St Hugh's College, Oxford - Chronicle 1931-1932

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ST. HUGH'S COLLEGE

CHRONICLE 19 3 1 - 3 2 Number 4

ASSOCIATION OF SENIOR MEMBERS



FO UNDRESS: DAME ELIZABETH WORDSWORTH, D.B.E., Hon. M.A., Hon. D.C.L.

BENEFACTORS: CLARA EVELYN MORDAN. EDWARD GAY. ELIZA MARY THOMAS. CHARLES SELWYN AWDRY. PHILIP MAURICE DENEKE. MARY GRAY ALLEN. JOHN GAMBLE. MARY MONICA CUNLIFFE WILLS EVELYN MARTINENGO CESARESCO



ST. HUGH'S COLLEGE ASSOCIATION OF SENIOR MEMBERS

Chairman. THE PRINCIPAL.

Hon. Secretary: MISS M. F. PERHAM [1929-32•

Editor of the Chronicle, 1930-2: MISS B. M. HAMILTON THOMPSON, St. Hugh's College, Oxford.


CONTENTS PAGE FRONTISPIECE FOUNDRESS AND BENEFACTORS . OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION .

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VISITOR, HON. FELLOWS AND COUNCIL . PRINCIPAL, TUTORS, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS, ETC. REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION

THE EXAMINATION IN HOLY SCRIPTURE .

THE 'OXFORD GROUP' .

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THE JUNIOR COMMON ROOM

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THE GAUDY

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THE PRINCIPAL'S LETTER

DEGREES HONOUR SCHOOLS,

1931

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THE RESEARCH STUDENTSHIP FUND A NOTE FROM MISS WARDALE

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UNDERGRADUATES IN RESIDENCE, 1931-2

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ST. HUGH'S CLUB

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OBITUARY

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MARRIAGES

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BIRTHS PUBLICATIONS APPOINTMENTS, 1931-2

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NEWS OF SENIOR MEMBERS WHO WENT DOWN IN 1931

CLARA EVELYN MORDAN SCHOLARS

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HURRY PRIZE-WINNERS

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NEWS OF SENIOR MEMBERS

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Visitor. THE RIGHT HON. EDGAR ALGERNON ROBERT, VISCOUNT CECIL OF CHELWOOD, M.A., HON. D.C.L.

Hon. Fellows: ELIZABETH WORDSWORTH, D.B.E., HON. M.A., HON. D.C.L. CHARLOTTE ANNE ELIZABETH MOBERLY, HON. M.A. BEATRICE MARGARET SPARKES, M.A. EDITH ELIZABETH WARDALE, M.A., PH.D. (Zurich).

Council. BARBARA ELIZABETH GWYER, M.A., Principal. PERCY COMYN LYON, M.A., Oriel, Chairman and Treasurer. CHARLOTTE ANNE ELIZABETH MOBERLY, Hon. M.A., Hon. Fellow. EDITH ELIZABETH WARDALE, M.A., Hon. Fellow. ELIZABETH ANNIE FRANCIS, M.A., Official Fellow. MARGERY FREDA PERHAM, M.A. Research Fellow. MARY ETHEL SEATON, M.A., Official Fellow, Secretary to the Council. EVELYN EMMA STEFANOS PROCTER, M.A., Official Fellow. GERTRUDE THORNEYCROFT, Official Fellow. CECILIA MARY ADY, M.A., Research Fellow. MARY REAVELEY GLOVER, M.A., Official Fellow. DAISY EMILY MARTIN CLARKE (Mrs.), Official Fellow. JOHN LINTON MYRES, M.A., Fellow of New College. ANNIE MARY ANNE HENLEY ROGERS, M.A. REV. VICTOR JOHN KNIGHT BROOK, M.A., Censor of St. Catherine's

Society. JOAN EVANS, B.LITT. REV. BURNETT HILLMAN STREETER, M.A., Fellow of Queen's. CHARLES RICHARD MORRIS, M.A., Fellow of Balliol. ELFRIDA MARY TALBOT, M.A. DORA IBBERSON, M.A. MAUDE AGNES KENNARD DAVIS (Mrs.), M.A. SIR BASIL PHILLOTT BLACKETT, M.A., University. REV. ROBERT HENRY LIGHTFOOT, M.A., Fellow of New College. DOUGLAS VEALE, M.A., Fellow of Corpus Christi.

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Principal. B. E. GWYER, M.A.

Tutors. E. A. FRANCIS, M.A., Vice-Principal. M. E. SEATON, M.A., F.R.S.L. E. E. S. PROCTER, M.A. M. R. GLOVER, M.A. D. E. MARTIN-CLARKE (Mrs.), M.A.

French. English Literature. History. Philosophy and Classics.

(Cantab.) English Language.

Assistant Tutors. M. A. LEISHMAN, M.A., B.SC. A. HEADLAM-MORLEY, B.A., B.LITT.

Science. Politics and Economics.

Lecturer. D. M. WRINCH (Mrs.), M.A., D.SC., F.R.A.S.

Mathematics.

Administrative Officers. Bursar.

Librarian.

G. THORNEYCROFT, B.A. (Birm.). B. M. HAMILTON THOMPSON, M.A.

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Assistant Bursar.

Principal's Secretary.

S. F. SALT.

M. FOWLE.


REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION, 1931 PrHE Sixth Annual Meeting of the Association was held on Satur-

it day, June 27th, 1931, and was attended by 107 members. The election of Mrs. Kennard Davis by the Association as a Member of the Council of the College was announced. Miss Hamilton. Thompson, on the motion of Miss Goodenough, seconded by Miss Procter, was appointed Editor of the CHRONICLE for 1931-2. The Chairman reminded members that the Jubilee of the College would take place in 1936, and invited the latter to consider, in view of their annually increasing number, the problem of accommodation at that date, and at future Gaudies, for discussion at the next meeting. There were present : B. Greenhalgh The Chairman D. M. Griffiths S. M. Andrews G. C. Grigg G. Arrowsmith B. M. Hamilton Thompson C. Awdry-Nicks D. M. Hammonds E. T. Bazeley R. W. Hare M. A. Bellamy P. Hartnoll N. Bentley T. R. Haslop L. I. G. Bickmore C. A. M. Havergal E. M. Bone M. W. Hensman M. M. Bone V. Higgin L. T. Bradbury K. N. H. Hoare M. Chappel D. Hudson M. M. Chattaway H. Humphreys J. E. Clarke W. F. Hutchinson M. Clarkson E. Jay-Browne P. M. A. Cooper M. Jones D. Darker J. A. Johnston E. Daws M. Kennard Davis M. Dean V. Keppel Compton R. J. Dean G. B. Lacey J. M. Dick M. L. Lardelli H. F. Douglas M. L. Lea K. M. Elliott L. F. Limpus K. J. Ellis W. M. Mammatt J. Evans M. H. Mansell T. M. E. Evans D. Martin-Hurst E. De L. Fagan M. Mathews E. A. Francis M. B. Maynard M. Garner V. E. Miskin C. Gent R. J. Mitchell E. Gent B. H. Moberly M. H. Gent N. Moller L. E. Glover M. Moore C. P. Goodenough


D. B. Morgan I. Morris H. Moss W. R. Murrell M. Neill M. Nichol-Smith M. C. Owen G. J. Parsons J. Paterson M. G. Peebles M. F. Perham, Secretary A. C. Percival D. K. Peters D. Pope M. L. Potter E. S. Procter W. A. Pronger F. Randolph C. L. A. Richardson D. M. L. Rippon

M. E. Robertson F. Robinson A. M. A. H. Rogers A. D. Rowntree M. E. Seaton G. M. S. Simey J. I. Smith E. M. Talbot V. K. Tallent F. Thelwell E. M. Thomas M. Tudor P. Tyacke E. E. Wardale J. Watson B. Watts M. M. Wilde G. M. B. Williams E. Wilson J. Winnington-Ingram

THE GAUDY

rHE Gaudy was held during the week-end of June 26th to June

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.1 29th. At the Dinner on June 27th the usual toasts of 'The King',

`The Association', and 'The College' were drunk, and speeches proposing and acknowledging them were made by the Principal, President of the Association, Miss M. F. Perham, Secretary of the Association, Mrs. Kennard Davis, the newly-elected Member of Council, and Miss A. C. Percival. There was a celebration of Holy Communion in the College Chapel on Sunday, June 28th, at 8 a.m., at which the Rev. Dr. T. H. Archer Houblon, formerly Chairman of the Council, was the celebrant.

THE PRINCIPAL'S LIETTE DEAR MISS HAMILTON THOMPSON, Y annual Oxford letter shall give first place to the news which perhaps will gratify Senior Members most : the two benefactions of 1931-2—a bequest of £I,000 from the late Dame Mary Monica Cunliffe Wills, and another of 43,500, together with some plate, books, and pictures, from the late Countess Evelyn Martinengo Cesaresco. The first legacy we owe to Dame Monica's general interest in women's education, possibly also to her awareness of our various links with Clifton and Bristol; the second comes to us from a friend of the late Miss Jourdain, who shared with her an interest in Dante studies,

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and in whose time she visited St. Hugh's and approved of what she saw there. The Countess was an Englishwoman by birth, the widow of an Italian and herself not without some inheritance of Italian blood. An engraving of the beautiful portrait by Lawrence of her Italian grandmother, Lady Carrington, of which the original is in the Victoria and Albert Museum, is among the pictures left to the College. Our benefactress was a woman of wide culture, who sought steadily to bring Italy and England into closer touch. Her works, of which I give a list in the footnote,' indicate the range of her sympathies. The best known is The Liberation of Italy, which owes much to the personal friendship between her husband and herself and the leading Italian patriots. Miss Ady tells me she remembers in 1913 inviting her to Oxford to lecture on the Risorgimento to the historical society known as the 'Hundred Moot', and she has a letter from her dated May 4th, x924, which records the opinion that at St. Hugh's education, and not mere instruction, was in progress. I hope she would think so still. In accordance with the conditions of the bequest, which the testatrix directed should be applied to the promotion of Italian studies, the Martinengo Cesaresco Lectureship, with facilities for research and teaching, has been founded. The first appointment is to be of a woman qualified to lecture and give instruction in the language and literature of Italy, and it is the intention of the Council to make it before October next. The interest on the bequest accruing up to that date is being devoted to Italian books for the Library, including Muratori, Rerum Italicarum Scriptores. The £1,000 inherited from Dame Monica Wills has been added to the Fund for research, which owes so much already to the support of Senior Members. The College is not without hope that by 1933 (our aim for some time past) there may be an income of about £150 per annum available for a succession of former undergraduates of the College duly selected by the Research Committee of the Council as qualified for higher study. I need hardly say that we are most anxious personal and individual effort should be in no way relaxed. Foreign travel under existing conditions would be impracticable on such a sum; and a steady inflow of further gifts is urgently needed. Senior Members will, I think, be pleased to learn that the Foundress of the College has consented to allow the first studentship endowed from this Fund to be named after her, and it will henceforth be known, therefore, as the Elizabeth Wordsworth Studentship. The income from the Gamble Bequest of £3,000 reported in Essays in the Study of Folk-Songs. 1886. Italian Characters in the Epoch of Unification. 189o. Glimpses of Italian Society in the Eighteenth Century, from the Journey of Mrs. Piozzi. 1892. The Liberation of Italy (1815-7o). 1895. Cavour. 1898. Lombard Studies. 1902. The Place of Animals in Human Thought. 19o9. Outdoor Life in Greek and Roman Poets. 1911.

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a former letter has also been reserved as to two-thirds for purposes connected with research. Graduates (not necessarily former undergraduates) of the College in need of help for approved specific objects such as publishing costs, visits to foreign libraries and archives, &c., may apply for grants not exceeding £ioo in amount from the John Gamble Fund. I shall at any time be glad to hear from any graduate of the College who may be contemplating such an application, and with the help of the Committee to offer her my advice. All awards, renewals, grants, reports, &c., in this sphere are now committed to the hands of this new Committee, which is to be elected annually by the Council, and has power also to obtain expert advice. The present members, in addition to the Chairman and the Principal, are Miss Francis, Miss Evans, and Professor Myres. The allocation to Funds capable of indefinite expansion of the Gamble and Wills bequests, and the appointment of this Research Committee, represent a definite advance on the part of the College along lines we have long recognized as vitally important. Our resources, owing to the paramount need for structural extension, are for the present limited; but the cadre is now there, and I have no doubt at all that progress, if gradual, will be uninterrupted.' The remaining one-third of the Gamble Bequest has gone to endow a small Lectureship, available for a woman engaged in teaching some subject not sufficiently read in the College to provide for any full-time appointment. The Gamble Lectureship is this year devoted to the subject of Chemistry and is accordingly held by Miss Leishman, Assistant Tutor in Science. There are now eighteen junior members of the College reading for Honours or for higher Degrees in the Physical and Biological Sciences—a considerable increase. The Honour School of Geography has been brought appreciably nearer by the appointment of a Professor to the newly instituted University Chair; his name is expected shortly to be announced. Miss Goulding's marriage in September, after the tenure for six years of her Official Fellowship and for seven of her Tutorship in Modern French, deprived the College of a most competent organizer and specialist, whose position in the Honour School of Modern Languages, indicated by her appointment in 1931 for three years as University Examiner, will not be easy to fill. Captain and Mrs. West are now in Malta, but expect to be ordered elsewhere fairly soon. Mrs. Martin Clarke, Tutor in English Language, has been elected, on reappointment after her first year, to an Official Fellowship. Apropos of our plans for aiding research, it is of interest to note that the University also has lately extended its powers to make grants of the same nature, and Sect. iv of Statute XII 'Of the Committee for Advanced Studies' now runs : `The Committee shall have power to make grants of money for or towards the publication of any dissertation for which leave to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy has been granted to an Advanced Student, and of any thesis for which a Certificate has been granted entitling a student to supplicate for the Degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Letters.' I0


Miss Perham's Research Fellowship has been renewed, and this distinction is now combined with another—her election to the first Fellowship awarded by the International Institute of African Cultures and Languages under its new scheme, financed by the Rockefeller Trust, for research into African social life. Miss Perham sailed to West Africa in November, but returns to Oxford this year for a period, and hopes to go out again to East Africa, this time for much longer, later in 1932. The further proof of confidence in her powers is a great gratification to the College. It is a little difficult to comment with free and fluent pen on your own appointment for two years as Librarian, in succession to Miss Procter, who laid down office in 1931 after seeing to its conclusion, with your help, the reorganization and reclassification begun by Miss Perham with the help of Miss Downie. Suffice it to say, for the benefit of your readers, that the appointment has proved as auspicious as welcome, for within six months a gift of volumes from Dr. Selbie's theological library was reported. This generous addition to our equipment for the first of Honour Schools—and one in which the College has won some distinction of late—has (I need not say) overwhelmed the shelves allotted to that subject in the Library. Such will be the case with every other section about two years from now. That the College Council has accepted a report recommending that at the end of that period 'designs should be available for a library with capacity for 20,000 volumes and capable of expansion, or with capacity for 30,000 volumes' is a matter of profound satisfaction to Principal and Fellows, who, agog to see accelerated the intake of new books, know this policy to be impracticable while floor-space and shelves remain stationary. I had the pleasure of attending the foundation-stone laying of the new chapel at Lady Margaret Hall last month, and saw the fine pile of buildings which is rising there under the impetus of the Harkness donation and the Jubilee gifts of Senior Members. It was natural to ask myself : At our Jubilee, will that standing (or rather rising) preoccupation, the Library problem, have become a thing of the past? Miss Moberly sends her annual greeting to you all. The success of Faber and Faber's new edition of The Adventure, with E. Olivier's excellent preface, has given her much pleasure this year. Yours sincerely,

February 1932.

B. E. GWYER.

POSTSCRIPT Since the above was written the Council has made its decision on a very important matter concerning our future development, just in time for me to inform the Association before this goes to press. The death of our neighbour Sir George Whitehead a few years before the expiry of his lease of a tract of land lying west of the College grounds (behind Nos. 8o, 78, 76, 74, on the eastern side of the Woodstock Road), together with the approaching expiry of the lease of a smaller intervening tract in the occupation of Alderman Ansell, raised the question, as between the owners, St. John's College, and II


ourselves, as to the future destiny of this whole area, about two acres in extent, and of the roadway into one corner of it lying between the Mary Gray Allen Wing and No. I St. Margaret's Road. After a period of anxious thought and negotiation, it has been decided, with the help of St. John's College, which has offered to allow half the purchase-money to remain on mortgage, to buy the site, and so to secure the College permanently against all possible unwelcome contingencies in its neighbourhood, at the same time making sure of the best aspect and of a perfectly free hand for ultimate building extensions of our own. (Whatever form these may take, space for lacrosse and a fortiori for hockey should also be assured.) A condition attached by the vendors, and after due consideration accepted, was the purchase of the five Woodstock Road freeholds, including No. 8z, which we already occupy, alined with the property. We shall now occupy No. 8o as well as No. 8z, and so give up the use of 13 Norham Gardens. In respect of the others, beyond receiving the ground rents we shall have no responsibilities until 1979-82, when the value of these sites to the College is likely to be considerable. The very careful administration of the College finances during the last ten years, which recently cleared off the heavy debt incurred during the War on the erection of our main buildings, together with the Mary Gray Allen benefaction (which bought our existing freeholds), has alone rendered possible this forward step when the moment for it arrived; and all members of the College, I think, recognize the debt we owe to past and present administrators as well as to our benefactress. A further period of indebtedness has no alarms for the College, the future of which rests upon the firmest basis. In 1935, when we shall be in command of the sites of No. 1 and possibly of No. z St. Margaret's Road, in addition to the intervening roadway, we hope to continue our building, and are already in consultation with the architect on the whole problem. To reduce the number of detached houses in occupation has long been our object, as I believe Senior Members know. It may be desirable to retain a certain amount of this type of accommodation, which, for those who prefer it—in particular members of the S.C.R.—secures a greater measure of quiet and homeliness than is possible in larger buildings. But for the majority of our members in residence, both senior and junior, the need of rooms, public and private, that are essentially adapted to their prime purposes of community life and of academic study, is of paramount importance; and we shall not be satisfied until the need has been met. The approach of the Jubilee makes these plans even more exciting than they would in any case be, and the vision of a large gathering of Senior Members, sharing with the resident community the thankful joy of the College in a further advance towards adequate accommodation for our life and work as members of the University of Oxford, will not be far from my mind at any moment between now and 1936. We must celebrate the occasion worthily. B. E. G. 12


THE EXAMINATION IN HOLY SCRIPTURE /ME removal of Holy Scripture from its traditional place as part of the First Public Examination at Oxford, and the subsequent unsuccessful attempt to insert it as a compulsory subject in Responsions, have excited a certain amount of comment in the newspapers and elsewhere. It is therefore considered that a brief account of the reasons giving rise to what has been described as 'at the very least, a minor landmark in the cultural development of our country', and of the counter-reasons submitted in favour of the retention of Holy Scripture as a compulsory subject, may be of interest to Senior Members, who may have been uncertain as to the true implications of the change. The proposal that Holy Scripture should no longer form part of the First Public Examination was the result of a petition signed by 13o Members of Congregation, and was embodied in a Statute the Preamble to which was considered in Congregation on November z4th, 1931. The Statute was moved purely as an educational reform, and its supporters, among whom was Dr. K. E. Kirk, Reader in Moral Theology, were particularly anxious that it should in no way be regarded as an anti-Christian move. The objections raised to the existing examination were as to its nature, and its place in the University curriculum. A Pass Examination occurring normally in the middle of an undergraduate's work for an Honours Degree was felt to be more and more of an interruption of his labours. The examination, moreover, as it stood was considered unworthy of the subjectmatter, and of the general standard of knowledge in any subject which should be required by the University. Critical or historical knowledge of the Bible was not, it was held, asked for, or encouraged. The Bible for the purpose of the then-existing examination was treated as a mere text-book, which must be 'got-up', without any stress being laid upon its intellectual, historical, or literary value. These were the main lines upon which the Statute was moved and ultimately carried, but the opposition raised fresh points which require further comment. The defence of the Statute was partly in answer to a printed paper which had been circulated upon November zoth to Members of Congregation, signed by seven names, representative of a variety of theological and philosophical schools of thought in the University, in which the objections to the proposed removal of the examination in Holy Scripture were stated. The two main grounds upon which was based the opposition were firstly the special standpoint of the Oxford educational system as being not merely vocational or utilitarian, but as including at least the rudiments of a traditional type of culture, and secondly, upon the whole structure of secondary education, the possible reaction of the removal of Holy Scripture from its place as a compulsory subject in the University. In favour of the

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cultural argument it was pleaded that some measure of acquaintance with Graeco-Roman civilization and the Christian religion, as the two outstanding factors which had moulded Europe, had always been required by our University. An elementary acquaintance with the first of these is secured by the Responsions Statute that all candidates must show a knowledge of Latin or Greek, and, save in the case of genuine conscientious objection, a similar elementary acquaintance with the second of these factors has hitherto been secured by the Examination in Holy Scripture. To quote the words of the authors of the paper: 'It appears to us that the abolition of any obligatory examination in Holy Scripture would undesirably alter the balance of this ideal—which though often not consciously present to the mind of the student, yet, we believe, exerts a real influence as an element in the intellectual atmosphere which surrounds him—in the merely utilitarian direction.' As regards the reaction upon secondary education, it was feared that Holy Scripture, when no longer a compulsory University subject, might share the place which Greek is beginning to occupy, as a subject not likely to be 'of use' in a boy's future career, and therefore condemned as an unnecessary waste of time. The deplorable ignorance of the Bible which already exists would then be increased still further. The opponents of the Statute made it very clear that they had no wish to keep the examination in its existing form; they also considered its present position in the resident student's career to be irrelevant and distracting, and therefore, generally speaking, to be an obstacle which must be overcome by 'cramming' methods. As a constructive suggestion, they would welcome any change which would associate the examination in Holy Scripture with Responsions and not with the First Public Examination, so that it could normally be taken by the student before coming into residence. They pointed out, however, that if the present examination were removed from the Statutes before a compulsory alternative was determined upon by Congregation, it was impossible to have a safeguard that the alternative proposed would be upon a compulsory footing—the essential point upon which the opponents of the Statute were determined. The debate of November z4th therefore tended to centre round a question of procedure. Both sides were agreed upon the point that the existing examination should be removed from its place in the Statute Book in its existing form, and the supporters of the Statute under consideration expressed themselves as willing that some such examination should be introduced into Responsions, and indeed bound themselves to see that the matter was brought before Congregation at some date in the near future. The question therefore resolved itself as follows. Should the existing examination be allowed to go before the new Statute was discussed, thus leaving a temporary vacuum between the two, or should it be left in its place until a new Statute embodying a compulsory examination in Holy Scripture in Responsions was brought in as an alternative to it ? It should be noted that a point of principle as well as of caution was thus involved, 14


as the supporters of the Statute under discussion on November 24th did not bind themselves to the support of Holy Scripture as a compulsory subject. The Statute was carried by a considerable majority. From this survey it will be seen that the theological value of such an examination and the general implications of the principle upon which it rested were barely touched upon. The seven signatories of the paper quoted above obviously had the religious question to the fore in their minds, though they chose to base their objections upon the cultural value of the Scriptures. The supporters of the Statute, moreover, were mainly concerned with the uneducational nature of the examination qua examination and without regard to the value of its subject-matter on either religious or cultural grounds. The second speaker in support of the motion, Dr. Kirk, did, it is true, make the point that the questions asked tended to the encouragement of the Bible being viewed in the light of so many `set-books', the contents of which must be tabulated and memorized for examination purposes, but his speech was really a corollary to that of the first speaker and did not touch upon the principles involved in a compulsory or non-compulsory religious education. The true issue was brought forward by an anonymous contributor to the Oxford Magazine of January 21st, 1932, in an article entitled `The Real Case against a Compulsory Examination'. The real case, he says, 'is bound up in the end with the distinction between religion and theology, and how far it is possible or desirable to teach either. When the seven signatories to the petition against the Statute passed in November last made a distinction between "cultural" and "utilitarian" they tended to obscure the distinction, quite different, between "religious" and "secular".' The effort about to be made when the article in the Oxford Magazine was written, to insist upon a compulsory examination of Holy Scripture in some form, was bound to bring the real issues to light—and as actually happened, it did. The writer of the article went to the root of the matter in the following words: `. . . it is plain that the study of the documents vital to the Christian religion as conducted in our schools by professed or convinced Christians . . . cannot possibly be merely literary or historical or cultural ; in effect if not directly, the truth of that religion, or rather theology will be inculcated or suggested. This was really recognized by the University when it allowed "conscientious objection". No one has conscientious objections to what is of prime merit or importance in history.' The proposal to insert a compulsory examination in Holy Scripture in Responsions should therefore properly be opposed on the grounds of a general objection to religious education, i.e. that religion cannot be taught, and theology as taught in schools cannot be satisfactory, and that, moreover, the schoolboy (or girl) is at an age when the emotions are strong and the critical intellect weak, and therefore (according to the writer) should not be influenced into accepting beliefs 'which every one with even the rudiments of scientific or philosophic culture knows to be highly doubtful, even when they are intelligible'.


There can be little doubt that this article expressed the feelings of a good many members of Congregation, though a certain amount of criticism followed, in connexion with the psychology of the schoolboy as postulated in the article. In the Debate on the proposed Amendments to the Responsions Statute, Dr. N. P. Williams, Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity, in moving the amendments, though he submitted what may be called the cultural argument once more, put forward at the same time a real plea for the recognition of the Christian religion. He criticized the assumption of the writer in the Oxford Magazine, that it was possible for a boy to grow up 'unbiased' by dogmatic knowledge. If authorities abolished Scripture study, then the minds of the young were biased by the knowledge that it was to be abolished. His appeal was for that 'benevolent neutrality' to the Christian religion which the State observes, and which the University also obviously observes by its provision of University sermons, and College chapels and chaplains. Could even secularists, he asked, deny that most of the virtues they possessed, of moderation and charity, were due to the Christian atmosphere of the society in which they had been brought up ? The real issues had now been made clear, and the opposition actually made in Congregation on February 9th was not on this ground, but on the ground of the awkward place which Holy Scripture as a fresh subject to be studied for Responsions before coming into residence must necessarily take in the school curriculum. This point probably influenced few people either way. The real question had plainly been perceived to be one not of procedure, or of expediency, or even of educational values. It was clearly a matter of principle, and the division showed that a small majority were unwilling to exhibit a 'benevolent neutrality' to the Christian religion, by insistence upon a compulsory examination. The amendments were therefore lost by ro8 to 127 votes. B. M. H. T.

NOTICE I WISH to draw the attention of Senior Members to the fact that, in view of the recent change in the Statute governing the First Public Examination, members of the University who have passed all the examinations (except that in Holy Scripture) qualifying them for the degree of B.A. are now eligible for the degree irrespective of their dates of matriculation, provided, of course, that they have resided for the necessary terms. B. E. GWYER.


THE 'OXFOR GROUP' A SENIOR MEMBER has recently asked for information con-

cerning the Group Movement. The following is a short bibliography of literature dealing with the subject which it is thought might be useful to those who are anxious to understand the aims and principles of the movement, and, at the same time, to know upon what grounds it has been criticized. The list of articles, &c., which is appended, does not claim to be a complete bibliography, nor does it contain actual propaganda, or the official publications of the Group. All types of opinion have been represented in the selected articles, which are mainly by men who have had actual experience of Group methods in Oxford. `Buchmanism.' The Rev. J. W. C. Wand, Dean of Oriel. [Theology, August 1930.] `The Groups.' The Rev. J. S. Bezzant, Fellow of Exeter College. [The Guardian, December II and r8, 1931.] `The Groups.' The Rev. J. S. Bezzant. [The Modern Churchman, January 1932.] `The "Oxford Group".' Canon L. W. Grensted, Oriel Professor of the Philosophy of the Christian Religion. [Oxford Diocesan Gazette, January 1932.] `A Note by the Bishop.' The Rt. Rev. the Lord Bishop of Oxford. [Oxford Diocesan Gazette, March 1932.] `The New Group Movement.' Canon M. R. Newbolt. [The Church Times, September ir and i8, 1931.] `A New Revivalism.' [Leader in The Church Times, September 18, 1931.] Articles and letters in The Church of England Newspaper. See especially May 2, 1930, October 30, November 6, November 13, December II, December 18, December 24, 1931, January 1,1932. The following articles appeared on five successive Sundays in The Sunday Referee. They are definitely of a propagandist nature and do not pretend to be of any critical or scholarly value. They, however, serve to give some illustration of the history and methods of the Group in. Oxford and elsewhere. They are all by different writers and are entitled: `Oxford's new religious movement.' [July I2, 1931.] `A remarkable faith and prayer wedding at Oxford.' [July 19.] `Some real miracles in Harley Street.' [July 26.] `How Oxford's new movement began.' [August 2.] `Oxford Group in Liverpool.' [August 9.]

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THE JUNIOR COMMON ROOM March 1931—March 1932

T TT T is sad to have to relate that St. Hugh's gained no 'Firsts' in the

this year; but the J.C.R. congratulates H. Skidelsky on winning the Winter Williams Law Scholarship for Women. In November The Critic by Sheridan was acted by the College; it was referred to by critics as a 'characteristic St. Hugh's production', `very gay, graceful and spirited', special praise being reserved for B. Henderson as producer and actress, and B. Green for an accomplished performance as the heroine, and also of a second-gentleman's part at twenty-four hours' notice. A collection was taken for St. Margaret's House. The College Musical and Debating Societies have both been active; and the former has given several concerts, at one of which a good sum was raised for St. Margaret's House. In view of the proposed establishment of a branch of the settlement in the neighbourhood, the J.C.R. has raised its subscription to St. Margaret's House to o a year. In the Trinity Term a letter was sent to Lord Cecil, Visitor of the College, expressing the sympathy and support of the J.C.R. in his work in the Disarmament Campaign. J. Sprules is President of the Women's Executive of the Student Christian Movement in Oxford, and E. Portsmore is Treasurer. B. Betts is Treasurer of the University Labour Club. B. Buckler is Secretary of the University French Club. E. Temple is Secretary of the Pentagon Club which has been opened for women members of the University. I. Josephy is Captain of United Tennis, and J. Burton Treasurer; M. Evans is Captain of United Swimming. J. Burton is a Hockey 'Blue' and has also played for the Southern Reserves; she and J. Lippold also play for Oxford County. N. Freestone is President of the Women's Rowing Club. St. Hugh's holds the Hockey and Tennis Cups, and shares the Swimming Cup with Somerville. MARGARET ELLIMAN,

President.


DEG EES 1111)

T.T. 1931. M.T. 1931. H.T. 1932 B.Litt. F. M. Doherty. Subject of thesis: 'Governor William Franklin.' B.Litt. M. Martin (in absence). Subject of thesis: 'Thomas Parnell: his life and works.' B.Litt. M. J. Sargeaunt, B.A. Subject of thesis: John Ford. B.Litt. G. M. Willing. Subject of thesis: 'The Influence of the Picaresque Novel in the French literature of the Seventeenth Century, with special reference to Sorel's Francion [1623-33].' M.A. D. H. Clarke M. Dalgleish M. Dunch C. P. Goodenough B. Greenhalgh 0. M. Griffiths V. Higgin A. H. Huxley G. M. Jaffe (nĂŠe Spurway) K. Johnson B. B. Kendall M. Lagden P. Lord (in absence) D. F. Martin-Hurst M. Matthews E. A. V. Mercer W. E. Murrell M.-E. B. Russell F. M. Thelwell B.A. R. Attenborough C. A. M. Barlow E. M. J. Baxter M. K. Beattie L. E. Braddick E. N. Brown Ethel Brown

M. Buick H. J. Butt L. M. R. Cattley D. Chell E. Clough M. E. Collington E. I. Cooper C. Dahl E. M. Ellis E. A. Facon H. A. E. Faure H. M. Forth G. Gauge R. Gordon-Potts (nĂŠe Johnson) D. M. Grey T. L. Halle K. Harman E. Iliff I. I. H. Jones N. E. V. Lawrence M. A. McNair N. Penhale E. M. Reeves H. W. M. Rodrigo M. C. Robertson E. B. B. Sharp E. J. C. Slimon P. M. Talbot K. E. Vile G. A. Witts

19


HONOUR SCHOOLS 1931 Literae Humaniores.

Class II. L. E. Braddick E. A. Facon Class III. M. E. Lowe E. M. Reeves

Modern History.

Class II. H. J. Butt E. Clough E. Iliff I. Yarwood Class III. K. Harman H. W. M. Rodrigo E. J. C. Slimon K. E. Vile G. A. Wilts

English Language and Literature. Class II. E. N. Brown L. M. R. Cattley Class III. H. M. Forth G. Gauge I. I. H. Jones N. E. V. Lawrence M. A. McNair N. Penhale V. Wetherall Class IV. I. J. R. Bromley E. Coe

Modern Languages.

Class II. D. Chell E. I. Cooper D. M. Grey F. 0. W. Hoare P. M. Talbot

Mathematics.

Class II. M. Buick Class IV. C. A. M. Barlow

Natural Sciences. Chemistry. Zoology. Botany. Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.

Part I. M. E. Collington Class II. H. Bradbrooke Class II. G. M. Ellis

20

Class II. R. Attenborough E. M. Brown H. A. E. Faure M. Robertson E. B. Sharp B. J. Spedding Class III. M. K. Beattie K. Mottram


Honour Classical ModeraClass I. S. W. Hingley tions. Class II. L. M. Dolphin H. M. Newell 0. Sweeting Class III. M. Garbett E. Portsmore

Honour Mathematical Moderations.

Class II. E. L. Parsons

UNIVERSITY AWARDS 1931

Ellerton Theological Prize:

B. M. Hamilton-Thompson, M.A. Subject of Essay: 'Institutional Religion.'

Henry Francis Pelham Studentship: M. Osborn, B.A. Subject of research: 'The native character of Etruscan art, with especial reference to Sarcophagi.'

Winter Williams Law Scholarship for Women, 1931-3: H. G. Skidelsky. COLLEGE PRIZE

Hurry Prize, 1931: E. M. Brown, B.A., Class I, Honour School of Modern History, 193o: Class II, Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, 1931.

THE RESEA CH STUDENTSHIP FUND

D

URING the year the Council has allotted to this Fund the Wills Bequest of £I,000. This sum, together with subscriptions, donations, and payments of instalments of promised sums, has brought the total in hand up to £3,035. (Of this sum £2,96q. 17s. 7d. is invested.) A further capital sum of £250 is required before a Studentship of a year can be offered. Is it not possible to raise this sum within the coming year and thus achieve the original objective of making an award in 1933 ? Donations, subscriptions, and promises from groups of students of sums payable in a period of years are all appreciated. GERTRUDE THORNEYCROFT.

Since the above was written a most pleasing anonymous gift has been received from a Senior Member—Lzoo invested in Manchester Corporation Stock. 21


Promised sums being paid in instalments. Miss Martin Hurst and nine others . „ Pope and nine others . „ Sparks . „ Limpus . . . „ D. B. Morgan and others . „ J. Machin and fourteen others . A. Haworth, Esq. . . College Shop profits . Miss Sharp and others .

• 50 • 50 • 5o • 50 • 50 • loo • 50 • 50 • 25

s.

d.

0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Annual Subscribers, 1928 onwards. Miss Hay Wilson . Mrs. Snow . Miss Davies . „ Porcher Deaconess M. Wilson Mrs. Moberly

s.

d.

10 10 I

0 o I 10

0 o o o

I

I

5

o

Other subscriptions and donations received during the year March 1931—March 1932. s. d. Miss Robertson . „ Barrows . . . . The Rev. Dr. T. H. Archer Houblon Miss M. Clarkson „ Doherty . „ E. M. Reeves . . . . . Anon. Miss B. H. Moberly (photographs) „ Towerton (sale of stools) . Per Council (Wills Bequest) . College Folk Dance Party . . Share of Colleges' Appeal Fund . College morning coffee proceeds . Interest on Investments . . . Professor J. Coatman (proceeds of lecture)

I

o

2

0

5 1 10 6 13

o 1 1o 6 10 6

2

I

I,000 0 6 9 6 3 4 3 io6 13 4 4

0 0 o 0 0 0 0 3 o 0 0 6 6 5 7

Lantern slides of St. Hugh's College and of Oxford may be borrowed for use in schools and elsewhere. It is hoped that headmistresses and others will avail themselves of this opportunity. All particulars to be obtained from Miss Beatrice Moberly, St. Hugh's College, with the request to be forwarded.

22


A NOTE F OM MISS WARDALE SHOULD like to take this opportunity of telling my many old that I inaugurated my life of leisure last summer (largely with 11theirpupils very practical encouragement) with a very delightful and restful holiday in Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, and finally in Florence. One expects a cordial welcome in Switzerland, but I was surprised to find an even warmer one for English travellers in Austria and Hungary, indeed in Budapest the friendly desire of every one to help with language difficulties was almost embarrassing. Many know the beauty of the journey from Zurich to Innsbruck and the charm of Vienna, and I think any who have got as far as Budapest will agree with me that there the views of the Danube alone repay one for the effort. It was a new experience to me to have to declare at the frontier what money of any kind I had with me, if I wanted to be allowed to take it out of Hungary again. ,

E. E. W.

UNDERG ADUATES IN RESIDENCE 1931-32 SCHOLARS University [M.A.]. E. M. M. ROBINSON, 1928. Alice M. G. ADAM, 1931. Municipal Ottley. High School, Doncaster. L. HARRISON, 1929. S. W. HINGLEY, 1929. Gilchrist. E. L. JEWETT, 1931. Mary Datchelor Girls' School. M. G. SHELLEY, 1929. Sir John C. M. LOVEDAY, 1931. Clifton Hawkins. High School. M. S. COCHRANE, 193o. M. G. MILNER, 1930. Clara Evelyn D. M. MATTHEWS, 1931. Mary Datchelor Girls' School. • Mordan. King P. WALLBANK, 1931. J. C. M. WHATLEY, 1930. Edward's Grammar School, M. MORTON, 1931. Mary Grey Handsworth. Allen Senior Scholar. Sheffield EXHIBITIONERS M. F. HARDIE, 1928. V. A. BASIL1WITCH, 1929. L. F. BELL, 1929. B. A. BETTS, 1929. 0. CHANDLER, 1929. M. GARBETT, 1929. F. M. HOULSTON, 1929. E. PORTSMORE, 1929. o. M. SWEETING, 1929. M. L. DOWNES, 1930. M. M. EVANS, 193o.

B. LE FANU, 1930. M. LL. LEWIS, 1930. E. E. NAYLOR, 1930. S. M. H. BIRD, 1931.

Oakdene,

Beaconsfield. B. L. CORBITT, 1931.

High School

Walthamstow. Ernest Bailey Secondary School, Matlock. P. HARDCASTLE, 1931. St. Paul's Girls' School, Hammersmith.

F. E. GREGORY, 1931.

23


1931. High School, M. WHITTAKER, 1931. Wycombe Abbey. K. D. MALLIN, I931. Grammar School, Rochester. G. KEAY,

Hanley.

ADVANCED STUDENTS M. A. MARSHALL, 1931. B.A., Harvard University. A. T. GARY, 1931. B.A., Columbia University, New

York City.

UNDERGRADUATES, NOT BEING SCHOLARS OR EXHIBITIONERS Fourth Year.

I. Ashcroft. H. R. Clarke. M. E. Collington. C. V. M. Lucas. J. Pape. Third Year.

D. M. Abson. W. E. Alder-Barrett. E. L. Baker. B. I. I. Buckler. G. Cooper. A. C. Dewhurst. A. B. Disney-Roebuck. L. Dolphin. E. H. Duthoit. M. H. Elliman. V. L. Eyles. N. A. Freestone. M. C. Gooderson. B. W. Green. M. E. Griffith. R. P. Hall. M. V. Halmshaw. I. Henderson. M. P. Holt. A. M. Hutchings.

J. Irwin. W. Hesketh-Wright. I. A. Josephy. M. Jackson. E. M. W. Lavington. D. I. M. Jeudwine. D. M. Layton. M. B. Johnson. H. M. Newell. H. J. F. Lapraik. J. Lippold. J. E. Parry. E. L. Parsons. M. Macdonald. J. Reynolds. E. M. Ockenden. A. S. M. Richardson. B. M. O'Donovan. N. M. Roberts. D. A. Parsons. 0. M. Shapley. M. N. M. Phillips. R. N. Preston. J. M. Sprules. N. M. Thorp. B. J. Reeve. E. M. C. Wilkes. M. H. Salinger. K. M. Wilson. N. H. Seymour. H. G. Skidelsky. H. M. Winter. E. J. Sparks. M. Strong. E. B. Sturgis. Second Year. M. Tamplin. D. E. Ackroyd. L. B. Taylor. A. M. Bell. H. M. Taylor. J. Burton. E. Temple. D. G. Bushnell. W. M. M. Troup. H. T. E. Charles. A M. Walker. A. K. H. Coburn. B. Whaley. E. M. R. Crosland. M. N. Woolf. M. B. Dauphinee. H. A. E. French. S. M. E. Goodfellow. First Year.

ALEXANDER, 0. L. B. • • Godolphin and Latymer Girls' School. ASPIN, I. S. T. .. • • St. James's, West Malvern. BEALE, M. A. B. •• High School, Bournemouth. BELL, J. C. .. •• B.A., Cambridge (Girton College). •• Trinity Hall, Southport. BIRD, T. G. I. ..

24


.. BONE, H. K. CHMELNITZKY, N. I. DOVETON, D. H. DOWNHAM, K. M. EVANS, P. M. C. FLETCHER, M. M. E. FORSTER, S. DE C. FYLEMAN, E. H. HARRIS, K. M. HAZLEHURST, W. J. L. HEARN, E. A. HINCH, A. E. .. IRONSIDE, J. E. .. LAWRENCE, P. H. V. LAWRENCE, C. E. M. MILKINS, M. I. MORGANS, D. B. OWEN-JONES, 0. RALLI, M. REYNOLDS, A. H. RICHARDSON, J. ROSS, M. M. .. SAMUELL, B. .. SHAW, 0. E. .. SPURGEON, I. .. SYKES, R. THORPE, E. H. .. TODD, C. M. .. TROLLOPE, D. L. WEST, C.

St. Swithun's, Winchester. Central Secondary School, Sheffield. Godolphin School, Salisbury. High School, Wimbledon. Wycombe Abbey. B.A., University of Wales. High School, Leeds. St. Paul's Girls' School, Hammersmith. Christ's Hospital, Hertford. North London Collegiate School. Ladies' College, Cheltenham. High School, Lincoln. Lady Margaret School, Parsons Green. Clifton High School, Bristol. St. Angela's High School, Forest Gate. Malvern Girls' College. Malvern Girls' College. B.A., University of Wales. Bedgebury Park, Goudhurst. Trinity Hall, Southport. High School, Bridlington. St. Margaret's School, Aberdeen. St. Paul's Girls' School, Hammersmith. King Edward VI High School, Birmingham. Queenswood, Eastbourne. Harrogate College and Leeds University. St. Swithun's, Winchester. Grammar School, Mirfield. Godolphin School, Salisbury. Ruskin College.

25


ST. HUGH'S CLU REPORT FFHE forty-fourth General Meeting of St. Hugh's Club was held .1 at St. Hugh's College on June 27th, 1931, in connexion with the College Gaudy, the Principal being in the Chair. The draft Constitution as revised by the Committee in October 1929 was discussed and with some amendments approved. The Constitution of the Club, as adopted, is appended. The Committee met in October 1931 to discuss arrangements for a Social Meeting to be held in the spring of 1932, but decided unanimously in view of the political and economic situation to postpone such a meeting until later in the year. The Committee meets again on March 17th, 1932, to discuss the suitability of holding a Social Meeting during the summer. The Committee consists of Miss Lagden, Miss Robinson, and Miss Williams, who retire in May 1932; Miss Greig, Miss Homersham, Miss Jones, and Miss Thomas, who retire in May 1933; the President of the J.C.R. (ex officio) and the Hon. Secretary of the Club. On January 1st, 1932, the Club membership was 2 honorary members and 345 life members. NANCIE MOLLER,

February z6th, 1932.

Hon. Secretary and Treasurer, Winkworth Hall, Brondesbury Park, N.W. 6.

CONSTITUTION OF ST. HUGH'S CLUB passed at the General Meeting in Oxford on June 27th, 193r I. Object. The Club shall exist for the purpose of reuniting old

students of St. Hugh's College. 2. Membership. There shall be two classes of members: (a) ordinary members, (b) honorary members. 3. Ordinary Members. Past and present members of the Senior

Common Room, all past students, and students who have been in residence for two years, are entitled to become ordinary members. 4. Honorary Members. Honorary members may be elected by the Club, on the recommendation of the Committee, and shall have no voting powers. 5. President. The Principal of the College shall be the President of the Club. 6. Committee. There shall be a Committee of Management, to consist of an Honorary Secretary—who shall also act as Honorary Treasurer—appointed by the Committee for three years, and eligible for reappointment; the President of the Junior Common Room; and seven Committee Members, of whom three and four 26


shall retire in rotation at the end of periods of two years. Retiring Committee Members shall be eligible for re-election for a further period of two years, after which they may not be elected until two years have elapsed. Chairman. The Committee shall elect from among their own number, a Chairman to preside at all Committee Meetings, and at Club Meetings in the absence of the President. Quorum. Three shall form a quorum. 7. Elections. The elections to vacancies on the Committee shall be made during May by postal ballot, and the results shall be declared at the next General Meeting. The ballot papers shall be sent out on or before i 5th May. 8. Casual Vacancies. A casual vacancy on the Committee shall be filled by co-opting a member of the Club to hold office as long as the vacating member would have done so. 9. Meetings. There shall be a Biennial General Business Meeting for the transaction of the regular business, to be held in London or Oxford in June or July. The next meeting to be held in 1933. so. Extraordinary Meetings. The Committee may summon an Extraordinary General or Social Meeting at any time, and shall do so on requisition in writing from not less than fifteen members, providing that not less than fourteen days' notice of such a meeting be given with the agenda. 11. Subscription. Life membership, for ordinary members, shall be purchased for sos. 2. Minutes. Separate minutes shall be kept of every Committee and Club Meeting. 13. Changes in Constitution. Alterations in the Constitution shall only be made at a General Business Meeting, a majority of three-quarters of the members present being necessary. 14. Honorary Auditor. The Committee shall appoint an Honorary Auditor to audit the accounts annually. 15. Capital Account. A proportion of the Club funds shall be allocated each year to Capital Account, the precise amount to be determined by the Committee on the advice of the Honorary Auditor.


0 ITUARY MARY LEVIN

M

ARY LEVIN was in residence at St. Hugh's College from 1914 to 1916. She did not take a degree, but read for the Diploma in Geography. She died on September 4th, 1931,and the following notice appeared in The Times on September 8th: `The premature death of Miss Mary Levin, which was announced in The Times last Saturday, at the beginning of what promised to be a fruitful career of original research in ethnology, is a great loss to anthropology and to University College, London. There for six years she had played a very useful if unobtrusive part, and during the last two years had been officially recognized by the college as honorary. assistant to Dr. W. J. Perry. Before coming to London she had obtained the Diploma in Geography at Oxford, and had spent some time in Vienna helping in the feeding of starving children after the War. During the last six years, although she published only a few brief notes on cremation in the journal Man, she carried on important investigations, distinguished by rare insight and judgement, on the early history of cremation and on the ritual significance of ancient stories of the Deluge. She had completed the manuscript of the former for publication as a book. Unfortunately, her more important work on Flood stories, characterized by striking originality, had not been committed to writing. It is hoped that it may yet be possible to recover enough of her notes to make a treatise that will reveal her unusual critical powers and insight and make a memorial worthy of her great achievement.'

GRACE LEFROY GRACE LEFROY was in residence at St. Hugh's College from 1923 to 1924, while reading for the Diploma in Education. She died at Wooroloo in Western Australia on September 1st, 1931, after a long illness. The following extract is from the September number of the School Magazine of the Sisters of the Church, Perth, Western Australia, where she was originally a pupil, and where, after her return from Europe, she taught for four years : `Grace was one of our pupils in the old School. Her home was then in West Perth, and she was a day scholar. When we moved to Mount Lawley, she came too. She passed the Junior in 1915, and the Leaving in 1917, and was a Prefect from the end of 1914 till she left for the University, where she took her B.A. with honours. . . . She always loved the College, and longed to help in the work there, and so when Sister Rosalie wrote offering her a post as assistant-mistress, she did not hesitate, but wrote in reply, "Your letter brought me untold joy. It is so nice to know one is wanted! Of course, if the College will have me, that is where I shall go. . . ." To the Sister, she was more than a valued fellow-worker, she was a beloved friend, whose 28


sympathy in every effort for the good of the School was assured before it was sought. We mourn the loss of one who gave her whole self to the School, until the call came to give up what perhaps she cared for most in this world.'

JANET SELMA BUDENBERG JANET

SELMA BUDENBERG read for the Honours School of Modern Languages at Oxford from 1923 to 1925. She had already taken her degree at Manchester University and so was rather older than most of her contemporaries at St. Hugh's. She threw herself into her work and into games at Oxford with a vigour which was her outstanding characteristic. It was while she was at Oxford that she had the accident at Lacrosse which, though slight in itself, was the beginning of a long series of painful illnesses which eventually caused her death. Even to one who saw her only at very long intervals during the last five years of her life, her hopefulness was very apparent. She never appeared to complain, though the courses of treatment which she underwent, one after the other, were often painful and meant of necessity enforced periods of inactivity and often complete solitude for weeks at a time. What it must have meant for her to be cut off from outdoor exercise, only those who knew her in her Wycombe or her Oxford days could probably guess. She turned her pent-up energy into other channels and was able to enjoy working in an artschool at Nice during the last winter of her life. She never gave up hope of recovery and underwent her last operation confident that a drastic cure would allow her at last to take up teaching or some sort of work for which her education had qualified her. Her strength, however, was not enough to stand the strain, and she died in the Wingfield Orthopaedic Hospital at Oxford on October 8th, 1931.

B. M. H. T. ISOBEL ANWYL EVANS THE following is extracted from a longer appreciation sent by an intimate friend : `I think the two events in the life of Isobel Evans which most influenced the development of her character were the death of her mother (when she was about 6) and her coming up to Oxford. The grief caused by her mother's death and the facing of life afterwards without this great friend seemed to give her a new independence and strength of character. Her whole personality matured and her ideas and convictions developed rapidly. The influence of Oxford came for her at just the right time and she responded to the full. `Her work (in the School of English Language and Literature) was good; sometimes very good. In method it was disciplined, and when necessary arranged with meticulous precision. This love of the neat 29


and ordered was one of her outstanding characteristics. She could not tolerate lack of discipline or method in any detail of life. But she was the reverse of dull. She was intensely witty, and I think few who ever saw and heard her describe any incident, however slight, will forget the use she made of her whole person—her voice, her eyes, and especially her hands—to give vividness and colour to the description. Her love of order gave her personality a coolness and freshness which she could share with others. She was very lovable and her independent way of life and very definite ideas, which might have made friendship difficult, were a shield against the world, behind which— as her many friends know—she was ready to receive, as well as to A. M. 0. give, richly.'

MA RIAGES MARGARET ASHFORD tO MR. EWEN SYFRET,

at Cape Town, December

17th, 193o. M. D. D. MONK tO MR. KENNETH EVANS, 1931. MURIEL JAMES tO MR. GORDON CARMICHAEL, at Buenos Aires, 1931. CHARLOTTE MACDONALD to MR. JOHN EVANS JULL, March 22nd, 1931. MARY VAN BOESCHOTEN tO MR. WYATT SAMPSON, at St. Michael and

All Angels', Sunnyside, Pretoria, April 8th, 1931. HEATHER MOORE tO MR. S. G. MARTIN, at Chefoo, China, May I, 1931. JOYCE CURREY to the REV. GORDON W. DREW, at Little Eaton, Derby-

shire, June 4th, I931. SYLVIA JOYCE BAKER tO MR. WILLIAM G. CUTTLE,

at Christ Church,

Wanstead, Essex, June 27th, 1931. at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Oxford, July 13th. SYBIL MAUD GOULDING, Fellow of St. Hugh's College, to CAPTAIN RAWDEN HENRY PITT WEST, M.C., The Royal Marines, at the Zivilestandamt and the English Church of St. Ursula, Berne, Switzerland, October 1st, 1931. LORNA SEYMOUR SMITH tO MAJOR R. A. B. SMITH, M.C., R.E. [R. of O.], at St. Oswald's Church, Bidston, Cheshire, October 3rd, 1931. KATHARINE ALLSOP tO MR. NOEL-PARKER, October 26th, 1931. FLORENCE MARY FOX to MR. WILLIAM HARKNESS BROWN,

EILEEN MARY HORNIBROOK to GROUP-CAPTAIN A. V. J. RICHARDSON, O.B.E., R.A.F., M.B., D.P.H., at St. James' Church, Gerrard's Cross,

Bucks., November 7th, 1931. HERMINE MAGDALEN THRUPP tO MR. CHRISTOPHER CLUTTON BROCK,

at

St. Luke's Church, Chelsea, December, 1931. CATHARINE MARGARET GREY tO MR. JOHN KENNETH MILLER,

December

5th, 1931. URSULA MARY KEPPEL-COMPTON to PROFESSOR REINHOLD NIEBUHR, D.D., at Winchester Cathedral, December 22nd, 1931. CAMILLA DAHL to MR. PATRICK JAMES CAMPBELL, at Jesmond Parish

Church, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, December 31st, 1931. at Holy Trinity Church, Brompton, January 4th, 1932.

MARGARET ERVINE to MR. ROBERT EWING ADAM,

30


1:, IRTFIS MRS. POWER (M. Chilton)—a son, John Danvers, March 31st, 1931. MRS. COCKET (M. Pickford)—a son, Nicholas Adam, April i6th,

1931. MRS. BLAXLAND (D. E. Platt)—a son, John William, May 1931. MRS. GARRICK (P. Michell)—a daughter, May 1931. MRS. MACKILLIGIN (M. Horn)—a son, Robert Alexander

Neil, June 23rd, 1931. MRS. ANDREWS (A. le B. Daman)—a daughter, Margaret Theodora, September irth, 1931. MRS. SPURLING (P. Lovett)—a son, September 27th, 1931. MRS. SYKES (M. J. Whicher)—a daughter, September 3oth, 1931. MRS. DIXON (E. P. Serocold)—a daughter, October 8th, 1931. MRS. GORDON-POTTS (R. Johnson)---a son, David, November 23rd, 1931. MRS. ELLIS (M. Evans)—a son and a daughter, John Edward Shipley and Susan Legh, December 1931. MRS. ALLEN (W. Brooke)—a son, Hugh John, December 26th, 1931. MRS. SPALDING (K. Paterson)—a son, Swinton Peter, January 1st, 1932. MRS. PHILLIPS (E. Varley)—a son, January rith, 1932.

PU LICATIONS ID

Colonial Administrating Jurisdiction in the Seventeenth Century. H. J.

Crump, M.A., Ph.D. (London). Longmans, Green & Co. 1931. gs. The Epyllion from Theocritus to Ovid. M. Marjorie Crump, Ph.D. (London). B. H. Blackwell, Ltd. 1931. 8s. 6d. English Posies and Posy Rings. Joan Evans, B.Litt. Oxford University Press. 1931. los. 6d. Children of Athens, London and Rome. Norah Mackenzie. Ginn. 1931. Is. 6d. The Courtiere Library, or Catalogue Librorum Aulicorum. John

Donne. Edited by Evelyn Mary Simpson. Nonesuch Press. 1931. POETRY Twenty Poems. Phyllis Hartnoll, B.A., Basil Blackwell. 1931. 2s.

ARTICLES `A term's work in Roman History and Literature.' Greece and Rome. 1931. E. Beames. `On the Maximum Modulus Principle for Functions with Zeros and Poles.' Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society, Series 2, vol. xxxii (193i). M. L. Cartwright, M.A., D.Phil. `The Zeros of certain Integral Functions. II.' Quarterly Journal of Mathematics (Oxford Series), vol. ii (1931). M. L. Cartwright. 31


`On Integral Functions of Integral Order.' Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society, Series 2, vol. xxxiii (1931). M. L. Cartwright. `The Zeros of the Cardinal Function of Interpolation.' Journal of London Mathematical Society, vol. vi (1931). M. L. Cartwright. `Entandrophragma cylindricum. Variation in vessel pattern.' Empire Forestry Journal, October 1931. M. M. Chattaway, M.A., B.Sc. `Proposed standards for numerical values used in describing woods.' Tropical Woods, September 1931. M. M. Chattaway. `A new Species of the Trematode Genus Notocotylne.' Annals and Magazine of Natural History, March 1931. C. M. G. Duthoit, B.A. `The Freedman's son in Municipal Life.' Journal of Roman Studies, 1931.M. L. Gordon. `The System of Native Administration in Tanganyika.' Africa, vol. iv, No. 3. M. F. Perham, M.A. `The Future of East Africa'. The Times, August ,3th, i4th, and i5th, 1931. M. F. Perham. `Materials for the Reign of Alphonso X of Castile. 1252-84.' Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 4th Series, vol. xiv, 1931. E. S. Procter, M.A., F.R.Hist.S. `John Ford at the Middle Temple.' Review of English Studies, January 1932. M. J. Sargeaunt, B.A., B.Litt. `Robert Poley's Ciphers.' Review of English Studies, April 1931. M. E. Seaton, M.A., F.R.S.L. `Experiments on Phyllotaxis. I. The effect of isolating a Primordium.' Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Series B. 1931. Mary Snow, M.A., B.Sc., and R. Snow, M.A., B.Sc. `Eclipse Plumage in the Mallard.' Nature, October 1931. V. K. Tallent, M.A. `Agricultural Survivals in Central Europe.' Slavonic Review, December 1931. D. Warriner, B.A. (Oxon.), D.Phil. (London). TRANSLATIONS Hege-Rodenwaldt. Translated by P. Hartnoll. B. H. Blackwell, Ltd. 37s. 6d. Blodig's Alpine Calendar. 1932. Translated by P. Hartnoll. B. H. Blackwell, Ltd. The Acropolis.

APPOINTMENTS, 1931-2 M. R. GLOVER, M.A., Master of M. J. SARGEAUNT, B.A., B.LITT.,

the Schools, M.T. 1931--H.T. 1934. Lecturer in Education, Sheffield Uni-

versity, 1931. Administrative Tutor on the staff of the Instructors for the Course of Dental Hygienists in connexion with the Eastman Dental Clinic, Royal Free Hospital, London, where she is Almoner. A. SPINK, M.A., Classics Mistress, Sowerby Bridge Dual Secondary School, Yorks.

D. MARTIN HURST, M.A.,

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English Mistress, Haberdashers' Aske's School, Acton, September 1931. J. EVANS, B.LITT., Honorary Librarian to the Courtauld Institute of Art. K. E. BABBS, B.A., Geography Mistress, Beckenham County School, for Girls, Kent. M. J. BIGNALL, B.A., History Mistress, Drayton Manor County School, Hanwell, W.7, September 1931. H. M. BRYANT, B.A., Principal's Secretary, Somerville College, Oxford, January 1932. B. L. CORRIE, B.A., Junior French Mistress at the Downs School, Seaford, Sussex. E. CRYER, B.A., English Mistress, Queen Anne School, York. A. C. Homs, B.A., District Inspector for Continued Education of Women in London, Education Officer's Dept., L.C.C. H. F. DOUGLAS, B.A., French and German Mistress, St. Mary's School, Wantage. M. HUNCH, B.A., Assistant Mistress, Manning School, Nottingham. C. DUTHOIT, B.A. B.A., Part-time Assistant in the Department of History and Method Science, University College, London. W. A. FORTH, B.A., Assistant in the Public Library, Leicester. E. V. FOWLER, B.A., French Mistress, Clear View School, Claremont, September 1931. P. M. M. GRAHAM, Lecturer in English, Grahamstown Training College for Student Teachers, South Africa, April 1931. F. W. HARE, B.A., History Mistress, Barnsley High School, Yorks. H. HAWORTH, B.A., Lecturer in Physiology, Bedford Physical Training College, September 1931. L. M. HILL, L.C.C. Inspector under Employment Act of 1931. M. HUSE, B.A., Junior French Mistress, City of London School for Girls, September 1931. G. B. LACEY, B.A., English Mistress, Central Foundation Girls' School, Bishopsgate, E.C., May 1931. A. D. K. PETERS, B.A., B.M., B.CH., Clinical Assistant, Department of Dermatology, Royal Free Hospital and at St. John's Hospital for Diseases of the Skin, Leicester Square, W. M. REEVES, History Lecturer, St. Gabriel's Training College, Camberwell, September 1931. A. C. STEPHENSON, B.A., History Mistress, St. Margaret's School, Bushey, January 1932. D. L. WHYMAN, B.A., Classics Mistress, Queen's Gate School, S.W. 7. G. M. WILLING, M.A. (Sheffield), B.LITT., Temporary French Mistress, Pendleton High School, Manchester. H. B. WILLIAMS, B.A., History Mistress, Northfield School, Watford, September 1931. H. M. WOOD, B.A., Sub-Warden, St. George's and Ashdown Hall, Reading University. E. J. WOODROW, B.A., Assistant French Mistress, Clifton High School for Girls, Bristol, September 1931. E. E. STOPFORD, M.A.,

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NEWS OF SENIOR MEM E S WHO WENT DOWN IN 1931 R. ATTENBOROUGH, H. A. E. FAURE, M. K. BEATTIE, E. ILIFF and D. M. GREY are doing Secretarial courses in London. E. M. J. BAXTER, L. M. R. CATTLEY, N. PENHALE, H. J. BUTT, and E. CLOUGH are reading for the Oxford Diploma in the Theory and

Practice of Education. is Mathematical Mistress at Charing House School, Highgate. H. BRADBROOKE is Assistant Mistress at Kendal High School. I. J. R. BROMLEY is travelling. E. M. BROWN is Assistant Inspector of Taxes at Walsall, 2nd District. G. N. BROWN is living at home for a year. M. Bum( is Junior Mathematics Mistress at Wycombe Abbey School, Bucks. D. CHELL is Junior Mistress in French and Latin at Kingswood Grammar School, Gloucestershire. E. M. COE is engaged in private teaching. I. COOPER is taking a course for a diploma in Domestic Science at King's College, London. H. M. FORTH is at the Maria Grey Training College. G. GAUGE is training to be a Hospital Almoner, and at present is doing a course at the London School of Economics. K. HARMAN is working at Risca, Monmouthshire, under the Warden of the Oxford House. Risca is one of the distressed coal-mining villages, and has been adopted by Oxford, in connexion with the Mayor of Oxford's Mining Distress Fund. The work consists in lecturing, organizing clubs, &c. F. O. W. HOARE is living at home for a year. I. I. H. JONES has been appointed English and Elocution Mistress at Greenway School, Tiverton, Devon, from May 1932. N. E. V. LAWRENCE is taking the course in Librarianship at University College, Gower Street, W.C.I. M. MCNAIR has gone home to New Zealand. K. M. MOTTRAM has gone home to South Africa. M. C. ROBERTSON was from October to December Temporary Acting Tutor in Modern Greats at St. Hugh's College. She has since been appointed Area Organizer for Buckinghamshire under the W.E.A. [Oxford district]. E. B. B. SHARP is reading for the Diploma in Economics at the London School of Economics and is living at St. Margaret's House. E. J. C. SLIMON is reading for the Diploma in Social Service at Edinburgh University. B. J. SPEDDING is taking a course of training in a London C.O.S. office. P. M. TALBOT is Assistant French Mistress at the Royal School, Bath. K. F. VILE is living at home. G. A. WITTS is at the Maria Grey Training College. C. A. M. BARLOW

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NEWS OF SENIOR MEM ERS has just finished her twenty-third year of work in the Zanzibar diocese. She says: 'Teaching is thrilling work, now that Missions and Government are co-operating, for any teacher who writes a good syllabus, or a new text-book, can influence all the Government and all the Mission Schools throughout Tanganyika • Territory.' P. ALLEN is staying in Tanganyika Territory, and has been teaching temporarily in a school at Tanga. In March 1932, she is taking up duties as Assistant Librarian at the McMillan Memorial Library, Nairobi. L. I. BEVIS (née DAWSON) has started a tea-shop at Blandford, Dorset. L. F. BRADBURY (née Todd) is returning to her work in India this year, with her husband and younger son. N. BOLTON is now on the staff of the Orme Girls' School, Newcastle, Staffs. MARY BONE is Assistant Mistress at Montrose, Cliftonville, Kent. E. M. R. BRADSHAW is coaching for examinations and is also busy with Girl Guides. A. BROUGH is working in the Paramount 'Talkie' Film, Aren't We AlL2 by Frederick Lonsdale. D. M. BUTLER is at the Katherine Low Settlement, Battersea, where she is Hon. Secretary of a School Care Committee, as well as doing work in connexion with clubs, summer holiday arrangements, &c. F. CAMOUS is Senior French Mistress, King Edward's High School, Birmingham. R. M. COMPSTON has left Brampton Down School, Folkestone, and is living for the present at home in Oxford. R. DEAN is still secretary to Dr. Lowe, Reader in Palaeography at Oxford, and has gone to Rome to work until April. D. K. DENHAM is working in Oxford for the Lambeth Diploma in Theology. SISTER ELSA [E. Henry], 0.H.P., was professed as a Sister of the Order of the Holy Paraclete by the Bishop of Whitby on June 26th, 1931. E. FAGAN has left Southlands, Exmouth, and is living at home. C. P. GOODENOUGH is working at Fort St. John, British Columbia, as a church worker for the Church of England Mission in the north half of the Peace River Block, which has its headquarters at Fort St. John. The parish is about 5o miles by too, so she and her two colleagues are perpetually on the move. Their work consists in running Sunday Schools, taking such services as they are able to when no clergyman is available, running companies of Girl Guides and Brownies, and in visiting the people in their huge and scattered area, who are completely out of touch with civilization, and appear to depend upon the Mission even for medical aid. L. GUNNERY is Second Mistress at the Bermondsey County Secondary School, and is Division Commissioner for Southwark, for Girl Guides. D. C. ABDY

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has given up teaching and is doing secretarial work at a brewery near Manchester. T. HALE is working for the Certificate in Social Service at the London School of Economics. M. N. HEWINS is running the Osiris players, and also a small professional company which plays Shakespeare, producing any play to order anywhere in schools, in addition to the amateur one which has been working in L.C.C. Schools for four years. G. HILL is Secretary to Sir Stafford Cripps, K.C., M.P. J. HOOLE is in charge of the Preparatory Department, at Ruthin Grammar School for boys. K. JACKSON is working in the firm of Messrs. Jarold & Sons, Ltd., Printers and Lithographers, of Norwich and London. C. C. JULL [nĂŠe Macdonald] is Organizer of the Adult Cripples' Welfare Association, Liverpool. P. KIRKBY is training at the Nightingale Home, St. Thomas' Hospital, London. A. Lomax is teaching privately in Hamburg. D. MADDOCK is teaching at Headington School, Oxford. M. MARTIN is instructor in English Literature at Hollins College, Virginia, U.S.A. E. G. MAY is Staff Lady Superior of the British Thomson-Houston Co., Ltd., Rugby, with about 500 girls in her care. M. MOORE is giving Old Testament lectures to students preparing for the London University certificate in religious knowledge, at King's College, and is taking some classes in the diocese of Guildford. P. G. moss has been awarded the degree of M.A. at Liverpool University, the subject of her thesis being 'The Teaching of Geography in the Secondary School, with special reference to maps and mapwork'. w. MURRELL is teaching at the Fulham County Secondary School. M. F. PERHAM has been elected to a Fellowship, for purposes of research into African social life, by the Council of the International Institute of African Cultures and Languages. The income of the Fellowship is derived from a grant made to the Institute by the Rockefeller Trust, in connexion with an extensive plan of research; and will be continued, under present advices, for the years 1932-5. Till 1932 Miss Perham is responsible to the Rhodes Trust for her movements; but the work, which will be continuous, has been undertaken by her in conjunction with that proposed for her College Research Fellowship, and is on the same subject with the same aims. M. J. PORCHER has now been for twenty years at St. Stephen's High School, Clewer, Windsor, which is celebrating its Jubilee this year. M. P. POTTER has retired from the Headship of Plymouth High School after twenty-one years there, and is now living in Bournemouth. M. E. PRICHARD has passed the Institute of the Horse examination for an instructor's certificate, and is now working at the Peterston Court Riding Academy, Ross, Herefordshire.

A. HADFIELD

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has retired from the Headmistress-ship of the School of St. Mary and St. Anne, Abbots Bromley, and is living in Oxford. D. RIVIERE is Assistant Publicity Manager to Imperial Airways. B. H. ROBERTS is engaged in an inquiry into the standard of living in Lancashire, in close connexion with the inquiry into the industrial future of Lancashire which has been undertaken by Manchester University. She is also Secretary of one of the twenty-four AfterCare districts in Manchester. E. C. M. ROUNTREE is French Mistress at the Queen's School, Chester. K. L. SMITH is English Mistress at the County School for Girls, Chislehurst, Kent. D. TAYLOR is Secretary with Polimac, Ltd., Bush House, Aldwych, a firm of Flooring and Panelling manufacturers. E. R. W. UNMACK is researching on the mind of the child under seven, with a view to a London Ph.D. in Psychology. She is working at the Central Employment Bureau for the Women and Students' Careers Association. Her work here consists in interviewing, committee work, and correspondence. M. VINCENT has passed into the Departmental Class of the Civil Service. She has been posted to the Board of Inland Revenue. M. E. K. WAIT is Organizing Secretary to the Devizes Division, Women's Unionist Association. C. G. WATSON is Private Secretary to the Hon. Lily Montagu, J.P., Secretary of the World Union for Progressive Judaism. s. J. WICKHAM is House Mistress of Meynell House, School of St. Mary and St. Anne, Abbots Bromley. M. M. WILDE has been transferred from Wales to London as Trade Boards Inspector for the Ministry of Labour. A. WILSON has joined the Community of the Holy Cross which does Missionary work at Siota, British Solomon Islands. M. D. WOOD has passed into the Departmental Class of the Civil Service. She has been posted to the Ministry of Labour. M. A. RICE

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CLARA EVELYN MORDAN SCHOLARS 1898 MARGARET MARY CRICK. 1902 ZOE EPPSTEIN. 1905 FRANCES MARY KNIPE. 1908 EDITH MARY LINTON. 1912 MURIEL LUCY POTTER. 1918 ELIZABETH NADA HORA. 1921 MARGARET JOYCE PATERSON. 1924 MARY GWENDOLEN WATKINS. 1925 VIVIEN BRYNHILD CAROLINE FOLEY RHYS. 1927 WINIFRED ALICE PRONGER. 1930 MARY GRACE MILNER.

HURRY PRIZE-WINNERS 1919 IRENE MARGARET SIMS. 1920 EVELEEN EMILY STOPFORD. 1921 CICELY MARGARET MORICE. 1922 HELEN DOROTHY BURNETT. 1923 MARY LUCY CARTWRIGHT. 1924 EVA DAWS. 1925 MARGARET JOAN SARGEAUNT. 1926 DOREEN WARRINER. 1927 CECILIA PHYLLIS GOODENOUGH. 1928 FLORENCE MARY FOX. 1929 ELSIE MYRTLE TOSTEVIN. 1930 EVELINE JOYCE WOODROW. 1931 EVELINE MARGARET BROWN.

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FORM OF BEQUEST

lent discharge to my Executors.

f the s aid College ime being o f the Bursar fo r the t The receipt o

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