees. The top applicants may also be awarded a stipend, book allowance, and

board and lodging allowance if they are from the province. In addition, Filipino students who have a financial need as attested to by the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finances and have met the minimum conditions are given financial grants that cover up to 100% of tuition fees plus stipend. Provincial grantees may also be given board and lodging allowance. All these are done to highlight the fact that being granted the opportunity to excel is not just a privilegeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it is a right that applies to all. Last school year, 16% of the economic value distributed went to scholarships. The actual amount of financial assistance (stipend/ allowances) paid to scholars, which was PHP 16,916,162.00, was funded by donations. The revenues generated by the University are not subject to income tax or value added tax (being a non-stock, non-profit educational institution), so by providing one of the most robust scholarship programs in the country, the University is able to give back. The total number of individual scholars has increased over the years.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

FOSTERING ENVIRONMENTAL CONSCIOUSNESS The University of Asia and the Pacific believes that a safe, clean, healthy, and sustainable environment is vital to an authentic integral development that upholds the dignity of the human person. We therefore recognize our responsibility to protect and care for the environment for the benefit of all our students, employees, and other people involved in our activities, and those who live and work in our community. The University aims to take all the steps necessary to ensure sustainable use of resources and prevent wasteful or damaging practices, and to minimize the environmental impacts of its activities. As an educational institution, it endeavors to make its stakeholders aware of environmental and development issues and encourage them to contribute to sustainable development. It is also committed to complying with the requirements of relevant legislation and to adopt metrics and targets for improving environmental performance.

The environmental management of the University is under the lead supervision of the Assets and Facilities Management (AFM) Group, in coordination with a pollution control officer. The AFM has, through the years, put in place several improvements to manage the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environmental impact. Efforts are especially targeted toward efficient and responsible use of our energy and water resources. We have taken steps to reduce energy consumption by converting our air-conditioning system from air-

57


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012 cooled to water-cooled and by ensuring the proper usage and maintenance of other energyconsuming equipment. In School Year 2011-2012, total indirect energy consumption was 2,102,137 KwH. The Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s target is to reduce it by 5% to 2,061,603 KwH in School Year 2012-2013.

58

We are also ensuring proper maintenance of water facilities and fixtures to prevent leakage. As a result, total water consumption for School Year 2011-2012 was 15,012 cu.m., which is 6.25% lower than the previous year. The target is to reduce this figure by 5% for School Year 2012-2013. Using recycled wastewater from our Sewage Treatment Plant, although minimal, will reduce our water consumption. Measurement tools will be put in place to gauge water consumption. Our plan is for green technology to be implemented in the three new buildings that will be constructed in the campus in the near future. This includes the use of renewable energy (solar power), rainwater catchment, and water recycling. Emissions are very minimal because pollutant equipment, such as generators, is used only during power interruptions. Also, because we partly compost the leaves from our plants and trees, biodegradable waste is minimal; non-biodegradable waste is likewise minimal because of nonusage of plastic products. The university effluents are well below the limit set by government agencies. Please see Table 14. We have put up a Sewerage Treatment Plant (STP) at a cost of Php 4.6 million, which treats our wastewater. We use a Sequencing

Table 14. Water Discharge Results School Year 2011-2012 Emissions, effluents, and waste Total water discharge by quality and destination

Qualitative

Yes

Quantitative

Remarks

Our effluent is in below/ 12,009.6cu.m, 80 % accordance with DENR of consumed water as effluents standard. stated in EN8. Written Data below shows the below are the results of difference between water analysis which is below the DENR effluents the limit and the water analysis results. standards.

Hydrogen Ion (pH)

6.71 @23.0C

Lower by 2.5

Color, Apparent Cu

25@pH 6.71

Lower by 125

Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD, mg/L)

6

Lower by 44

Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, mg/L)

28

Lower by 72

Total Suspended Solids (TSS/ mg/L)

22

Lower by 48

Oil & Grease (mg/L)

<2.0

Lower by <3

Batch Reactor, a type of STP that is efficient and low energyconsuming. We are currently implementing the segregation scheme in our University: we do not use plastic products and most of our waste is biodegradable. Our recyclable wastes are stored and sold every week to responsible waste collectors. The University maintains a fleet of three official vehicles for its personnel. Under the auspices of the Assets & Facilities Management Group, these vehicles strictly conform to the safety, health, and environmental standards set by government regulatory bodies. While the University recognizes the importance of biodiversity, we

were unable to adequately address this issue since our campus is currently situated within a central business district in Metro Manila. However, we are working with relevant government and private entities to ensure that this aspect of environmental sustainability is always considered whenever decisions with regard to the establishment of our physical facilities have to be made. In addition, the University is committed to include biodiversity as one of the parameters for planning and decision-making in our search for an expansion campus outside of Metro Manila. Currently, we do not have targets in place for every area in this report. We are working to address this need as we gather more accurate baseline data.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS The University sees to it that all the applicable environmental laws, regulations, and ordinances issued by the national and local governments are properly observed. These include the Philippine Clean Water Act of 2004 (Republic Act No. 9275), which ordains that wastewater not be discharged beyond the parameters set by the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources (DENR). We also abide by the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1999 (Republic Act No. 8749) by monitoring the emission and proper maintenance of our air-polluting equipment. Regarding hazardous waste products, we make sure that their storage and disposal are vigilantly and properly managed and that these are hauled by an accredited contractor. A pollution control officer is now working to secure all permits and clearances required by the local and national government. Our application for the Permit to Operate Pollutant Equipment is in process. All reports such as Compliance Monitoring Reports and Self Monitoring Reports are submitted on time to the government agencies concerned in accordance with the conditions of our Environmental Compliance Certificate. With our compliance with the environmental laws, we are confident that our emissions, effluents, and waste are within the standard limits set by regulatory agencies. We have not been charged any penalty or sanction by environmental authorities for School Year 2011-2012.

Table 15. Breakdown of Waste Disposed School Year 2011-2012 Emissions, effluents, and waste

Qualitative

Quantitative

Remarks

Total weight of waste by type and disposal method (Hazardous) Liquid Used Oil

9.33 gals

Solid Used Batteries

155.62 kgs Details are as follows: • 8D – 2 pcs @152 kgs • 9v @ 48 pcs or  2.2 kgs (for lapel mics) • AA size batt - 36 pcs or 0.8 kgs. • AAA size batt - 48 pcs or 0.62 kgs

Fluorescent Lamps

Sludge

108.64 kgs details are as follows: • 36 watts - 288 pcs or 80.64 kgs • 18 watts - 200 pcs or 28 kgs. Sludge was hauled on April 2011 by Manila Water Company, Inc. free of charge because they are the local supplier of water.

No recorded data

59 Sludge disposal is done every two years.

Total weight of waste by type and disposal method (Non-hazardous) Hauled 81,768 kgs Details are as follows: by local government • 10,200 pcs xx large trash bag per year @ 7 kgs/pc =71400.00 kgs. • 2,592 pcs medium trash bag per year x 4 kgs/pc = 10,368.00 kgs

Biodegradable

Non-biodegradable

Recyclable

We do not have any generated plastic/cellophane products due to local laws.

Non biodegradable usually hauled free of charge by the buyer of recyclable items

178,156.50

Stored and sold quarterly


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

ASSURANCE STATEMENT Triple Bottom Line Overview A team of External Review Committee was convened on September 27, 2012 to undertake a quality assurance check through a veracity review of the data-information mix support of the University of Asia and the Pacific’s (UA&P) Sustainability Reporting for 2011-2012. The Committee spent one month to accomplish the objectives. The assurance team agreed to use the Global Reporting Initiatives (GRI) principles as overall framework for the review, both in its report content and quality, alongside the quality checkers of the data with regard to its compilation, sufficiency, appropriateness and materiality, sustainability baseline; and the economic, social, and environment impact on the community and stakeholders. Excluded from this report is the assessment of the university’s academic operations performance indicators.

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Assurance Framework Arriving at the Assurers’ conclusions on the quality of the report and the data-information mix support for the UA&P’s 2011-2012 SR (Sustainability Report) involved an analysis of the degree of adherence to the predetermined quality-checkers as per the GRI Guidelines and on grounds of sufficiency and appropriateness, materiality, sustainability baseline, sustainability enablers, and economic contribution to the community and stakeholders served by the institution. Subsequently, these were rationalized in terms of their relevance, reliability, and appropriateness to the purposes of the SR. The analytical veracity-based review process framework (AVRPF) builds from the UA&P’s 2011-2012 SR on economic, social, and environment performance. The AVRPF proceeded with an analysis and veracity-review of the data-information mix support for the SR using a horizontal-vertical structure. The review process included scheduled interviews of people and the review results were based on internally and externally generated data and information.

Findings On Data-Mix Support for the UA&P Sustainability Reporting Quality of Data Compilation – The sustainability report (SR) presented a three-year trend of information without a future target. In presenting and in analyzing the indicators, it utilized as guides the Economic (EC) Indicator Protocols (IP) as well as performance indicators on Social Impact on Society covering labor practices and decent workforce, particularly employment, occupational health and safety, and training and education, product responsibility, particularly customer satisfaction and customer privacy, human rights in the area of non-discrimination and freedom of association and collective bargaining; society, particularly on community and compliance, and environmental practices and compliance. On the other hand, data analysis,


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

which is presented in tables or other appropriate data presentation formats, used a combination of ratios and absolute values. It also adopted an appropriate aggregation level of information to disclose performance. Sufficiency and Appropriateness – The sustainability report is supported by a sufficient quantity of evidence that is appropriate, relevant, and reliable for the analysis of the data-information mix and is therefore a credible basis for drawing findings and conclusive statements. Materiality – The sustainability report is significant both from the point of view of UA&P and its stakeholders. UA&P used 24 key performance indicators in the Indicator Protocols in conducting material analysis of economic, environmental, and social sustainability indicators which in turn created a certain level of confidence that the data support/evidence presented is reliable and not misstated. The data support for these three indicators is credible because there is consistency of information obtained from two or more sources.

On Sustainability Enablers / Baselines a. Grounding of Sustainability and Sustainability Enablers – In collecting data-information mix support for the SR, the basic attributes and enablers of sustainability were the key determinants in understanding the organization’s nature of services and practices as anchors of sustainability. It was disclosed that the process of sustainability has been clearly designed in the UA&P’s enabling charter as a non-stock, non-profit institution. The EC performance indicators for EC1 that includes Economic Value Generated (EVG), Economic Value Distributed (EVD), and Economic Value Retained (EVR) are major sustainability measures that contributed to the University’s revenue-generation processes and the benefits gained by the community and stakeholders from the UA&P’s wealth distribution to the community where it operates. It is observed that the UA&P SR indicated the University’s commitment to integral human development, which is a springboard for its strategic goal of being worldclass and of being internationally recognized as one of the top 100 academic institutions in the Asia-Pacific region. By the UA&P design, a key institutional sustainability factor of UA&P is its utmost concern in synchronizing its programs with its EC resources through enhanced client relations such as business partners, donors, students, alumni, parents, and other stakeholders.

Furthermore, a commendable effort has been the establishment of the University Sewerage Plant that has contributed to environmental sustainability and balance. Among others, the facility can normalize the water content in the rivers within its premises, liveable enough for freshwater fish and other green vegetation to flourish within the vicinity.

b. Credibility Power – Credibility power is a sustainability performance outcome that is established through a continuing track record of recognized exemplary achievements of UA&P’s leadership and the delivery of its programs. It is also an outcome of faithful and excellent compliance with relevant government, non-government institutions, and quality-oriented

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

ASSURANCE STATEMENT

accrediting bodies. Credibility power is also the anchor of the University’s partnerships with its stakeholders. Other impacts created include continuity of internally and externally generated funds, expanding campus domain, and support for further university developmental programs by government and non-government entities such as the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Committee on Accreditation (PACUCOA), support from alumni, local community and parents, etc.1 The UA&P’s credibility power is indeed an asset for its sustainability.

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c. Governance and Sustainability – By design, the UA&P’s legal framework and governance configuration (as a non-stock, non-profit business entity) are observed to be sustainability enablers. All its EVG in the pursuance of its programs are plowed back for the welfare of the community and the stakeholders it serves after netting out its tax obligations. The value of shared responsibility is a key element in moving the University program-service to excellence and economic sustainability, (e.g., students’ tuition fees, participation in community programs and projects, scholarship programs, etc.) Shared responsibility is evident in the UA&P’s culture of fiduciary responsibility being exercised by management decision-makers, operations personnel, and support-to-operations workforce. d. Financial Accounts and Statements – These are the communication tools of the UA&P’s economic sustainability: the Audited Financial Statements (AFS) and Tax Compliance Reports, which serve as checkers of EC sustainability, (e.g., internal controls). The explanatory supports contained in the SR are attestations of financial and resource management performance. The AFS is likewise a major sustainability checker as indicated in the GRI/SR. Completeness of the data from the AFS attested to the reasonableness of data support of the SR. e. Continuous Quality Improvement through Performance Measurement – The UA&P SR is also supported by sustainability indicators on institutional performance improvement through business management partnerships and participation in developmental and sustainability endeavours in the community. These collective efforts reveal that the UA&P has been objective, candid, and open to continuous development and performance measurement by integrating human, financial/economic, and environmental performance results. Aside from its regular monitoring and evaluation of programs and services provided to its beneficiaries, a yearly program and resource performance assessment (e.g., budget performance and budget allocation reviews) are mechanisms adopted to check on its gains and confront problems using its budget as a tool of performance, planning, implementation, and accountability reporting. It contributes its resources to community human development programs (e.g., community outreach programs, participation in the NSTP activities, disaster relief operations, environmental management, involvement in research and consultancy work, etc.). Aside from complying with financial accounts reporting in accordance with the PFRS/PAS that virtually conform to International 1

These include Government Recognition No.C-04, s. 1991; CHED – GR / Permit No. C-024, s. 2002; GR No. 057, s. 2011; GR No. 056, s. 2001; etc


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Accounting Standards (IAS), the University actively engages itself in standardized institutional performance reviews conducted by accrediting bodies and organizations as well as regulatory, standards-compliance checks, and sustainability-oriented institutions, such as the Philippine Council for NGO Certification (PCNC), CHED, and PACUCOA, etc., whom it virtually considers as its performance facilitators and performance qualityand-sustainability enablers through feedback provided. f.

On Sustainability Indicators - The culture of fiduciary responsibility is significantly inculcated and observed not only as an indicator for EC sustainability, but also in ably managing the UA&P’s total EC resources, which are likewise valued by external stakeholders in their involvement with the University’s program and resource management services. The University’s business model as non-stock, non-profit has posed both as a challenge and as an opportunity for sustainability and served as a major “asset” in finding opportunities for continuous excellence in the various aspects of its internal operational systems and processes.

In 2011, the University adopted strengthened measures and continuing efforts in sourcing out for development funds by building strong partnerships with local and international donors. There is an increasing awareness of the importance of enhancing research and consultancy services, among others, in addition to ongoing measures and activities to strengthen its financial and economic position, as well as operational system processes and procedures that improve its EVG capabilities.

UA&P, being non-stock, non-profit, allowed adequate EVD to the community it served. Its commitment for its program and services delivery performance to thrive in excellence as an academic institution in the Asia-Pacific Region, and its recognition as B+ SR level will inevitably result in increased quality service.

In 2011, UA&P adopted a competitive salary level in order to attract the best talents and maintain its total workforce that is compensated at a salary scale higher than regulations on minimum wage. Effective June 1, 2012, the University has designed a salary structure for both managerial and non-managerial levels that are higher than and/or are within the national wage market in order to attract and maintain a stable and competent workforce who can support the UA&P’s long-term financial and strategic program planning.

The University provided in 2011 a retirement plan, among other employee benefits allowed. The retirement plan structure is a defined benefit plan because the employer shoulders total obligations for retirement benefit plans. A Retirement Trust Fund (RTF) is maintained by the UA&P.

g. Environmental Sustainability - For the environment indicators, University of Asia and the Pacific is compliant with the standards of performance and disclosure set by the GRI in the area of environmental protection. Said university has an outstanding performance

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

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in the Philippines when it comes to the installation of sewage treatment plant which is a mandatory requirement of Clean Water Act and wastewater ordinance of Pasig City.

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h. Sustainability Impact on Society - On the whole, UA&P is found to be compliant with the standards of performance and disclosure set by the GRI in the areas of labor practices, human rights, society, and product responsibility. UA&P is taking the lead in terms of competitive compensation and employee relations, as well as in the areas of community service/outreach, respect for human rights, and compliance with regulatory requirements. UA&P ensures that it selects and retains the right people in achieving its goals. Policies and systems are in place to hire the right people for the right job as evidenced by the strong participation of the Management Committee prior to the hiring of its faculty. Training programs which are reflected in the University’s Integral Development Program (IDP) is are a manifestation of the University’s commitment to the total and continuous development of its employees. Healthy labor-management relations are cultivated within the University. The University gathers information on what its stakeholders think and feel are the priority areas which it can focus on to achieve its mission. Furthermore, the University’s policies on hiring and student admissions do not discriminate people based on one’s creed, gender, and age, provided that they meet the professional standards and organizational fit established by the University, as well as adhere and contribute to its mission and vision. UA&P shows its commitment to creating a sustainable community through its programs that allow the entire community to participate and share resources.

The Way Forward The Assurers offer the following suggestions in pursuance of sustainability initiatives in the future: In order to maintain financial sustainability, the University should continue its initiatives in building partnerships for fund generation and in improving faculty capabilities in resource generation by nurturing their capabilities in research and consultancy services. This way, the faculty and the University are both benefited by the incentive packages obtained. Likewise, strengthening capabilities on financial planning and expenditure management should be part of the ongoing improvement and developmental actions. The Operations Committees, school accountants, and all financial and economic resource-processing personnel should benefit from such strengthening measures. The University can enhance its people productivity measures and controls to lend to financial sustainability. The University should also implement its plans for additional program offerings, tuition fees being one of its major revenue sources. Alongside continuous improvement and assessment of existing programs and services, including fund generation and expenditure management through


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

enhanced monitoring and evaluation, the University would benefit from continuing its initiatives to go through quality-oriented improvement accreditations from national and international accrediting entities. Projects which demonstrate corporate social responsibility and environmental concern would be enhanced further with expected outcomes spelled out. Towards any succeeding SR efforts, the University should adopt a more compatible data generation mechanism, with systematically regular updating, using the GRI EC guideposts and experiences from its first time RAL for B+, which should be monitored on a monthly basis. It should, however, systematic allyallow any changes or developments for improvement that the GRI and the UA&P may adopt in order to appropriately measure its economic, social, and environmental performance for sustainability.

Dr. Manuel R. Morga Consultant Public Sector and Development

Racquel C. Austria-Naciongayo Head, City Environment and Natural Resources Office Pasig City, Philippines

Dr. Genevieve V. Ledesma-Tan Chief Executive Mentor Southville International School and Colleges Philippines

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

ASSURANCE STATEMENT Academic Performance Academic Performance is a measure of the ability of the University to achieve its main mission as an educational institution, i.e., to produce quality graduates who meet the standards set by both local and international bodies as well as standards set by the Institution itself. Academic Performance “speaks” of the quality of the “products” of the institution and how they are able to meet the needs of the University’s stakeholder base. Although the GRI Sustainability Reporting does not include this aspect in its required report, the University felt the importance of considering this area in its assessment mainly because of the following: 1. UA&P is an educational institution. As such, all activities, programs, and policies are crafted and developed to contribute towards the University’s Academic Performance. Taking this fact under consideration, it was felt that a thorough assessment of the University’s Academic Performance would allow for a more comprehensive assessment of the impact of UA&P on society.

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2. The three main areas under investigation by the GRI Sustainability Report are Social, Economic, and Environmental Impact. As in any other businesses, these three areas are considered vital in the ability of the organization to maintain the quality and viability of its “product”. In the case of an educational institution, Academic Performance becomes the primary area to determine its sustainability; hence, there is a need to give this area a closer assessment and review. An assessment of the various data of Academic Performance of the University of Asia and the Pacific saw the impressive level of quality which the institution has been able to build around its program offerings and resources that contribute to the development of quality graduates. Specifically, the Assurer was able to determine the following: 1. The various programs of the University of Asia and the Pacific are periodically reviewed, updated, and have maintained compliance with the needs of its stakeholder base and in accordance with the standards set by the Commission on Higher Education of the Republic of the Philippines. Through the voluntary accreditation process under PACUCOA, the quality of the University as a purveyor of education in the country is kept on constant peer review and monitoring. 2. The faculty remains a critical resource of the ability of the University to deliver a high level of Academic Performance. Through the use of a strict selection procedure, a competitive salary rate, and an extensive faculty development program, the quality of instructors is kept at par with the best that other universities and institutions of learning can offer. 3. Student development remains at a high level of performance at the University of Asia and the Pacific. Through a combination of the four vital functions of education, i.e., Instruction, Mentoring, Research, and Outreach, students are moulded in both mind and body to be true Christian men and women able to rise up to the challenges of an ever changing social environment.


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Based on his assessment, the assurer puts forward the following recommendations: 1. In the formulation of plans, programs and initiatives, the University should always consider its Philosophy, Vision-Mission, Goals, and Objectives its guiding principles. This will enable the University to remain ever mindful and centered on its true nature and reason for existence. 2. Considering the trend of the current educational system of the country to move towards Outcomes Based Teaching and Learning, it is recommended that curriculum objectives be slowly transformed from the traditional Process-based approach to the Outcomes-based approach. This means that the main focus of education now would be not on what the student would eventually know (Output), but rather on what the students would eventually be able to do (Outcome). 3. The University must give strong consideration on the development of a strong and supportive Alumni base. Many schools in the country and the world have attested to the tremendous value and worth that the Alumni can give to their academic development. The experience and knowledge of an Alumnus or Alumna can act as a model for students to emulate as they prepare for their own future.

Dr. Victor C. Manabat Dean, School of Business Administration Saint Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College of Laguna Philippines

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

External Review Committee The University of Asia and the Pacific has invited an External Review Committee to assess the content of its sustainability report.

Dr. Victor C. Manabat has spent a major part of his life in the fields

of business education, marketing, and corporate planning. He acquired his first baccalaureate degree, AB Communication Arts, from San Beda College and thereafter worked for 13 years in the field of marketing and advertising.

VICTOR C. MANABAT, DBA 68

In the early 80’s, Dr. Manabat began his career as an educator by teaching marketing and marketing research in St. Paul’s College, Manila and the University of the Philippines Diliman and Los Baños. He enrolled at the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila to earn a bachelor’s degree in Business Management. From there, he finished his master’s degree and doctorate degree in Business Administration. He is currently the Dean of the School of Business Administration of Saint Michael’s College of Laguna. However, he continues to go beyond the boundaries of the campus to offer his services to schools and companies as trainor, lecturer, and business consultant. He organized the Council of Deans and Educators in Business in Region 4 (CODEB4A) and served as charter president in 2003. He also served as National President of the Philippine Council of Deans and Educators in Business (PCDEB) in 2008 and sat as Director of the Philippine Association of Colleges and Schools in Business (PACSB). He sits as a member of the Committee on Education and Training of the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI). He is an accreditor of the Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities Commission on Accreditation (PACUCOA) since the year 2000 and has participated in the accreditation of more than 50 schools all over the country. He is a member of the Regional Quality Assessment Team of the Commission of Higher Education (CHED) Region IV, which is tasked to evaluate schools, colleges, and universities in the region who apply for permission to offer courses in Business Administration.


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Dr. Manuel Morga holds a PhD in Commerce, major in Management

(UST, 1985 / Summa Cum Laude) and a Master of Arts in Public Administration (MPA) degree. He is an educationist and independent development management consultant with multi-specialization in public administration and governance, human resource capital, capacity building, and public financial management systems. He has over 34 years of professional work experience in various capacities on these fields.

MANUEL R. MORGA, PhD

As a development professional, he practices a unique approach that is anchored on resource management involving both quantitative and qualitative methods of analyzing, reviewing, and advising on performance management systems and processes. He has worked in Indonesia, Nepal, Philippines, East Timor, Lao PDR, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Mongolia, Liberia, and Kenya. His expertise encompasses the following areas: • Public Finance & Financial Management Systems – fiscal reform, public expenditure management, budget formulation, budget execution, budget accountability and finance systems reforms, medium-term expenditures framework, linking budgets to public sector poverty reduction strategies, analysis of expenditure policies, sector budget and finance reforms (health, education, tourism, agriculture and rural development, etc.), procurement rationalization, and results-based management; • Capacity-building – human resource development, training, improvement of work systems and methods and organizational productivity; • Local Government Administration Reform – local economic development and fiscal planning, strategic planning, administrative and human resource management systems, local/municipal finance and budgeting, and revenue generation; • Institutional Strengthening – educational management systems reform, restructuring and rationalization, decentralization, devolution, transparency and accountability, and anti-corruption reforms; • Inter-Governmental Relations – policy studies, organizational development and reforms; • Project Management – strategic planning, systems and processes reviews and reforms, manuals and procedural guides development; • Monitoring and Evaluation systems – public investments program accountability reforms; • Short-, medium-, and long-term budgeting; and • Expenditure management and performance-based budgeting.

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Raquel Austria-Naciongayo currently heads the City Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO) of Pasig City. Her profound interest in the conservation of natural resources led her to focus thoroughly on issues concerning air, water, and land pollution.

RAQUEL C. AUSTRIA-NACIONGAYO 70

She graduated with an AB in Political Science degree from the University of the Philippines in 1994. While still in college, she served as public relations officer/community organizer of the SPCMBY Fisherfolk Organization in Laguna, thereby getting a good look at the concerns of the fishing community. She then took on employment a few months after graduation as public relations officer of the Laguna Lake Development Authority (LLDA), one of the agencies responsible for the preservation, development and sustainability of the Laguna de Bay and its 21 major tributary rivers. She only relinquished her post to take on her immediate job at the Pasig City ENRO. At present, she also serves, among other positions, as Director for Environment Sector of the Rotary Club of Ortigas Center; member of the Board of Trustees of Philippine Water Partnership, a non-stock, non-profit corporation geared towards promoting and implementing Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in the Philippines; President of Metro Manila Anti-Smoke Belching Association (MMSBA); trustee of Partnership for Clean Air, a non-stock, non-profit corporation that aims to promote air quality management as a multi-stakeholder effort in the Philippines; Vice President for Clean Air of the Association of Metro Manila Environment Offices; Chairperson of the Public Monitoring Group of LLDA; and Vice President for Solid Waste of the League of Local Governmental and Natural Resources Officers of the Philippines. Her fields of specialization include enforcement of pollution laws; planning and development of public information campaigns; conducting environmental projects for the youth sector of the community; implementation of basic sectoral consultation programs; political analysis and strategy for campaigns; and formulation, development, and coordination of solid waste management plans, measures, and activities.


Sustainability in Academe

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Genevieve Ledesma-Tan has carved a significant niche in the academe and in the business industry. She is the Chief Executive Mentor of Southville International School and Colleges (SISC) and Director of Southville Global Education Network (SGEN), which consists of seven schools, including Southville Foreign University, the pioneer and leader in transnational university in the Philippines.

GENEVIEVE V. LEDESMA-TAN, PhD

She was honored with an Outstanding Alumna Award by Silliman University where she graduated cum laude, with a degree of Bachelor of Arts in Literature. She holds a diploma in Industrial Relations from the University of the Philippines, a Master of Science degree in Counseling Psychology, and a doctorate degree in Philosophy, major in Psychology. Exhibiting a keen interest in the field of training and education, she attended special studies in prestigious universities abroad, such as the University Associates, California; Azusa Pacific University, California; National Training Laboratories, Colorado; and Harvard University, Cambridge. As a practitioner, she has rendered consulting services, conducted training programs, and presented papers in various schools and top business organizations in the Philippines and in other countries. Her astute observations of the needs of the organization and an engaged workforce are well expressed in the books she wrote and published, notable of which are the following: Focused Interview Selection Technology for School Administrators, Officers, Faculty and Staff; Six (6) Qualities of High Achievers; Job Ranking and Salary Schemes for Schools and Colleges; WPS: An Effective Tool for Organizational Efficiency; Institutional Productivity and School Quality Through Key Result Areas and Rubrics; An Education Culture Manual; Human Resources Management: Local and Global Prospectives; and Outstanding Achievers of the Philippines. She is a recipient of the Filipina Starpreneur Award (Large Enterprises Category) given by the Philippine Center for Entrepreneurship Foundation Inc. (Goâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Negosyo) on March 4, 2011. She was also chosen as a Finalist in the prestigious Entrepreneurship Award 2011, a year-long nationwide competition conducted by Ernst & Young â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SGV Foundation.

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UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

GRI Content Index G3 Content Index - GRI Application Level B+  

Assured by

Application Level B+

 

STANDARD DISCLOSURES PART I: Profile Disclosures REPORT FULLY ON THE BELOW SELECTION OF PROFILE DISCLOSURES OR PROVIDE A REASON FOR OMISSION 1. Strategy and Analysis Profile Disclosure

Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Reason for omission

Explanation for the reason for omission

1.1

Statement from the most senior decision-maker of the organization.

Fully

page 1

 

 

1.2

Description of key impacts, risks, and opportunities.

Fully

page 2

 

 

2. Organizational Profile

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Profile Disclosure

Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

2.1

Name of the organization.

Fully

Front cover

2.2

Primary brands, products, and/or services.

Fully

page 6

Fully

page 5

2.3

Operational structure of the organization, including main divisions, operating companies, subsidiaries, and joint ventures.

2.4

Location of organization’s headquarters.

Fully

page 3

Fully

page 3

2.5

Number of countries where the organization operates, and names of countries with either major operations or that are specifically relevant to the sustainability issues covered in the report.

2.6

Nature of ownership and legal form.

Fully

page 3

2.7

Markets served (including geographic breakdown, sectors served, and types of customers/beneficiaries).

Fully

pages 26 and 45

Fully

page 3 and page 55 that states “The total revenue for 2012…”

Fully

Fully

Scale of the reporting organization. 2.8

2.9 2.10

Significant changes during the reporting period regarding size, structure, or ownership. Awards received in the reporting period.

Reason for omission

Explanation for the reason for omission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No significant changes during the reporting period

 

 

No awards received during the reporting period

 

 


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail 3. Report Parameters Profile Disclosure

Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Reason for omission

Explanation for the reason for omission

3.1

Reporting period (e.g., fiscal/calendar year) for information provided.

Fully

page 9

 

 

3.2

Date of most recent previous report (if any).

Fully

page 9

 

 

3.3

Reporting cycle (annual, biennial, etc.)

Fully

Annual

 

 

3.4

Contact point for questions regarding the report or its contents.

Fully

page 9

 

 

3.5

Process for defining report content.

Fully

pages 6 and 9

 

 

Fully

3.6

The boundary of the report is the reporting organization. The reporting organization operates solely and has no subsidiaries, leased facilities, or joint ventures.

 

 

Fully

3.7

The boundary of the report is the reporting organization. The reporting organization operates solely and has no subsidiaries, leased facilities, or joint ventures.

 

 

Fully

3.8

Basis for reporting on joint ventures, subsidiaries, leased facilities, outsourced operations, and other entities that can significantly affect comparability from period to period and/or between organizations.

The boundary of the report is the reporting organization. The reporting organization operates solely and has no subsidiaries, leased facilities, or joint ventures.

 

 

Fully

3.9

Data measurement techniques and the bases of calculations, including assumptions and techniques underlying estimations applied to the compilation of the Indicators and other information in the report. Explain any decisions not to apply, or to substantially diverge from, the GRI Indicator Protocols.

 

 

Fully

3.10

Explanation of the effect of any re-statements of information provided in earlier reports, and the reasons for such restatement (e.g., mergers/acquisitions, change of base years/periods, nature of business, measurement methods).

 

 

Fully

3.11

Significant changes from previous reporting periods in the scope, boundary, or measurement methods applied in the report.

 

 

Boundary of the report (e.g., countries, divisions, subsidiaries, leased facilities, joint ventures, suppliers). See GRI Boundary Protocol for further guidance.

State any specific limitations on the scope or boundary of the report (see completeness principle for explanation of scope).

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We followed the formula for calculations prescribed by GRI.

This is the organization’s first report.

Not available. First report.


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

3.12

Table identifying the location of the Standard Disclosures in the report. Policy and current practice with regard to seeking external assurance for the report.

Fully

page 72

Fully

We invited experts in the economic, social, environmental, and academic aspects. External assurance report is on pages 68-71.

3.13

 

 

 

 

4. Governance, Commitments, and Engagement Profile Disclosure

Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Fully

pages 4-5

4.1

Governance structure of the organization, including committees under the highest governance body responsible for specific tasks, such as setting strategy or organizational oversight.

4.2

Indicate whether the Chair of the highest governance body is also an executive officer.

Fully

page 4

Fully

page 4

4.3

For organizations that have a unitary board structure, state the number of members of the highest governance body that are independent and/or nonexecutive members.

Fully

4.4

Mechanisms for shareholders and employees to provide recommendations or direction to the highest governance body.

Fully

page 5

4.5

Linkage between compensation for members of the highest governance body, senior managers, and executives (including departure arrangements), and the organization’s performance (including social and environmental performance).

4.6

Processes in place for the highest governance body to ensure conflicts of interest are avoided.

Fully

There is an internal policy on conflict of interest being implemented.

Fully

page 5

4.7

Process for determining the qualifications and expertise of the members of the highest governance body for guiding the organization’s strategy on economic, environmental, and social topics.

Fully

page 8, (Mission Statement of UA&P), page 10 (2nd paragraph), page 50 (first paragraph under the sub-heading Fight Against Corruption), page 53 (paragraphs under the sub-heading The Principle), and page 57

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Internally developed statements of mission or values, codes of conduct, and principles relevant to economic, environmental, and social performance and the status of their implementation. 4.8

Reason for omission

Explanation for the reason for omission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

page 6


Sustainability in Academe

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Fully

4.9

Procedures of the highest governance body for overseeing the organization’s identification and management of economic, environmental, and social performance, including relevant risks and opportunities, and adherence or compliance with internationally agreed standards, codes of conduct, and principles.

Fully

4.10

Processes for evaluating the highest governance body’s own performance, particularly with respect to economic, environmental, and social performance.

4.11

Explanation of whether and how the precautionary approach or principle is addressed by the organization.

Fully

page 57

Fully

page 13 (paragraph that talks about accreditation with PACUCOA), page 38 (statement on the University following the stipulations of the Labor Code of the Philippines, and CHED rulings), page 55 (statement that UA&P complies with tax laws and other government rulings), page 59 (first three paragraphs under the heading Compliance with Environmental Standards)

Externally developed economic, environmental, and social charters, principles, or other initiatives to which the organization subscribes or endorses.

4.12

pages 4-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

pages 4-6

Fully

4.13

Memberships in associations (such as industry associations) and/or national/ international advocacy organizations in which the organization: * Has positions in governance bodies; * Participates in projects or committees; * Provides substantive funding beyond routine membership dues; or * Views membership as strategic.

4.14

List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organization.

Fully

page 6

4.15

Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with whom to engage.

Fully

page 6

4.16

Approaches to stakeholder engagement, including frequency of engagement by type and by stakeholder group.

Fully

page 6

Fully

pages 6-7

4.17

Key topics and concerns that have been raised through stakeholder engagement, and how the organization has responded to those key topics and concerns, including through its reporting.

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page 15


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

STANDARD DISCLOSURES PART II: Disclosures on Management Approach (DMAs) REPORT ON THE DISCLOSURES ON MANAGEMENT APPROACH FOR EACH CATEGORY. YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO DISCLOSE THIS INFORMATION ON THE ASPECT LEVEL FOR EACH PERFORMANCE INDICATOR THAT YOU HAVE REPORTED FULLY ON. G3 DMA

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Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Further comments

DMA EC

Disclosure on Management Approach EC

Aspects

Economic performance

Fully

page 54

 

Market presence

Fully

page 54

 

Indirect economic impacts

Fully

page 56

 

DMA EN

Disclosure on Management Approach EN

Aspects

Materials

Fully

page 59

 

Energy

Fully

pages 57-58

 

Water

Fully

page 58

 

Biodiversity

Fully

page 58

 

Emissions, effluents and waste

Fully

page 58

 

Products and services

Fully

page 58

 

Compliance

Fully

page 59

 

Transport

Fully

page 58

 

Overall

Fully

page 59

 

DMA LA

Disclosure on Management Approach LA

Aspects

Employment

Fully

page 37

 

Labor/management relations

Fully

page 39

 

Occupational health and safety

Fully

page 40

 

Training and education

Fully

page 41

 

Diversity and equal opportunity

Fully

page 42

 

DMA HR

Disclosure on Management Approach HR

Aspects

Investment and procurement practices

Fully

page 42

 

Non-discrimination

Fully

page 42

 

Freedom of association and collective bargaining

Fully

page 45

 

Child labor

Fully

page 45

 

Forced and compulsory labor

Fully

page 46

 

Security practices

Fully

page 46

 

Indigenous rights

Fully

page 46

 

DMA SO

Disclosure on Management Approach SO

Aspects

Community

Fully

page 46

 

Corruption

Fully

page 50

 

Public policy

Fully

page 50

 

Anti-competitive behavior

Fully

page 50

 

Compliance

Fully

page 50

 


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail DMA PR

Disclosure on Management Approach PR

Aspects

Customer health and safety

Fully

page 51

 

Product and service labelling

Fully

page 51

 

Marketing communications

Fully

page 52

 

Customer privacy

Fully

page 52

 

Compliance

Fully

page 52

 

STANDARD DISCLOSURES PART III: Performance Indicators REPORT FULLY ON AT LEAST 20 CORE OR ADDITIONAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS - AT LEAST 1 FROM EACH CATEGORY (ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENT, LABOR PRACTICES & DECENT WORK, HUMAN RIGHTS, SOCIETY, PRODUCT RESPONSIBILITY) Economic Indicator

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Direct economic value generated and distributed, including revenues, operating costs, employee compensation, donations and other community investments, retained earnings, and payments to capital providers and governments.

Fully

page 55

EC2

Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization’s activities due to climate change.

Not

Though the institution recognizes the impact and is not averse to the issue of climate change, we have not made a quantification of its impact to the University finances.

EC3

Coverage of the organization’s defined benefit plan obligations.

Fully

page 55

EC4

Significant financial assistance received from government.

Fully

None

Disclosure

Economic performance EC1

Market presence EC5

Range of ratios of standard entry level wage compared to local minimum wage at significant locations of operation.

Fully

page 55

EC6

Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally-based suppliers at significant locations of operation.

Fully

page 42

EC7

Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior management hired from the local community at significant locations of operation.

Not

None

Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for public benefit through commercial, in-kind, or pro bono engagement.

Fully

page 56

Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts.

Not

None

Indirect economic impacts EC8

EC9

77


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Environmental Indicator

Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Materials EN1

Materials used by weight or volume.

Fully

page 59

EN2

Percentage of materials used that are recycled input materials.

Not

None

EN3

Direct energy consumption by primary energy source.

Not

This topic is deemed not material because our energy comes from secondary sources.

EN4

Indirect energy consumption by primary source.

Fully

page 58

EN5

Energy saved due to conservation and efficiency improvements.

Fully

page 58

Fully

page 58

EN6

Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable energy based products and services, and reductions in energy requirements as a result of these initiatives.

EN7

Initiatives to reduce indirect energy consumption and reductions achieved.

Fully

page 58

EN8

Total water withdrawal by source.

Fully

page 58

EN9

Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water.

Not

None

EN10

Percentage and total volume of water recycled and reused.

Fully

page 58

Not

EN11

Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas.

The topic of this disclosure is not material to us because the University is in the heart of a highly urbanized city.

Not

The topic of this disclosure is not material to us because the University is in the heart of a highly urbanized city.

EN12

Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas. Habitats protected or restored.

Not

The topic of this disclosure is not material to us because the University is in the heart of a highly urbanized city.

EN14

Strategies, current actions, and future plans for managing impacts on biodiversity.

Not

The topic of this disclosure is not material to us because the University is in the heart of a highly urbanized city.

Not

EN15

Number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by operations, by level of extinction risk.

The topic of this disclosure is not material to us because the University is in the heart of a highly urbanized city.

Fully

page 58

Energy

Water

78

Biodiversity

EN13

Emissions, effluents and waste EN16

Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail EN17

Other relevant indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight.

Not

Deemed not relevant in the organization

EN18

Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved.

Fully

page 58

EN19

Emissions of ozone-depleting substances by weight.

Not

None

EN20

NOx, SOx, and other significant air emissions by type and weight.

Not

None

EN21

Total water discharge by quality and destination.

Fully

page 58

EN22

Total weight of waste by type and disposal method.

Fully

page 59

EN23

Total number and volume of significant spills.

Not

None

Not

None

EN24

Weight of transported, imported, exported, or treated waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the Basel Convention Annex I, II, III, and VIII, and percentage of transported waste shipped internationally.

Not

None

EN25

Identity, size, protected status, and biodiversity value of water bodies and related habitats significantly affected by the reporting organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s discharges of water and runoff.

79

Products and services

EN26

Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation.

Fully

page 59

EN27

Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category.

Not

None

Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations.

Fully

page 59

Significant environmental impacts of transporting products and other goods and materials used for the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operations, and transporting members of the workforce.

Not

None

Total environmental protection expenditures and investments by type.

Fully

pages 57-58

Compliance

EN28 Transport

EN29 Overall EN30


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Social: Labor Practices and Decent Work Indicator

Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Employment LA1

Total workforce by employment type, employment contract, and region.

Fully

page 38

LA2

Total number and rate of employee turnover by age group, gender, and region.

Fully

page 39

Fully

page 38

LA3

Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by major operations.

Labor/management relations LA4

Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements.

Fully

pages 39-40

Fully

page 40

LA5

Minimum notice period(s) regarding significant operational changes, including whether it is specified in collective agreements.

Fully

page 40

LA6

Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint managementworker health and safety committees that help monitor and advise on occupational health and safety programs.

LA7

Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities by region.

Not

Not reported

Fully

pages 40-41

LA8

Education, training, counseling, prevention, and risk-control programs in place to assist workforce members, their families, or community members regarding serious diseases.

LA9

Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions.

Not

None

Average hours of training per year per employee by employee category.

Not

We do not have the complete information yet. The data is not yet centralized to one unit and has to be requested from the schools and administrative units. We will disclose this information in the next report.

Fully

page 41

LA11

Programs for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings.

LA12

Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews.

Fully

page 42

Not

None

Occupational health and safety

80

Training and education

LA10

Diversity and equal opportunity

LA13

Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity.


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail LA14

Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee category.

Not

None

Social: Human Rights Indicator

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Fully

page 42

HR1

Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements that include human rights clauses or that have undergone human rights screening.

Fully

page 42

HR2

Percentage of significant suppliers and contractors that have undergone screening on human rights and actions taken.

Fully

page 42

HR3

Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained.

Disclosure

Investment and procurement practices

Non-discrimination HR4

Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions taken.

Fully

page 45

Freedom of association and collective bargaining

HR5

Operations identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk, and actions taken to support these rights.

Fully

page 45

Fully

pages 45-46

Fully

page 46

Fully

page 46

Fully

None

Child labor

HR6

Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labor, and measures taken to contribute to the elimination of child labor.

Forced and compulsory labor

HR7

Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor, and measures to contribute to the elimination of forced or compulsory labor.

Security practices

HR8

Percentage of security personnel trained in the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations.

Indigenous rights

HR9

Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous people and actions taken.

81


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Social: Society Indicator

Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Nature, scope, and effectiveness of any programs and practices that assess and manage the impacts of operations on communities, including entering, operating, and exiting.

Fully

page 50

SO2

Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption.

Fully

page 50

SO3

Percentage of employees trained in organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anti-corruption policies and procedures.

Fully

page 50

SO4

Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption.

Fully

page 50

SO5

Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying.

Fully

page 50

SO6

Total value of financial and in-kind contributions to political parties, politicians, and related institutions by country.

Not

None

Not

None

Not

page 51

Community

SO1

Corruption

Public policy

82

Anti-competitive behavior

SO7

Total number of legal actions for anticompetitive behavior, anti-trust, and monopoly practices and their outcomes.

Compliance

SO8

Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations.

Social: Product Responsibility Indicator

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Not

None

PR1

Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures.

Not

None

PR2

Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts of products and services during their life cycle, by type of outcomes.

Disclosure

Customer health and safety


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail Product and service labelling

Not

None

PR3

Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirements.

Not

None

PR4

Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning product and service information and labeling, by type of outcomes.

PR5

Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction.

Fully

page 51

Not

Not reported

PR6

Programs for adherence to laws, standards, and voluntary codes related to marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship.

Not

None

PR7

Total number of incidents of noncompliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship by type of outcomes.

Marketing communications

83

Customer privacy

PR8

Total number of substantiated complaints regarding breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data.

Fully

page 52

Fully

None

Compliance

PR9

Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services.


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Academic Content Index

Content Index for Academic Category Disclosures on Management Approach (DMAs)

DMA

84

Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Further comments

DMA AC

Disclosure on Management Approach on Curriculum

Aspects

Undergraduate Programs

Full

page 12

 

Core and Specialization Curriculum

Full

page 14

 

Control and Accreditation

Full

page 15

 

DMA AF

Disclosure on Management Approach on Personal and Professional Prestige of Faculty

Aspects

Faculty Classification

Full

page 17

 

Faculty Appointments

Full

page 20

 

Teaching

Full

page 20

 

Research

Full

page 20

 

Extension

Full

page 21

 

Teaching Load

Full

page 20

 

Compensation

Full

page 21

 

Development

Full

page 22

 

Evaluation

Full

page 22

 

Retention

Full

page 23

 

 

Retirement

Full

page 55

 

 

DMA AS

Disclosure on Management Approach on Professional Preparedness of Students

Aspects

Admission and Enrolment

Full

page 26

 

Student Load

Full

page 27

 

Instruction

Full

page 27

 

Co-curricular

Full

pages 27-28

 

Hidden Curriculum

Full

page 30

 

Guidance and Mentoring

Full

page 31

 

Other means of Personal Formation

Full

page 32

 

Scholarships

Full

page 33

 

Other student services

Full

page 34

 


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail

DMA AA

Disclosure on Management Approach on Alumni

Aspects

Monitoring

Full

page 35

 

Continuing Education

Full

page 35

 

Continuing Communications

Full

page 35

 

Performance Indicators Curriculum Indicator AC1

Disclosure

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Undergraduate and Graduate Programs 

 

Correspondence between undergraduate programs and graduate programs

Full

page 12

 

Content linkage between undergraduate program and graduate program

Full

page 12

 

Standards differentiation between undergraduate and graduate program

Full

page 12

 

Recognition and accreditation stages of undergraduate and graduate programs

Full

page 13

 

Criteria for passing and other evaluation marks

Full

page 13

 

Researches assigned to students

Full

page 13

 

Preparation stages for comprehensive examination and thesis

Full

page 13

 

Criteria and standards for comprehensive examination and thesis evaluation

Full

page 13

AC2

AC3

 

Core and Specialization Curriculum

 

Academic units assigned to core and specialization curriculum

Full

page 14

Placement of core curriculum courses across the specialization programs

Full

page 14

Contribution of core curriculum subjects to undergraduate specialization

Full

page 14

Integration of courses within the core curriculum

Full

page 14

Criteria for competence determination for core curriculum courses

Full

page 14

Content of specialization vis-a-vis industry competency demands

Full

page 14

Demand-supply relations of specialization course graduates

Full

page 14

Permission-Recognition status of different programs

Full

pages 15-16

Accreditation status of different programs

Full

page 15

Projected accreditation schedule of different programs

Full

page 15

Status of and plan towards internationalization

Full

page 16

Control and Accreditation 

Personal and Professional Prestige of Faculty

85

 


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Criteria for classification system: probation to permanent

Full

page 18

Criteria for classification system: permanent to tenure

Full

page 18

Minimum qualifications for hiring

Full

pages 37-38

Criteria for promotion intra and inter ranks: Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor

Full

page 19

Procedure for hiring faculty

Full

pages 37-38

Qualifications for faculty appointments

Full

pages 37-38

Evaluation ratings of faculty

Full

page 23

Student feedback mechanism for faculty

Full

page 23

Supervision mechanism of teaching for new, experienced, and senior teachers

Full

page 23

Supervision procedures for faculty

Full

page 23

Institutional researches of faculty

Full

pages 20-21

Roster of lectures and unpublished and published research of faculty, all types

Full

page 21

Load of faculty by ranking and by employment status

Full

page 17 

Balance between teaching-research-extension-administrative load

Full

Indicator AF1

AF2

AF3

AF4

86 AF5

AF6

Disclosure Faculty Classification 

Faculty Appointments 

Teaching 

Research 

Load 

Compensation  Basis and criteria for salary structure scheme

AF7

Full

pages 21 and 55

Full

page 22, 41, and 44

Evaluation system and procedure for faculty with corresponding rubrics

Full

page 23

Awareness of evaluation criteria

Full

page 23

Corresponding awards and compensation for good or sterling performance

Full

page 25

Full

page 24 

Full

 page 25  

Development  Internal development program for faculty, with statistics of utility

AF8

AF9

Evaluation 

Retention  Criteria for retention/separation

AF10

page 20 

Retirement  Retirement package, with statistics Professional Preparedness of Students


Sustainability in Academe

Blazing a Trail Indicator AS1

AS2

AS3

Disclosure Admission and Enrolment

Level of reporting

AS5

AS6

AS7

 

 

 

 

Criteria for admission

Full

page 25

Procedure for enrolment

Full

page 26

Profile of admitted students

Full

pages 26 and 45

Growth in enrolment in each undergraduate and graduate program

Full

page 26

Load

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of policy implementation regarding loading

Full

page 27

Academic load of students

Full

page 27

 

Instruction Clarity of evaluation criteria

AS4

Location of Disclosure

Full

 

 

 

Profile of co-curricular and extra-curricular clubs

Full

pages 28-30

Membership in and activities of university clubs

Full

pages 29-30

Provision of appropriate supervision for clubs

Full

page 28

 

Hidden Curriculum

 

Efficiency of security measures

Full

page 46

Provision for optimum security and safety measures and facilities

Full

page 46

 

Guidance and Mentoring

 

Guidance services

Full

page 31

Mentoring statistics by sector

Full

page 32

 

 

 

 

page 28

Co-curricular

Other means of Personal Formation

 

 

 

 

 

87  

 

Provision of means for ascetical-doctrinal-sacramental-moral formation

Full

AS8

Scholarships

Full

pages 33 and 56

AS9

Other Student Services

Full

page 34

Level of reporting

Location of Disclosure

Full

page 35

Full

page 35

Provision of means to sustain e-communication with alumni

Full

page 35

Provision of regular, periodic activities for alumni

Full

page 35

Provision of information dissemination on the univesity to alumni

Full

page 35

Provision of official alumni privileges in and out of campus

Full

page 35

 page 32

Social Responsibility of Alumni Indicator AA1

Disclosure Monitoring  Efficiency of monitoring mechanism fior alumni

AA2

Continuing Education  Provision for continuing education opportunities via short courses

AA3

Continuing Communications 


UA&P Sustainability Report 2011-2012

GRI Application Level Check Statement

88


UA&P

University of Asia and the Pacific For more information, contact us at: University of Asia and the Pacific Pearl Drive, Ortigas Center Pasig City, Philippines 1600 Telephone: (+632) 637-0921 to 26 email: info@uap.asia web: www. uap.asia http://www.facebook.com/uap.asia http://twitter.com/uapasia


UA&P Sustainability Report 2012