St Hugh's College, Oxford - Chronicle 1943-1944

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ST. HUGH'S COLLEGE, OXFORD CHRONICLE 1943-4. No. 16 ASSOCIATION OF SENIOR MEMBERS

Chairman: THE PRINCIPAL Hon. Secretary 1941-4: DR. C. M. ADY Hon. Editor of the Chronicle, 1941-4: MRS. T. G. JALLAND St. Thomas's Vicarage, Oxford

Visitor THE RIGHT HON. EDGAR ALGERNON ROBERT, VISCOUNT CECIL OF CHELWOOD, M.A., HON. D.C.L.

Honorary Fellows BEATRICE MARGARET SPARKS, M.A. JOAN EVANS, D.LITT.

Council BARBARA ELIZABETH GWYER, M.A., Principal. DOUGLAS VEALE, M.A., Fellow of Corpus Christi, Chairman. ELIZABETH ANNIE FRANCIS, M.A., Official Fellow. MARY ETHEL SEATON, M.A., Official Fellow. EVELYN EMMA STEFANOS PROCTER, M.A., Official Fellow. GERTRUDE THORNEYCROFT, M.A., Official Fellow. CECILIA MARY ADY, M.A., D.LITT., Research Fellow. MARY REAVELEY GLOVER, M.A., Official Fellow. DAISY EMILY MARTIN CLARKE (MRS.), M.A., Official Fellow. AGNES HEADLAM-MORLEY, B.LITT., M.A., Official Fellow. DOROTHEA HELEN FORBES GRAY, M.A., Official Fellow. OLGA DELFINA BICKLEY, M.A., Official Fellow. MADGE GERTRUDE ADAM, M.A., D.PHIL., Official Fellow. IDA CAROLINE MANN, M.A., Professorial Fellow. JOHN LINTON MYRES (SIR), M.A., Fellow of New College. ALFRED EWERT, M.A., Fellow of Trinity. JOAN EVANS, D.LITT., Hon. Fellow. GWENDOLEN MOBERLY (LADY), M.A. MARJORIE MOLLER, M.A. JOAN MERVYN HUSSEY, B.LITT., M.A. CHARLES STEWART ORWIN, M.A., D.LITT., Fellow of Balliol. STEPHEN GROSVENOR LEE, M.A., Fellow of Magdalen.


REPO T OF EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OF SENIOR MEMBERS HE Eighteenth Annual Meeting of the Association was held at Holywell T Manor on Saturday, June z6th, 1943, the Principal in the Chair. Nineteen members were present. The Chairman in her statement spoke of the problems arising from wartime regulations with regard to women students. Now that many undergraduates could not spend more than two years at a University, about half the Junior Members of the College would be going down at the end of Trinity Term. A good proportion of the vacant places were already filled, and further candidates were being considered. The latest regulations made it possible for students admitted under the age of 18 to spend three years at the University, and experience had already shown that such students were fully capable of profiting by a University course. With regard to vacancies after the war the first preference would be given to candidates already elected to Scholarships and Exhibitions who had been unable to complete, or in some cases to begin, their course. The Chairman commented with satisfaction on the high standard of work and conduct prevailing among the undergraduates in residence. Of the Fellows absent on war-work, Miss Gray had been sent by her Ministry on a special mission to America, Miss Glover had been appointed Welfare Officer to a group of aircraft factories, Miss Thorneycroft was returning in July to resume her work as Bursar. Her release had been asked for owing to the resignation, on her marriage, of the Acting Bursar, Miss Cundall. The following Research appointments had been made: Dr. Ady had been reappointed Research Fellow for seven years and some other reappointments were reported. Mrs. Gorodetzky had received a special grant to enable her to finish her thesis. The Elizabeth Wordsworth Studentship had not been awarded. The re-election without contest of Miss Joan Hussey as a member of Council for another three years was reported. Dr. Ady was appointed as Secretary of the Association for four years. The Membership of the Association now stands at 618, an increase of 6 on last year.

THE P INCIPAL'S LETTER

W

ARMEST greetings to all Members of the Association. They will be glad to know that we have battled through another year, carrying on with energy our preparation for following them into works of national importance, thankful we are still permitted periods of two or of three years for the purpose. Tutors in residence had a very hard year of teaching, lecturing, and University examining. Miss Glover and Miss Gray are still on Government service. The former has improved her qualifications as a Personnel Manager by experience of factory conditions as a hand, and the latter has been on an important mission to the U.S.A. The Bursar returned to Holywell Manor in the 2


summer after an arduous period of work in the Ministry of Supply, where her expert knowledge of buildings and equipment and her sympathy with the needs of the workers found abundant scope. Dr. Busbridge has now the status of Tutor as well as of Lecturer, and has so much to do in her Faculty that a second mathematician has been appointed (at Somerville College) to assist her with pupils. Madame Gorodetzky's tenure of the Yates Lecturership 1942-3 was the occasion of a precedent; she was the first woman to lecture in her Faculty and in the Chapter House of the Cathedral. Undergraduates have persevered with their 'war service' and have also taken their share in domestic work and in Red Cross and Civil Defence training. Their academic record, as appears on another page, is excellent. The Elizabeth Wordsworth Studentship is in abeyance for the present, but Miss Edwards's tenure of the Mary Gray Allen Senior Scholarship has been extended for a second year and Mrs. FitzPatrick, B.A. (J. Richardson) holds the Moberly Senior Scholarship for research into 'Grasses for Pastureland'. Friends of St. Margaret's House will be interested to hear that Miss Kelly retired amid universal regret in September, and is succeeded by Miss Penley, already known and loved in Bethnal Green, and experienced in every sphere as a highly qualified, and indeed distinguished, social worker. The House is to be congratulated. By this time next year a new Education Act may be on the Statute Book. Adaptations will doubtless be required on the part of our Universities. We are preparing for them and studying with care the role Oxford may be called on to play. B. E. GWYER.

January 1944

HONOUR EXAMINATIONS, 1943 B.C.L. Class II, K. Tyabji, B.A. Hon. Math. Moderations. Class II, Z. J. Garrett. Hon. Class. Moderations. Class II, M. W. Wait. Class III, I. E. Lambert, J. C. Morland, D. M. Rennie.

Literae Humaniores. Class II, A. H. Elliott, A. M. Powell (Mrs.), M. H. Sykes. Class III, M. G. Beamish, H. M. Harris, H. M. Watts.

Modern History. Class II, B. M. Child, M. E. Eade, N. P. Littlewood, M. M. Oldham. Class III, M. R. Eldridge, P. R. Groom (Mrs.), D. L. Rowley, M. I. G. Smith. Theology. Class II, N. Hoare. Class III, R. Swain. English. Class I, P. T. Thomson. Class II, R. Andrews, J. M. Hepburn, I. R. Hodgson, R. Jones, S. M. Ottley, R. Rieu, S. Runganadhan. Modern Languages. Class II, A. F. G. Alexander, M. G. Boyall, D. Colbeck, R. Fanning,* M.-L. Hendtlass, E. M. Luscombe, J. V. McQuillen,* H. M. P. Monfries, H. M. Purkis, J. M. Sheppard. Mathematics. Class I, 0. B. N. Fawcett. Class II, M. C. Legerton, M. Lofts. Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. Class I, A. V. Readman, M. J. Rigby. Class II, A. Botcharsky, M. D. B. Seaton. Class III, M. P. Ciantar. * Distinction in spoken language.

3


Natural Science. Class I, V. P. Leonard (Mrs.). Class II, J. M. Richardson, E. Dresel. Chem. Pt. I, C. M. Lilleyman. Geography. Class II, M. B. Pritchard. Class III, N. Elliott.

SHORTENED HONOURS (FINAL) Literae Humaniores. Class I, R. L. Beaumont. Class II, S. M. Castor. Class III, M. K. B. Wilkins.

Modern History, Pt. II. Class II, H. Cartwright, R. E. Franklin, J. M. Gamon, Class III, D. P. MacLean.

Theology. Class III, E. H. Marsh. English. Class II, M. M. Morris. Class III, E. M. C. Liddiard, A. Raine. Modern Languages, Pt. II. Class II, A. W. Weeks,* E. M. Wright. Class III, M. Brittain.

Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. Class II, B. Day, M. N. Whittaker. Class III, D. R. Davie.

Geography, Pt. II. Class II, B. W. Brown, A. D. Reynolds, M. L. Woodward. First B.M. U. R. Allen. * Distinction in spoken language.

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS, 1943-4 SCHOLARS Hilary Term, 1943 Ladies' College, Cheltenham. L. L. LEWENZ. Malvern Girls' College.

J. E. DAWSON.

Michaelmas Term, 1943 J. D. MCCALL. Lincoln High School. D. M. NUTBOURNE. Ladies' College, Cheltenham. J. R. RICHARDS. King Edward's High School, Birmingham. P. M. ROBERTSON. Christ's Hospital, Hertford.

EXHIBITIONERS Hilary Term, 1943 M. E. GERKEN. D. M. JAMES.

Southampton Girls' Grammar School. Mitcham Girls' County School.

Trinity Term, 1943 THE HON. J. SOMERSET.

Monmouth School for Girls.

Michaelmas Term,1943 B. COWDEROY. Surbiton High School. C. GARNETT. Settle Girls' High School. H. G. GOODWIN. Streatham County High School. M. G. HARTSHORNE. Swansea High School and Blunt House, J. H. LLOYDS. Godolphin and Latymer Girls' School. v. J. PITT. Mary Datchelor Girls' School. J. M. TELFER. Leeds High School.

4

Oxted.


Trinity Term, 1943 R. S. MAAS. Clifton High A. M. M. ORIEL. Malvern

School. Girls' College.

Michaelmas Term, 1943 A. M. Archdale. St. James's, West Malvern. H. E. Bambridge. Harrogate College and Mrs. Hunter. D. N. Barrett. North London Collegiate School. J. C. Blomfield. Edinburgh Ladies' College and Westminster Tutors. B. Coxon. Durham County School. E. A. Crawshaw. Cheltenham Ladies' College. B. P. Deverill. High Wycombe High School. J. M. Dutton. King Edward's High School, Birmingham. M. E. Easter. Chorleywood College. S. M. Eaton. High Wycombe High School. B. E. Fielding. Wakefield Girls' High School. S. W. Glenister. Slough High School. D. M. Harvey. Chipping Norton County School. P. M. J. Higham. Byculla School, Liss. D. M. Hoare. Sherborne Girls' School. M. I. Hodgkins. Ludlow High School. S. P. C. Hodgson. Clifton High School. A. M. James. Redland High School, Bristol. J. M. Lewis. Neath County School. M. A. Lister. Luckley, Wokingham. M. McConnachie. Rugby High School. H. D. Martin. Bournemouth School for Girls. I. Meigh. Harrogate Grammar School. J. Melloy. Monmouth School for Girls. N. M. Moore. Atherley School, Southampton. M. Nicklin. King Edward's High School, Birmingham. D. Nixon. Bedales School and Blunt House, Oxted. B. M. Orton. Truro High School. G. M. Parry. Altrincham County High School. P. Pedlar. Maynard School, Exeter. E. S. Robinson. Christ's Hospital. J. P. Robinson. City of London School for Girls. X. V. Ryder. King's Hall, Compton, Canada, and McGill University. M. L. Sims. Gloucester High School. H. Singer. Mill Mount Secondary School, York. K. D. Stedmond. St. Brandon's Clergy Daughters' School. H. M. Stewart. Oakdene School, Beaconsfield. F. V. Tallack. Cheltenham Ladies' College. M. P. Thorneycroft. Alice Ottley School, Worcester. M. A. W. Toovey. Luckley, Wokingham. M. E. J. Trinder. City of London School for Girls. M. M. Y. Tyler. Clifton High School. G. H. Weston. St. Martin's High School, Tulse Hill. N. M. Windross. Haberdashers' Aske's Girls' School, West Acton. 5


P. E. C. Wood. Oakdene School, Beaconsfield. R. E. Woolf. St. George's School, Ascot. Hilary Term, 1944 M. P. Dodwell. Harrow County School for Girls. A. E. Guilding. Clapham High School. J. Le Gros Clark. St. Clement's School, Toronto, and University of Toronto. C. M. Werner. Convent School, Bath. D. L. Werner. Convent School, Bath. H. M. Watt. Ashford School for Girls.

OBITUARY MRS. DECATUR (E. Vosper), 1924-6: September 13, 1943. MRS. HARVEY (C. D. Barter), 1895-8: February, 1943. MRS. HYDE-LEES (Ada Gwynne Younghughes), 1917-20: February JOAN EDITH IRONSIDE, 1931-4: March 3rd, 1943. MRS. LOCKET (Margaret Pickford), 1918-22: August 23rd, 1943.

17th, 1943.

RUTH METHERELL, Bursar of the College, 1921-5: May 15th, 1943. RUTH GWENLLIAN LEFROY MOSS, 1934-7: August 8th, 1943. MARGARET ETHEL ROBERTSON, Acting Principal of the College, Trinity Term 1924: January 24th, 1943. MRS. SHEBBEARE (Alice Isabel Woodhouse), 1898-1901: February 8th, 1944. EDITH ELIZABETH WARDALE, Vice-Principal 1891-4, Tutor 1889-1923, Member of Council 1894-1941, Hon. Fellow 1929-42: February 17th, 1943. MRS. ORMOND WILSON (Margery Helen Wace), 1922-5: January I ith, 1944. EDITH ELIZABETH WARDALE fl HE death of Edith Wardale marks the passing of the last of the pioneers I of women's education in Oxford. For over fifty years her energies were spent in the service of the Women's Societies in general, and of St. Hugh's College in particular. She came up as a student to Lady Margaret Hall in 1887, and a year later migrated to St. Hugh's Hall. After taking a First Class in Modern Languages and studying for the degree of Ph.D. at Zurich, she entered upon her life work as a teacher of philology. At this time all teaching arrangements were in the hands of the Council of the Association for the Education of Women, the women's colleges then being little more than halls of residence. Miss Wardale was made Lecturer in Anglo-Saxon by the A.E.W. in 1891, and subsequently Tutor, in which capacity all women students reading English came under her care. When (in course of time) each of the Women's Societies appointed its own resident tutor, Miss Wardale remained primarily responsible for the St. Hugh's students reading English. She was formally appointed Tutor in 1911, when St. Hugh's Hall became St. Hugh's College, and retained the post until 1923. Her pupils, however, were never confined to her own College. She was at various times Lecturer at Lady Margaret Hall, St. Hilda's College, and Royal Holloway College, and, after the English School became a recognized part of the Second Public Examination, she had many men pupils. She was the first woman to be appointed as Examiner in the Honour School of English Language and 6


Literature, and to serve on the Board of her Faculty. Her scholarship found expression in the two books An Old English Grammar (1922) and An Introduction to Middle English (1937), both indispensable to students. A third publication, Chapters on Old English Literature (1935), was acclaimed as the mature fruit of a rich and erudite mind Fully occupied as Miss Wardale was with teaching, she found time to play an active part in the administration of her College. She was Vice-Principal of St. Hugh's Hall from 1891 to 1894. She served on the governing body of St. Hugh's from 1894 until shortly before her death. For a few years she undertook the work of Treasurer. When St. Hugh's College obtained its Charter she was named in the Schedule as a member of the Council 'for as long as she shall desire to serve', and was made an Honorary Fellow. As a resident tutor, junior members of St. Hugh's found in her an unfailing friend. She audited the accounts of their societies, presented them with a piano, chaperoned them to theatres and concerts, and generally identified herself with their interests. It was in her relations with her pupils that her most valuable work was done. It may be said without exaggeration that she served as a model to women members of the University of what a tutor should be. Her high standard of scholarship and her great gifts as a teacher stimulated her abler pupils to make full use of their powers, and gave confidence and encouragement to the weaklings. Many learned for the first time from her the true meaning of advanced study. In each of her pupils, whether academically minded or not, she took a real human interest. She was never sentimental and she never played the school-mistress. Her pupils were made to realize that they were grown-up people and they must shoulder their own responsibilities. At the same time, she was always at their service. Her shrewd judgement was brought to bear upon their problems, her keen and varied interests gave them a wider outlook on life, and her humour taught them to take themselves less seriously. The motive of her life lay in the pursuit of truth and goodness. In this she showed courage, consistency, and selfless devotion. Many colleagues and pupils, who have drawn inspiration from her example, are conscious that the world is made poorer by her loss. C. M. A.

(Reprinted by permission from The Oxford Magazine, May zryth,

1943.)

CECILY DORA HARVEY (nĂŠe BARTER) (nĂŠe Barter) came to St. Hugh's Hall in September 1895, having gained one of the few scholarships then available for its members. She was aged eighteen and had been more or less home-taught, passing from the tuition of a sister to be a day scholar in the little school of St. Michael's established in Shipton-under-Wychwood by an aunt on her father's side. Cecily came of a family distinguished in the educational and clerical world. She was a great-niece of 'Warden Barter' of Winchester College, and a granddaughter of the Rev. George Moberly, Headmaster of Winchester and later Bishop of Salisbury. She was therefore the niece of Miss Moberly, first Principal of St. Hugh's. Cecily read English at St. Hugh's and in 1898 obtained a First Class, specializing in Philology, and thereby justifying her ancestry. She was one of the younger members of the Hall where nearly all the students in those days were very youthful. In character she was of a deep

CECILY HARVEY

7


reserve beneath 'kitten like' ways, and only gave herself really out to a few. She was also very religious and devout; all her life an ardent Anglo-Catholic. After leaving St. Hugh's Cecily taught in the Nottingham High School until her marriage with the Rev. Reginald Harvey in 1901. The remainder of her history is that of a remarkably happy married life, marked by no great events and by no great sorrows. She was a devoted wife and mother. Her husband, who held the living of Barwick-in-Elmet, eight miles from Leeds, for several years before his retirement in 1933, died in 1941, only two years before Cecily's own death. All her six children survive her, and never were sons and daughters more devoted to their mother. Cecily, for her part, found her pride and joy in being sympathizer, counsellor, and friend to each one of them through every stage of their lives. May she rest in peace. m. A. RICE. ADA GWYNNE HYDE-LEES (nĂŠe YOUNGHUGHES) came to St. Hugh's College in 1917, and read for the Honour School of English Language and Literature. She was keenly interested in literature and some little poems by her appeared both in The Fritillary and The Imp. She met her future husband while she was an undergraduate, and she was married soon after she went down to the Rev. H. M. Hyde-Lees, now Archdeacon of Portsmouth. The daughter of a clergyman, she found her husband's parish her natural sphere, and helped him by her devoted labours. She left a lasting impression on the girls of her Bible Class at Looe. During the present war, she went through the worst of the raids on Portsmouth, and it may be that these months of trial were too much for her. Never very strong, she suffered a great deal of pain and weariness in later years, without telling anyone what she was going through. Her friends remember above all things her quiet influence for good, and her strong sense of humour. R.I.P. ADA GWYNNE YOUNGHUGHES

MARGARET LOCKET (nee PICKFORD) MARGARET LOCKET'S death in August of last year, following so swiftly on the birth of her second son, Andrew, has brought a poignant sense of loss to all who knew her. She had been so happy at the prospect of another child that we had all forgotten how dangerous an enterprise she was engaged upon. Our heartfelt sympathy goes out to her husband and family in their sorrow. Margaret Pickford, as she then was, came up to St. Hugh's in 1918 and was one of that very happy band who enjoyed College to its full in the immediate post-war years. To us all it seemed a time of hope and infinite possibilities, and Margaret as much as any shared in this. She was then, as always, of an inquiring mind, intolerant of all kinds of shams, proving all things, holding fast to those which were good. She took 'groups' in classics and Hindu law, thus vindicating the value of a non-honours degree as a preliminary to a many-sided life. She never let her intellectual interests wane, and her latest venture was learning Russian. At Oxford she was a devoted member of the Bach Choir, and all through her life music remained her chief delight, an interest which later, when her husband became Science Master at Harrow, brought her into direct contact with the school, where 8


`her fierce loyalty to good standards was at once an encouragement and corrective'. Margaret's contribution to the world was pre-eminently by what she was, and the actual achievements of her life were of secondary importance to the character and quality of the life she lived. It is easy to dwell on her gifts of intelligence, her originality, and forthrightness of expression, her delightful sense of humour. But though these are not to be lightly forgotten, it is for other qualities that her memory will live in our hearts, for her integrity, her kindliness, her spontaneous generosity, and all those other characteristics which made her the most lovable of friends. A. D. H. MARGERY HELEN ORMOND WILSON (née WACE) MARGERY WACE (Mrs. Ormond Wilson) was one of the most notable among the many women whose devoted work in these war years should leave an imperishable record. Quiet, unassuming, almost diffident, and with a slight defect of speech that masked without hiding the vigour of her mind, she seemed mutely to appeal for help and guidance from others when she was generously helping and guiding them. Under Mr. (now Sir) Cecil Graves, she was the soul of the B.B.C. Empire Service, if not its real creator. Certainly it would not have been created and carried on triumphantly, amid technical difficulties and despite obstacles of incomprehension, had not her unwearying toil been given to it night and day or if her charm and self-devotion had not awakened and sustained among those who worked with her a strong sense of personal loyalty and of enthusiasm for the idea she served. She gave herself utterly to a cause—the cause of fuller understanding and deeper mutual trust between the members of the British Commonwealth and Empire. The physical courage she showed during the 'blitz' was but an outward sign of the unflinching moral courage which marked all her work. She knew she was giving her health and—as the event has sorrowfully proved—perhaps her life to the task of bending the waves of the ether to her sedulous purpose and undeviating will. Again and again during the Battle of Britain, or when a Nazi spokesman expectorated some unusually monstrous falsehood, she would run great risks to convince foreign, especially American, doubters that British fighters were winning the battle, or to demolish the Nazi lie before it could reach the ends of the earth. The censors may not always have loved her. Her collaborators thought no effort too hard and no hour too late—or early—to stand by her. She was, I believe, a great-niece of the veteran Dean Wace of Canterbury, whose pen was often at the service of The Times in the days of Delane. A full share of his journalistic skill fell to her lot. Cumbrous scripts would be put in good broadcasting order in the twinkling of an eye. Her suggestions to contributors were terse and clear. Among her colleagues none gave her more valiant support than the steadfast, reserved New Zealander, Ormond Wilson, who became her husband. To him and, presently, to their infant daughter it may be some solace to know how deeply others share their grief and their affection. WICKHAM STEED (Reprinted by kind permission of The Times.)

9


JOAN EDITH IRONSIDE JOAN IRONSIDE was killed by enemy action on the night of March 3rd, 1943. With her died her mother and her aunt. She was within a fortnight of her thirty-first birthday. Those who were with Joan at College in the years 1932-4 will not need to be reminded of her. Slight and barely five feet tall, she made an excellent Tom Thumb in Fielding's play of that name. But she was not stunted in body or mind. She had a vital personality, great physical and mental energy, an incisive wit that was often brilliant, but above all an intellectual honesty which, whatever illusions the rest of us might cherish about ourselves, would not allow her a moment of self-deception. She read English Language and Literature not primarily for aesthetic reasons or because she wished to impart knowledge but because she loved people and life, and English Literature was her source book. The same unsentimental affection for people made her decide to make social work her career. After a brief business training she spent some months as a welfare worker, working in Bristol and Salisbury and living happily on a week with workingclass families. But the life was too circumscribed and she came back to London to learn her job thoroughly. After six months' voluntary work in an office of the Charity Organization Society, she joined the temporary staff of the London County Council as an Assistant Organizer of Children's Care Work. She was soon appointed to the permanent staff and worked on both the general and medical sides of the Council's school care work. About a year before her death she had become a Senior Organizer. In the early years of the war she worked strenuously for the evacuation scheme and had a wide experience of its difficulties and opportunities, both from the London end and in the reception areas. Latterly she had become deeply interested in adult education in general and in the Workers' Educational Association in particular. In the autumn she delivered a course of lectures on 'Eighteenth Century Literature'. She had herself some of the best qualities of that century—honesty of mind, courage of speculation, ease of social manner, and that readiness of retort and brightness of wit which those who knew her best cannot believe are extinguished by death. K. D.

MARRIAGES MOYRA ACASTER tO MR. J. BILTCLIFFE, October 23rd, 1943. DIANA ANTONA-TRAVERSI to LT. D. M. CUSHING, April 29th, 1943. MARIE BARBIER tO MR. CARL P. BARBIER, May 2oth, 1943. MARY BURCH to MR. C. H. BALF, August 4th, 1943. STELLA IRENE CADOGAN (nee ZILLIACUS) tO LT.-COL. D. R. ELLIAS, November

1943.

6th,

HESTER RENEE MARGUERITE COBB to MR. ATKINSON, April 29th, 1943. GWENDOLEN ELEANOR DAVIES tO the REV. W. S. HOWELL, August r7th, 1943. PRUDENCE BARBARA DAVIES to MR. C. E. LEIGHTON THOMSON, July 7th, 1943. JEAN AGNES DIXON tO SUB.-LT. GORDON MEYER, January 16th, 1943. IO


ANN MARGARET EARLY to FLIGHT.-LIEUT. K. D. POTTER, March 6th, 1943. LEONORA FALLAS to MR. D. R. WILCOX, April zoth, 1943. OCTAVIA BRIDGETT FAWCETT to MR. E. C. THOMPSON, August 7th, 1943. MARCIA HELEN GILLETT to LT. A. MARSDEN, R.A., September i6th, 1943. BEATRICE MARY HAMILTON THOMPSON to the REV. T. G. JALLAND, D.D., January

r2th, 1944. PHYLLIS RACHEL HORSEMAN tO 2ND.-LT. B. F. GROOM,

The Buffs, March 29th,

1943. PARVATI MUKTABAI KUMARAMANGALAM to MR. KRISHMAN, 1942. MARGARET LANE to the EARL OF HUNTINGDON, February 1st, 1944. DIANA MORGANS to MR. ALVAR ANDERSON, June 4th, 1943. JOAN MARJORIE RAWLINSON tO LT. D. SCOTT, U.S.A. Army Signal Corps,

De-

cember z ith, 194.2. JEANNE MARGARET RICHARDSON to MR. P. M. F. FITZPATRICK, September 25th,1943. NORA COMPIGNg SHAW to the REV. W. F. M. SCOTT, December 17th, 1943. FRANCES HELEN ELIZABETH SHEPSTONE to MR. L. KNIBBS, 1941. LIESA LOTTIE STAVE tO MR. S. MACDONALD, June 1941. JOAN TRESISE to MR. J. R. HARDFORTH, M.D., July 17th, 1943.

BIRTHS MRS. ALGIE (C. Upton)—a daughter, Elizabeth Margaret, 1943. MRS. BAGGALEY (H. Bradbroke)—a son, June 21st, 1943. MRS. BARRY (R. Wynne)—a daughter, May 14th, 1943. MRS. BAYLEY (J. M. L. Greaves)—a daughter, Clare Valerie Linford,

July 8th,

1943. MRS. BROWNRIGG (M. Miles)—a daughter, June 9th, 1943. MRS. CARTLEDGE (K. M. Harris)—a daughter, August izth, 1943. MRS. CLAY (A. Clarence)—a son, Daniel Paulman, January loth, 1944. MRS. COLLIS (A. Brunyate)—a son, Antony Thomas Gurney, November

3rd,

943.

1

MRS. CORNWELL (E. M. C. Wilkes)—a son, October 8th, 1943. MRS. CREE (D. Fraser)—a daughter, December 3rd, 1943. MRS. DICEY (D. M. Doveton)—a daughter, Nicola Joyce, December 8th, 1943. MRS. DOUGHTERTY (R. Sykes)—a son, Christopher Robert Sykes, July 1943. MRS. DU PARCQ (E. A. Poole)—a son, June 13th, 1943. MRS. FARISH (A. C. Stephenson)—a daughter, Catherine Ruth, August i2th,

1943. MRS. GEACH (G. Anscombe)—a daughter, Barbara, August 12th, 1943. MRS. GILLINGHAM (B. Gimson)—a daughter, Jane, August 6th, 1943. MRS. HARGREAVES (P. Loveday)—a daughter, November 18th, 1942. MRS. HEDLEY (E. Lavington)—a daughter, November i3th, 1943. MRS. IREMONGER (L. Parks)—a daughter, October 6th, 1943. MRS. JONES (J. Wiltshire)—a daughter, Audrey, April r2th, 1943. MRS. LOCKET (M. Pickford)—a son, Andrew Richard, August 21st, 1943. MRS. KNIBBS (F. H. E. Shepstone)—a son, Peter John, April 12th, 1942. MRS. MANIFOLD (H. Bloodworth)—a son, January 29th, 1944. MRS. MISCHLER (H. Newell)—a son, October 1943. MRS. MONK GIBBON (W. Dingwall)—a son, January 1943. II


MRS. RUTHERFORD (M. E. E. McDougall)—a son, February 4th, 1944. MRS. SALT (0. Shapley)—a son, August 15th, 1943. MRS. SMYTHE (A. C. Dewhurst)—a daughter, Lydia Catherine, March

943.

1

MRS. TICKELL (R. Haynes)—a son, April zest, MRS. TURNER (L. Taylor)—a daughter, Hilary

25th,

1943. Lovise, August 1942.

PUBLICATIONS The Service of Youth Book. Desiree Edwards-Rees, M.A., F.R.Hist.S. Religious Education Press, Ltd., 1943. 3s. 6d. `MS. Bodl. 292 and the Canon of Nicholas Trevet's Works.' Speculum, xvii. z

(April, 1942), pp. 243-9. R. J. Dean, D.Phil.

Chateaubriand: a Biography. Joan Evans, D.Litt. Macmillan, 1943. 12s. 6d.

`The Fauna of an Upland Pond and its Inflowing Stream, at Ystumtuen, North Cardiganshire, Wales.' Journal of Animal Ecology, vol. ii, No. 2, pp. 165-81, November 1942. E. M. D. Laurie, M.Sc. `The dissolved Oxygen of an Upland Pond and its Inflowing Stream, at Ystumtuen, North Cardiganshire, Wales.' Journal of Ecology, vol. xxx, No. 2, August 1942. E. M. D. Laurie, M.Sc. `Avascular Heating in the Cornea.' Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology, lv. B. P. Pullinger and Ida Mann, M.A. `The Pathology of Cholesterin and Fat Deposition in Mustard Gas Injuries of the Cornea.' British Journal of Ophthalmology, 503. Ida Mann and B. P. Pullinger. Race and Politics in Kenya. Margery Perham, M.A., and Elspeth Huxley. Faber and Faber, 1943. 125. 6d. `Religious Education.' Supplement to Christian News Letter, No. 200, January 26th, 1944. Marjorie Reeves, M.A. Food and Farming in Post-war Europe. P. L. Yates and D. Warriner, M.A. (World Today Series), O.U.P., 1943. 3s. 6d.

NEWS OF SENIOR MEMBE S WHO WENT DOWN IN 1943 After 4 or 3 years M. D. G. BOYALL, B. M. CHILD, M. M. OLDHAM, M. B. PRITCHARD, D. L. ROWLEY, M. K. B. WILKINS are reading for the Oxford Diploma in the Theory, History,

and Practice of Education. A. F. G. ALEXANDER, M. P. CIANTAR, J. M. HEPBURN, R. JONES, H. M. P. MONFRIES: W.R.N.S. R. L. BEAUMONT, R. RIEU, M. J. RIGBY, M. I. M. SMITH, P. T. THOMSON

are in

various branches of the A.T.S. R. A. ANDREWS, I. R. HODGSON: W.A.A.F. S. M. CASTOR, D. COLBECK, N. P. LITTLEWOOD, J. V. MCQUILLEN, MRS. THOMPSON (O. B. FAWCETT), H. M. WATTS: Foreign Office. I2


B. W. BROWN, 0. D. REYNOLDS: Ministry of Town and Country Planning. M. G. BEAMISH. Training for Labour Management. S. A. BOTCHARSKY. Ministry of Economic Warfare. E. B. B. DAY. Research Assistant, Post-war Commodity Policy and British Relief Department, Board of Trade. P. DAY WINTER. Assistant in Filing Section, P.O.W. Library. E. DRESEL. British Coal Utilization Research Association. M. E. EADE. Teachers' Training Department, University of Leeds. M. R. ELDRIDGE. Teaching. N. ELLIOTT. Women's Land Army. R. FANNING. Passport Control Department. MRS. GROOM (P. R. Horseman). Temporary Assistant Principal, Admiralty. M.-L. C. E. HENDTLASS. B.B.C. N. R. HOARE is working in a Community of Germans, preparing for theological and pastoral work in the Reich. MRS. KRISHMAN (P. Kumaramangalam). Broadcasting to India on Western music and organizing regular B.B.C. talks and programmes for women. J. E. LAMBERT. Training for work as Hospital Almoner. M. C. LEGERTON. Ministry of Aircraft Production. MRS. LEONARD (V. P. Swann). Research Assistant to Professor of Genetics, University of Cambridge. c. M. LILLEYMAN. Research with firm of chemists. M. LOFTS. Royal Aircraft Establishment. J. C. MORLAND. Training for Labour Management. MRS. POWELL (A. H. Johnson). Classics Mistress, Sherborne School for Girls. R. M. P. SWAIN. S.C.M. Woman Secretary of S.W. region (Cambridge included). J. M. SYKES. Teacher, Training Department, University of Liverpool.

After 2 years P. BEER. Lecturer in English, St. Katherine's Training College, Liverpool. M. BRITTAIN, E. M. C. LIDDIARD, D. R. DAVIE, M. N. WHITTAKER: A.T.S. B. W. BROWN, D. D. REYNOLDS. Ministry of Town and Country Planning. H. CARTWRIGHT. Ministry of Post-war Reconstruction.

z. J. GARRETT. Foreign Office. I. E. LAMBERT. Training as Hospital Almoner. E. M. D. LAURIE. Research Assistant (Rodent Control) Agricultural Research Council (Bureau of Animal Population) August 1943. D. P. MACLEAN. Training for Labour Management. A. RAINE. Probationer at Wingfield Orthopaedic Hospital. A. M. WEEKS: W.R.N.S. M. L. WOODWARD. Post at Admiralty. E. M. WRIGHT. Industrial Trainee; now in industrial establishment. M. E. YOCKNEY. Teaching English, French, and Latin at Warwick (Boys' Public) School. After 1- year M. JACOB. Nursery School Teaching. E. H. MARSH. Preparatory School Teaching.

13


APPOINTMENTS AND NEWS I. J.

BAKER, B.A. Almoner, Sunderland Royal Infirmary, 1944. A. H. BISHOP, B.A. Foreign Office. D. BISHOP, B.A. Modern Language Mistress, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Church High School (at Alnwick Castle), September 1943. F. E. BRAMLEY, B.A. Classics Mistress, Redland High School, Bristol. B. C. H. BRODIE, B.A. Modern Language Mistress, Twickenham County School. H. M. BRYANT, M.A. Principal's Secretary, Somerville College (reappointment). O. M. CHANDLER, M.A. Juvenile Employment Officer, County of Cambridge. J. S. A. CHAPPAT, B.A. Fellowship at Radcliffe College. She has been engaged in two or three months' Field work in Anthropology in Arizona. MRS. CONKLING (C. L. Sowby), M.A. Is now living at Evanston, Illinois. Her husband, the Rt. Rev. W. E. Conkling, was consecrated Bishop of Chicago in 1941. L. CRANKSHAW, B.A. History Mistress, Oakfield School, Arnside, September 1943. U. M. S. DACOMBE, B.A. Women's Land Army (dairy work). Her farm diary has been published periodically in the Farmers' Weekly for the last 18 months. R. J. DEAN, M.A., D.PHIL. Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Fellowship, 1944 (to work on a book on Trevet), awarded by the American Association of University Women. Guest-Resident member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, New Jersey. z. M. DIGGINES, B.A. Factory Inspector. E. M. DUGGAN, B.A. Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Hygiene and Tropical Diseases, London, W.C. I. A. M. S. DUNN, B .A. English Mistress, Worcester Secondary School. A. A. B. FAIRLIE, D.PHIL., B.A. Lecturer in French, Girton College, as from October 1944. s. DE C. FORSTER, M.A. Assistant Director of Social Studies, University College, Nottingham. N. W. GAMON, B.A. Work at Admiralty. MRS. GILLINGHAM (B. Gimson), B.A. Part-time appointment, teaching mathematics, at Bedales School, Petersfield. D. M. GILMOUR, B.A. Geography Mistress, Nottingham High School. E. GOLD, B.A. Is nursing in London. P. M. M. GRAHAM, M.A. Is on the staff of Makerere College, Uganda, and is opening up higher education for African women in East Africa. B. w. GREEN, B.A. Post Office Censorship Department. F. HANSON, B.A. Assistant History Mistress, Accrington High School. S. HARBOTTLE, B.A. Junior Administrator Assistant, Admiralty (Honours Awards Board). D. D. HARRIS, B.A. House Property Manager, under Ministry of Supply. K. A. HASLAM, B.A. Post in Dutch Government Information Bureau. A. H. HEDLEY, M.A. Classics Mistress, King Edward's School, Birmingham, September 1943. M. N. HENSMAN, M.A. Headmistress, St. Bride's School, Helensburgh, 1943. C. HORNBY, B.A. After a year's service in W.A.A.F. obtained her release at the end of 1943, to accept an appointment under the London County 14


Council in connexion with the requisitioning of houses for bombed-out citizens. B. HOW, B.A. Junior History Mistress, Nottingham High School. J. M. HUSSEY, M.A., B.LITT. Lecturer in History, Bedford College, University of London, October 1943. D. IBBERSON, M.A. Welfare Officer in Trinidad, 1943. MRS. IREMONGER (L. Parks), M.A. Position with the Man Power Board, Auckland, N.Z., interviewing women under 3o, called up for essential work; now returned to England. MRS. JAFFII (G. Spurway), M.A. Professor of Social Science, Barat College, Lake Forest, U.S.A. M. E. KING, M.A. Head of Modern Language Department, Redland High School, Bristol. A. A. E. LEVINSON, B.A. Work at Admiralty. F. LONGBOTTOM, B.A. Scripture Mistress, Dudley High School. M. E. LOWE, M.A. Classics Mistress, Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School, Penrith. MRS. MACDONALD (L. Stave), B.A. Private Secretary to Managing Director of S. H. Benson, Ltd. (Advertising Agents). M. MACDONALD, M.A. Staff Officer, Supreme Headquarters, Allied Expeditionary Force, 1943. MRS. MCINTOSH (M. Betts), M.A. History Mistress, Wigan High School. E. B. MACKINLAY, B.A. Assistant Mistress (English), Leeds High School. E. N. MACLEAN, M.A. Senior History Mistress, St. Leonard's School, St. Andrews, September 1943. E. I. MARSHALL, B.A. Joined W.R.N.S. in an administrative capacity for services abroad. MRS. MARTIN (F. H. Moore), B.A. Is interned with her husband and four children in Cheefoo. MRS. MILLER (E. W. Tanner), B.A. History Mistress, City of London School for Girls. A. B. Y. MITCHELL, B.A. Post at Admiralty. M. OSBORN, M.A. Headmistress, St. George's School, Edinburgh, 1943. D. E. PENNY, B.A. Nursing in an Indian Hospital. M. F. PERHAM, M.A. Has left England for the West Indies on a Commission appointed by the Secretary of State to review existing facilities for higher education in the British Colonies in the Caribbean, and to make recommendations regarding University development for these colonies. L. POWYS ROBERTS, B.A. Postal and Telegraph Censorship Office in the north of England. M. L. REEPMAKER D'ORVILLE, B.A. Foreign Office. M. F. RICHARDSON, B.A., B.M. House Surgeon, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford. M. I. M. ROGER, M.A. Secretary of the London (Ontario) Council of Social Agencies, 1943. P. M. RUSSELL, B.A. Temporary Assistant Civilian in Operations Division of the Naval Staff, Admiralty, since 1992. M. E. RYALL, B.A. English Mistress, Chichester High School. MRS. SANDERS (I. M. Townsend), B.A. Post at Admiralty. F. E. SCURFIELD, B.A. Regional Personnel Officer, M.A.P. J. E. SEYMOUR, M.A. W.R.N.S. 15


M. R. B. SHAW, M.A. Form-Master, Repton School, Derby. MRS. SMITH (S. Tilling), B.A. Temporary secretary, Charity

Organization

Society. Is teaching English at St. Columba's Castle School, Kilmorden. M. S. STANDEVEN, B.A. English Mistress, Thomlinson Girls' School, Wigton. 0. M. SWEETING, M.A. Classics Mistress, St. Helen's, Northwood (evacuated to Tregoyd). D. M. THORNTON, B.A. Medico-social work in London Hospital, and research under Medical Research Council, Department of Industrial Disease, 1943. E. C. VOLLANS, B.A. Geography Mistress, Bradford High School. A. M. WATSON, B.A. Probation Officer for Colchester. D. U. C. WESTON, B.A. English Mistress, Sutton Coldfield High School. B. WOLFF, B.SC. Histologist in Cancer Research, London Hospital, January 1944. E. R. SNODGRASS, B.A.

EDITO 'S NOTE N case it is, again, not possible this year to send out the usual forms with .11. requests for particulars of news, Senior Members are asked to inform either the Secretary, St. Hugh's College, at Holywell Manor, Oxford, or the Editor of the Chronicle (Mrs. Jalland, St. Thomas's Vicarage, Oxford) of any particulars of interest which they would like included in the next publication of the Chronicle. Every effort will be made to publish any news received, though shortage of paper naturally may make curtailment necessary. Changes of addresses should be sent to the Secretary.

PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS, OXFORD BY JOHN JOHNSON, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY